Digitala Vetenskapliga Arkivet

Change search
Refine search result
123 1 - 50 of 135
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Andersson, Anders
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Bergman, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Social and Life Sciences, Department of Biology.
    Piccolo, John
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Comparing mail-in, interview and tournament catch rates for a recreational salmonid fisheryManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Andersson, Anders
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Greenberg, Larry
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Bergman, Eva
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Su, Zhenming
    Andersson, Magnus
    Piccolo, John
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Estimating effort and catch of a recreational trolling fishery in one of Europe’s largest lakesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Andreas, Seiler
    et al.
    SLU.
    Jägerbrand, Annika
    Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut och Calluna AB.
    Mörkertal i viltolycksstatistiken: Resultat från enkätundersökning och analyser av olycksdata2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Hidden statistics in wildlife-vehicle collision data – results from a drivers’ questionnaire and database analyses

    Among the most common causes of road accidents in Sweden are collisions with wild animals, especially ungulates. Over 50,000 ungulate accidents per year have been reported during the past 5 years and the numbers are steadily in-creasing since the 1970-ies. Despite regular campaigns, extensive investment in wildlife fencing and other preventive measures, and in contrast to declining game bag in moose and roe deer, accident statistics increase faster than what can be expected from increased traffic alone. It is obvious that wildlife-vehicle accidents in Sweden are not under control. Major contributing factors are defi-ciencies in data and uncertainty in statistics. It is well known that not all accidents are reported or show up in the official statistics, but the correction factor still used by the Swedish Transport Administration is based on over 35 years old data when traffic and wildlife conditions had been different. A better knowledge of where and when and how frequent wildlife-vehicle collisions occur is needed to more effectively plan and target mitigation actions.

    This project provides updated estimates of the hidden statistics in wildlife-vehi-cle collision data and identifies uncertainties and problems in current statistics. This was done by: i. a survey with car drivers, ii. an analysis of wildlife-related accident statistics on human injuries in the Swedish Traffic Accident Data Ac-quisition (STRADA), and iii. a comparative analysis of accident report statistics from the police and from hunters provided by the National Council on Wildlife-Vehicle Collisions (Nationella Viltolycksrådet).

    To estimate how often drivers do report and refrain from reporting wildlife-ve-hicle accidents to the police, we conducted a publicly available online-survey during Nov. 2013 to Dec. 2014 that was answered by 3981 respondents. We asked the respondents about their knowledge of and experience with wildlife-ve-hicle accidents and requested details on the most recent incident they experi-enced after 2004. More than half of all respondents (65%) reported to have been involved in wildlife-vehicle collisions at any time and around 20 % of these indi-cated that the accident was never reported to the police. About 45% of the re-spondents declared that they experienced traffic accidents with wildlife after 2004, and the proportion of non-reported incidents was estimated to between 9% (public respondents) and 19 % (control groups). We recommend therefore assuming that about 15% (± 5%) of the incidents will not be known by the police. Compared to studies from the late 1970-ies, these hidden statistics appear hence much smaller today.

    After that an incident has been reported to the police, however, there are further important sources of data loss. Depending on how the incident has been classified in the report, the records are manually transferred to secondary databases such as the traffic accident register (T-RAR). Incidents where wildlife was not the immediate cause of the accident may not be classified as wildlife-vehicle collision and thus not be found in the of-ficial police statistics. This loss has not been quantified but is estimated to be around 2%.

    Traffic accidents with human injuries (about 1.6% of all wildlife accidents) are reported to the database STRADA. Our analysis showed that on average 37% of all game-related injury accidents during 2003- 2012 was not classified as a wild-life accident and therefore probably neither was listed as such in the official police statistics.

    In most cases (74%) when an accident with wildlife is reported to the police, they notify a contracted hunter to take care of the injured animal. The hunter in turn issues a report with detailed information on the location, time and animal species. Not all of the reports (84%), however, contain complete and accurate in-formation that can be used for spatial analyses of accidents. In addition, hunt-ers’ reports seem to be biased towards larger roads and underestimate the num-ber of accidents on private and tertiary roads by about 12%.

    Technical problems in the police data system during 2012-2015 resulted in the loss of an unknown number of reported wildlife-vehicle accidents. This is why in some regions and in some years, more hunter reports were issued than police records exist. We estimate that this loss may accede 11% on average.

    In simplified terms, police statistics on wildlife-vehicle accidents during 2010 - 2015 may stand for about two-thirds of the truly occurred accidents, while hunter reports that are used in spatial analyses represent about half of the true accident frequency. However, this rule of thumb should be used cautiously as there are substantial differences in the hidden and lost statistics between the years, counties and species.

    Thus, the various shortfalls in these statistics have a significant impact on the overall estimate of wildlife-vehicle collision numbers. Depending on the data sources and on how statistics are used, different biases and data losses must be considered. Some of the causes can be easily overcome as they relate to deficien-cies in registration routines and database management. We therefore recom-mend a systematic check of the databases and improved control during registra-tion and classification of reported cases. We advocate that the different inde-pendent databases are linked through a common event ID. We also suggest de-tailed studies of how accidents are recorded and interpreted in order to better prevent future data loss.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 4.
    Andreas, Seiler
    et al.
    SLU.
    Jägerbrand, Annika K.
    Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut och Calluna AB.
    Mörkertal i viltolycksstatistiken: resultat från enkätundersökning och analyser av olycksdata2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Hidden statistics in wildlife-vehicle collision data – results from a drivers’ questionnaire and database analyses

    Among the most common causes of road accidents in Sweden are collisions with wild animals, especially ungulates. Over 50,000 ungulate accidents per year have been reported during the past 5 years and the numbers are steadily in-creasing since the 1970-ies. Despite regular campaigns, extensive investment in wildlife fencing and other preventive measures, and in contrast to declining game bag in moose and roe deer, accident statistics increase faster than what can be expected from increased traffic alone. It is obvious that wildlife-vehicle accidents in Sweden are not under control. Major contributing factors are defi-ciencies in data and uncertainty in statistics. It is well known that not all accidents are reported or show up in the official statistics, but the correction factor still used by the Swedish Transport Administration is based on over 35 years old data when traffic and wildlife conditions had been different. A better knowledge of where and when and how frequent wildlife-vehicle collisions occur is needed to more effectively plan and target mitigation actions.

    This project provides updated estimates of the hidden statistics in wildlife-vehi-cle collision data and identifies uncertainties and problems in current statistics. This was done by: i. a survey with car drivers, ii. an analysis of wildlife-related accident statistics on human injuries in the Swedish Traffic Accident Data Ac-quisition (STRADA), and iii. a comparative analysis of accident report statistics from the police and from hunters provided by the National Council on Wildlife-Vehicle Collisions (Nationella Viltolycksrådet).

    To estimate how often drivers do report and refrain from reporting wildlife-ve-hicle accidents to the police, we conducted a publicly available online-survey during Nov. 2013 to Dec. 2014 that was answered by 3981 respondents. We asked the respondents about their knowledge of and experience with wildlife-ve-hicle accidents and requested details on the most recent incident they experi-enced after 2004. More than half of all respondents (65%) reported to have been involved in wildlife-vehicle collisions at any time and around 20 % of these indi-cated that the accident was never reported to the police. About 45% of the re-spondents declared that they experienced traffic accidents with wildlife after 2004, and the proportion of non-reported incidents was estimated to between 9% (public respondents) and 19 % (control groups). We recommend therefore assuming that about 15% (± 5%) of the incidents will not be known by the police. Compared to studies from the late 1970-ies, these hidden statistics appear hence much smaller today.

    After that an incident has been reported to the police, however, there are further important sources of data loss. Depending on how the incident has been classified in the report, the records are manually transferred to secondary databases such as the traffic accident register (T-RAR). Incidents where wildlife was not the immediate cause of the accident may not be classified as wildlife-vehicle collision and thus not be found in the of-ficial police statistics. This loss has not been quantified but is estimated to be around 2%.

    Traffic accidents with human injuries (about 1.6% of all wildlife accidents) are reported to the database STRADA. Our analysis showed that on average 37% of all game-related injury accidents during 2003- 2012 was not classified as a wild-life accident and therefore probably neither was listed as such in the official police statistics.

    In most cases (74%) when an accident with wildlife is reported to the police, they notify a contracted hunter to take care of the injured animal. The hunter in turn issues a report with detailed information on the location, time and animal species. Not all of the reports (84%), however, contain complete and accurate in-formation that can be used for spatial analyses of accidents. In addition, hunt-ers’ reports seem to be biased towards larger roads and underestimate the num-ber of accidents on private and tertiary roads by about 12%.

    Technical problems in the police data system during 2012-2015 resulted in the loss of an unknown number of reported wildlife-vehicle accidents. This is why in some regions and in some years, more hunter reports were issued than police records exist. We estimate that this loss may accede 11% on average.

    In simplified terms, police statistics on wildlife-vehicle accidents during 2010 - 2015 may stand for about two-thirds of the truly occurred accidents, while hunter reports that are used in spatial analyses represent about half of the true accident frequency. However, this rule of thumb should be used cautiously as there are substantial differences in the hidden and lost statistics between the years, counties and species.

    Thus, the various shortfalls in these statistics have a significant impact on the overall estimate of wildlife-vehicle collision numbers. Depending on the data sources and on how statistics are used, different biases and data losses must be considered. Some of the causes can be easily overcome as they relate to deficien-cies in registration routines and database management. We therefore recom-mend a systematic check of the databases and improved control during registra-tion and classification of reported cases. We advocate that the different inde-pendent databases are linked through a common event ID. We also suggest de-tailed studies of how accidents are recorded and interpreted in order to better prevent future data loss.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 5.
    Andreas, Seiler
    et al.
    SLU.
    Jägerbrand, Annika K.
    Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut och Calluna AB.
    Mörkertal i viltolycksstatistiken: resultat från enkätundersökning och analyser av olycksdata2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    En av de vanligaste orsakerna till vägtrafikolyckor är påkörning av vilda djur, i synnerhet klövdjur. Över 45 000 viltolyckor per år registrerades under de sen-aste 5 åren och antalen ökar stadigt. Trots upprepade informationskampanjer, omfattande investering i viltstängsel och andra förebyggande åtgärder och i kon-trast till avskjutningsstatistik för älg och rådjur, så ökar olyckstalen i snabbare takt än vad som kan förväntas på grund av ökat trafikarbete och större fordons-flotta. Det är tydligt att viltolycksproblematiken i Sverige inte är under kontroll. En bidragande faktor är att inte alla inträffade olycksfall rapporteras och inte alla rapporterade händelser återges av den officiella statistiken. Uppräknings-faktorerna som Trafikverket använder i sina Effektberäkningar vid Väganalyser (EVA-kalkyler) är utdaterade och utgår från effektsamband som troligtvis inte längre är aktuella. För att planera effektiva och riktade åtgärder behövs bättre kunskap om var, när och hur ofta viltolyckor inträffar.

    Föreliggande projekt avser att uppdatera kunskaperna om mörkertalet i rapporteringen av viltolyckor på väg och belysa andra bortfall i statistiken. Målsätt-ningen är att ta fram ett uppdaterat underlag (Uppräkningsfaktorer) för använd-ning i effektberäkningar vid väganalyser samt undersöka kvarstående utred-ningsbehov och eventuella förbättringsmöjligheter som kan leda till en bättre uppskattning av konflikten mellan vilt och vägtrafik. Projektet omfattar tre delstudier: enkätundersökning med bilförare, analys av viltrelaterade personskadeolyckor i STRADA (d.v.s. Swedish Traffic Accident Data Acquisition) samt en jämförande analys av olycksrapporter från polisens och eftersöksjägarnas inrapportering i viltolycksstatistiken tillgänglig hos NVR (Nationella Viltolycksrådet).

    Download full text (pdf)
    Mörkertal i viltolycksstatistiken
  • 6.
    Andreas, Seiler
    et al.
    SLU.
    Jägerbrand, Annika K.
    Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut och Calluna AB.
    Mörkertal i viltolycksstatistiken: Resultat från enkätundersökning och analyser av olycksdata2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Hidden statistics in wildlife-vehicle collision data – results from a drivers’ questionnaire and database analyses

    Among the most common causes of road accidents in Sweden are collisions with wild animals, especially ungulates. Over 50,000 ungulate accidents per year have been reported during the past 5 years and the numbers are steadily in-creasing since the 1970-ies. Despite regular campaigns, extensive investment in wildlife fencing and other preventive measures, and in contrast to declining game bag in moose and roe deer, accident statistics increase faster than what can be expected from increased traffic alone. It is obvious that wildlife-vehicle accidents in Sweden are not under control. Major contributing factors are defi-ciencies in data and uncertainty in statistics. It is well known that not all accidents are reported or show up in the official statistics, but the correction factor still used by the Swedish Transport Administration is based on over 35 years old data when traffic and wildlife conditions had been different. A better knowledge of where and when and how frequent wildlife-vehicle collisions occur is needed to more effectively plan and target mitigation actions.

    This project provides updated estimates of the hidden statistics in wildlife-vehi-cle collision data and identifies uncertainties and problems in current statistics. This was done by: i. a survey with car drivers, ii. an analysis of wildlife-related accident statistics on human injuries in the Swedish Traffic Accident Data Ac-quisition (STRADA), and iii. a comparative analysis of accident report statistics from the police and from hunters provided by the National Council on Wildlife-Vehicle Collisions (Nationella Viltolycksrådet).

    To estimate how often drivers do report and refrain from reporting wildlife-ve-hicle accidents to the police, we conducted a publicly available online-survey during Nov. 2013 to Dec. 2014 that was answered by 3981 respondents. We asked the respondents about their knowledge of and experience with wildlife-ve-hicle accidents and requested details on the most recent incident they experi-enced after 2004. More than half of all respondents (65%) reported to have been involved in wildlife-vehicle collisions at any time and around 20 % of these indi-cated that the accident was never reported to the police. About 45% of the re-spondents declared that they experienced traffic accidents with wildlife after 2004, and the proportion of non-reported incidents was estimated to between 9% (public respondents) and 19 % (control groups). We recommend therefore assuming that about 15% (± 5%) of the incidents will not be known by the police. Compared to studies from the late 1970-ies, these hidden statistics appear hence much smaller today.

    After that an incident has been reported to the police, however, there are further important sources of data loss. Depending on how the incident has been classified in the report, the records are manually transferred to secondary databases such as the traffic accident register (T-RAR). Incidents where wildlife was not the immediate cause of the accident may not be classified as wildlife-vehicle collision and thus not be found in the of-ficial police statistics. This loss has not been quantified but is estimated to be around 2%.

    Traffic accidents with human injuries (about 1.6% of all wildlife accidents) are reported to the database STRADA. Our analysis showed that on average 37% of all game-related injury accidents during 2003- 2012 was not classified as a wild-life accident and therefore probably neither was listed as such in the official police statistics.

    In most cases (74%) when an accident with wildlife is reported to the police, they notify a contracted hunter to take care of the injured animal. The hunter in turn issues a report with detailed information on the location, time and animal species. Not all of the reports (84%), however, contain complete and accurate in-formation that can be used for spatial analyses of accidents. In addition, hunt-ers’ reports seem to be biased towards larger roads and underestimate the num-ber of accidents on private and tertiary roads by about 12%.

    Technical problems in the police data system during 2012-2015 resulted in the loss of an unknown number of reported wildlife-vehicle accidents. This is why in some regions and in some years, more hunter reports were issued than police records exist. We estimate that this loss may accede 11% on average.

    In simplified terms, police statistics on wildlife-vehicle accidents during 2010 - 2015 may stand for about two-thirds of the truly occurred accidents, while hunter reports that are used in spatial analyses represent about half of the true accident frequency. However, this rule of thumb should be used cautiously as there are substantial differences in the hidden and lost statistics between the years, counties and species.

    Thus, the various shortfalls in these statistics have a significant impact on the overall estimate of wildlife-vehicle collision numbers. Depending on the data sources and on how statistics are used, different biases and data losses must be considered. Some of the causes can be easily overcome as they relate to deficien-cies in registration routines and database management. We therefore recom-mend a systematic check of the databases and improved control during registra-tion and classification of reported cases. We advocate that the different inde-pendent databases are linked through a common event ID. We also suggest de-tailed studies of how accidents are recorded and interpreted in order to better prevent future data loss.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 7.
    Arrendal, Johanna
    Swedish Transport Administration.
    Nationell utvärdering av åtgärder för utter vid korsande transportinfrastruktur2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Trafikverket har byggt s k faunapassager sedan mitten av 1990-talet (dåvarande Vägverket). För att säkerställa att lämpliga åtgärder utförs behöver utvärderingar göras. I denna studie undersökte vi djurens preferens för olika typer och modeller av åtgärder ämnade för utter och andra mindre och medelstora arter, samt hur förhållanden kring åtgärderna påverkade djurens val. Vi studerade åtgärdernas skick och kostnader och summerade vad som hade anlagts fram till 2011 i de olika regionerna i landet för att diskutera om åtgärdsarbetet behöver justeras.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
    Download full text (jpg)
    Omslagsbild
  • 8. Backstrom, Tobias
    et al.
    Heynen, Martina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Brannas, Eva
    Nilsson, Jan
    Winberg, Svante
    Magnhagen, Carin
    Anaesthesia and handling stress effects on pigmentation and monoamines in Arctic charr2017In: Environmental Biology of Fishes, ISSN 0378-1909, E-ISSN 1573-5133, Vol. 100, no 5, p. 471-480Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stress responsiveness differs between individuals and is often categorized into different stress coping styles. Using these stress coping styles for selection in fish farming could be beneficial, since stress is one main factor affecting welfare. In Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) carotenoid pigmentation is associated with stress responsiveness and stress coping styles. Thus this could be an important tool to use for selection of stress resilient charr. However, anaesthetics seem to affect carotenoid pigmentation, and it would be better if the method for selection could be implemented during normal maintenance, which usually includes anaesthetics. Therefore, this study investigated how the use of anaesthetics affected carotenoid pigmentation, i.e. number of spots, over time compared to no-anaesthetic treatment. Additionally, the stress indicators monoamines and glucocorticoids were investigated. The results indicate that the anaesthetic MS-222 affects number of spots on the right side. This anaesthetic also increased dopaminergic activity in the telencephalon. Both brain dopaminergic and serotonergic activity was associated with spottiness. Further, behaviour during anaesthetization was associated with spots on the left side, but not the right side. Repetition of the same treatment seemed to affect spot numbers on the right side. In conclusion, this study shows that inducing stress in charr affects the carotenoid spots. Thus, it is possible to use anaesthetics when evaluating spottiness although careful planning is needed.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 9.
    Berrío-Martínez, Jineth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Exploring complexities of fishery closures using octopus movements: an individual-based modelling approach2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 40 credits / 60 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Temporary closures of octopus fishing areas constitute a promising co-management measure that aims to improve local governance, food security and incomes in coastal small-scale fishing communities. Although positive social and economic outcomes of temporary closures are increasingly reported, the underlying social-ecological and ecological interactions, and their impact on closure benefits are rarely studied. This lack of systemic understanding may lead to undesired outcomes. Here, I extend an existing agent-based model of temporary closures to explore the influence of individual octopus movements on ecological outcomes and fishers’ benefits in Zanzibar. First, I conceptualized the octopus closure system by analyzing empirical qualitative data and literature. Next, I iteratively developed and tested an individual-based model extension. This extension simulates between-den movements across a hypothetical seascape and formalizes intrinsic attributes of Octopus cyanea such as movement patterns and maturity stages. I analyzed the effects of varying closure size of fishing grounds temporarily closed to illustrate potential implications for outcomes of octopus closures. Simulation results show that individual octopus movements triggered by fishing activities have noticeable impacts on octopus sizes, their spatial and temporal distribution, and fishers’ catches, particularly when considering different social groups that depend on the fishery. Scenarios with closures in place show higher mean octopus weight in closed areas in contrast to open-access areas. Mean catches for women foot-fishers are lower compared to freedivers’ catches and even slightly lower when allowing octopuses to move in response to disturbance in all scenarios. Catch rates and distribution of mature octopuses are highly sensitive to closure size revealing a social-ecological trade-off when implementing larger closures. This study demonstrates an approach to integrating individual octopus movements and interactions between fishers and octopuses in a fishery management context, and suggests that reactive movement of octopus contributes to unequal distribution of the closure benefits between different social groups.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 10.
    Bignert, Anders
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bäcklin, Britt-Marie
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Helander, Björn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Roos, Anna
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden.
    9. Contaminants and Health of Aquatic Wildlife2012In: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, p. 73-85Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Download full text (pdf)
    ehsa 2-9
  • 11.
    Bjärstig, Therese
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Stark, Elin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Removing the glass ceiling in Swedish wildlife management?: A norm-critical study of the potential for more gender-equal moose management groups2023In: Human Dimensions of Wildlife, ISSN 1087-1209, E-ISSN 1533-158XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This empirical study investigates how "gender is done" within Swedish wildlife management by identifying prevailing gender norms, and how gender norms can be challenged from a norm-critical perspective, in order to promote women's participation. The basis for the study is an ongoing evaluation of the Swedish Hunters' Association training initiative to increase women's participation in moose management groups. Three main norm categories are identified: performance; social interaction; and hunting as a lifestyle. Recommendations for continued gender equality work include active leadership in gender equality issues, a review of potentially excluding structures, promoting female mentors and networks, and the use of formal and transparent recruitment procedures. An understanding of norms affecting women's participation (or nonparticipation) in wildlife management is fundamental to design effective training, recruitment and nomination strategies in the future.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 12.
    Blomquist, Johan
    et al.
    AgriFood Economics Centre, Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet.
    Persson, Lars
    Centre for Environmental and Resource Economics, Umeå universitet.
    Stage, Jesper
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Waldo, Staffan
    AgriFood Economics Centre, Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet.
    Samhällsekonomiska begrepp i yrkes- och fritidsfiske2022Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Havs- och vattenmyndigheten har utifrån förvaltningens mål och strategin Framtidens Fiske gett forskarna Johan Blomquist, Lars Persson, Jesper Stage och Staffan Waldo i uppdrag att sammanställa och analysera inom vilka områden och för vilka indikatorer som fritidsfisket och yrkesfisket är jämförbara.

    Rapporten är en viktig del i det påbörjade arbetet inom den nya framtagna strategin för framtidens fiske och kan kopplas till flera åtgärder inom handlingsplanerna fritidsfiske och fisketurism samt yrkesfiske. I rapporten diskuteras dels vilka indikatorer som alls är meningsfulla att jämföra med motsvarande indikatorer i andra fisken och dels vad som krävs för att åstadkomma jämförbara indikatorer för olika fisken.

    I rapporten diskuteras även några utvecklingsmöjligheter för framtida datainsamling och framtida analysarbete inom fiskeområdet.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
    Download (jpg)
    presentationsbild
  • 13.
    Blyth, Samuel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Rönnbäck, Patrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    To eat or not to eat, coastal sea trout anglers' motivations and perceptions of best practices for catch and release2022In: Fisheries Research, ISSN 0165-7836, E-ISSN 1872-6763, Vol. 254, article id 106412Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The wide variety of perspectives and actions of individual anglers contribute greatly to success or failure when adopting and implementing fisheries management tools. Catch-and-release (C&R) is one such tool where success is influenced by both variation in human factors, but also species and fishery specific characteristics. In this study, an intercept survey of 94 sea trout anglers in a C&R dominated fishery on the Swedish island of Gotland investigated motivations to release or retain catches, self-assessment of anglers' own ability to release fish, and their rating of the importance of various factors influencing the successful outcomes of C&R. Retention of catches was most strongly motivated by situations where anglers deemed the fish unlikely to survive, however more than half of anglers acknowledged being unaware of delayed mortality in released fish. The spawning status of an individual fish was the primary motivation for release, particularly among anglers that prefer to keep at least some of their catches. The roles of water temperature, using single, and barbless hooks were scored as significantly less important than other components contributing to the success of a release. Anglers that gave a favourable rating to their ability to release sea trout also gave greater importance to various factors influencing the success of release, reported higher catch per unit effort, and released a greater proportion of their catches. These findings are discussed in the context of bridging knowledge and behavioural gaps around best practices for C&R in this fishery.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 14.
    Brawn, Jeffrey D.
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign,.
    3. Maintaining and Restoring Avian Habitat in Agricultural Landscapes2012In: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, p. 39-41Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Download full text (pdf)
    ehsa 2-3
  • 15.
    Brown, Ludovick
    et al.
    Département de biologie, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Canada.
    Fuchs, Boris
    Department of Forestry and Wildlife Management, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Koppang, Norway.
    Arnemo, Jon M.
    Department of Forestry and Wildlife Management, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Koppang, Norway; Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Kindberg, Jonas
    Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden; Norwegian Institute for Nature Research, Trondheim, Norway.
    Rodushkin, Ilia
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering. ALS Scandinavia AB, Luleå, Sweden.
    Zedrosser, Andreas
    Department of Natural Sciences and Environmental Health, University of South-Eastern Norway, Bø in Telemark, Norway; Institute for Wildlife Biology and Game Management, University for Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Austria.
    Pelletier, Fanie
    Département de biologie, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Canada.
    Lead exposure in brown bears is linked to environmental levels and the distribution of moose kills2023In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 873, article id 162099Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lead (Pb) is heterogeneously distributed in the environment and multiple sources like Pb ammunition and fossil fuel combustion can increase the risk of exposure in wildlife. Brown bears (Ursus arctos) in Sweden have higher blood Pb levels compared to bears from other populations, but the sources and routes of exposure are unknown. The objective of this study was to quantify the contribution of two potential sources of Pb exposure in female brown bears (n = 34 individuals; n = 61 samples). We used multiple linear regressions to determine the contribution of both environmental Pb levels estimated from plant roots and moose (Alces alces) kills to blood Pb concentrations in female brown bears. We found positive relationships between blood Pb concentrations in bears and both the distribution of moose kills by hunters and environmental Pb levels around capture locations. Our results suggest that the consumption of slaughter remains discarded by moose hunters is a likely significant pathway of Pb exposure and this exposure is additive to environmental Pb exposure in female brown bears in Sweden. We suggest that spatially explicit models, incorporating habitat selection analyses of harvest data, may prove useful in predicting Pb exposure in scavengers.

  • 16. Byrne, Conor
    et al.
    Oostdijk, Maartje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography. University of Iceland, Iceland.
    Agnarsson, Sveinn
    Davidsdottir, Brynhildur
    The Transitional Gains Trap in Grandfathered Individual Transferable Quota Fisheries2024In: Ecological Economics, ISSN 0921-8009, E-ISSN 1873-6106, Vol. 215, article id 108013Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Trade in freely granted individual rights has been speculated to gradually reduce the political feasibility of reallocation, as the initial recipients who enjoy windfall profits are replaced by rights holders who purchased their rights and would unfairly become loss-making if the rights were subsequently reallocated. This hypothesis, sometimes referred to as a Transitional Gains Trap, may be relevant when evaluating alternative methods of allocating rights. This paper presents a potential indicator for investigating the Transitional Gains Trap in grandfathered individual transferable quota fisheries, based on the cumulative amount invested in quota after allowing for offsetting windfall profits, relative to the total value of all quota. The indicator ranges between 0% and 100%, with higher values indicating more net investment and a greater threat of a Transitional Gains Trap. Illustrative calculations for Iceland's ITQ system, introduced in 1991, yield a value of 29% by 2016, suggesting that the Transitional Gains Trap is not a major constraint, although the results vary by species and are sensitive to assumptions. Finally, the indicator is shown to decrease over time under certain conditions, implying that the potential relevance of the Transitional Gains Trap is context-specific.

  • 17.
    Bäckstrand, Tobias
    Perfomers of environmental monitoring, The County Administrative Boards, The County Administrative Board of Västra Götaland.
    Fisketillsyn i Västra Götaland2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I den här rapporten har Länsstyrelsen i Västra Götaland beskrivit hur de arbetar med fisketillsyn längs kusten och i Vänern. Rapporen beskriver organisation, samverkan, utbildning, planering, operativ tillsyn, uppföljning och administration.

    Sport- och fritidsfisket bedrivs främst kustnära och i skärgårdsområden, både i havet och stora sjöarna Vänern, Vättern, Mälaren, Hjälmaren och Storsjön. En betydande del av fritidsfisket genomförs i områden där fisket inom givna regler är fritt för var och en, antingen på allmänt vatten eller på enskilt frivatten.

    Det är HaVs förhoppning att rapporten ska belysa den viktiga uppgift som ligger i fisketillsynen och ge kunskap om hur man kan arbeta med planering, samordning, uppföljning och genomförande av operativ fisketillsyn.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
    Download (jpg)
    presentationsbild
  • 18.
    Börs, Johanna
    et al.
    SLU.
    Olsson, Mattias
    EnviroPlanning.
    Seiler, Andreas
    SLU.
    Berndt, Carolin
    SLU.
    Studier av skrämselsystem för ren: beteenderespons hos ren till olika ljudsignaler2023Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Skrämselsystem baserade på ljuduppspelning har under senaste åren testats på flera olika klövdjursarter. Studiens syfte har varit att undersöka vilka ljudsignaler som fungerar bäst när det gäller att avvärja ren från en plats. Ett mer långsiktigt mål är att använda metoden i situationer där både ren och vilt snabbt ska kunna avvärjas från platser, till exempel för att förhindra ren- och viltolyckor. I studien undersöktes hur renar reagerar beteendemässigt till fyra akustiska stimuli: rovdjur (gutturalt morrande av björn), ett pysande ljud (ett högt kraftigt brus), människoröster samt sirener. Renarna reagerade absolut starkast på ljud från rovdjur (björn) och det pysande ljudet, men även på den mänskliga rösten. Flyktresponsen skilde sig dock signifikant mellan olika ljudstimuli. Även om resultaten är lovande finns det många utmaningar att hantera innan principerna kan implementeras fullt ut vid infrastrukturen.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Studier av skrämselsystem för ren
    Download (jpg)
    presentationsbild
  • 19.
    Carpenter, Angela
    et al.
    School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, United Kingdom; Centre for Marine and Coastal Policy Research, Plymouth University, United Kingdom.
    Shellock, Rebecca
    Plymouth Marine Laboratory, United Kingdom; European Centre for Environment and Human Health, University of Exeter, Truro, United Kingdom.
    von Haartman, Robin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Stephen, Fletcher
    UN Environment World Conservation Monitoring Centre, United Kingdom.
    Glegg, Gillian
    Centre for Marine and Coastal Policy Research, Plymouth University, United Kingdom.
    Public perceptions of management priorities for the English Channel region2018In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 97, p. 294-304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The English Channel region is an area of high conservational importance, as well being a contributor to economic prosperity, social well-being and quality of life of the people living around it. There is a need to incorporate societal elements into marine and coastal governance, to improve management of the Channel ecosystem. Public Perception Research (PPR) is a relatively unexplored dimension of marine science, with limited research at the scale of the Channel region. Using an online survey, this study examined the public's use of, and funding priorities for, the Channel's marine and coastal environment. It revealed that there are variations in how the English and French coastlines are used. Environmental issues were generally viewed as being more important than economic ones. Country-level differences were observed for public uses of, and priorities for the Channel region. Cleaner water and beaches, and improved coastal flood defences, were more highly prioritised by English respondents, while offshore renewable energy and sustainability of businesses were more highly prioritised by French respondents. The paper contributes to the debate on the value of PPR by addressing evidence gaps in the English Channel region, and to PPR literature more broadly. It provides baseline data to inform future engagement strategies for the marine and coastal governance of the Channel region specifically. It also identifies how this type of research has implications for the wider marine and coastal environment, including contributing to Sustainable Development Goal 14 on conserving and sustainably using the oceans, seas, and marine resources.

  • 20. Christensen-Dalsgaard, Signe
    et al.
    Anker-Nilssen, Tycho
    Crawford, Rory
    Bond, Alexander
    Már Sigurðsson, Guðjón
    Glemarec, Gildas
    Snær Hansen, Erpur
    Kadin, Martina
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Environmental research and monitoring.
    Kindt-Larsen, Lotte
    Mallory, Mark
    Ravn Merkel, Flemming
    Petersen, Aevar
    Provencher, Jennifer
    Bærum, Kim Magnus
    What’s the catch with lumpsuckers? A North Atlantic study of seabird bycatch in lumpsucker gillnet fisheries2019In: Biological Conservation, ISSN 0006-3207, E-ISSN 1873-2917, Vol. 240, article id 108278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Worldwide, incidental bycatch in fisheries is a conservation threat to many seabird species. Although knowledge on bycatch of seabirds has increased in the last decade, most stems from longline fisheries and the impacts of coastal gillnet fisheries are poorly understood. Gillnet fishing for North Atlantic lumpsucker (Cyclopterus lumpus) is one such fishery. We collated and synthesized the available information on seabird bycatch in lumpsucker gillnet fisheries across the entire geographical range to estimate and infer the magnitude of their impact on the affected seabird populations. Most birds killed were diving ducks, cormorants and auks, and each year locally high numbers of seabirds were taken as bycatch. We found large differences in bycatch rates among countries. The estimated mean bycatch in Iceland was 2.43 birds/trip, while the estimates in Norway was 0.44 and 0.39 birds/trip, respectively. The large disparities between estimates might reflect large spatial differences in bycatch rates, but could partly also arise due to distinctions in data recorded by onboard inspectors (Iceland), self-administered registration (Norway) and direct observations by cameras (Denmark). We show that lumpsucker gillnet fisheries might pose a significant risk to some populations of diving seabirds. However, a distinct data deficiency on seabird bycatch in terms of spatio-temporal coverage and the age and origins of the birds killed, limited our abilities to fully assess the extent and population consequences of the bycatch. Our results highlight the need for a joint effort among countries to standardize monitoring methods to better document the impact of these fisheries on seabirds.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Christensen-Dalsgaard-et-al_BycatchLumpsuckerFishery_2019
  • 21. Dankel, Dorothy
    et al.
    Haraldsson, Gunnar
    Heldbo, Jesper
    Hoydal, Kjartan
    Lassen, Hans
    Siegstad, Helle
    Schou, Mogens
    Sverdrup-Jensen, Sten
    Waldo, Staffan
    Ørebech, Peter
    Allocation of Fishing Rights in the NEA: Discussion paper2015Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This discussion paper aims to initiate an informed debate in the Nordic countries and elsewhere on how to allocate the trans-boundary fish stocks in the North East Atlantic in the future and how to resolve possible allocation conflicts. The paper maps the current legal framework and international fisheries agreements in the North East Atlantic Ocean which forms the basis for allocation agreements. It considers the relevance of the biological status of the fish stocks and the economic situation of the coastal states in the area for the allocation of fishing rights and further proposes a dynamic allocation methodology and a decision making process including the handling of allocation conflicts. The paper is compiled by an inter-disciplinary Nordic group of fisheries experts.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
    Download (jpg)
    preview image
  • 22. Dressel, Sabrina
    et al.
    Ericsson, Göran
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Mapping social-ecological systems to understand the challenges underlying wildlife management2018In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 84, p. 105-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A holistic understanding of the complex interactions between humans, wildlife, and habitats is essential for the design of sustainable wildlife policies. This challenging task requires innovative and interdisciplinary research approaches. Using the newly implemented ecosystem-based management of moose (Alces alces) in Sweden as a case, we applied Ostrom’s social-ecological system (SES) framework to analyse the challenges that wildlife management faces throughout the country. We combined data derived from natural and social science research to operationalize the framework in a quantitative way; an approach that enabled a spatially explicit analysis on the national and regional levels. This study aimed to discover patterns in the social-ecological context of Swedish moose management. Identifying these patterns can provide input for an in-depth evaluation of the institutional fit of the current system and subsequently for national policy development. Our SES maps suggest that there are spatial variations in factors challenging moose management. In some areas, ecological aspects such as the co-occurrence of carnivores and other ungulate species burdens future management, while in other regions challenges are shaped by governance aspects, e.g. diverse property rights. These findings demonstrate that the new management system must apply adaptive learning principles to respond to local context attributes in order to be successful. Our innovative approach provides a valuable tool for the assessment of other natural resource management issues and the avoidance of panacea traps, especially when repeated over time.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 23.
    Drury O'Neill, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Small-Scale Fisheries Governance: Broadening Perspectives on Markets, Relationships and Benefits in Seafood Trade2016Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This licentiate adresses the relative ambiguity surounding benefit flows from small-scale fisheries seafood trade with a specific focus on how they may be impacted by market and social stuctures. Small-scale fishery governenace has previously taken a narrowly approach to sustainability. Focused on managing fishing activities, economic-led market interventions and overlooking the embededness of the fishers within a broader social structure. Also failing to address fisheries as interlinked social-ecological systems where feedbacks between the two can impact future sustainability. The larger PhD project takes a step towards combining these two out-of-focus areas by taking a systems perspective, through a Value Chain approach, to fisheries governance, associated market influences and the consequent benefit flows from marine ecosystem services. This licentiate begins by unpacking dynamics within the social realm that may impact benefit flows and ultimately resource extraction decisions, potentially contributing to feedbacks from the marine ecosystem. Research uses mixed-methods and is case-orientated with sites across two tropical marine small-scale fisheries in Zanzibar and the Philippines. Results present two market environments with distinct structures, conduct, reciprocity systems and notably, gender roles. However both systems experience economic transactions underlain by broader social relations and binds. These various features manifest themselves in different, yet often unexpected, ways through income equalities, distributions and reciprocal networks of fishers and trading actors. Once a broadened and diversified view of the SSF trading environment is appropriated, it is clear that benefit flows are impacted by various contextual features (e.g. gender, transaction forms and buyer types). Governance-related research or interventions should incorporate undervalued local attributes such as cultural characteristics, social relationships and market participation as they play a role in who benefits from seafood trade. Thus If governance is to be improved for sustainably increasing food and livelihood security it is necessary to unpack these benefit flow mechanisms and, in particular, the local social dynamics that mediate fishers’ everyday interplay with the marine ecosystem. Future steps include the aim to identify potential social-ecological feedbacks between the disentangled market environments and the local marine ecosystems as a result of interactions in SSF trade. 

    Download (pdf)
    summary
  • 24.
    Elfström, Marcus
    EnviroPlanning AB.
    Miljöuppföljning planpassage för fauna över väg 108 vid Sjödiken: Förekomst och fördelning av större däggdjur vid planpassage för fauna 2019–20202021Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Medelstora och stora däggdjur berörs av den barriär som väg E65 och väg 108 utgör i landskapet och som begränsar djurlivets nordsydliga respektive västostliga rörelser i sydvästra Skåne. Mot bland annat denna bakgrund har Trafikverket anlagt en planpassage utmed väg 108 vid Sjödiken, Svedala kommun. Planpassagen färdigställdes under sommaren år 2019. Målet med planpassagen är att minska den barriäreffekt som väg 108 utgör genom att skapa säkrare passagemöjligheter för fauna. Planpassagen ingår i arbetet med att återupprätta den ”gröna infrastrukturen” för däggdjur genom att länka samman inte minst skogsmarker väst och öst om väg 108 i landskapet.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Miljöuppföljning planpassage för fauna över väg 108 vid Sjödiken
    Download (jpg)
    presentationsbild
  • 25.
    Elsler, Laura G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    The complexity of seafood trade relations across scales2020Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There is growing concern about the unprecedented rise in international seafood trade that relies on increasingly overused and climate-driven fisheries. Seafood trade relations, the multi-dimensional relations between fishers, traders, and countries for seafood exchange and other interactions, are central in the process of globalization. Despite empirical evidence of their importance, (bio-)economic models that inform fisheries management usually reduce trade relations to price dynamics. Here, I aim to understand better the role of seafood trade relations for models that guide the sustainable and equitable management of globalizing fisheries. I studied traders' collusion in Mexico (Paper I), fisher-trader relations in Indonesia (Paper II), countries trade relations in a global network study (Paper III), and fisher-market relations in a theoretical model (Paper IV). I demonstrate that seafood trade relations are affected by social-ecological change (SEC), such as climate change. Their responses, in turn, influence how other fishery actors, such as fishers, are affected. Together these interactions shape the importance of seafood trade relations to SEC. These insights suggest that seafood trade emerges from, interacts, and co-evolves with seafood trade relations across scales, which needs to be represented in management models that analyze the 'interplay of seafood trade relations with globalizing fisheries'.

    Download full text (pdf)
    The complexity of seafood trade relations across scales
    Download (jpg)
    omslagsframsida
  • 26.
    Elsler, Laura G.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Neil, Muhammad
    Ferse, Sebastian
    Navarrete Forero, Gabriela
    Glaser, Marion
    Schlüter, Maja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Compliance in small-scale fisheries is linked to fisher-trader relations: not fishers alone (Southeast Asian case study)2023In: Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries, ISSN 0960-3166, E-ISSN 1573-5184, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 751-766Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fisher-trader relations are influential in many small-scale fisheries worldwide. The ability to influence emergent fishing practices has shifted traders into focus of fisheries policy-making. Formal policies could be more effective if they were complementary to and build on an understanding of the role of traders, their interaction with fishers, and how these contribute to the emergence of compliant or non-compliant fishing practices. Here, we first compared fishing practices with policies to assess the latter's effectiveness in Indonesia, Spermonde. Second, we identified the roles and interactions of fisher-trader relations in shaping emergent fishing practices using the social-ecological action situation framework. We found that 6 out of 7 fishing practices were at least partially non-compliant with formal policies. Second, fisher-trader relations mediated by social norms enabled more fishing practices to emerge than those focused solely on selling and buying fish. Third, traders' interactions with other fishery actors enabled non-compliant fishing practices. These findings comprehensively characterize fishers' and traders' roles and interactions in the emergence of fishing practices. Policy effectiveness could be enhanced by engaging in traders' interactions with other fishery actors.

  • 27.
    Elsler, Laura G.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Oostdijk, Maartje
    Gephart, Jessica A.
    Free, Christopher M.
    Zhao, Junfu
    Tekwa, Eden
    Bochniewicz, Elaine M.
    Giron-Nava, Alfredo
    Johnson, Andrew F.
    Global trade network patterns are coupled to fisheries sustainability2023In: PNAS Nexus, E-ISSN 2752-6542, Vol. 2, no 10, article id pgad301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rapid development of seafood trade networks alongside the decline in biomass of many marine populations raises important questions about the role of global trade in fisheries sustainability. Mounting empirical and theoretical evidence shows the importance of trade development on commercially exploited species. However, there is limited understanding of how the development of trade networks, such as differences in connectivity and duration, affects fisheries sustainability. In a global analysis of over 400,000 bilateral trade flows and stock status estimates for 876 exploited fish and marine invertebrates from 223 territories, we reveal patterns between seafood trade network indicators and fisheries sustainability using a dynamic panel regression analysis. We found that fragmented networks with strong connectivity within a group of countries and weaker links between those groups (modularity) are associated with higher relative biomass. From 1995 to 2015, modularity fluctuated, and the number of trade connections (degree) increased. Unlike previous studies, we found no relationship between the number or duration of trade connections and fisheries sustainability. Our results highlight the need to jointly investigate fisheries and trade. Improved coordination and partnerships between fisheries authorities and trade organizations present opportunities to foster more sustainable fisheries. 

  • 28.
    Eriksson, Louise
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Månsson, Johan
    Grimsö Wildlife Research Station, Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Riddarhyttan, Sweden.
    Liljebäck, Niklas
    Grimsö Wildlife Research Station, Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Riddarhyttan, Sweden.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Johansson, Maria
    Environmental Psychology, Department of Architecture and Built Environment, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Eklund, Ann
    Environmental Psychology, Department of Architecture and Built Environment, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Department of Environmental Science and Bioscience, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    The importance of structural, situational, and psychological factors for involving hunters in the adaptive flyway management of geese2023In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 7112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adaptive flyway management of superabundant geese is emerging as a strategy to reduce damage to agricultural crops and other ecosystem disservices, while also ensuring sustainable use and conservation objectives. Given the calls for intensified hunting as part of flyway management in Europe, we need to increase the understanding of structural, situational, and psychological factors important for goose hunting among hunters. Our survey data, retrieved in southern Sweden, showed a higher potential to intensify hunting among goose hunters than other hunters. In response to hypothetical policy instruments (including regulations, collaborative, and others), hunters declared a minor increase in their intention to hunt geese, with the greatest expected increase among goose hunters should the hunting season be extended. Situational factors (e.g., access to hunting grounds) were associated with goose hunting (frequency, bag size, and intention to increase hunting). In addition, controlled motivation (derived from external pressures or to avoid guilt) and more importantly autonomous motivation (due to hunting being enjoyable or valuable) were along with goose hunter identity positively associated with goose hunting. Hunters’ involvement in flyway management may be encouraged by using policy instruments to remove situational barriers and facilitate their autonomous motivation.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 29.
    Eriksson, Max
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Ericsson, Göran
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, Umeå.
    Direct experience and attitude change towards bears and wolves2015In: Wildlife Biology, ISSN 0909-6396, E-ISSN 1903-220X, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 131-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding how changes in the sizes of large carnivore populations affect the attitudes of the public is vital in order to mitigate social conflicts over large carnivore management issues. Using data from two Swedish postal surveys in 2004 and 2009, we examined the probable social effects of a continued increase in the Swedish populations of bear and wolf by comparing levels of direct experience of bears and wolves with public attitudes towards these animals. We report an increase in direct experience of bears and wolves, lower levels of acceptance of the existence of these animals, and a lower degree of support for the policy goals of both species in 2009 compared to 2004. We also find that these changes are more prominent in areas with local carnivore populations than in other areas of Sweden. Our results imply that attitudes towards bears and wolves are likely to become more negative as populations continue to grow. The uneven distributions of the carnivore populations are likely to generate more frequent social conflicts in the future as they could cause an increase in the attitudinal divide between those members of the Swedish public who have had direct experiences of carnivores and those who have not.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 30.
    Estes, Kelly
    Illinois Natural History Survey University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
    4. Terrestrial Invasive Species of the Great Lakes Region2012In: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, p. 42-46Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Download full text (pdf)
    ehsa 2-4
  • 31.
    Fitzgerald, Guy
    University of Montreal, Saint-Hyacinthe, QC, CAN.
    15. Effects and Remediation of Oil Spills on Wild Birds: The St. Lawrence Estuary and Gulf Experience2012In: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, p. 122-127Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Download full text (pdf)
    ehsa 2-15
  • 32.
    Fitzsimons, John D.
    et al.
    Great Lakes Laboratory for Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, Burlington, Canada.
    Wolgamood, Martha
    Michigan Department of Natural Resources, Mattawan, MI, USA.
    Madenjian, Charles P.
    United States Geological Survey, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
    Bunnell, David B.
    United States Geological Survey, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
    20. Thiamine Deficiency in Aquatic Food Chains: The Cumulative Result of Ecosystem Disruption by Clupeids?2012In: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, p. 167-180Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Download full text (pdf)
    ehsa 2-20
  • 33.
    Fohringer, Christian
    et al.
    Department of Wildlife, Fish, and Environmental Studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Dudka, Ilona
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Spitzer, Robert
    Department of Wildlife, Fish, and Environmental Studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Stenbacka, Fredrik
    Department of Wildlife, Fish, and Environmental Studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Rzhepishevska, Olena I
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Cromsigt, Joris P. G. M.
    Department of Wildlife, Fish, and Environmental Studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Gröbner, Gerhard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Ericsson, Göran
    Department of Wildlife, Fish, and Environmental Studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Singh, Navinder J.
    Department of Wildlife, Fish, and Environmental Studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Integrating omics to characterize eco‐physiological adaptations: How moose diet and metabolism differ across biogeographic zones2021In: Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 11, no 7, p. 3159-3183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1. With accelerated land conversion and global heating at northern latitudes, it becomes crucial to understand, how life histories of animals in extreme environments adapt to these changes. Animals may either adapt by adjusting foraging behavior or through physiological responses, including adjusting their energy metabolism or both. Until now, it has been difficult to study such adaptations in free‐ranging animals due to methodological constraints that prevent extensive spatiotemporal coverage of ecological and physiological data.

    2. Through a novel approach of combining DNA‐metabarcoding and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)‐based metabolomics, we aim to elucidate the links between diets and metabolism in Scandinavian moose Alces alces over three biogeographic zones using a unique dataset of 265 marked individuals.

    3. Based on 17 diet items, we identified four different classes of diet types that match browse species availability in respective ecoregions in northern Sweden. Individuals in the boreal zone consumed predominantly pine and had the least diverse diets, while individuals with highest diet diversity occurred in the coastal areas. Males exhibited lower average diet diversity than females.

    4. We identified several molecular markers indicating metabolic constraints linked to diet constraints in terms of food availability during winter. While animals consuming pine had higher lipid, phospocholine, and glycerophosphocholine concentrations in their serum than other diet types, birch‐ and willow/aspen‐rich diets exhibit elevated concentrations of several amino acids. The individuals with highest diet diversity had increased levels of ketone bodies, indicating extensive periods of starvation for these individuals.

    5. Our results show how the adaptive capacity of moose at the eco‐physiological level varies over a large eco‐geographic scale and how it responds to land use pressures. In light of extensive ongoing climate and land use changes, these findings pave the way for future scenario building for animal adaptive capacity.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 34. Fredberg, Jennifer
    et al.
    Nylén, Sara
    Norrortsleden, väg 256: Utredning av funktion, överlämning och skötsel av Norrortsledens passager samt översikt av andra miljöåtgärder för djur2022Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vägar utgör hinder för djurens fria rörlighet genom landskapet, de är så kallade vandringshinder. Trafiken kan skrämma bort djuren, hindra dem från att passera om de vågar sig fram och många som ändå försöker ta sig över vägen dödas. Därmed är det få individer som tar sig levande till andra sida. Vägar riskerar därför att dela lokala populationer och skära av dem från viktiga resurser på olika håll i landskapet, t.ex. föda, partners och övervintringsplatser. Det gör att risken för inavel ökar och att de lokala populationerna får svårare att hantera andra miljöfaktorer.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Norrortsleden, väg 256
    Download (jpg)
    presentationsbild
  • 35.
    Gillespie, Thomas
    Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
    24. Habitat Fragmentation and Species Barriers2012In: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, p. 199-200Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Download full text (pdf)
    ehsa 2-24
  • 36.
    Glikman, Jenny A.
    et al.
    Instituto de Estudios Sociales Avanzados (IESA-CSIC), Cordoba, Spain.
    Frank, Beatrice
    Capital Regional District Regional Parks, BC, Victoria, Canada.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Meysohn, Samantha
    OR, Portland, United States.
    Bogardus, Michelle
    Pacific Islands Fish and Wildlife Office, United States Fish and Wildlife Service, HI, Honolulu, United States.
    Madden, Francine
    Center for Conservation Peacebuilding (CPeace), DC, Washington, United States.
    Zimmermann, Alexandra
    WildCRU, University of Oxford, United Kingdom.
    The human dimensions and the public engagement spectrum of conservation translocation2022In: Conservation translocations / [ed] Martin J. Gaywood; John G. Ewen; Peter M. Hollingsworth; Axel Moehrenschlager, Cambridge University Press, 2022, p. 303-330Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding the 'human dimensions of wildlife' – how humans value wildlife, how they affect and are affected by wildlife, and what triggers people to be willing to live with a translocated species – are the first building blocks and vital steps towards the long-term success of a conservation translocation project. However, to be fully meaningful, the understanding of the human dimensions needs to be nested in a social engagement process, which has too often been overlooked or poorly designed by conservation practitioners. A well-developed engagement process has the power to increase the transparency, credibility, and legitimacy of a decision-making process, thus fostering support for a conservation policy, plan, or project – including a conservation translocation. Nevertheless, planning and running a tailored engagement process are not the final steps. Reporting back and evaluating the process is key to ensuring the success of any public involvement. Such an approach keeps the public engaged over time, increases transparency, and legitimises the decision-making process. 'One size fits all' stakeholder engagement approaches typically fail to reflect the specific needs of the unique social dynamics within the system and fall short of reconciliation of the relationships, and disentanglement of the deeper roots of conflict. The 'Levels of Conflict' model is one tool used to orientate conservation practitioners and stakeholders to the types and depths of conflict in a given situation. Conservation conflicts are microcosms of larger societal conflicts, and conservation conflict transformation (CCT) provides a way of thinking about, understanding, and actively addressing such conflicts. Practitioners of CCT consider disputes as opportunities to constructively engage with the underlying relationships, decision-making processes, and social systems to create an enabling social environment for effective, lasting, broadly supported conservation efforts.

  • 37.
    González-Mon, Blanca
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Bodin, Örjan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Lindkvist, Emilie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Frawley, Timothy H.
    Giron-Nava, Alfredo
    Basurto, Xavier
    Nenadovic, Mateja
    Schlüter, Maja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Spatial diversification as a mechanism to adapt to environmental changes in small-scale fisheries2021In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 116, p. 246-257Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Small-scale fisheries’ actors increasingly face new challenges, including climate driven shifts in marine resource distribution and productivity. Diversification of target species and fishing locations is a key mechanism to adapt to such changes and maintain fisheries livelihoods. Here we explore environmental and institutional factors mediating how patterns of spatial diversification (i.e., utilization of alternative fishing grounds) and target species diversification change over time. Using small-scale fisheries in Baja California Sur (Mexico) as a case study, we adopt a social-ecological network approach to conduct a spatially explicit analysis of fisheries landings data (2008–2016). This approach quantifies relative patterns of diversification, and when combined with a qualitative analysis of existing literature, enables us to illuminate institutional and environmental factors that may influence diversification strategies. Our results indicate that interannual changes in spatial diversification are correlated with regional oceanographic change, while illustrating the heterogeneity and dynamism of diversification strategies. Rather than acting in isolation, we hypothesize that environmental drivers likely operate in combination with existing fisheries regulations and local socioeconomic context to mediate spatial diversification. We argue that small-scale fisheries policies need to better account such linkages as we move towards an increasingly variable environment. Overall, our results highlight spatial diversification as a dynamic process and constitute an important step towards understanding and managing the complex mechanisms through which environmental changes affect small-scale fisheries.

  • 38.
    Gren, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Jägerbrand, Annika
    Calluna AB.
    Costs of traffic accidents with ungulates in Sweden2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Traffic accidents with ungulates pose a serious problem in many countries, and there is a need for predicting accidents and costs at a large scale for an efficient management of the accidents. Based on the assumption that traffic accidents are determined by traffic volume and ungulate population sizes, this study provides a relatively simple method for calculating and predicting costs of current and future traffic accidents with roe deer, wild boar, and moose in Sweden. A logistic population model is assumed for all ungulates, and econometric methods are used for predicting vehicle accidents with panel data on traffic accidents, traffic load, bags, hunting licenses, and landscape characteristics for each county and year during 2003-2015. The calculated total discounted cost of traffic accidents over a period of 15 years is relatively stable around 1300 million SEK per year in present value (which corresponds to 0.03% of gross domestic product in 2015), but the allocation of costs among ungulates differs. Costs of vehicle accidents with moose account for the largest share of the cost (44%), but accidents with wild boar show the most rapid increase over a 15 year period because of the estimated relatively high intrinsic growth rate and the recent establishment of this animal in several counties. The predicted costs are, however, sensitive to the assumption of future hunting pressure and traffic volume.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 39.
    Gren, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Jägerbrand, Annika K.
    Calluna AB.
    Costs of traffic accidents with ungulates in Sweden2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Traffic accidents with ungulates pose a serious problem in many countries, and there is a need for predicting accidents and costs at a large scale for an efficient management of the accidents. Based on the assumption that traffic accidents are determined by traffic volume and ungulate population sizes, this study provides a relatively simple method for calculating and predicting costs of current and future traffic accidents with roe deer, wild boar, and moose in Sweden. A logistic population model is assumed for all ungulates, and econometric methods are used for predicting vehicle accidents with panel data on traffic accidents, traffic load, bags, hunting licenses, and landscape characteristics for each county and year during 2003-2015. The calculated total discounted cost of traffic accidents over a period of 15 years is relatively stable around 1300 million SEK per year in present value (which corresponds to 0.03% of gross domestic product in 2015), but the allocation of costs among ungulates differs. Costs of vehicle accidents with moose account for the largest share of the cost (44%), but accidents with wild boar show the most rapid increase over a 15 year period because of the estimated relatively high intrinsic growth rate and the recent establishment of this animal in several counties. The predicted costs are, however, sensitive to the assumption of future hunting pressure and traffic volume.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Fulltext
  • 40. Hansen, Inger
    et al.
    Strand, Geir-Harald
    de Boon, Auvikki
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Impacts of Norwegian large carnivore management strategy on national grazing sector2019In: Journal of Mountain Science, ISSN 1672-6316, E-ISSN 1993-0321, Vol. 16, no 11, p. 2470-2483Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing populations of large carnivores are leading to tension and conflicts with livestock production, a situation that potentially might escalate. In Norway the objective of the large carnivore policy is two-folded: to ensure viable carnivore populations and to secure a sustainable grazing industry. The main instrument is zonation, with carnivore management zones (CMZs) prioritized for reproduction of the large carnivore species separated from other areas prioritized for grazing livestock. The objective of this paper is to describe current knowledge about the impact of the zoning management strategy on the grazing industry. This is done by documenting status and changes in sheep production, losses of livestock to predating carnivores, and the use of grazing areas inside and outside the CMZs. CMZs offering protection for lynx, wolverine, bear and wolf cover 55% of the Norwegian mainland. 30% of the sheep and 50% of the Sami reindeer grazing areas are found inside the CMZs. Livestock (semi-domestic reindeer excluded) is using 59% of the available natural pasture areas outside the CMZs, but only 26% inside the CMZs. The lowest use of available grazing areas was found inside zones for wolves (12%) and brown bears (6%). Livestock in these zones are confined to fenced enclosures, mostly on the farm itself, or moved to pastures outside the management zone for summer grazing. Livestock losses increased in the affected regions during the period when carnivores were reestablished. Later, losses declined when CMZs were established and mitigation efforts were implemented in these zones. The bulk of sheep and reindeer killed by carnivores are now found in boundary areas within 50 km off the CMZs, where sheep are still grazing on open mountain and forest ranges. Therefore, instruments to protect livestock in areas close to the CMZs are also needed. The number of sheep declined inside the CMZs from 1999 to 2014, but increased outside the zones. The reduction in the absolute number of sheep in the CMZs is balanced by a similar increase outside, thus the total sheep production in Norway is maintained. We conclude that although of little consequence for the total food production in Norway, the economic and social impact of the large carnivore management strategy can be serious for local communities and individual farmers who are affected. There is a need for more exact carnivore population monitoring to quantify the carnivore pressure, better documentation of reindeer losses, and a clearer and stricter practicing of the zoning strategy. Increased involvement of social sciences is important in order to understand the human dimension of the carnivore conflicts.

  • 41. Hariohay, Kwaslema Malle
    et al.
    Machaninga, Agripina Cletus
    Lyimo, Emmanuel Happygod
    Hunninck, Louis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Kideghesho, Jafari Ramadhan
    Røskaft, Eivin
    Can conservation-based incentives promote willingness of local communities to coexist with wildlife? A case of Burunge Wildlife Management Area, Northern Tanzania2024In: Human Dimensions of Wildlife, ISSN 1087-1209, E-ISSN 1533-158XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Globally, conservation-based incentives (CBIs) are perceived as effective tools for enhancing human–wildlife coexistence. This study investigated whether CBIs could improve willingness of local communities around Burunge Wildlife Management Area (BWMA) to coexist with wildlife. We conducted a questionnaire survey which was orally administered to 150 households from three villages participating in the BWMA. Providing social services like education, healthcare, and livestock disease control increased the community’s willingness to coexist with wildlife by 60%. Gender, occupation and time of residence were significant predictors explaining the observed 27.4% variation in the willingness to coexist with wildlife. Women involved in small businesses were more receptive to CBIs if they received training on protecting their property from wildlife. People who lived in the area for a longer time showed higher tolerance for wildlife-related challenges. We recommend implementing effective CBIs to enhance coexistence and developing measures to minimize crop losses caused by wildlife.

  • 42. Helldin, J-O
    et al.
    Seiler, Andreas
    Olsson, Mattias
    Norin, Helena
    Klövviltolyckor på järnväg: kunskapsläge, problemanalys och åtgärdsförslag2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Djurpåkörningar på järnväg medför ofta problem för Trafikverket och samhället med framför allt tågförseningar, kadaverhantering, skador på tåg och minskade jaktbyten. Denna rapport innehåller en genomförd undersökning i tre delar: En litteraturgenomgång med fokus på vegetationens påverkan på viltolyckorna på järnväg. En analys om var de flesta påkörningarna av älg och rådjur sker och orsakerna till detta. En enkätundersökning om lokförares erfarenheter av viltpåkörningar på järnväg.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
    Download full text (jpg)
    Omslagsbild
  • 43.
    Hellström, Anders
    et al.
    National Veterinary Institute, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Chukalova, Natalia
    AtlantNiro, Kaliningrad, Russia.
    Rodjuk, Galina
    AtlantNiro, Kaliningrad, Russia.
    Ekman, Elisabet
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Norrgren, Leif
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    8. Aquaculture and Fish Health2012In: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, p. 63-72Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Download full text (pdf)
    ehsa 2-8
  • 44.
    Häggmark Svensson, Tobias
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala.
    Gren, Ing-Marie
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala.
    Andersson, Hans
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala.
    Jansson, Gunnar
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Jägerbrand, Annika
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Stockholm.
    Costs of traffic accidents with wild boar populations in Sweden2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Traffic accidents with wild boar have increased rapidly over the last years in Sweden. This paper calculates and predicts costs of current and future accidents, totally and for different Swedish counties, based on estimates of wild boar populations. A logistic population model is assumed, and econometric methods are used for calculating populations with panel data on traffic accidents, traffic load, and landscape characteristics for each county. The results show an average growth rate of 0.48, which varies between 0.39 and 0.52for different counties. This, together with predictions on changes in traffic load, forms the basis for calculations of costs of traffic accidents for a 10 year period. In total, the predicted costs can increase from 60 million SEK in 2011 to 135 or 340 million SEK in 2021 in present value depending on hunting pressure. The variation in cost increases is, however, large among counties, increasing by tenfold in Stockholm and Södermanland where the wild boar populations are relatively small and by approximately 50% in counties with mature populations.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 45.
    Häggmark Svensson, Tobias
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala.
    Gren, Ing-Marie
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala.
    Andersson, Hans
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala.
    Jansson, Gunnar
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Jägerbrand, Annika K.
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Stockholm.
    Costs of traffic accidents with wild boar populations in Sweden2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Traffic accidents with wild boar have increased rapidly over the last years in Sweden. This paper calculates and predicts costs of current and future accidents, totally and for different Swedish counties, based on estimates of wild boar populations. A logistic population model is assumed, and econometric methods are used for calculating populations with panel data on traffic accidents, traffic load, and landscape characteristics for each county. The results show an average growth rate of 0.48, which varies between 0.39 and 0.52for different counties. This, together with predictions on changes in traffic load, forms the basis for calculations of costs of traffic accidents for a 10 year period. In total, the predicted costs can increase from 60 million SEK in 2011 to 135 or 340 million SEK in 2021 in present value depending on hunting pressure. The variation in cost increases is, however, large among counties, increasing by tenfold in Stockholm and Södermanland where the wild boar populations are relatively small and by approximately 50% in counties with mature populations.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Fulltext
  • 46.
    Håkansson, Emma
    et al.
    EnviroPlanning AB.
    Elfström, Macus
    EnviroPlanning AB.
    Faunaåtgärder  för väg 156: Skene – väg 402023Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Väg 156 är ett viktigt pendlingsstråk och planeras att etappvis byggas ut till 2+1-väg. Redan nu är vägen drabbad av viltolyckor. Utredningen visar hur vägens barriäreffekt kan minska, faunapassager anläggas och trafiksäkerheten öka, både i närtid och då delsträckorna byggs om. Viktiga åtgärder är faunabroar, viltpassage i plan och ett korrekt utformat stängselsystem. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    Faunaåtgärder för väg 156
    Download (jpg)
    presentationsbild
  • 47.
    Håkansson, Emma
    et al.
    EnviroPlanning AB.
    Wahlman, Henrik
    EnviroPlanning AB.
    Olsson, Mattias
    EnviroPlanning AB.
    Seiler, Andreas
    SLU.
    Teknisk beskrivning Viltolyckskartor järnväg2023Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Viltpåkörningar på järnväg har blivit allt fler under de senaste 10–20 åren. Även rennäringen lider stora förluster på grund av påkörningar varje år. Trafikverket tar numera fram och tillhandahåller aggregerade informationslager om vilt- och renolyckor för att definiera och kunna visa var det sker flest vilt- och renpåkörningar i Sverige. Målen med dessa viltolyckskartor är att kunna följa trender över tid, på olika skalor i landskapet och för olika järnvägssträckor, höja trafik- och driftsäkerheten på järnväg genom att minska antalet ren- och viltpåkörningar och de därmed relaterade kostnaderna och förbättra kunskaperna om viltpåkörningar på järnväg för att kunna vidta förebyggande åtgärder i infrastruktur och på fordon. Denna rapport beskriver tekniska detaljer i framtagningen av kartunderlaget för viltolyckor på järnväg och ger stöd i tolkning och användning av materialet.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Teknisk beskrivning Viltolyckskartor
    Download (png)
    presentationsbild
  • 48.
    Jarnemo, Anders
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Innovation and Sustainability.
    Nilsson, Lovisa
    Swedish University Of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wikenros, Camilla
    Swedish University Of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Home range sizes of red deer in relation to habitat composition: a review and implications for management in Sweden2023In: European Journal of Wildlife Research, ISSN 1612-4642, E-ISSN 1439-0574, Vol. 69, no 5, article id 92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge about deer spatial use is essential for damage mitigation, conservation, and harvest management. We assess annual and seasonal home range sizes in relation to habitat composition for red deer (Cervus elaphus) in Sweden, using GPS-data from two regions with different management systems. We compare our findings with reviewed data on red deer home range sizes in Europe. Annual and seasonal home ranges during calving, hunt, and winter-spring, decreased with increasing proportion forest. Female annual home ranges in a mixed agricultural-forest landscape were three times larger than in a forest-dominated landscape. Core areas (50% Kernels) were approximately 1/5 of the full annual and seasonal home ranges (95% Kernels) regardless of habitat composition. Home range size in the forest-dominated landscape showed little inter-seasonal variation. In the agricultural-forest landscape, home ranges were larger during calving, hunt, and winter-spring compared to summer and rut. In the forest-dominated landscape, management areas are large enough to cover female spatial use. In the agricultural-forest landscape, female spatial use covers several license units. Here, the coordinated license system is needed to reach trade-offs between goals of conservation, game management, and damage mitigation. Males had in general larger home ranges than females, and the majority of the males also made a seasonal migration to and from the rutting areas. The license system area in the agricultural-forest landscape is large enough to manage migrating males. In the forest landscape, a coordination of several management areas is needed to encompass male migrations. We conclude that management needs to adapt to deer spatial use in different types of landscapes to reach set goals. © 2023, The Author(s).

  • 49. Johansson, Maria
    et al.
    Dressel, Sabrina
    Ericsson, Göran
    Sjölander-Lindqvist, Annelie
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    How stakeholder representatives cope with collaboration in the Swedish moose management system2020In: Human Dimensions of Wildlife, ISSN 1087-1209, E-ISSN 1533-158X, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 154-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The collaborative ecosystem-based management of moose (Alces alces) in Sweden puts a strain on the involved stakeholders. Representatives have to cope with environmental uncertainty and social stress associated with goal conflicts. This article advanced the understanding of representatives' coping strategies in response to perceived challenges and how these coping strategies are associated with social trust, focusing upon salient value similarity. A mixed-method approach, combining a questionnaire survey (n = 624) and interviews (n = 21) among landowners and hunter representatives, was employed. Survey results showed that the presence of emotion-centered coping strategies that involve venting of negative emotions and behavioral disengagement were associated with relatively lower trust, whereas problem-solving centered coping was associated with relatively higher trust. The interviews indicated the importance of appointing group leaders who are skilled at initiating dialogue and working toward decisions and compromises, as this seemed to hinder expressions of emotion-centered coping strategies.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 50.
    Johansson, Maria
    et al.
    Environmental Psychology, Department of Architecture and the Built Environment, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Dressel, Sabrina
    Forest and Nature Conservation Policy Group, Department of Environmental Sciences, Wageningen University, Wageningen, Netherlands; Department of Wildlife, Fish & Environmental Studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Sjölander-Lindqvist, Annelie
    School of Global Studies & Gothenburg Research Institute (GRI), University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sustaining the public’s positive feelings towards ungulates at the local level2024In: Society & Natural Resources, ISSN 0894-1920, E-ISSN 1521-0723Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Europe, spatial distributions and densities of ungulates have been increasing, triggering both negative and positive feelings. Ecosystem-based and collaborative approaches to wildlife management have been introduced to, among other things, consider the perspectives of the local public. Consequently, it becomes necessary to understand the public’s emotional appraisals and feelings toward the presence of moose and other ungulates. We studied four socio-ecological contexts in Sweden. Statistical analyses of a postal questionnaire (N = 1111) showed that negative feelings were weak and positive feelings were modest across all settings. In particular, wildlife value orientation of mutualism and perceptions of moose and other ungulates as supporting recreation opportunities sustained positive feelings. Currently there seems to be little need among the public to cope with negative implications of ungulates. Management may benefit from informing about adequate strategies and building social trust if negative impacts of ungulates were to become salient to the public.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
123 1 - 50 of 135
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf