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  • 1.
    Alati, Victor Mwakha
    et al.
    Kenya Marine & Fisheries Res Inst, POB 81651-80100, Mombasa, Kenya.;Univ Roehampton, Dept Life Sci, Roehampton Lane, London SW15 5PU, England..
    Olunga, Jibril
    Kenya Marine & Fisheries Res Inst, POB 81651-80100, Mombasa, Kenya..
    Olendo, Mike
    Conservat Int, POB 1963-00502, Nairobi, Kenya..
    Daudi, Lillian Nduku
    Kenya Marine & Fisheries Res Inst, POB 81651-80100, Mombasa, Kenya..
    Osuka, Kennedy
    Coastal Oceans Res & Dev Indian Ocean CORDIO East, 9 Kibaki Flats,POB 10135-80101, Mombasa, Kenya.;Univ York, Dept Environm & Geog, York, N Yorkshire, England..
    Odoli, Cyprian
    Kenya Marine & Fisheries Res Inst, POB 81651-80100, Mombasa, Kenya..
    Tuda, Paul
    Leibniz Zentrum Marine Tropenforsch ZMT GmbH, D-628359 Bremen, Germany..
    Nordlund, Lina M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Mollusc shell fisheries in coastal Kenya: Local ecological knowledge reveals overfishing2020In: Ocean and Coastal Management, ISSN 0964-5691, E-ISSN 1873-524X, Vol. 195, article id 105285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is limited documentation on the status and dynamics of fished marine shelled mollusc species in many countries. Some of the challenges are due to obscure documentation of species, extensive unregulated and unrecorded fishing and unawareness of drivers behind declining stocks. The lack of understanding makes it difficult to formulate effective management plans. Here, we assess the fishers' perceptions on changes in abundance of targeted marine shelled mollusc species and status of associated fished habitats. We interviewed 132 marine shelled mollusc gleaners (fishing by walking) at five sites in coastal Kenya. We established that a multispecies marine shelled mollusc fishery is present in Kenya and that this fishery is conducted by both women and men. We distinguished 158 different shelled mollusc species being targeted. The gleaners perceived a temporal decline of gleaned species. The main causes for the decline were perceived to be overfishing of shells, elevated sea-surface temperature and habitat destruction. The more experienced gleaners perceived a greater decline indicating a baseline shift in perceptions. Our findings suggest that local ecological knowledge is useful to understand historic changes in fisheries lacking long-term scientific data. Furthermore, it highlights the potential benefits of a collaboration between ecologists and gleaners to improve our understanding of the status and dynamics of fishing of marine shelled molluscs as well as other types of fishing.

  • 2.
    Alati, Victor Mwakha
    et al.
    Kenya Marine & Fisheries Res Inst, POB 81651-80100, Mombasa, Kenya.;Univ Roehampton, Dept Life Sci, Roehampton Lane, London SW15 5PU, England..
    Osuka, Kennedy
    Coastal Oceans Res & Dev Indian Ocean CORDIO East, 9 Kibaki Flats,POB 10135-80101, Mombasa, Kenya.;Univ Liverpool, Dept Earth Ocean & Ecol Sci, Liverpool, England..
    Otwoma, Levy Michael
    Kenya Marine & Fisheries Res Inst, POB 81651-80100, Mombasa, Kenya..
    Tuda, Paul
    Leibniz Ctr Trop Marine Res ZMT GmbH, Fahrenheitstr, D-628359 Bremen, Germany..
    Nordlund, Lina M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Gender analysis in fisheries: The case of the shelled mollusc fisheries in Kenya2023In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 158, article id 105863Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Analysing gender in small-scale fisheries (SSF) is vital for understanding the contributions of women and men and detecting potential inequalities. In this study, the shelled mollusc fishery was examined through the gender lens using quantitative and qualitative data collected from 132 shelled mollusc fishers accross five sites in coastal Kenya. In Kenya, both women and men participate in shelled mollusc fisheries. The study incorporated in its analyses the main components that intersect with gender to investigate whether similarities and differences exist in SSF in coastal Kenya in terms of access to shelled mollusc fisheries resources and the distribution of monetary benefits from the fishery. Most women respondents (73%, n = 91) relied on shelled mollusc fishing as their primary occupation compared to men (17%, n = 41) whose primary occupation was finfish fishing (69%, n = 41). There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) between women and men fishers in terms of income per individual fisher, time spent fishing, the number of species caught per individual fisher, as well as the monetary value of shells caught. There are several similarities between women and men in this fishery, but with a very important distinction that women more often consider this fishery their primary occupation. Thus, women constitute a large and important part of this fishery in Kenya. To advance coastal and fisheries management, it is essential that women, as well as gender aspects, are included in policy and decision-making processes related to SSF.

  • 3.
    Almqvist, Gustaf
    et al.
    University of Stockholm, Stockholm Sweden.
    Andersen, Michael
    Danish Fishermen’s Association, Fredericia, Denmark.
    Willestofte Berg, Casper
    DTU Aqua – National Institute of Aquatic Resources Section for Fisheries Advice, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Broadgate, Wendy
    The Fisheries Secretariat (FISH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bryan, Meaghan
    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Southeast Fisheries Science Center, Miami, United States.
    Campana, Steven
    Fisheries and Oceans Canada Bedford Institute of Oceanography, Dartmouth, Canada.
    Cardinale, Max
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Casini, Michele
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Dierking, Jan
    Leibniz-Institut für Meereswissenschaften, Kiel, Germany.
    von Dorrien, Christian
    Thünen Institute Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Eero, Margit
    DTU Aqua – National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Efimov, Yuri
    Russian Federal Research Institute of Fisheries & Oceanography (VNIRO), Moscow, Russian Federation.
    Gasyukov, Pavel
    AtlantNIRO, Kaliningrad, Russian Federation.
    Hemmer-Hansen, Jakob
    DTU Aqua – National Institute of Aquatic Resources Department of Inland Fisheries, Silkeborg, Denmark.
    Hjelm, Joakim
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Holmgren, Noél
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Horbowy, Jan
    National Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Gdynia, Poland.
    Hüssy, Karin
    DTU Aqua – National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Johansson, Reine
    Baltic Sea Advisory Council, Dyrön, Sweden.
    Jonusas, Stanislovas
    DGMare, Brussels, Belgium.
    Kornelius, George
    Institute of Food Safety, Animal Health and Environment (BIOR) 8 Daugavgrivas Str. Fish Resources Research Department, Riga, Latvia.
    Köster, Fritz
    DTU Aqua – National Institute of Aquatic Resources Section for Fisheries Advice, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Kraak, Sarah
    Thünen Institute, Braunschweig, Germany.
    Krumme, Uwe
    Thünen Institute Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Large, Scott
    International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Larsson, Staffan
    Swedish Cod Fishermen’s Producer Organisation, Lycke, Sweden.
    Luzenczyk, Anna
    National Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Gdynia, Poland.
    Lövgren, Johan
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Maguire, Jean-Jacques
    Godefroy, Quebec, Canada.
    Mosegaard, Henrik
    DTU Aqua – National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Nielsen, Anders
    DTU Aqua – National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Norrström, Niclas
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Oeberst, Rainer
    Thünen Institute Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Stepputtis, Daniel
    Thünen Institute Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Stern, Edward
    The Fisheries Secretariat (FISH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Storr-Paulsen, Marie
    DTU Aqua – National Institute of Aquatic Resources Section for Fisheries Advice, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Strehlow, Harry Vincent
    Thünen Institute Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Svedäng, Henrik
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Trenkel, Verena
    Ifremer Nantes Centre, Nantes, France.
    Wæver Pedersen, Martin
    DTU Aqua – National Institute of Aquatic Resources Section for Fisheries Advice, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Zimmermann, Christopher
    Thünen Institute Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Report of the Benchmark Workshop on Baltic Cod Stocks (WKBALTCOD)2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The ICES Benchmark Workshop on Baltic Cod Stocks (WKBALTCOD), chaired by External Chair Jean-Jacques Maguire, Canada and ICES Chair Marie Storr-Paulsen, Denmark, and attended by two invited external experts Verena Trenkel, France and Meaghan Bryan, USA met in Rostock, Germany, 2–6 March 2015 with 39 participants and six countries represented. The objective of WKBALTCOD was to evaluate the appropriateness of data and methods to determine stock status and investigate meth-ods appropriate to use in the single-stock assessment for the cod stock in SD 22–24 and cod in SD 25–32 in the Baltic. Participants in the workshop were a large group with diverse backgrounds representing the industry, fisheries, NGOs, managers and scientists.The single-stock analytic assessment of the eastern Baltic stock was not accepted by the assessment working group (WGBFAS) in 2014 due to severe problems with the input data. The advice for the eastern Baltic cod was, therefore, based on the ICES approach for data-limited stocks. As an outcome ICES decided to establish a bench-mark for both cod stocks and to scope an integrated assessment for the Baltic cod stocks. The first meeting (WKSIBCA) was therefore meant to introduce the interces-sional work conducted since the assessment working group in April 2014, and to reach some conclusions on how to proceed both in the short term (Benchmark in March 2015) and longer term (2–3 years) and was seen as a data compilation work-shop, there is produced a separate report from this workshop. The WKBALTCOD was the 2nd meeting in the benchmark process and was intended to come up with a final stock assessment method, stock annex and input data for both stocks. As it was not possible to reach conclusive decision on the final model to be used for the east Baltic cod stock during the benchmark meeting and as more work on the preferable models was needed, it was decided by the ACOM leadership to prolong the bench-mark process until the assessment working group meeting in April 2015. This deci-sion has led to a relatively long process partly mixed with the assessment working group WGBFAS.It became clear during the benchmark process that although large effort has been put into explaining the underlying processes leading to the changes in the Baltic ecosys-tem, there is still some lack of understanding of the present situation in the eastern Baltic cod stock. Therefore, it was not possible to reach firm conclusions on the final model to be used and therefore not possible to set reference points. It was decided to continue to explore the most promising models and to continue to improve the input data until the assessment working group started in April.The main challenges still to be solved for the Eastern Baltic cod stock is the quantifi-cation of increased natural mortality and decrease in growth. Through several presentations during the workshop (both WKSIBCA and WKBALTCOD) it became clear that natural mortality very likely has increased in later years, due to decreased condition and increased parasite infection. A decrease in growth also seems plausible duo to a decrease in condition and/or selectivity-induced mortality of the largest in-dividuals. However, as none of these parameters are easily estimated, especially with the severe ageing problems, different model assumptions made the output very shaky.For the western Baltic cod, stock identification issues were examined in area SD 24, the intermediate area: based on otolith characteristics and genetics. Due to the results showing a large proportion of east cod in this area, it was decided to split the catch2 | ICES WKBALTCOD REPORT 2015and survey from SD 24 into either the western or eastern Baltic cod stock. It was pos-sible to derive proportions of eastern and western cod in SD 24 back to the mid-1990s.For the western Baltic cod stock a modelled survey indices was included in the as-sessment covering the western part of SD 24 and Area 22+23 and based on a smoothed ALK.Both cod stocks have in the past used commercial tuning fleet to have a better cov-ered of older age groups. It was decided to abound this time-series duo quality issues such as a limited coverage and problems with technical creeping.WKBALTCOD was not able to explore and define reference points for the Western Baltic cod stock during the meeting due to time constraints, but these were calculated and decided by correspondence after the meeting. The recent protocols on estimation procedures developed by WKMSYREF3 for stocks with a full analytical assessment and for data-limited stocks served as objective guidelines to obtain reference point estimates.

  • 4.
    Andersen, Michael
    et al.
    Danish Fishermen’s Association Fredericia, Denmark.
    Arula, Timo
    University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Casini, Michele
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Clink, Sally
    Baltic Sea Regional Advisory Council, Denmark.
    Collie, Jeremy
    University of Rhode Island, USA.
    Eckeskog, Magnus
    The Fisheries Secretariat (FISH), Sweden.
    Eero, Margit
    DTU Aqua - National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Denmark.
    Eriksson, Pehr E.
    Swedish Fisherman’s Federation Fiskets Hus, Sweden.
    Gasyukov, Pavel
    AtlantNIRO, Russian Federation.
    Gröhsler, Thomas
    Thünen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries (TI-OF), Germany.
    Holmgren, Noél
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Horbowy, Jan
    National Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Poland.
    Howell, Daniel
    Institute of Marine Research, Norway.
    Jepsena, Ilona
    European Commission, Directorate for Maritime Affairs and Fisheries, Belgium.
    Johansson, Reine J.
    Swedish Fishermen´s Federation, Sweden.
    Janusas, Stanislovas
    European Commission Directorate for Maritime Affairs and Fisheries, Belgium.
    Kaljuste, Olavi
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Karpushevskiy, Igor
    AtlantNIRO, Russian Federation.
    Klaas, Kunnar
    Ministry of the Environment of Estonia, Estonia.
    Kornilovs, Georgs
    Institute of Food Safety, Animal Health and Environment (BIOR), Latvia.
    Krumme, Uwe
    Thûnen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries (TI-OF), Germany.
    Linke, Sebastian
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lövgren, Johan
    Swedish Unniversity of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Luzenczyk, Anna
    National Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Poland.
    Maguire, Jean-Jacques
    International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, Canada.
    Neuenfeldt, Stefan
    DTU Aqua - National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Denmark.
    Norrström, Niclas
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Oeberst, Rainer
    Thünen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries (TI-OF), Germany.
    Plaganyi, Eva
    CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research (CMAR), Australia.
    Plikshs, Maris
    Institute of Food Safety, Animal Health and Environment (BIOR), Latvia.
    Raid, Tiit
    Estonian Marine Institute, University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Reeves, Stuart
    European Commission Directorate for Maritime Affairs and Fisheries , Belgium.
    Rindorf, Anna
    DTU Aqua - National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Denmark.
    Storr- Paulsen, Marie
    DTU Aqua - National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Denmark.
    Strehlow, Harry V.
    Thünen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries (TI-OF), Germany.
    Vinther, Morten
    DTU Aqua - National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Denmark.
    Walther, Yvonne
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Report of the Benchmark Workshop on Baltic Multispecies Assessments (WKBALT): 4–8 February 2013, Copenhagen, Denmark2013Report (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Andersson, Jan
    Perfomers of environmental monitoring, Government Agencies, National Board of Fisheries.
    Insamling av zooplankton för uppfödning av fisklarver i kylvattenrecipienter1993Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Två system för anrikning och insamling av naturligt zooplankton i kylvattenrecipienter har utvecklats för odling av fiskyngel. Det första bygger på anlockning med undervattensljus och pumpning av organismerna till flytande odlingsenheter. Systemet är automatiskt och drivs av elström från landnätet. Den tekniska tillgängligheten har varit god. Planktonorganismerna har storlekssorteras genom att nätkassar monterats runt lamporna. Vid Oskarshamnsverket har i genomsnitt insamlats 45—565 g zooplankton per lampa och natt. Insamlingssystemet bedöms vara användbart i produktiva områden med måttlig vattenomsättning. Det andra systemet avfiltrerar plankton ur kylvattenströmmen med roterande håvar. Rotationen drivs av vattnets rörelseenergi, och håvarna rengörs kontinuerligt med högtrycksspolning. Det på plankton anrikade vattnet från håvarna pumpas kontinuerligt till ett sorteringsverk, där oönskade storleksfraktioner avlägsnas, varefter vattnet fördelas till odlingsenheterna. Funktionen har prövats vid Forsmarksverket och befunnits vara lovande. I medeltal insamlades 280 g zooplankton per dygn under en period av ca fem veckor. Båda systemen befinner sig i ett tidigt stadium av utveckling och har inte uppnått sin fulla potential. Förbättringar föreslås och diskuteras.

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  • 6.
    Andersson, Leif
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Texas A&M Univ, Dept Vet Integrat Biosci, College Stn, TX 77843 USA.
    André, Carl
    Gothenburg Univ, Dept Marine Sci Tjarno, Stromstad, Sweden.;Univ Gothenburg, Ctr Marine Evolutionary Biol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Johannesson, Kerstin
    Gothenburg Univ, Dept Marine Sci Tjarno, Stromstad, Sweden.;Univ Gothenburg, Ctr Marine Evolutionary Biol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Pettersson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Ecological adaptation in cod and herring and possible consequences of future climate change in the Baltic Sea2023In: Frontiers in Marine Science, E-ISSN 2296-7745, Vol. 10, article id 1101855Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Atlantic herring and Atlantic cod are two marine fish species that have successfully adapted to the brackish Baltic Sea, and the former is able to spawn in near-freshwater conditions in the inner Gulf of Bothnia. Here, we review the state of current knowledge concerning ecological adaptation in the two species and make an attempt to predict how they will be able to cope with future climate change. Previous whole genome sequencing studies in Atlantic herring have revealed hundreds of genetic loci underlying ecological adaptation, including several loci that show very strong associations to variation in salinity and temperature. These results suggest the existence of standing genetic variation available for adaptation to a changing environment. However, although Atlantic herring probably has the genetic potential to adapt, its future status also depends on how climate change will affect plankton production and competing species, such as sprat and three-spined stickleback. In cod, the situation is challenging, as there is only one true Baltic population, spawning east of Bornholm and then dispersing towards the east and north. This Baltic cod population is threatened by overfishing, low oxygen levels in benthic waters and generally bad physiological condition of individual fish, in addition to being completely isolated from gene flow from nearby cod populations at the entrance of the Baltic Sea.

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  • 7.
    Andersson, Leif
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Texas A&M Univ, Dept Vet Integrat Biosci, College Stn, TX 77843 USA.
    Bekkevold, Dorte
    Tech Univ Denmark, Natl Inst Aquat Resources, Silkeborg, Denmark..
    Berg, Florian
    Inst Marine Res, Bergen, Norway..
    Farrell, Edward D.
    Killybegs Fishermens Org, Killybegs, County Donegal, Ireland..
    Felkel, Sabine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Ferreira, Mafalda S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Fuentes-Pardo, Angela P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Goodall, Jake
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Pettersson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    How Fish Population Genomics Can Promote Sustainable Fisheries: A Road Map2024In: Annual Review of Animal Biosciences, ISSN 2165-8102, E-ISSN 2165-8110, Vol. 12, p. 1-20Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Maintenance of genetic diversity in marine fishes targeted by commercial fishing is a grand challenge for the future. Most of these species are abundant and therefore important for marine ecosystems and food security. Here, we present a road map of how population genomics can promote sustainable fisheries. In these species, the development of reference genomes and whole genome sequencing is key, because genetic differentiation at neutral loci is usually low due to large population sizes and gene flow. First, baseline allele frequencies representing genetically differentiated populations within species must be established. These can then be used to accurately determine the composition of mixed samples, forming the basis for population demographic analysis to inform sustainably set fish quotas. SNP-chip analysis is a cost-effective method for determining baseline allele frequencies and for population identification in mixed samples. Finally, we describe how genetic marker analysis can transform stock identification and management.

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  • 8.
    Andersson, Matilda L.
    et al.
    Department of Ecology and Genetics, UppsalaUniversity, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sundberg, Fredrik
    Department of Ecology and Genetics, UppsalaUniversity, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Eklöv, Peter
    Department of Ecology and Genetics, UppsalaUniversity, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Chasing away accurate results: exhaustive chase protocols underestimate maximum metabolic rate estimates in European perchPerca fluviatilis2020In: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 97, no 6, p. 1644-1650Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metabolic rates are one of many measures that are used to explain species' response to environmental change. Static respirometry is used to calculate the standard metabolic rate (SMR) of fish, and when combined with exhaustive chase protocols it can be used to measure maximum metabolic rate (MMR) and aerobic scope (AS) as well. While these methods have been tested in comparison to swim tunnels and chambers with circular currents, they have not been tested in comparison with a no-chase control. We used a repeated-measures design to compare estimates of SMR, MMR and AS in European perch Perca fluviatilis following three protocols: (a) a no-chase control; (b) a 3-min exhaustive chase; and (c) a 3-min exhaustive chase followed by 1-min air exposure. We found that, contrary to expectations, exhaustive chase protocols underestimate MMR and AS at 18°C, compared to the no-chase control. This suggests that metabolic rates of other species with similar locomotorty modes or lifestyles could be similarly underestimated using chase protocols. These underestimates have implications for studies examining metabolic performance and responses to climate change scenarios. To prevent underestimates, future experiments measuring metabolic rates should include a pilot with a no-chase control or, when appropriate, an adjusted methodology in which trials end with the exhaustive chase instead of beginning with it.

  • 9.
    Appelberg, Magnus
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    7. Fish Communities2012In: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, p. 56-62Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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    ehsa 2-7
  • 10.
    Appelberg, Magnus
    et al.
    Perfomers of environmental monitoring, Government Agencies, National Board of Fisheries.
    Holmqvist, Malin
    Perfomers of environmental monitoring, Government Agencies, National Board of Fisheries.
    Lagenfelt, Ingvar
    Perfomers of environmental monitoring, Government Agencies, National Board of Fisheries.
    Lettevall, Erland
    Perfomers of environmental monitoring, Government Agencies, National Board of Fisheries.
    Sparrevik, Erik
    Perfomers of environmental monitoring, Government Agencies, National Board of Fisheries.
    Wahlberg, Magnus
    Perfomers of environmental monitoring, Government Agencies, National Board of Fisheries.
    Westerberg, Håkan
    Perfomers of environmental monitoring, Government Agencies, National Board of Fisheries.
    Öresundsförbindelsens inverkan på fisk och fiske: underlagsrapport 1992-20052005Report (Other academic)
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  • 11.
    Appelblad, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Fritidsfiskets ekonomi och rekreationsvärde - exempel lax2001In: Kungl. Skogs- och Lantbruksakademiens Tidskrift, ISSN 0023-5350, Vol. 140, no 10, p. 89-94Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 12.
    Appelblad, Håkan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Alatalo, Marita
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Wild Swedish salmon: A regional development resource through recreational use?1998In: Northern waters: Management issues and practice / [ed] David Symes, Oxford: Fishing News Books , 1998, p. 164-174Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Aps, R.
    et al.
    University of Tartu.
    Fetissov, M.
    University of Tartu.
    Holmgren, Noel
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Norrström, Niclas
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Kuikka, S.
    University of Helsinki.
    Central Baltic Sea herring: effect of environmental trends and fishery management2011In: Ecosystems and Sustainable Development VIII / [ed] Y. Villacampa & C. A. Brebbia, Southampton: BioMed Central Ltd. , 2011, p. 69-80Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Uncertainty is an endemic condition of the Baltic Sea herring (Clupea harengus membras, L) fishery management. It is a condition exacerbated by the fishing fleet overcapacity and consequent exploitation of the herring stock at a level believed to be unsustainable. Some sources of uncertainty are mainly related to biology and fishing technique: the unsolved problem of herring assessment and management units, the recruitment–environment relationship and the reduction in mean weights-at-age, uncertain ageing of fish, the problem of unaccounted fishing mortality caused by the fish selection through the trawl net. Fishing fleet overcapacity is believed to be behind of the regulatory overfishing when setting the Total Allowable Catches (TACs) higher than the scientific advice (decision overfishing) and tolerating the extensive underreporting of catches (implementation overfishing). Two scenarios for the Central Baltic Sea herring fishery management options are constructed and the Bayesian networks are used to represent and update uncertainties encountered in the process of the management related situation assessment. First scenario represents the current status of the fishery management resulting in fishing mortality (F) higher than FMSY – the fishing mortality that corresponds to the Maximum Sustainable Yield (MSY). The second scenario demonstrates the assumed potential impact of economic incentives (e.g.zoning, individual transferable quotas (ITQs), territorial use rights etc.) on the reduction of excessive fishing capacity and bringing actual fishing mortality closer to FMSY.

  • 14. B., Sjöstrand
    Resurs 90: Sammanställning över fiskbeståndens tillstånd i våra omgivande hav baserad på uppskattningar gjorda inom Internationella Havsforskningsrådet (ICES)1989Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Svenskt havsfiske utnyttjar de levande resurserna (fisk,skaldjur) i framför allt den svenska fiskezonen, och i så gott som hela Kattegatt och Skagerack. Dessutom gesfisket, efter förhandlingar och bytesaffärer, vissa möjligheter att utnyttja andra staters fiskezoner, framförallt i Östersjön och Nordsjön. Många av de ekonomiskt viktiga fiskslagen vandrar över stora områden och är inte bundna av gränserna för nationella fiskezoner. Det krävs därför ett fungerande internationellt samarbete för att kunna uppskatta deras storlek. Detta samarbete sker inom Internationella havsforskningsrådet (ICES) med deltagande av biologer från alla kuststater runt Östersjön, Nordsjön och NE Atlanten. ICES står för den biologiska rådgivningen angående fiskbeståndens skötsel och har som avnämare enskilda medlemsstater, fiskerikommissioner och andra sammanslutningar som har ansvar för skötseln av de levande resurserna i havet.

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  • 15.
    Baeck, Jonathan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    How using live bait affects longline bycatch in the artisanal fishing fleet of Costa Rica: The dilemma between live and dead bait2023Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Long-lining is a frequently used method in marine fisheries. Similarly to trawling and nets, also long-lining is associated with bycatch which may have negative impacts on the ecosystems. However, different methods of long-lining may vary in the amount and ratio of bycatch but methods have rarely been compared directly. This study investigates whether the fishing method of floated demersal longlining baited with live Pacific Anchoveta (Cetengraulis mysticetus) has a lower bycatch ratio or bycatch amount than using demersal long lines baited with filet pieces of dead fish. The study was carried out in collaboration with artisanal small-scale fishermen in the Paquera area of the Gulf of Nicoya in Costa Rica. Six efforts were made in February of 2023, and were then compared to dead bait data from the same area from 2015 and 2016 collected by Universidad Nacional de Costa Rica. This comparison showed no significant difference between the two methods in bycatch ratio but showed that live bait longlining captures significantly more total fish and bycatch per catch per unit effort (CPUE). There are also ethical issues and issues with bait fish acquirement that points against live bait fishing. However, there are certain arguments in support of the method, such as broadening the exploitation strain across more species and not hindering financially struggling artisanal fishermen further.   

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  • 16.
    Barkerud, Rickard
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Welfare Evaluation of Stunning Practices for Farmed Fish in the European Union2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    An optimal method for stunning animals before slaughter should result in instantaneous and irreversible insensibility. Today, there are various stunning and slaughter practices used around the world for farmed fish. With aquaculture being a growing food sector, the welfare of the animals used has become increasingly important in the consciousness of consumers, researchers and regulatory bodies. With growing research into the subject matter, an overview to summarize and examine how these practices impact on the welfare of the fish, and how well they conform to animal welfare legislation, is warranted to minimize the suffering of farmed fish. Stunning practices used in aquaculture include methods such as electrical and percussive stunning, carbon dioxide and asphyxiation. Each with its own level of effectiveness in terms of how fast the method results in loss of consciousness, whether or not the effect is reversible and how the welfare of the fish is affected as determined by behavioural and physiological stress responses. It was concluded that there is no unambiguous answer as to which stunning method is optimal in regard to animal welfare in modern day aquaculture. The optimal method for a given facility is influenced by factors like practicalities relating to each individual method as well as legislation on EU and national level. Suggestions were made for future research. 

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    Welfare Evaluation of Stunning Practices for Farmed Fish in the European Union
  • 17.
    Bekkevold, Dorte
    et al.
    Tech Univ Denmark, Natl Inst Aquat Resources, DK-8600 Silkeborg, Denmark..
    Berg, Florian
    Inst Marine Res IMR, POB 1870 Nordnes, N-5018 Bergen, Norway..
    Polte, Patrick
    Thunen Inst Baltic Sea Fisheries, D-18069 Rostock, Germany..
    Bartolino, Valerio
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Inst Marine Res, S-45321 Lysekil, Sweden..
    Ojaveer, Henn
    Univ Tartu, Parnu Coll, Ringi 35, EE-80012 Parnu, Estonia.;Tech Univ Denmark, Natl Inst Aquat Resources, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark..
    Mosegaard, Henrik
    Tech Univ Denmark, Natl Inst Aquat Resources, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark..
    Farrell, Edward D.
    Univ Coll Dublin, Sci Ctr West, Sch Biol & Environm Sci, Dublin 4, Ireland.;Killybegs Fishermens Org, St Catherines Rd, Killybegs, Donegal, Ireland..
    Fedotova, Jelena
    Klaipeda Univ, Marine Res Inst, Smiltyne 1, LT-93100 Klaipeda, Lithuania..
    Hemmer-Hansen, Jakob
    Tech Univ Denmark, Natl Inst Aquat Resources, DK-8600 Silkeborg, Denmark..
    Huwer, Bastian
    Tech Univ Denmark, Natl Inst Aquat Resources, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark..
    Trijoulet, Vanessa
    Tech Univ Denmark, Natl Inst Aquat Resources, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark..
    Albertsen, Christoffer Moesgaard
    Tech Univ Denmark, Natl Inst Aquat Resources, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark..
    Fuentes Pardo, Angela P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Gröhsler, Tomas
    Thunen Inst Baltic Sea Fisheries, D-18069 Rostock, Germany..
    Pettersson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Jansen, Teunis
    Tech Univ Denmark, Natl Inst Aquat Resources, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark.;Greenland Inst Nat Resources, Kivioq 2,POB 570, Nuuk 3900, Greenland..
    Folkvord, Arild
    Inst Marine Res IMR, POB 1870 Nordnes, N-5018 Bergen, Norway.;Univ Bergen, Dept Biol Sci, N-5020 Bergen, Norway..
    Andersson, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Texas A&M Univ, Dept Vet Integrat Biosci, College Stn, TX 77843 USA.;Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Anim Breeding & Genet, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Mixed-stock analysis of Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus): a tool for identifying management units and complex migration dynamics2023In: ICES Journal of Marine Science, ISSN 1054-3139, E-ISSN 1095-9289, Vol. 80, no 1, p. 173-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We developed and validated a mixed-stock analysis (MSA) method with 59 single-nucleotide polymorphisms selected from genome-wide data to assign individuals to populations in mixed-stock samples of Atlantic herring from the North and Baltic seas. We analysed 3734 herring from spawning locations and scientific catches of mixed feeding stocks to demonstrate a "one-fits-all" tool with unprecedented accuracy for monitoring spatio-temporal dynamics throughout a large geographical range with complex stock mixing. We re-analysed time-series data (2002-2021) and compared inferences about stock composition with estimates from morphological data. We show that contributions from the western Baltic spring-spawning stock complex, which is under management concern, have likely been overestimated. We also show that a genetically distinctive population of western Baltic autumn spawners, ascribed low fisheries importance, contributes non-negligible and potentially temporally increasing proportions to mixed-stock aggregations, calling for a re-evaluation of stock definitions. MSA data can be implemented in stock assessment and in a variety of applications, including marine ecosystem description, impact assessment of specific fleets, and stock-rebuilding plans.

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  • 18.
    Berg, Florian
    et al.
    Univ Bergen, Dept Biol Sci, Post Box 7803, N-5020 Bergen, Norway.;Inst Marine Res IMR, Post Box 1870, N-5817 Bergen, Norway..
    Ostgaard, Hedda D.
    Univ Bergen, Dept Biol Sci, Post Box 7803, N-5020 Bergen, Norway..
    Slotte, Aril
    Inst Marine Res IMR, Post Box 1870, N-5817 Bergen, Norway..
    Andersson, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Anim Breeding & Genet, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden.;Texas A&M Univ, Dept Vet Integrat Biosci, College Stn, TX 77843 USA..
    Folkvord, Arild
    Univ Bergen, Dept Biol Sci, Post Box 7803, N-5020 Bergen, Norway.;Inst Marine Res IMR, Post Box 1870, N-5817 Bergen, Norway..
    A combination of genetic and phenotypic characterization of spring- and autumn-spawning herring suggests gene flow between populations2021In: ICES Journal of Marine Science, ISSN 1054-3139, E-ISSN 1095-9289, Vol. 78, no 2, p. 694-703Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) has complex population structure and dynamics including diverse life histories and spawning times with spring and autumn spawning as the most common modes. Originally, spawning herring were phenotypically identified based on their maturity development or otolith microstructure by determining seasonal specific larval growth patterns. Recently, genetic markers have revealed clear genetic differentiation between spring- and autumn-spawning populations. All three methods were applied to herring caught at the same locations during spring and autumn to determine the coherence of methods. In a selected subset, most herring (similar to 77%) had an otolith microstructure and genetic assignment coinciding with the phenotypically assigned spawning season. Non-spawning herring (<5%) that were classified as belonging to the current spawning season using genotyping and otolith-typing were assigned as skipped spawners. For similar to 8% of spawning herring, the genetic and otolith assignment contradicted the phenotypically assigned spawning season, characteristic of straying individuals. Otolith-typing contradicted the genetic and phenotypical assignment in similar to 7% of the cases, potentially representing individuals reuniting back to the spawning season favoured by their genotype. Although the viability of offspring from these individuals remains undocumented, it is suggested that the observed switching of spawning season may contribute to gene flow between herring populations.

  • 19.
    Bergenius, Mikaela
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Boje, Jesper
    The National Institute of Aquatic Resources Section for Fisheries Advice, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Casini, Michele
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Degel, Henrik
    The National Institute of Aquatic Resources Section for Fisheries Advice, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Eero, Margit
    The National Institute of Aquatic Resources Section for Management Systems, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Florin, Ann-Britt
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Institute of Coastal Research, Öregrund, Sweden.
    Gasyukov, Pavel
    AtlantNIRO, Kaliningrad, Russian Federation.
    Grygiel, Wlodzimierz
    Sea Fisheries Institute, Gdynia, Poland.
    Gröhsler, Tomas
    Thünen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries (TI-OF), Rostock, Germany.
    Hjelm, Joakim
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Institute of Marine Research, Sweden.
    Horbowy, Jan
    Sea Fisheries Institute, Gdynia, Poland.
    Holmgren, Noél
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Norrström, Niclas
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Kaljuste, Olavi
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Institute of Coastal Research, Öregrund, Sweden.
    Karpushevskiy, Igor
    AtlantNIRO, Kaliningrad, Russian Federation.
    Karpushevskaia, Anastasiia
    AtlantNIRO, Kaliningrad, Russian Federation.
    Kornilovs, Georgs
    Latvian Fish Resources Agency, Riga, Latvia.
    Krumme, Uwe
    Thünen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries (TI-OF), Rostock, Germany.
    Luzenczyk, Anna
    National Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Gdynia, Poland.
    Lövgren, Johan
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Institute of Marine Research, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Pönni, Jukka
    Finnish Game and Fisheries Research, Institute Kotka Unit, Kotka, Finland.
    Oeberst, Rainer
    Thünen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries (TI-OF), Rostock, Germany.
    Raid, Tiit
    Estonian Marine Institute, University of Tartu, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Raitaniemi, Jari
    Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute Turku Game and Fisheries Research, Turku, Finland.
    Statkus, Romas
    Division of fishery research and science, Fishery service under Ministry of Agriculture, Klaipeda, Lithuania.
    Stoetera, Sven
    Thünen Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries (TI-OF), Rostock, Germany.
    Storr-Paulsen, Marie
    DTU Aqua - National Institute of Aquatic Resources Section for Fisheries Advice, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Ustups, Didzis
    Institute of Food Safety, Animal Health and Environment (BIOR), Fish Resources Research Department, Riga, Latvia.
    Walther, Yvonne
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Institute of Marine Research, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Report of the Baltic Fisheries Assessment Working Group (WGBFAS): 14-21 April 2015, ICES HQ, Copenhagen, Denmark2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The ICES Baltic Fisheries Assessment Working Group (WGBFAS) met 14-21 April 2015 (Chair: Mare Storr-Paulsen, Denmark), with 28 participants and 9 countries represented. The objective of WGBFAS was to assess the status of the following stocks:

    1 ) Sole in Division IIIa, SDs 20-22

    2 ) Cod in Kattegat, Cod in SD 22-24, Cod in SD 25-32

    3 ) Herring in SD 25-27, 28.2, 29 and 32, Herring in SD 28.1 (Gulf of Riga), Herring in SD 30, Herring SD 31.

    4 ) Sprat in SD 22-32

    5 ) Plaice 21-23, Plaice 2425

    6 ) Flounder 22-23; 24-25; 26+28 and 27+29-32, Brill 2232, Dab 2232, and Turbot 2232 (survey trends)

    WGBFAS also identified the data needed, for next year’s data call with some suggestions for improvements in the data call as well as in InterCatch. The report contains an introduction with the summary of other WGs relevant for the WGBFAS, country specific fishery description, the methods used, and ecosystem considerations. The results of the analytical stock assessment or survey trends for the species listed above are then presented with all the stocks with the same species in the same sections. The report ends with references, list of Working Documents, recommendations and Stock Annexes. In first quarter 2015 the Baltic cod stocks and the plaice stocks were benchmarked. As a result the Baltic cod stocks now have to apply a splitting key in SD 24 were both stocks are present. This has changed the assessment from being an area based assessment to now being a stock based assessments and has implications for the advice. The principle analytical models used for the stock assessments were XSA and SAM. For most flatfishes, CPUE trends from bottom trawl surveys were presented (except plaice 2425 and her31 using relative SSB from SAM and XSA, respectively). Ecosystem changes have been analytically considered in the following stock assessments: Herring in SD 25-27, 28.2, 29 and 32, and Sprat in SD 22-32, in form of cod predation mortality. Last year a very large retrospective pattern in the Eastern Baltic cod stock caused that the WG rejected the analytic assessment. Several uncertainties in the data lead to this conclusion i.a age reading problems with large inconsistency between and within nations as well as a change in growth and natural mortality. However, even though a data compilation workshop and a benchmark have been conducted in the intermediate time it was not possible to solve the main issue on growth. The lack of knowledge on growth caused to that even the length based data required in the data call was very uncertain for the models and in the end the WG was not able to produce a better model than was presented last year which is based on survey trends. The Her-30 (Herring in the Botnian Sea) was by the working group down scaled from a category 1 stock to a category 3 stock due to the commercial tuning fleet used in the assessment having very uncertain estimates in the last couples of years. However, during the Baltic ADG an alternative assessment was suggested were the stock is still considered a category 1 stock but the last 8 years of the commercial tuning fleet was terminated. This assessment was conducted after the working group but has been included in the report.

  • 20.
    Bergenius, Mikaela
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Cadigan, Noel
    Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada.
    Gröhsler, Tomas
    Johann-Heinrich von Thünen-Institute, Germany .
    Holmgren, Noél
    University of Skövde, School of Life Sciences. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Morgado, Cristina
    International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, Denmark.
    Pönni, Jukka
    Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute, Finland.
    Raitaniemi, Jari
    Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute, Finland.
    Storr-Paulsen, Marie
    DTU Aqua - National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Denmark.
    Trenkel, Verena
    Ifremer Nantes Centre, France.
    Report of the Inter-Benchmark Protocol for Herring in Subdivision 30 (IBP Her30): 11–15 March 2013, By correspondence2013Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Inter-Benchmark Protocol for Herring in Subdivision 30 (IBP-Her30) worked by correspondence  between  February  28  and  March  28  2013. Verena Trenkel  (France) served as Chair with invited expert Noel Cadigan (Canada). There were six participants. The objectives of the groups were to review the work carried out in response to the benchmark working group WKPELA in 2012.

  • 21.
    Bergström, Lena
    et al.
    Swedish Univeristy of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Öregrund, Sweden.
    Blenckner, Thorsten
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Grimvall, Anders
    Swedish Institute for the Marine Environment, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gårdmark, Anna
    Swedish Univeristy of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Öregrund, Sweden.
    Hamrén, Henrik
    Baltic Sea Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Holmgren, Noél
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Jacob, Ute
    University of Hamburg, Institute of Hydrobiology and Fishery Science, Hamburg, Germany.
    Kininmonth, Stuart
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Large, Scott
    ICES, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Levin, Phil
    Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, USA.
    Lehikoinen, Annukka
    Helsinki University, Kotka Maritime Research Centre, Kotka, Finland.
    Llope, Marcos
    Instituto Español de Oceanografía, Centro Oceanográfico de Cádiz, Spain.
    Luzenczyk, Anna
    National Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Gdynia, Poland.
    Müller-Karulis, Bärbel
    Baltic Sea Centre, Stockholm university, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Möllmann, Christian
    University of Hamburg, Institute of Hydrobiology and Fishery Science, Hamburg, Germany.
    Neuenfeldt, Stefan
    DTU Aqua, Charlottenlund, Denmark.
    Norrström, Niclas
    University of Skövde, School of Bioscience. University of Skövde, The Systems Biology Research Centre.
    Olsson, Jens
    Swedish Univeristy of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Öregrund, Sweden.
    Otto, Saskia
    University of Hamburg, Institute of Hydrobiology and Fishery Science, Hamburg, Germany.
    Pekcan-Hekim, Zeynep
    Swedish Univeristy of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Öregrund, Sweden.
    Rau, Andrea
    Thuenen-Institute of Baltic Sea Fisheries, Rostock, Germany.
    Reid, David
    Marine Institute, Rinville, Galway, Ireland.
    Tomczak, Maciej, T.
    Baltic Sea Centre, Stockholm university, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Torres, Marian
    Swedish Univeristy of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Öregrund, Sweden.
    Ustups, Didzis
    Institute of Food safety, Animal Health and Environment, Riga, Latvia.
    Uusitalo, Laura
    Finnish Environment Institute, Marine Research Centre, Helsinki, Finland.
    Wesslander, Karin
    Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute, Marine Environment, Västra Frölunda, Sweden.
    Report of the ICES/HELCOM Working Group on Integrated Assessments of the Baltic Sea (WGIAB)2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The ICES/HELCOM Working Group on Integrated Assessments of the Baltic Sea(WGIAB) was established in 2007 as a forum for developing and combining ecosystembasedmanagement efforts for the Baltic Sea. The group intends to serve as a scientificcounterpart and support for the ICES Baltic Fisheries Assessment Working Group(WGBFAS) as well as for efforts and projects related to Integrated Ecosystem Assessments(IEA) within ICES and HELCOM. The group works in cooperation with similargroups within the ACOM/SCICOM Steering Group on Integrated Ecosystem Assessments(SSGIEA).The 2015 WGIAB meeting was held in Cádiz, Spain, from 9–13 March, back-to-backwith the meeting of its counterpart in the Working Group on Ecosystem Assessmentof Western European Shelf Seas (WGEAWESS). The meetings had joint sessions as wellas WG specific work, and some participants effectively participated in both meetings.The WGIAB meeting was attended by 27 participants from nine countries. The meetingwas chaired by Christian Möllmann, Germany, Laura Uusitalo, Finland and Lena Bergström,Sweden.This was the last year of the ongoing three-year Terms of Reference (ToR) for WGIAB.The main working activities in 2015 were to i) conduct studies on Baltic Sea ecosystemfunctioning with the goal to publish case studies from different parts of the Baltic Seain peer-reviewed journals, ii) work on the demonstration exercise to develop ecosystem-based assessment and advice for Baltic fish stocks focusing on cod (DEMO) withmultiple approaches, iii) plan further how to integrate the social and economic aspectsmore tightly in the WGIAB work, and iv) discuss the future focus and format of theWGIAB work.The Baltic ecosystem functioning activity focused on identifying and exploring keytrends and linkages in the Baltic Sea foodweb. This was pursued by presentation andfurther discussion of ongoing intersessional work on foodweb modelling and integratedanalyses, and by exercises to develop conceptual models Baltic Sea foodwebsand the links to ecosystem function. Long-term monitoring datasets on the abiotic andbiotic parts of the Baltic Sea Proper ecosystem were updated for use in the continuedwork to develop environmental indicators for fisheries and marine management.The focus of the DEMO 3 (DEMOnstration exercise for Integrated Ecosystem Assessmentand Advice of Baltic Sea cod) was on finding a way to use the results from theDEMO1 and DEMO2 workshops in short and midterm projections/scenarios of Balticcod dynamics based on different types of modelling, as well as designing methodologyand modelling data for practical implementation of Integrated Advice for Baltic cod.The WGIAB was positively inclined towards including social and economic aspectsinto the integrated assessment. Openings to this path were provided by presentationon ongoing project work, and discussing their linkages to ecological aspects. It wasseen as crucial that experts on social and economic analysis should be included andtake an active part in the future work of the group.The group concluded that its upcoming work should focus more closely on functionaldiversity, which was identified as a recurring issue in the Baltic Sea. This approach wasalso identified as a useful connection point between scientific and management aspectsin order for the group to continue serving as a forum for developing ecosystem-basedmanagement efforts in the Baltic Sea. A focus on functional diversity was also seen as2 | ICES WGIAB REPORT 2015a potentially feasible way of bringing together management aspects for different sectors,by linking to ecosystem services concepts.The group proposed Saskia Otto, Germany and Martin Lindegren, Denmark as newincoming Chairs, together with Lena Bergström, Sweden and Laura Uusitalo, Finland.Having four Chairs is justified due to the wide scope of the group's work, as well asthe increased work load due to the planned new foci.

  • 22. Bergström, Ulf
    et al.
    Eklöf, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Sköld, Mattias
    Hansen, Joakim P.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm University Baltic Sea Centre.
    Wikström, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm University Baltic Sea Centre.
    Berkström, Charlotte
    Inför fler fiskefria områden för att skydda bestånd och ekosystem2024Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Fiskefria områden kan vara ett effektivt verktyg för att skydda både fisk- och kräftdjursbestånd och marina ekosystem. Men det är viktigt att områdena utformas på rätt sätt och är tillräckligt stora. Lektidsfredade områden kan vara enklare att driva igenom, men ger inte lika goda effekter.

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  • 23.
    Bignert, Anders
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bäcklin, Britt-Marie
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Helander, Björn
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Roos, Anna
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Stockholm, Sweden.
    9. Contaminants and Health of Aquatic Wildlife2012In: Ecology and Animal Health / [ed] Leif Norrgren and Jeffrey Levengood, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, p. 73-85Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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    ehsa 2-9
  • 24.
    Björkvik, Emma
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Boonstra, Wiebren J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Telemo, Vera
    Stockholm Univ, Stockholm Resilience Ctr, Kraftriket 2B, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Going on and off the map: Lessons from Swedish fisher knowledge about spawning areas in the Baltic Sea2021In: Ocean and Coastal Management, ISSN 0964-5691, E-ISSN 1873-524X, Vol. 211, article id 105762Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scholars frequently promote fishers' rich understanding of marine environments as a legitimate and unique form of knowledge that must be accounted for in fisheries management. It is, however, challenging to combine fisher knowledge (FK) with the conventional scientific knowledge that fisheries management relies upon. In this paper we investigate the (in)commensurability between FK and scientific objectives and procedures. Towards this aim we performed interviews with a group of fishers who participated in an earlier Swedish study in which FK was used to map locations of fish spawning areas along the Swedish Baltic coast. By interviewing these fishers again we were able to identify and assess aspects of FK that were left implicit in the earlier study. Based on our results we discuss the value of these aspects of FK for understanding marine environments.

  • 25.
    Blom, Eva-Lotta
    et al.
    Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Box 463, SE-405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden; .
    Wilson, Joanna R.
    Department of Biology, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON L8S 4K1, Canada; The Linnaeus Centre for Marine Evolutionary Biology, University of Gothenburg, Box 460, SE-405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kvarnemo, Charlotta
    Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Box 463, SE-405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden; The Linnaeus Centre for Marine Evolutionary Biology, University of Gothenburg, Box 460, SE-405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Amorim, M. Clara P.
    MARE – Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre / ARNET - Aquatic Research Network, ISPA, Instituto Universitário, Lisbon, Portugal; Departamento de Biologia Animal, Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal..
    Svensson, Ola
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT. Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Box 463, SE-405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden; The Linnaeus Centre for Marine Evolutionary Biology, University of Gothenburg, Box 460, SE-405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Male acoustic display in the sand goby – Essential cue in female choice, but unaffected by supplemental feeding2022In: Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, ISSN 0022-0981, E-ISSN 1879-1697, Vol. 556, article id 151791Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many teleost fishes use acoustic and visual signalling during courtship. Such displays may convey information about body condition. Here we experimentally altered body condition of sand goby (Pomatoschistus minutus) males to examine effects on acoustic and visual courtship and subsequent spawning decisions. Over two weeks, males fed in excess were fed daily, whereas food-deprived males were fed once a week. Females only spawned with males that produced courtship sound. However, there were no treatment effects on the occurrence of spawning and males fed in excess did not invest more in visual or acoustic courtship than food-deprived males. That said, males fed in excess built more well-covered nests, with more sand piled on top, compared to food-deprived males. Male condition measured as lipid content differed significantly between treatments. However, only males fed in excess differed in lipid content from wild caught males, indicating that in nature, males are of similar condition to males in the low condition treatment group. Apart from the importance of courtship sound, the only male or female behaviour predicting reproductive success was if male displayed in the nest opening. Males often produce courtship sounds together with a visual display in this position. A female dark-eye display did not associate with reproductive success which, together with previous results, suggest a non-ornamental function of this trait. We conclude that male courtship sounds appear to be crucial in female mate choice, but the information content of the courtship sounds and how it relates to male condition remains elusive.

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  • 26.
    Blyth, Samuel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Bower, Shannon D.
    Infin Social & Ecol Solut, Ottawa, ON, Canada.
    After the spawn and on the hook: Sea trout Salmo trutta biophysical responses to different components of catch and release in a coastal fishery2022In: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 101, no 3, p. 464-477Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the biophysical responses of sea run brown trout Salmo trutta to catch-and-release in the coastal fishery around Gotland, Sweden. It used information recorded on individual angled S. trutta (n = 162), including fight time, handling time, total air exposure time, injury, bleeding, fish length, body condition, spawning status, water temperature, hook location and difficulty of hook removal. Reflex action mortality predictors (equilibrium, operculum beats, tail grab response, body flex response and vestibular-ocular response), tests of blood glucose and lactate, and observation of hooking injury were used to measure the relative impact of the angling event on the fish's physical state and stress experienced. The results of this study suggest low rates of post-release mortality and generally limited stress responses to angling events, and relatively high post-release survival supported by the recapture of many tagged S. trutta. However, a number of scenarios were identified in which stress responses are likely to be compounded and where anglers should take additional action to reduce sublethal physiological disturbances and the risk of delayed mortality. Particular care should be taken to limit cumulative total air exposure to <10 s, and to reduce handling time and risk of additional injury in angling events with extended fight times, when water temperatures >10 degrees C, or where S. trutta show evidence of being physically compromised by injury or having recently spawned. The results also indicate the importance of using appropriately sized single hooks rather than larger treble hooks to reduce hooking injury and handling time during unhooking.

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  • 27.
    Bohman, Brita
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Law, Department of Law. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Regulatory control of adaptive fisheries: Reflections on the implementation of the landing obligation in the EU common fisheries policy2019In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 110, article id 103557Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The most recently revised CFP Regulation, adopted in 2013, includes a number of significant changes with the aim to make fisheries more in tune with concept of the ecosystem approach and to avoid unsustainable exploitation of marine biological resources, including fish, as a natural resource. As part of that the CFP Regulation introduced the landing obligation, an obligation to land all catches as opposed to previous praxis where fisheries have been relying on a system of discarding fish and other marine biological resources in order to optimize their catch. One aim with the landing obligation is to push for new adaptive fishing methods and in a way to implement an ecosystem approach since the fishing strategies are meant to be adjusted to ecosystem factors. To be effective, the system for controlling implementation must be adjusted to take different aspects of the ecosystem approach into account. The paper presents some reflections on the required balance between adaptive approaches connected to the ecosystem approach and the strictness established by principles of rule of law in relation to the so called EU CFP landing obligation. It is concluded that the best way to create a control system adjusted to these factors seems to be by giving more influence to the industry itself. Involving those concerned at all levels, and thus applying all aspects of the regulatory governance under an ecosystem approach, would create an effective adaptive system where the rule of law is also safe-guarded.

  • 28.
    Bondad-Reantaso, Melba G.
    et al.
    Food & Agr Org United Nations FAO, Fisheries & Aquaculture Div, Rome, Italy..
    MacKinnon, Brett
    City Univ Hong Kong, Jockey Club Coll Vet Med & Life Sci, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Karunasagar, Iddya
    Nitte Univ, Med Sci Complex, Mangaluru, Karnataka, India..
    Fridman, Sophie
    Food & Agr Org United Nations FAO, Fisheries & Aquaculture Div, Rome, Italy..
    Alday-Sanz, Victoria
    Natl Aquaculture Grp NAQUA, Al Lith, Saudi Arabia..
    Brun, Edgar
    Norwegian Vet Inst, As, Norway..
    Le Groumellec, Marc
    Aqualma Unima Grp, Direct Domesticat & Genet Pathol & Biosecur, Majunga, Madagascar..
    Li, Aihua
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Hydrobiol, Wuhan, Peoples R China..
    Surachetpong, Win
    Kasetsart Univ, Fac Vet Med, Dept Vet Microbiol & Immunol, Bangkok, Thailand..
    Karunasagar, Indrani
    Nitte Univ, Med Sci Complex, Mangaluru, Karnataka, India..
    Hao, Bin
    Food & Agr Org United Nations FAO, Fisheries & Aquaculture Div, Rome, Italy..
    Dall'Occo, Andrea
    Food & Agr Org United Nations FAO, Fisheries & Aquaculture Div, Rome, Italy..
    Urbani, Ruggero
    Vet Dept Prevent, Rome, Italy..
    Caputo, Andrea
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Review of alternatives to antibiotic use in aquaculture2023In: Reviews in Aquaculture, ISSN 1753-5123, E-ISSN 1753-5131, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 1421-1451Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the rapid growth of the aquaculture production since the 1980s, there has been a concomitant increase in disease outbreaks. The injudicious and/or incorrect use of antimicrobial agents against diseases of farmed aquatic species poses a considerable threat to the development and growth of a successful and sustainable aquaculture industry. An increase in antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is an important consequence, resulting to the difficulty in treating common bacterial diseases in populations of aquatic organisms, combined with the presence of antibiotic residues in food fish and their products, leading to import refusals and negative impacts on international trade. To reduce the frequency of AMR, good aquaculture and effective biosecurity practices should include the prudent and responsible use of antibiotics and also consider the use of alternatives to antibiotics, in addition to disease prevention management. This article reviews the literature discussing the scope of the problem pertaining to antibiotic use, the emergence of AMR in aquaculture and to consider and discuss viable alternatives (e.g., vaccination, bacteriophages, quorum quenching, probiotics and prebiotics, chicken egg yolk antibody and medicinal plant derivative). We also discuss lessons learnt, from specific case studies such as the vaccination of farmed salmon in Norway and the use of 'specific pathogen-free' seed-as primary and essential part of a biosecurity strategy.

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  • 29.
    Boonstra, Wiebren J.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. University of Oslo, Norway.
    Hentati-Sundberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Classifying fishers' behaviour. An invitation to fishing styles2016In: Fish and Fisheries, ISSN 1467-2960, E-ISSN 1467-2979, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 78-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study and classification of fishers’ behaviour remains a much debated topic. There is a tension between detailed empirical studies, which highlight the variety and diversity of fisheries, and the parsimony and generalization required to satisfy science and policy demands. This study contributes to this debate. The first sec- tion reviews quantitative methods currently used for classifying fishing practices. The review uncovers significant weaknesses in quantitative classification methods, which, we argue, can be improved through the complementary use of qualitative methods. To this purpose, we introduce the concept of ‘fishing style’, which integrates quantitative classification methods with qualitative analysis. We explain the scientific premises of the fishing-style concept, outline a general methodological framework and present a fishing-style analysis of Swedish Baltic Sea fisheries. Based on these results, we conclude that it is possible to classify fishing practices in a rel- atively uniform and limited number of styles that can highlight the rich, empirical diversity of fishers’ behaviour. We therefore propose that fishing-style analysis, based on an integration of quantitative and qualitative methods, can be an impor- tant step towards more effective and sustainable fisheries management.

  • 30.
    Borthwick, Louisa
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Bergman, Kristina
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Ziegler, Friederike
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Svensk konsumtion av sjömat2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den här rapporten visar att det är möjligt att få fram tillförlitlig statistik över svensk sjömatskonsumtion för alla arter utom sill och skarpsill på en detaljgrad som tidigare saknats, trots de dataluckor som finns.Sjömatskonsumtionen i Sverige beräknas ligga på 25 kg per capita hel sjömat, vilket motsvarar 12,5 kg ätlig sjömat eller knappt två portioner i veckan. Vi äter mindre sjömat än för fem år sedan.Upp mot 80 olika sjömatsarter finns på den svenska marknaden, men de tio vanligaste står för 80 procent av konsumtionen. Mest äter svenskar av lax, sill, torsk och räkor.Knappt 30 procent av det som äts kommer från den inhemska produktionen av sjömat från yrkes- och fritidsfiske, samt odling. Den inhemska produktionen kan ses som Sveriges teoretiska självförsörjningsgrad av sjömat. Drygt 70 procent importeras alltså och då främst med Norge, Danmark och Kina som avsändarland. Från den svenska produktionen är det främst sill, skarpsill, regnbåge och den fisk som rapporteras under koden ”Fryst fisk i.a.n.” i tulltaxan, som exporteras. Figuren nedan visar fördelningen mellan import och inhemsk produktion.Siffran på sillkonsumtion är mycket osäker på grund av att den officiella statistiken håller låg kvalitet. Sill är den volymmässigt och ekonomiskt viktigaste arten i svenskt fiske och den är viktig för svensk konsumtion. Det är därmed anmärkningsvärt att data kring fisket och handeln är så bristfällig.Det är genomförbart att ta fram statistiken på årlig basis för att följa trenden för sjömatskonsumtion över tid, både totalt och utvecklingen av enskilda arter. Metoden som utvecklats här förenklar detta avsevärt, men det krävs fortfarande en del manuell justering och bearbetning av befintliga dataset, samt kunskap om branschen.

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  • 31.
    Bosma, R. H.
    et al.
    Wageningen University & Research, Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Ha, T. T. P.
    Can Tho University, Can Tho, Vietnam.
    Hiep, T. Q.
    Can Tho University, Can Tho, Vietnam.
    Phuong, N. T. H.
    Can Tho University, Can Tho, Vietnam.
    Ligtenberg, A.
    Wageningen University & Research, Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Rodela, Romina
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Bregt, A. K.
    Wageningen University & Research, Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Changing opinion, knowledge, skill and behaviour of Vietnamese shrimp farmers by using serious board games2020In: The Journal of Agricultural Education and Extension, ISSN 1389-224X, E-ISSN 1750-8622, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 203-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Mekong Delta's shrimp farming contributes to socio-economic development but tends to reduce the mangrove area. On the one hand, NGOs advocate balancing ecology and economy, while on the other hand, the Vietnamese government supports intensifying shrimp production. The latter strategy increases shrimp diseases and marginalises smallholders. To influence the opinions, knowledge and behaviour of shrimp farmers, we developed and tested a serious board game. Approach: Through several iterations, we designed a realistic board game mimicking local shrimp farming. Then, after conducting three sessions of gameplay with farmers in three sites, we assessed how this gameplay influenced players. We used a semi-experimental set-up by collecting data on the day of the gameplay, and on two further time-points. Findings: After the gameplays, farmers reported to have learned about the risks of monoculture-intensive-shrimp system and the advantages of hybrid systems. Likert ratings showed that players adopted innovations faster and, in case of shrimp diseases, consulted commercial service-providers less, but with other farmers more. They confirmed to have learned that the best strategy for them would be to adopt hybrid systems, i.e. intensify part of the area of mixed-mangrove or improved-extensive shrimp farms. Theoretical implications: Realistic board games can create opportunities for social learning and training of groups which are not always easy to reach. Practical implications: Board games can support transfer of knowledge and skills to farmers, and can develop their critical thinking. Creation: The findings that board games are effective in the context of a top-down extension systems offer value opportunities.

  • 32. Both, Adrianus
    et al.
    Parrish, Christopher
    Penney, Randy
    Growth and biochemical composition of Mytilus edulis when reared on effluent from a cod, Gadus morhua, aquaculture facility2012In: Journal of Shellfish Research, ISSN 0730-8000, E-ISSN 1943-6319, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 79-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study determined the growth and biochemical composition of blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) reared on effluent from Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and compared it with mussels reared on a standard shellfish diet. Feeding trials lasted 6 mo, and mussels were sampled on a monthly basis. Dry weight, ash-free dry weight, shell length, and condition index were all significantly higher in algae-fed mussels at the end of the experiment compared with effluent-fed mussels. The carbon content decreased for mussels fed both diets; however, their nitrogen and protein content increased, with effluent-fed mussels having significantly more nitrogen and protein than algae-fed mussels, suggesting that effluent can increase mussel growth. Total lipid and fatty acid (FA) content decreased for effluent-fed mussels at the end of the experiment. There were no significant differences in the lipid class composition between mussels fed the 2 diets. Mussels fed both diets significantly decreased in the amount of 14:0, 16:1ω7, 16:2ω4, 16:4ω1 and 20:5ω3, and effluent-fed mussels also decreased in 18:4ω3 and 21:5ω3, as well as increased in the amount of 17:1, the Zooplankton markers 20:1ω11 and 22:1ω11, and the dienoic nonmethylene-interrupted fatty acids (NMIDs) 20:2a and 22:2b. Significant differences in the amount of individual FAs between mussels fed the 2 diets included a larger amount of 18:2ω6 and 20:4ω6 in algae-fed mussels, and a significantly larger amount of 16:4ω1 in mussels fed effluent. Mussels fed both diets underwent significant increases in the proportion of bacterial FAs, ω6 FAs, Zooplankton markers, and NMIDs. Effluent-fed mussels had a significantly larger proportion of monounsaturated FAs, Zooplankton markers, and NMIDs, as well as a smaller proportion of polyunsaturated FAs, and ω3 and ω6 FAs than algae-fed mussels. The increased presence of Zooplankton markers supports the use of these FAs to track aquaculture wastes.

  • 33. Both, Adrianus
    et al.
    Parrish, Christopher
    Penney, Randy
    Thompson, Raymond
    Lipid composition of Mytilus edulis reared on organic waste from a Gadus morhua aquaculture facility2011In: Aquatic Living Resources, ISSN 0990-7440, E-ISSN 1765-2952, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 295-301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to determine biochemical changes occurring in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) fed effluent from an Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) aquaculture facility over a period of ten weeks, compared to those in mussels fed a commercial shellfish diet and those supplied only filtered seawater. The total lipid and fatty acid content (mg g -1 wet weight) significantly decreased for mussels fed effluent during the experiment. The only change in the lipid class composition (% total lipid) at the end of the experiment was a significant increase in the proportion of acetone mobile polar lipids. There were several significant changes in the fatty acid composition (% total fatty acid) including an increase in the proportion of 18:1ω9, 18:2ω6, 20:4ω6, 21:5ω3 and the dienoic non-methylene-interrupted fatty acids 20:2a and 22:2b and significant decreases in the proportions of 16:0, 18:4ω3 and 20:5ω3. The increase in non-methylene interrupted dienes suggests that the amount of essential fatty acids in the effluent may be insufficient for optimal mussel growth. The presence of the terrestrial plant marker 18:2ω6 in both the fish feed and the effluent and its increased proportion in mussels fed effluent suggest that this fatty acid may have potential as a marker for aquaculture wastes.

  • 34. Both, Adrianus
    et al.
    Parrish, Christopher
    Penney, Randy
    Thompson, Raymond
    Physical and biochemical properties of effluent leaving an onshore Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua, Linnaeus 1758; Gadiformes: Gadidae) aquaculture facility and potential use in integrated multi-trophic aquaculture2013In: Aquaculture Research, ISSN 1355-557X, E-ISSN 1365-2109, Vol. 44, no 12, p. 1940-1951Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The physical and biochemical properties of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) wastes were analysed, and the waste remediation potential of blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) was assessed. Waste generated daily by Atlantic cod represented 24.9% of the cod feed added to the system. Particle distributions determined using a Coulter Multisizer and image analysis revealed that the majority of the particles in terms of numbers occupy the smaller size ranges; however, larger particles occupy a larger proportion of the volume. Effluent was composed of particles <70 μm (36%), 70-500 μm (31%) and particles >500 μm (33%) by weight. The amount of dissolved carbon and nitrogen associated with the effluent represented 3.1% and 3.7%, respectively, of the total feed added to the system daily. Particles <70 μm had significantly less organic matter, lipids and fatty acids and were expected to be ingested more by mussels than larger particles. The major lipid classes present in effluent were free fatty acids, triacylglycerols, phospholipids, acetone mobile polar lipids and sterol. Cod effluent contained two essential fatty acids DHA and EPA, a diatom marker (16:1ω7), as well as two zooplankton markers 22:1ω11 and 20:1ω9, which accumulated in mussels and may serve as markers for aquaculture wastes. Although only 36% of the effluent was of a size suitable for mussel ingestion, this size fraction has the greatest potential to spread to surrounding areas. These particulates may be useful as an alternate food source when natural seston is low.

  • 35.
    Bryhn, Andreas
    et al.
    Perfomers of environmental monitoring, Universities, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU, Aquatic Resources.
    Sundelöf, Andreas
    Perfomers of environmental monitoring, Universities, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU, Aquatic Resources.
    Florin, Ann-Britt
    Perfomers of environmental monitoring, Universities, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU, Aquatic Resources.
    Lymer, David
    Perfomers of environmental monitoring, Universities, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU, Aquatic Resources.
    Jones, Douglas
    Perfomers of environmental monitoring, Universities, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU, Aquatic Resources.
    Petersson, Erik
    Perfomers of environmental monitoring, Universities, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU, Aquatic Resources.
    Vitale, Francesca
    Perfomers of environmental monitoring, Universities, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU, Aquatic Resources.
    Sundblad, Göran
    Perfomers of environmental monitoring, Universities, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU, Aquatic Resources.
    Strömberg, Helena
    Perfomers of environmental monitoring, Universities, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU, Aquatic Resources.
    Wickström, Håkan
    Perfomers of environmental monitoring, Universities, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU, Aquatic Resources.
    Lövgren, Johan
    Perfomers of environmental monitoring, Universities, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU, Aquatic Resources.
    Persson, John
    Perfomers of environmental monitoring, Universities, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU, Aquatic Resources.
    Sundin, Josefin
    Perfomers of environmental monitoring, Universities, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU, Aquatic Resources.
    Lundström, Karl
    Perfomers of environmental monitoring, Universities, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU, Aquatic Resources.
    Fetterplace, Lachlan
    Perfomers of environmental monitoring, Universities, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU, Aquatic Resources.
    Edsman, Lennart
    Perfomers of environmental monitoring, Universities, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU, Aquatic Resources.
    Wennerström, Lovisa
    Perfomers of environmental monitoring, Universities, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU, Aquatic Resources.
    Ogonowski, Martin
    Perfomers of environmental monitoring, Universities, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU, Aquatic Resources.
    Cardinale, Massimiliano
    Perfomers of environmental monitoring, Universities, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU, Aquatic Resources.
    Ulmestrand, Mats
    Perfomers of environmental monitoring, Universities, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU, Aquatic Resources.
    Bergenius, Mikaela
    Perfomers of environmental monitoring, Universities, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU, Aquatic Resources.
    Sjoberg, Niklas
    Perfomers of environmental monitoring, Universities, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU, Aquatic Resources.
    Renman, Ola
    Perfomers of environmental monitoring, Universities, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU, Aquatic Resources.
    Kaljuste, Olavi
    Perfomers of environmental monitoring, Universities, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU, Aquatic Resources.
    Bohman, Patrik
    Perfomers of environmental monitoring, Universities, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU, Aquatic Resources.
    Fredriksson, Ronny
    Perfomers of environmental monitoring, Universities, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU, Aquatic Resources.
    Eiler, Stefan
    Perfomers of environmental monitoring, Universities, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU, Aquatic Resources.
    Axenrot, Thomas
    Perfomers of environmental monitoring, Universities, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU, Aquatic Resources.
    Dekker, Willem
    Perfomers of environmental monitoring, Universities, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU, Aquatic Resources.
    Yngwe, Rickard (Editor)
    Perfomers of environmental monitoring, Universities, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU.
    Bureborn, Sofia (Editor)
    Perfomers of environmental monitoring, Universities, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SLU.
    Fisk- och skaldjursbestånd i hav och sötvatten 2020: Resursöversikt2021Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I rapporten kan du ta del av bedömningen som görs av situationen för bestånd som regleras inom ramen för EU:s gemensamma fiskeripolitik (GFP). Bedömningarna baseras på det forskningssamarbete och den rådgivning som sker inom det Internationella Havsforskningsrådet (ICES). Totalt redovisas underlag och råd för 48 fisk- och skaldjursarter.

    De bestånd som förvaltas nationellt baseras på de biologiska underlagen, och rådgivningen i huvudsak på den forskning och övervakning samt analys som bedrivs av Institutionen för akvatiska resurser vid Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet (SLU Aqua) samt yrkesfiskets rapportering.

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  • 36.
    Brüchert, Volker
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Bonaglia, Stefano
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Raymond, Caroline
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Sediment med nyckelroll i näringsväven2014In: Havsutsikt, ISSN 1104-0513, Vol. 2014, no 1, p. 20-21Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    I sedimenten sker processer som kan vara helt avgörande för näringsbalansen i havsvattnet. Omvandlingen av fosfor till olika former är relativt väl känd, medan detaljerna i kvävets kretslopp är betydligt mindre kända. Mer än hälften av den årliga tillförseln av kväve till Östersjön beräknas omsättas till kvävgas i sedimentet, vilket sedan går förlorat för de flesta marina organismer.

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    Sediment med nyckelroll
  • 37.
    Båmstedt, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Comparing static and dynamic incubations in primary production measurements under different euphotic and mixing depths2019In: Hydrobiologia, ISSN 0018-8158, E-ISSN 1573-5117, Vol. 827, no 1, p. 155-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since phytoplankton production is usually estimated from static incubations (fixed depths or light levels), a mesocosm study was performed to evaluate the significance of mixing depth, mixing intensity and load of humus of natural phytoplankton assemblages. Vertically rotated (dynamic) incubations usually gave higher results than static incubations in humus-rich water. Mixing intensity was of significant importance in one of 2years tested, but strong interaction effects with humus complicated the explanation. Differences in primary production between dynamic incubations did not fully reflect the received PAR dose, and increased humus and increased mixing depth increased the photo-assimilation efficiency. Different single-depth incubations did not provide a shortcut method to measure water-column primary production with high accuracy. Results diverged from theoretical estimates based on recent combined photo-biological and physical environmental models. The large variability in responses to mixing is supposed to reflect species-specific adaptations and pre-history regarding quantity (photons) and quality (spectral distribution) of the optical environment in an assemblage of different species. The proportional abundance of each species with its specific characters will therefore strongly influence bulk primary production. Due to such variable responses, clear guidelines for a best practice in primary production measurements cannot be given, based on the present results.

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  • 38.
    Calamnius, Linda
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Biology. Institute of Freshwater Research, Department of Aquatic Resources, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundin, Mikael
    Harmångers Machine & Marine, Stocka, Sweden; Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Fjälling, Arne
    Institute of Freshwater Research, Department of Aquatic Resources, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Königson, Sara
    Institute of Coastal Research, Department of Aquatic Resources, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Lysekil, Sweden.
    Pontoon trap for salmon and trout equipped with a seal exclusion device catches larger salmons2018In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 7, article id e0201164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The growing seal populations of the Baltic have led to more frequent interactions with coastal fisheries. The motivation for seals to interact with fishing gear is high. It provides high densities of fish. A successful means of mitigating the conflict is the pontoon trap. Seal visits here have been frequent. Seals have access to most parts of the trap system including the middle chamber, which is an overhead environment. Concerns have been raised about seals possible entanglement in this specific part of the trap. As a means of keeping seals from entering the middle chamber, two different Seal Exclusion Devices (SEDs) were tested. A diamond mesh SED and a square mesh SED, which was rotated 45. The aim was to compare the functionality of the different SEDs with respect to seal deterrent abilities and catch composition. The hypothesis tested were (i) that seals would not be able to enter the middle chamber, (ii) that the catch would increase and (iii) that the SED would deter larger fish from swimming into the middle chamber. Catch data and underwater film were collected. Larger salmons were caught in traps equipped with SEDs. The SEDs did not affect the number of caught fish or the total catch per soak day. © 2018 Calamnius et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

  • 39.
    Capo, Eric
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Department of Marine Biology, Institut de Ciències del Mar, CSIC, Barcelona, Spain.
    Spong, Goran
    Molecular Ecology Group, Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies, SLU, Umeå, Sweden.
    Norman, Sven
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Königsson, Helena
    Molecular Ecology Group, Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies, SLU, Umeå, Sweden.
    Bartels, Pia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Byström, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Droplet digital PCR assays for the quantification of brown trout (Salmo trutta) and Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) from environmental DNA collected in the water of mountain lakes2019In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 12, article id e0226638Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Classical methods for estimating the abundance of fish populations are often both expensive, time-consuming and destructive. Analyses of the environmental DNA (eDNA) present in water samples could alleviate such constraints. Here, we developed protocols to detect and quantify brown trout (Salmo trutta) and Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) populations by applying the droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) method to eDNA molecules extracted from water samples collected in 28 Swedish mountain lakes. Overall, contemporary fish CPUE (catch per unit effort) estimates from standardized survey gill nettings were not correlated to eDNA concentrations for either of the species. In addition, the measured environmental variables (e.g. dissolved organic carbon concentrations, temperature, and pH) appear to not influence water eDNA concentrations of the studied fish species. Detection probabilities via eDNA analysis showed moderate success (less than 70% for both species) while the presence of eDNA from Arctic char (in six lakes) and brown trout (in one lake) was also indicated in lakes where the species were not detected with the gillnetting method. Such findings highlight the limits of one or both methods to reliably detect fish species presence in natural systems. Additional analysis showed that the filtration of water samples through 1.2 mu m glass fiber filters and 0.45 mu m mixed cellulose ester filters was more efficient in recovering DNA than using 0.22 mu m enclosed polyethersulfone filters, probably due to differential efficiencies of DNA extraction. Altogether, this work showed the potentials and limits of the approach for the detection and the quantification of fish abundance in natural systems while providing new insights in the application of the ddPCR method applied to environmental DNA.

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  • 40.
    Caputo, Andrea
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Bondad-Reantaso, Melba G.
    Fisheries and Aquaculture Division, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Rome, Italy.
    Karunasagar, Iddya
    Nitte Univ, Med Sci Complex, Mangaluru, Karnataka, India..
    Hao, Bin
    Food & Agr Org United Nations FAO, Fisheries & Aquaculture Div, Viale Terme Caracalla, I-00153 Rome, Italy..
    Gaunt, Patricia
    Mississippi State Univ, Starkville, MS, Brazil..
    Verner-Jeffreys, David
    Centre for Environment Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (CEFAS) and FAO Reference Center on AMR, Weymouth, Dorset, UK.
    Fridman, Sophie
    Fisheries and Aquaculture Division, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Rome, Italy.
    Dorado-Garcia, Alejandro
    Joint FAO/WHO Centre (CODEX Food Standards and Zoonotic Diseases (CJW), Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Rome, Italy.
    Antimicrobial resistance in aquaculture: A global analysis of literature and national action plans2023In: Reviews in Aquaculture, ISSN 1753-5123, E-ISSN 1753-5131, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 568-578Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the establishment of a Global Action Plan (GAP) on Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) (68th World Health Assembly, Geneva, Switzerland, 2015), most members of the World Health Organisation (WHO) have developed and implemented a National Action Plan (NAP) based on a "One Health" approach to AMR. Aquaculture, significant among the food producing sectors, has often been overlooked in AMR governance. We did a systematic review of 95 country NAPs and assessed the inclusion of aquaculture. We also reviewed the scientific literature from 1996 until April 2021 to retrieve data characterising AMR in aquaculture during the last 25 years. In our analysis, 37% of countries did not mention an aquaculture component within their AMR NAP. The South-East Asia Region had the highest implementation rate of AMR-aquaculture programmes. Our literature review indicated that most AMR-aquaculture related studies have taken place in China, followed by the United States of America and India. Beta-lactamases, tetracyclines, sulfonamides, macrolides, and fluoroquinolones were the most represented classes of antibiotics, with Vibrio spp. and Aeromonas spp. as the most investigated antimicrobial-resistant bacteria. This review highlighted the gaps in AMR-aquaculture governance and the progress made across WHO members. Countries are encouraged to (i) fulfil their commitments by developing and/or fully implementing the AMR NAP, (ii) further engage in the research, monitoring, and surveillance of antimicrobial usage and AMR within the aquaculture sector, and (iii) collaborate at national and international level for a concerted "One Health" approach.

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  • 41.
    Casimir, Justin
    et al.
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Östlund, Johanna
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Holtz, Emma
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Hondo, Haris
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Eliasson, Lovisa
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Moore, Susanna
    RISE - Research Institutes of Sweden (2017-2019), Bioscience and Materials, Agrifood and Bioscience.
    Småskalighet som ett medel för att bana väg för framtidens livsmedel?2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The food value chain system in Sweden is well established making it hard for small companies to develop new products and even harder to create new food supply systems Obstacles could lay at the beginning of the chain (food production or processing), at the end (marketing, consumer) or could even be related to the legislative regulation framing the food supply chain. Smaller actors often lack resources and networks to develop their sector. However, their degree of creativity, innovativeness, and engagement is high, and their energy is needed in the development of new sustainable food value chains.

    The aim of this project was to develop and apply a methodology for evaluating food value chains, focusing on profitable small-scale production systems in Sweden that show potential for fast development of new products that quickly reach the market. The work also included identifying Swedish raw food materials with growth potential and to identify how they could come into greater demand. Ten food value chains with high development potential in Sweden and for export were mapped and the main bottlenecks briefly described. Three food chains where selected based on a potential-difficulty-benefit matrix. The three selected food value chains were: (i) Hops, (ii) Swedish forest berries, and (iii) Land-based fish farming. These three food value chains where further studied looking at the whole value chain, from production to end consumer. Through literature review and contacts with relevant stakeholders (telephone interview, face-to-face interview, or workshop) the bottlenecks were clarified and potential solutions for increased demand where identified.

    Swedish hops production is carried out by passionate and engaged smaller actors, mostly on a hobby level, and the hops is used as an ingredient for beer. Germany and the USA produce about 75% of the worldwide production These hops varieties are not adapted to the Swedish climate and therefore result in a low volume and poor quality. However, domestic varieties have been grown in the past giving better yield under Swedish climate conditions. More work is needed to characterize the quality of Swedish hops. At the present time, knowledge about the characteristics of Swedish hops is low, explaining the lack of interest from brewers. In Sweden most hops are harvested by hand, making it nearly impossible to be profitable on the market. The mechanization of the harvesting step is necessary to move Swedish hops from a hobby to a commercial activity. No solutions are available on the Swedish market, RISE together with SLU is looking to develop a hops harvester fulfilling Swedish and EU regulations and adapted to small scale cultivation. At the end of the value chain, innovative products could increase the need for Swedish hops, for example by developing beers brewed with fresh hops. Moreover, hops have antiseptic characteristics and could potentially be used in other food products than beer.

    Only about four percent of the berries that are produced by the Swedish forests every year are picked. The largest volumes picked are for bilberry (Swedish: blåbär), lingonberry, and cloudberry and most of them are washed and frozen in Sweden. Processing of berries, however, has to a large extent moved out of the country while the products produced for the Swedish market are quite traditional, low-processed foods such as jams, juices and dessert soups. The majority of the Swedish berries mainly bilberries due to their nutritional content are exported and are further processed into value added powders or extracts in Asia and Europe. In Sweden this kind of value chain is under developed largely due to knowledge barriers and to the currently very traditional market. However, there is a great consumer interest in berries and they have a perceived healthiness also in Sweden. Consumers are also increasingly aware of the origin of berries used as ingredients in products such as jams, purees and juice, as well as in health food products. To fill this gap between consumer interest/demand and raw materials available new businesses can be developed. To facilitate such development there is a need for knowledge generation and transfer along the whole value chain (picking, processing, product development and consumer studies), which can be generated by starting up new innovation and research projects. It is also of importance to facilitate networking, for example in the ‘berry network’ (coordinated by RISE), as the creation of a new value chain will require different businesses to cooperate. Also, product development projects will need support for testing, pilot production, and possibly in finding investment funding for new equipment.

    Land-based fish farming is small in comparison to traditional fish farming in Sweden, but several actors see a great potential in this system which has a lower impact on the environment compared to conventional fish farms. For instance, the Swedish farmer federation (LRF) has invested in a land-based fish farm recently. As in other EU-countries, the number of active farms in Sweden is decreasing and some see the potential to recycle unused animal stables into fish farms. A major bottleneck for land-based fish farming is current legislation as it is based on conventional fish farming and therefore does not consider the environmental benefits of land-based systems. Knowledge should be spread to relevant authorities and policy makers to open a dialog and facilitate the development of a relevant regulatory framework. Regarding the production phase, access to sustainably produced feed and technical competence are lacking. Moreover, as the technology is costly learning through trial and error would not be recommended. A testbed dedicated to land-based fish farming could support companies who wish to try modifications to their system. Furthermore, smaller producers have difficulties in finding processing solutions for their products; e.g. slaughterhouses and conditioning. Two potential solutions would be to develop a land-based fish farm cooperative and/or mobile systems that could take care of smaller productions. Finally, the competition on the market is tough as land-based fishes are competing with large-scale conventional fish farms from Norway and Asia. To overcome this bottleneck, the sector could develop its own certification as well as increasing the consumers awareness and knowledge.

    Some conclusions could be applied to all the studied food chains. For instance, each value chain can be seen as a puzzle with many pieces. In order to develop new food value chains many separate pieces need to fall into place. Therefore, it is necessary to increase collaboration between stakeholders but also to have a stakeholder driven coordination of this collaboration. The stakeholders within the developing value chains often do not have all the resources to carry out this task, especially if they are small businesses. The development of cooperatives also seems to be a solution to overcome bottlenecks in the studied food chains. Likewise, logistics in the developing value chains have a great margin for improvement. Furthermore, this project focused on value chains where food commodities are the end product but investigating the potential for non-food uses would also be of interest.

    The method used in this project can be replicated to other value chains with potential of development. It would help the users to get a holistic view of the current bottlenecks and facilitate contact between stakeholders. The list of bottlenecks can be followed up and used as an indicator to evaluate if the value chain in moving forward.

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  • 42. Cazelles, Kevin
    et al.
    Bartley, Timothy
    Guzzo, Matthew M.
    Brice, Marie-Hélène
    MacDougall, Andrew S.
    Bennett, Joseph R.
    Esch, Ellen H.
    Kadoya, Taku
    Kelly, Jocelyn
    Matsuzaki, Shin-ichiro
    Nilsson, Karin A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    McCann, Kevin S.
    Homogenization of freshwater lakes: Recent compositional shifts in fish communities are explained by gamefish movement and not climate change2019In: Global Change Biology, ISSN 1354-1013, E-ISSN 1365-2486, Vol. 25, no 12, p. 4222-4233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Globally, lake fish communities are being subjected to a range of scale-dependent anthropogenic pressures, from climate change to eutrophication, and from overexploitation to species introductions. As a consequence, the composition of these communities is being reshuffled, in most cases leading to a surge in taxonomic similarity at the regional scale termed homogenization. The drivers of homogenization remain unclear, which may be a reflection of interactions between various environmental changes. In this study, we investigate two potential drivers of the recent changes in the composition of freshwater fish communities: recreational fishing and climate change. Our results, derived from 524 lakes of Ontario, Canada sampled in two periods (1965-1982 and 2008-2012), demonstrate that the main contributors to homogenization are the dispersal of gamefish species, most of which are large predators. Alternative explanations relating to lake habitat (e.g., area, phosphorus) or variations in climate have limited explanatory power. Our analysis suggests that human-assisted migration is the primary driver of the observed compositional shifts, homogenizing freshwater fish community among Ontario lakes and generating food webs dominated by gamefish species.

  • 43.
    Charisiadou, Stefania
    et al.
    Hellen Ctr Marine Res, Inst Marine Biol Resources & Inland Waters, Anavyssos, Greece.;Stockholm Univ, Dept Ecol Environm & Plant Sci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Halling, Christina
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Ecol Environm & Plant Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.;Swedish Univ Agr Sci, SLU Swedish Species Informat Ctr, Box 7007, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Jiddawi, Narriman
    Inst Fisheries Res Zanzibar, Zanzibar, Tanzania..
    von Schreeb, Kristina
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Ecol Environm & Plant Sci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gullstrom, Martin
    Södertörn Univ, Sch Nat Sci Technol & Environm Studies, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Larsson, Terese
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Ecol Environm & Plant Sci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Mtwana Nordlund, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development. Stockholm Univ, Dept Ecol Environm & Plant Sci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Coastal aquaculture in Zanzibar, Tanzania2022In: Aquaculture, ISSN 0044-8486, E-ISSN 1873-5622, Vol. 546, article id 737331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study provides an overview of the multi-sectoral coastal aquaculture development in Zanzibar (Tanzania) over the last thirty years based on empirical evidence from interviews, field observations, policy reports and literature reviews. Despite the immense potential of aquaculture for food and livelihoods, only seaweed farming has so far established into commercial-scale production. This activity is dominated by women and became widespread in the early 1990s as a small but regular source of income. However, seaweed farming constraints such as frequent seaweed die-offs, as well as economic and institutional constraints inhibit its development. Other types of aquaculture activities such as fish farming, mud crab fattening, half-pearl farming, sea cucumber farming and sponge and coral cultures are under development with limited production or in experimental stages. Common constraints among these activities are economic limitations, lack of technical infrastructure and skills, small and irregular production, and limited trade and market availabilities. At the same time, there is a lack of sufficient management and monitoring systems, while there are no formal regulations or clear strategies to boost aquaculture at the national level. In addition, new aquaculture initiatives are often dominated by donor-driven projects instead of local entrepreneurships. This situation does not encourage engagement in aquaculture and thus such activities are outcompeted by other already established sectors (e.g. agriculture and fisheries). We conclude that aquaculture has great potential to evolve due to high environmental capacity. Nevertheless, achieving profitable production and a stronger commitment within local communities, as well as developing effective mariculture governance through support mechanisms and clear strategies to boost the sector at the national level, are essential for sustainable mariculture development in Zanzibar.

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  • 44. Chary, Killian
    et al.
    van Riel, Anne-Jo
    Muscat, Abigail
    Wilfart, Aurélie
    Harchaoui, Souhil
    Verdegem, Marc
    Filgueira, Ramón
    Troell, Max
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Henriksson, Patrik J. G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden; WorldFish, Malaysia.
    de Boer, Imke J. M.
    Wiegertjes, Geert F.
    Transforming sustainable aquaculture by applying circularity principles2024In: Reviews in Aquaculture, ISSN 1753-5123, E-ISSN 1753-5131, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 656-673Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A circular economy is considered one way to reduce environmental impacts of human activities, by more efficient use of resources and recovery, resulting in less waste and emissions compared to linear take-make-dispose systems. Muscat et al. developed five ecological principles to guide biomass use towards a circular economy. A few studies have demonstrated environmental benefits of applying these principles to land-based food systems, but to date, these principles have not been explored in aquaculture. The current study expands on these principles and provides a narrative review to (i) translate them to aquaculture, while identifying implications for the main species and production systems, and (ii) identify the main pathways to make aquaculture more circular. We show that the underlying concepts of the ‘safeguard’, ‘entropy’, and ‘recycle’ principles have been well researched and sometimes well implemented. In contrast, the ‘avoid’ and ‘prioritise’ principles have been explored much less; doing so would provide an opportunity to decrease environmental impacts of aquaculture at the food-system level. One example is prioritising the production of species that contribute to food and nutrition security, have low environmental impacts and thinking at wider food system scale to avoid feed-food competition in aquaculture. We identified six priorities that could make aquaculture more circular: (i) increase production and demand for the most essential species, (ii) decrease food loss and waste at farm and post-harvest stages, (iii) support nutrient recycling practices at multiple scales, (iv) adapt aquafeed formulations, (v) inform consumers about benefits of species of low trophic levels and other environmentally friendly aquatic foods, and (vi) address urgent research gaps.

  • 45.
    Cooke, Steven J.
    et al.
    Carleton Univ, Dept Biol, Fish Ecol & Conservat Physiol Lab, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Canada;Carleton Univ, Inst Environm & Interdisciplinary Sci, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Canada.
    Twardek, William M.
    Carleton Univ, Dept Biol, Fish Ecol & Conservat Physiol Lab, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Canada;Carleton Univ, Inst Environm & Interdisciplinary Sci, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Canada.
    Reid, Andrea J.
    Carleton Univ, Dept Biol, Fish Ecol & Conservat Physiol Lab, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Canada;Carleton Univ, Inst Environm & Interdisciplinary Sci, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Canada.
    Lennox, Robert J.
    Carleton Univ, Dept Biol, Fish Ecol & Conservat Physiol Lab, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Canada;Carleton Univ, Inst Environm & Interdisciplinary Sci, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Canada.
    Danylchuk, Sascha C.
    Fish Mission, Amherst, MA USA.
    Brownscombe, Jacob W.
    Carleton Univ, Dept Biol, Fish Ecol & Conservat Physiol Lab, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Canada;Carleton Univ, Inst Environm & Interdisciplinary Sci, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Canada.
    Bower, Shannon D.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development.
    Arlinghaus, Robert
    Humboldt Univ, Leibniz Inst Freshwater Ecol & Inland Fisheries, Dept Biol & Ecol Fishes, Berlin, Germany;Humboldt Univ, Fac Life Sci, Div Integrat Fisheries Management, Berlin, Germany.
    Hyder, Kieran
    Ctr Environm Fisheries & Aquaculture Sci, Lowestoft, Suffolk, England;Univ East Anglia, Sch Environm Sci, Norwich, Norfolk, England.
    Danylchuk, Andy J.
    Fish Mission, Amherst, MA USA;Univ Massachusetts, Dept Environm Conservat, Amherst, MA 01003 USA.
    Searching for responsible and sustainable recreational fisheries in the Anthropocene2019In: Journal of Fish Biology, ISSN 0022-1112, E-ISSN 1095-8649, Vol. 94, no 6, p. 845-856Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recreational fisheries that use rod and reel (i.e., angling) operate around the globe in diverse freshwater and marine habitats, targeting many different gamefish species and engaging at least 220 million participants. The motivations for fishing vary extensively; whether anglers engage in catch-and-release or are harvest-oriented, there is strong potential for recreational fisheries to be conducted in a manner that is both responsible and sustainable. There are many examples of recreational fisheries that are well-managed where anglers, the angling industry and managers engage in responsible behaviours that both contribute to long-term sustainability of fish populations and the sector. Yet, recreational fisheries do not operate in a vacuum; fish populations face threats and stressors including harvest from other sectors as well as environmental change, a defining characteristic of the Anthropocene. We argue that the future of recreational fisheries and indeed many wild fish populations and aquatic ecosystems depends on having responsible and sustainable (R&S) recreational fisheries whilst, where possible, addressing, or at least lobbying for increased awareness about the threats to recreational fisheries emanating from outside the sector (e.g., climate change). Here, we first consider how the concepts of R&S intersect in the recreational fishing sector in an increasingly complex socio-cultural context. Next, we explore the role of the angler, angling industry and decision-makers in achieving R&S fisheries. We extend this idea further by considering the consequences of a future without recreational fisheries (either because of failures related to R&S) and explore a pertinent case study situated in Uttarakahand, India. Unlike other fisheries sectors where the number of participants is relatively small, recreational angling participants are numerous and widespread, such that if their actions are responsible, they have the potential to be a key voice for conservation and serve as a major force for good in the Anthropocene. What remains to be seen is whether this will be achieved, or if failure will occur to the point that recreational fisheries face increasing pressure to cease, as a result of external environmental threats, the environmental effects of recreational fishing and emerging ethical concerns about the welfare of angled fish.

  • 46.
    Crona, Beatrice
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Science, Sweden.
    Wassénius, Emmy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Science, Sweden.
    Jonell, Malin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Science, Sweden.
    Koehn, J. Zachary
    Short, Rebecca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Tigchelaar, Michelle
    Daw, Tim M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Golden, Christopher D.
    Gephart, Jessica A.
    Allison, Edward H.
    Bush, Simon R.
    Cao, Ling
    Cheung, William W. L.
    DeClerck, Fabrice
    Fanzo, Jessica
    Gelcich, Stefan
    Kishore, Avinash
    Halpern, Benjamin S.
    Hicks, Christina C.
    Leape, James P.
    Little, David C.
    Micheli, Fiorenza
    Naylor, Rosamond L.
    Phillips, Michael
    Selig, Elizabeth R.
    Springmann, Marco
    Sumaila, U. Rashid
    Troell, Max
    Thilsted, Shakuntala H.
    Wabnitz, Colette C. C.
    Four ways blue foods can help achieve food system ambitions across nations2023In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 616, no 7955, p. 104-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Blue foods, sourced in aquatic environments, are important for the economies, livelihoods, nutritional security and cultures of people in many nations. They are often nutrient rich1, generate lower emissions and impacts on land and water than many terrestrial meats2, and contribute to the health3, wellbeing and livelihoods of many rural communities4. The Blue Food Assessment recently evaluated nutritional, environmental, economic and justice dimensions of blue foods globally. Here we integrate these findings and translate them into four policy objectives to help realize the contributions that blue foods can make to national food systems around the world: ensuring supplies of critical nutrients, providing healthy alternatives to terrestrial meat, reducing dietary environmental footprints and safeguarding blue food contributions to nutrition, just economies and livelihoods under a changing climate. To account for how context-specific environmental, socio-economic and cultural aspects affect this contribution, we assess the relevance of each policy objective for individual countries, and examine associated co-benefits and trade-offs at national and international scales. We find that in many African and South American nations, facilitating consumption of culturally relevant blue food, especially among nutritionally vulnerable population segments, could address vitamin B12 and omega-3 deficiencies. Meanwhile, in many global North nations, cardiovascular disease rates and large greenhouse gas footprints from ruminant meat intake could be lowered through moderate consumption of seafood with low environmental impact. The analytical framework we provide also identifies countries with high future risk, for whom climate adaptation of blue food systems will be particularly important. Overall the framework helps decision makers to assess the blue food policy objectives most relevant to their geographies, and to compare and contrast the benefits and trade-offs associated with pursuing these objectives.

  • 47. Daewel, Ute
    et al.
    Hjøllo, Solfrid Saetre
    Huret, Martin
    Ji, Rubao
    Maar, Marie
    Niiranen, Susa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Travers-Trolet, Morgane
    Peck, Myron A.
    van de Wolfshaar, Karen E.
    Predation control of zooplankton dynamics: a review of observations and models2014In: ICES Journal of Marine Science, ISSN 1054-3139, E-ISSN 1095-9289, Vol. 71, no 2, p. 254-271Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We performed a literature review to examine to what degree the zooplankton dynamics in different regional marine ecosystems across the Atlantic Ocean is driven by predation mortality and how the latter is addressed in available modelling approaches. In general, we found that predation on zooplankton plays an important role in all the six considered ecosystems, but the impacts are differently strong and occur at different spatial and temporal scales. In ecosystems with extreme environmental conditions (e.g. low temperature, ice cover, large seasonal amplitudes) and low species diversity, the overall impact of top-down processes on zooplankton dynamics is stronger than for ecosystems having moderate environmental conditions and high species diversity. In those ecosystems, predation mortality was found to structure the zooplankton mainly on local spatial and seasonal time scales. Modelling methods used to parameterize zooplankton mortality range from simplified approaches with fixed mortality rates to complex coupled multispecies models. The applicability of a specific method depends on both the observed state of the ecosystem and the spatial and temporal scales considered. Modelling constraints such as parameter uncertainties and computational costs need to be balanced with the ecosystem-specific demand for a consistent, spatial-temporal dynamic implementation of predation mortality on the zooplankton compartment.

  • 48.
    Daw, Tim M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. University of East Anglia, United Kingdom.
    Coulthard, Sarah
    Cheung, William W. L.
    Brown, Katrina
    Abunge, Caroline
    Galafassi, Diego
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Peterson, Garry D.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    McClanahan, Tim R.
    Omukoto, Johnstone O.
    Munyi, Lydiah
    Evaluating taboo trade-offs in ecosystems services and human well-being2015In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 112, no 22, p. 6949-6954Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Managing ecosystems for multiple ecosystem services and balancing the well-being of diverse stakeholders involves different kinds of trade-offs. Often trade-offs involve noneconomic and difficult-to-evaluate values, such as cultural identity, employment, the well-being of poor people, or particular species or ecosystem structures. Although trade-offs need to be considered for successful environmental management, they are often overlooked in favor of win-wins. Management and policy decisions demand approaches that can explicitly acknowledge and evaluate diverse trade-offs. We identified a diversity of apparent trade-offs in a small-scale tropical fishery when ecological simulations were integrated with participatory assessments of social-ecological system structure and stakeholders' well-being. Despite an apparent win-win between conservation and profitability at the aggregate scale, food production, employment, and well-being of marginalized stakeholders were differentially influenced by management decisions leading to trade-offs. Some of these trade-offs were suggested to be taboo trade-offs between morally incommensurable values, such as between profits and the well-being of marginalized women. These were not previously recognized as management issues. Stakeholders explored and deliberated over trade-offs supported by an interactive toy model representing key system trade-offs, alongside qualitative narrative scenarios of the future. The concept of taboo trade-offs suggests that psychological bias and social sensitivity may exclude key issues from decision making, which can result in policies that are difficult to implement. Our participatory modeling and scenarios approach has the potential to increase awareness of such trade-offs, promote discussion of what is acceptable, and potentially identify and reduce obstacles to management compliance.

  • 49.
    Drury O'Neill, Elizabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Small-Scale Fisheries Governance: Broadening Perspectives on Markets, Relationships and Benefits in Seafood Trade2016Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This licentiate adresses the relative ambiguity surounding benefit flows from small-scale fisheries seafood trade with a specific focus on how they may be impacted by market and social stuctures. Small-scale fishery governenace has previously taken a narrowly approach to sustainability. Focused on managing fishing activities, economic-led market interventions and overlooking the embededness of the fishers within a broader social structure. Also failing to address fisheries as interlinked social-ecological systems where feedbacks between the two can impact future sustainability. The larger PhD project takes a step towards combining these two out-of-focus areas by taking a systems perspective, through a Value Chain approach, to fisheries governance, associated market influences and the consequent benefit flows from marine ecosystem services. This licentiate begins by unpacking dynamics within the social realm that may impact benefit flows and ultimately resource extraction decisions, potentially contributing to feedbacks from the marine ecosystem. Research uses mixed-methods and is case-orientated with sites across two tropical marine small-scale fisheries in Zanzibar and the Philippines. Results present two market environments with distinct structures, conduct, reciprocity systems and notably, gender roles. However both systems experience economic transactions underlain by broader social relations and binds. These various features manifest themselves in different, yet often unexpected, ways through income equalities, distributions and reciprocal networks of fishers and trading actors. Once a broadened and diversified view of the SSF trading environment is appropriated, it is clear that benefit flows are impacted by various contextual features (e.g. gender, transaction forms and buyer types). Governance-related research or interventions should incorporate undervalued local attributes such as cultural characteristics, social relationships and market participation as they play a role in who benefits from seafood trade. Thus If governance is to be improved for sustainably increasing food and livelihood security it is necessary to unpack these benefit flow mechanisms and, in particular, the local social dynamics that mediate fishers’ everyday interplay with the marine ecosystem. Future steps include the aim to identify potential social-ecological feedbacks between the disentangled market environments and the local marine ecosystems as a result of interactions in SSF trade. 

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  • 50. Duy, Duong The
    et al.
    Berg, Håkan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Dao, Tran Thi Kim
    Da, Chau Thi
    Assessing the effects of social capital on trade credit in shrimp farming in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam2024In: Aquaculture Economics & Management, ISSN 1365-7305, E-ISSN 1551-8663Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study assesses and identify major factors of social capital that affect the use of trade credit among shrimp farmers and how these contribute to and affect the profits of households in coastal provinces of the Mekong Delta, Vietnam. Data was collected through observations, informal discussions, and interviews with 364 shrimp farmers from the Ca Mau, Bac Lieu, Ben Tre and Tra Vinh provinces. The Probit and Tobit regression models were applied to analyze and evaluate the effect of social capital on the use of trade credit and the amount of trade credit used by farmers. The results show that many social capital factors affect the use of trade credit by shrimp farmers in the investigated areas, including in descending order of importance: profit, wholesale agents, colleague-friend-family line-neighbor, and trust. Besides the factors above, other factors such as agricultural land value, households’ income, distance, experiences in shrimp production, households’ assets, savings, profits of the previous crop, and the average household income had also an effect on trade use and amount of trade credit used by shrimp farming households. 

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