Digitala Vetenskapliga Arkivet

Change search
Refine search result
1234567 1 - 50 of 3666
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Abbas, Nasir
    et al.
    Univ Karachi, Int Ctr Chem & Biol Sci, HEJ Res Inst Chem, Karachi 75270, Pakistan..
    Ali, Arslan
    Univ Karachi, Dr Panjwani Ctr Mol Med & Drug Res, Int Ctr Chem & Biol Sci, Karachi 75270, Pakistan..
    Kumari, Sindhia
    Univ Karachi, Int Ctr Chem & Biol Sci, HEJ Res Inst Chem, Karachi 75270, Pakistan..
    Iqbal, Ayesha
    Univ Karachi, Dr Panjwani Ctr Mol Med & Drug Res, Int Ctr Chem & Biol Sci, Karachi 75270, Pakistan..
    Husain, Adnan
    Kuwait Inst Sci Res KISR, Environm & Life Sci Res Ctr, Safat 13109, Kuwait..
    Saeed, Talat
    Kuwait Inst Sci Res KISR, Environm & Life Sci Res Ctr, Safat 13109, Kuwait..
    Al-Ballam, Zainab Abdulamer
    Kuwait Inst Sci Res KISR, Environm & Life Sci Res Ctr, Safat 13109, Kuwait..
    Ahmed, Nisar
    Kuwait Inst Sci Res KISR, Environm & Life Sci Res Ctr, Safat 13109, Kuwait..
    El-Seedi, Hesham R.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Farmakognosi. Jiangsu Univ, Int Res Ctr Food Nutr & Safety, Zhenjiang 212013, Jiangsu, Peoples R China..
    Musharraf, Syed Ghulam
    Univ Karachi, Int Ctr Chem & Biol Sci, HEJ Res Inst Chem, Karachi 75270, Pakistan.;Univ Karachi, Dr Panjwani Ctr Mol Med & Drug Res, Int Ctr Chem & Biol Sci, Karachi 75270, Pakistan.;Univ Karachi, Ind Analyt Ctr, Int Ctr Chem & Biol Sci, Halal Testing Labs, Karachi 75270, Pakistan..
    Untargeted-metabolomics differentiation between poultry samples slaughtered with and without detaching spinal cord2020In: Arabian Journal of Chemistry, ISSN 1878-5352, E-ISSN 1878-5379 , Vol. 13, no 12, p. 9081-9089Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chicken meat is among the common and relatively inexpensive source of protein consumed worldwide from the poultry industry. Many communities show concern regarding the procedure of slaughtering animals for meat consumption due to ethical, religious, or cultural reasons. Liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) based untargeted metabolomics of 40 chicken meat samples were evaluated to differentiate meat samples based on slaughtering methods. Samples were grouped into, Zabiha (cutting neck without detaching spinal cord) and Non-Zabiha (completely detaching neck). A volcano plot reveals at least 150 features found significantly different between the two groups having >= 2-fold changes in intensities with p-values <= 0.05. Among them 05 identified and 25 unidentified metabolites have clear differences in peak intensities. The identified features can be employed to differentiate meat obtained from different slaughtering methods. A characteristic pattern based on principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least square-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) was observed among the groups. The results will benefit Halal certification, food safety, and security agencies to curb food fraud. (C) 2020 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of King Saud University.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2. Abrahamsson, C.
    et al.
    Siahpoosh, M.
    Altskär, Annika
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Nyden, M.
    Composite silica gel as test bed for flow in nano porous materials2011In: European Cells & Materials, E-ISSN 1473-2262, Vol. 21, no SUPPL.1, p. 27-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Abrahamsson, Christoffer K.
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Nordstierna, Lars
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Bergenholtz, Johan
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Altskär, Annika
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Nyden, Magnus
    University of South Australia, Australia.
    Magnetically induced structural anisotropy in binary colloidal gels and its effect on diffusion and pressure driven permeability2014In: Soft Matter, ISSN 1744-683X, E-ISSN 1744-6848, Vol. 10, no 24, p. 4403-4412Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on the synthesis, microstructure and mass transport properties of a colloidal hydrogel self-assembled from a mixture of colloidal silica and nontronite clay plates at different particle concentrations. The gel-structure had uniaxial long-range anisotropy caused by alignment of the clay particles in a strong external magnetic field. After gelation the colloidal silica covered the clay particle network, fixing the orientation of the clay plates. Comparing gels with a clay concentration between 0 and 0.7 vol%, the magnetically oriented gels had a maximum water permeability and self-diffusion coefficient at 0.3 and 0.7 vol% clay, respectively. Hence the specific clay concentration resulting in the highest liquid flux was pressure dependent. This study gives new insight into the effect of anisotropy, particle concentration and bound water on mass transport properties in nano/microporous materials. Such findings merit consideration when designing porous composite materials for use in for example fuel cell, chromatography and membrane technology.

  • 4.
    Abrahamsson, K
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Svenska institutet för konserveringsforskning.
    Effect of various chemicals on production of toxin by Clostridium botulinum, type E1964Report (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 5.
    Abrahamsson, K
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Svenska institutet för konserveringsforskning.
    Hållbarhet och kvalitet hos färska jordgubbar : en litteraturstudie1962Report (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6.
    Abrahamsson, K
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Svenska institutet för konserveringsforskning.
    Strålpastörisering av livsmedel : studievistelse i USA den 4/7-21/12 19621963Report (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 7.
    Abrahamsson, K.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Svenska institutet för konserveringsforskning.
    Studier över inverkan av olika kemikalier på toxinproduktionen hos Clostridium Botulinum typ E1964In: Nordisk Hygienisk Tidskrift, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 49-58Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Abrahamsson, K
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Svenska institutet för konserveringsforskning.
    Studier över inverkan av olika kemikalier på toxinproduktionen hos Clostridium botulinum typ E: Studies on the effect of different chemical inhibitors on the toxinproduction of Clostridium botulinum type E1964Report (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Abrahamsson, K.
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Svenska institutet för konserveringsforskning.
    DeSilva, N.N.
    Molin, Nils
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Svenska institutet för konserveringsforskning.
    Toxin production by Clostridium botulinum, type E, in vacuumpacked, irradiated fresh fish in relation to changes of the associated microflora1965In: Canadian Journal of Microbiology, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 523-529Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10. Abrahamsson, K.
    et al.
    Gullmar, B.
    Molin, Nils
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Svenska institutet för konserveringsforskning.
    The effect of temperature on toxin formation and toxin stability of clostridium botulinum, type E, in different environments1966In: Canadian Journal of Microbiology, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 385-394Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Abrahamsson, Lillemor
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Matvanor och behov under livscykeln1999In: Näringslära för högskolan, Liber AB Stockholm , 1999, p. 289-316Chapter in book (Other scientific)
  • 12.
    Abrahamsson, Lillemor
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Principles of nutritional assessment2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Food and Nutrition, ISSN 1748-2976, E-ISSN 1748-2984, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 177-177Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Abrahamsson, Lillemor
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences. kost.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences. Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Becker, Wulf
    Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences. Klinisk nutrition och metabolism.
    Nilsson, Gerd
    Näringslära för högskolan2006Book (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 14.
    Abrahamsson, Lillemor
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Ekblad, Jenny
    Behov under livscykeln och varianter av kost2006In: Näringslära för högskolan, Liber AB, Stockholm , 2006, p. 356-393Chapter in book (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 15.
    Abrahamsson, Lillemor
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Löf, Marie
    Proteiner2006In: Näringslära för högskolan, Liber AB, Stockholm , 2006, p. 131-165Chapter in book (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 16.
    Abrahamsson Nordin, Jennifer
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Lundmark, Emma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    En studie om högstadieelevers lunchvanor2011Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Intake of a balanced school lunch has been associated with healthier eating habits in general, for example better meal planning and healthier snacks.Objective: To investigate the lunch habits of pupils during school days, in one secondary school in Arjeplog and Arvidsjaur, respectively.Method: A survey was handed out to 110 pupils in 8th and 9th grade in Arjeplog and Arvidsjaur. The survey asked for the pupils’ lunch habits, intake of high sugary and fast food as well as fruit and vegetables.Results: Four out of five pupils ate school lunch daily (77 %, n=84). Less than every five of these pupils ate a balanced school lunch according to the Swedish food administration’s definition (17 %, n=14). More pupils ate a balanced school lunch in Arvidsjaur (p=0,009). The most chosen reason to eat school lunch was to satisfy ones hunger, and for not to eat that they didn’t like the food. Among non-school lunch eaters, it was most common to eat fast food instead. Of all the pupils, 62 % (n=67) thought that the school lunch was lacking main course options. Candy was eaten at least two days per week by 53 % (n=57) of the pupils. Among balanced school lunch eaters, fruit and vegetables where consumed more frequently than among those eating an unbalanced school lunch (p=0,023; p<0,001, respectively). Vegetables where eaten daily by 37 % (n=15) of the girls and 17 % (n=11) of the boys (p=0,025).Conclusion: The eating habits during lunchtime in Arjeplog and Arvidsjaur indicate less healthy dietary habits in general. There are tendencies of less healthy food habits in Arjeplog. When deciding whether to eat school lunch or not, taste and quality of the food is of major importance. Investment in school meals is an important investment in public health.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 17.
    Abramsson-Zetterberg, Lilianne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Strongly heated carbohydrate-rich food is an overlooked problem in cancer risk evaluation2018In: Food and Chemical Toxicology, ISSN 0278-6915, E-ISSN 1873-6351, Vol. 121, p. 151-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A cascade of compounds is produced when foodstuffs are heated at high temperatures but only a few of these compounds have been identified and quantified. In this study data are evaluated regarding differences in the micronucleus frequency of human erythrocytes (fMNs) in peripheral blood (a known biomarker of genotoxicity) in individuals that consumed either high- or low-heated food during a 4-day period. Concomitantly, acrylamide (aa) levels were measured in the food that the participants consumed. The obtained fMNs in this human study are compared with the fMNs in mice after comparable exposure levels of pure aa. The results of this comparison showed several hundred times higher fMNs in humans compared with mice. With an assumed linear correlation between an increased genotoxic effect and cancer, our data suggest that aa only represents a fraction of all carcinogenic compounds produced in heated carbohydrate-rich food. Consequently, our daily intake of carbohydrate-rich food heated at high temperatures might be responsible for one-fifth of the rate of the total cancer risk. One sentence summary: A biomarker of genotoxicity indicates the risk of cancer to be some hundred-fold greater in heated carbohydrate-rich food than the risk calculated from animal studies on pure acrylamide.

  • 18.
    Abramsson-Zetterberg, Lilianne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Ilback, Nils-Gunnar
    The synthetic food colouring agent Allura Red AC (E129) is not genotoxic in a flow cytometry-based micronucleus assay in vivo2013In: Food and Chemical Toxicology, ISSN 0278-6915, E-ISSN 1873-6351, Vol. 59, p. 86-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The safety of several azo colouring agents, used as food additives, has during the years been questioned. Allura Red AC (E129) has in some publications been classified as genotoxic. In fact, in the European Union, Allura Red is permitted as a food additive in human food, but, surprisingly, it was not acceptable as an additive for use in animal feed. In this study we have evaluated whether Allura Red is genotoxic using a flow cytometer-based micronucleus assay in peripheral blood of mice. Male FVB mice were given a single intra-peritoneal injection of various doses of Allura Red and sacrificed at 46 h after treatment. The tested doses were 0, 100, 200, 400, 600, 800, 1000, 1500, and 2000 mg/kg body weight (b.w.). Each dose group constituted three mice, except for in the dose group of 1000 mg/kg b.w., which constituted four mice. Blood samples were collected and the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (fMNPCE) and the cell proliferation (%PCE) was determined. The analyses did not show any significant difference in the %PCE or in the fMNPCE. Consequently, under the testing circumstances one can conclude that Allura Red is not genotoxic.

  • 19.
    Acuña, Ulyana Muñoz
    et al.
    Ohio State University, USA.
    Carcache, Peter J Blanco
    Ohio State University, USA.
    Matthew, Susan
    Ohio State University, USA.
    Carcache de Blanco, Esperanza J
    Ohio State University, USA.
    New acyclic bis phenylpropanoid and neolignans, from Myristica fragrans Houtt., exhibiting PARP-1 and NF-κB inhibitory effects.2016In: Food Chemistry, ISSN 0308-8146, E-ISSN 1873-7072, Vol. 202, p. 269-275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The bioassay-guided fractionation of the aril of Myristica fragrans (mace spice) yielded five phenolic compounds, one new acyclic bis phenylpropanoid (1) and four previously known phenolic compounds: compounds (1) (S) 1-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)-2-(3-methoxy-5-(prop-1-yl) phenyl)-propan-1-ol, (2) benzenemethanol; α-[1-[2,6-dimethoxy-4-(2-propen-1-yl)phenoxy]ethyl]-3,4-dimethoxy-1-acetate, (3) odoratisol A, phenol, 4-[(2S,3S)-2,3-dihydro-7-methoxy-3-methyl-5-(1E)-1-propenyl-2-benzofuranyl]-2,6-dimethoxy, (4) 1,3-benzodioxate-5-methanol,α-[1-[2,6-dimethoxy-4-(2-propenyl)phenoxy]ethyl]-acetate, (5) licarin C; benzofuran,2,3-dihydro-7-methoxy-3-methyl-5-(1E)-1-yl-2-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl). An NMR tube Mosher ester reaction was used in an approach to characterize and determine the assignment of the absolute configuration of the new isolated chiral alcohol (1). The PARP-1 inhibitory activity was evaluated for compound (1) (IC50=3.04μM), compound (2) (IC50=0.001μM), compound (4) (IC50=22.07μM) and compound (5) (IC50=3.11μM). Furthermore, the isolated secondary metabolites were tested for NF-κB and K-Ras inhibitory activities. When tested in the p65 assay, compounds (2) and (4) displayed potent NF-κB inhibition (IC50=1.5 nM and 3.4nM, respectively).

  • 20.
    Adamek, P
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedelsforskning.
    Heat resistant fungi : a literature study1996Report (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 21.
    Adamek, P
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Svenska livmedelsinstitutet.
    Identifiering av mögelsvampar1986Report (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 22.
    Adamek, P
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedelsforskning.
    Mögelsvampar1991Report (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Adamek, P
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedelsforskning.
    Mögelsvampar - en introduktion till livsmedelsmykologi1995Report (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 24.
    Adamek, Petr
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Svenska livmedelsinstitutet.
    Mögelsvampen naturens egen Dr Jekyll och Mr Hyde.1988In: Livsmedelsteknik, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 70-71Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Ader, Adina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Culinary Science.
    Berlin, Mathilda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Culinary Science.
    Naturvin - Producenters föreställningar om en certifiering inom Europeiska unionen2023Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The following study is an inductive qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews. The purpose was to explore European natural wine producers' perceptions of a certification of natural wine regulated by the EU. The background of the study illuminates the complexity of the concept of natural wine, as well as certifications and their effects on the market. Additionally, the study's theoretical framework, Conscious Capitalism, is presented. Collected data was transcribed and analyzed using an inductive thematic analysis. The discussion utilizes the theoretical framework to contextualize the findings in relation to the market and certifications. Authenticity, freedom, and control are among the concepts that are reflected upon. The results reveal variations in the participants' perceptions of natural wine, which pose difficulties in reaching a consensus on a definition and certification. The possibility of an EU-regulated certification of natural wine is limited based on the producers' beliefs and motivations as a result of their varying opinions and working methods.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 26.
    Adolfsson, Olivia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Sustainable Food Systems: Leveraging Producer-Retailer Relationships2024Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: An unsustainable food system in Sweden, marked by power imbalances, limited opportunities for smaller producers, and a lack of collaboration, demands solutions. Many workers in the food system operate as smaller producers, while the retail sector is highly concentrated, dominated by a few major retailers. Due to their significant market share, these retailers have the potential to drive production improvements, sustainability, and innovation by actively supporting smaller producers. However, if these issues remain unaddressed, the entire food system risks becoming increasingly vulnerable to future disruptions. This thesis aims to explain the dynamics within the Swedish food value chain, focusing on the collaboration between established retailers and smaller producers. It seeks to understand how this collaboration can be improved by both parties to foster a more sustainable food system. Through qualitative semi-structured interviews employing a dual-perspective approach from both producers and retailers, it sought an understanding of both actors’ perspectives regarding their current experiences and perceptions. Both producers and retailers acknowledge the need for collaboration, but challenges persist, particularly expressed by the producers. The main theory used, The Ladder of Partnership, highlights the necessity for trust, mutual understanding, and investment in collaboration. While some companies are making efforts, more is required for a sustainable food system. Given the retailer’s market influence, they should lead by creating opportunities for smaller producers, making strategic decisions about market inclusion, and excluding less sustainable options. The thesis advocates for accountability and shared responsibility among all actors in the food system to achieve a sustainable future. The study concludes that the Swedish food value chain relies on collaboration among various actors, and without it, the system's functionality would be compromised. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 27.
    Adolfsson, Päivi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Fjellström, Christina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Lewin, Barbro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Observed dietary intake in adults with intellectual disability living in the community2008In: Food & Nutrition Research, ISSN 1654-6628, Vol. 52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Knowledge is lacking about dietary habits among people with intellectual disability (ID) living in community residences under new living conditions.

    Objective: To describe the dietary habits of individuals with ID living in community residences, focusing on intake of food, energy and nutrients as well as meal patterns.

    Design: Assisted food records and physical activity records over a 3-day observation period for 32 subjects.

    Results: Great variation was observed in daily energy intake (4.9-14 MJ) dispersed across several meals, with on average 26% of the energy coming from in-between-meal consumption. Main energy sources were milk products, bread, meat products, buns and cakes. The daily intake of fruit and vegetables (320_221 g) as well as dietary fiber (21_99.6 g) was generally low. For four vitamins and two minerals, 19-34% of subjects showed an intake below average requirement (AR). The physical activity level (PAL) was low for all individuals (1.4_0.1).

    Conclusion: A regular meal pattern with a relatively high proportion of energy from in-between-meal eating occasions and a low intake of especially fruits were typical of this group of people with ID. However, the total intake of energy and other food items varied a great deal between individuals. Thus, every adult with ID has to be treated as an individual with specific needs. A need for more knowledge about food in general and particularly how fruit and vegetables could be included in cooking as well as encouraged to be eaten as inbetween-meals seems imperative in the new living conditions for adults with ID.

  • 28.
    Adrianson, Elin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Culinary Science.
    Wall, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Culinary Science.
    Hur menyplaneringen utformas på lunchrestauranger - en kvalitativ intervjustudie2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background The Swedish Food Agency has recommendations for the population to follow, in order to prevent widespread diet and lifestyle related diseases and to keep a healthy life. Through the years the habit of having lunch out has increased and people have become more aware of the healthy choices, even though those options can vary. Studies showed that people tended to make better choices if the restaurants explicitly labelled the healthy options in their menus. 

    Objective The aim of this study was to find out how lunch restaurants plan their menus, what dietary recommendations and guidelines they rely on and how they make the choice of what dishes they will serve.  

    Method Qualitative interviews have been done with eleven different restaurant owners and that material then got transcribed, coded, categorized and analyzed. 

    Results The economy and the guests’ demands were in focus when the choice of dishes was made and the menu was planned. Firstly, the taste was more important than nutrition recommendations, and secondly, the variation, both on the plate and over time was prioritised. Another result was that the nutrition recommendations were not followed but concerning the origin, the fabrication and the quality of the products the restaurants followed the present dietary recommendations and guidelines. 

    Conclusion Guests demand, ingredients and its quality and price were central parts of the menu planning. The restaurant staff need more knowledge about the nutrition recommendations, since their opinions that taste and quality are reduced because of them are wrong. The responsibility of healthy choices lies in both the society and the restaurants.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 29.
    Agerhäll, Britta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Söderqvist, Maja
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Energi- och näringsinnehåll i det faktiska intaget av skollunch: en jämförelse mellan pojkar och flickor i årskurs 52014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background Establishing good eating habits during childhood are important since these lay the foundation for the future. Having a balanced and healthy diet is associated with a better learning ability. Research shows differences in intake of energy and nutrients between boys and girls.

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate possible differences between boys and girls referring intake of school lunch and to compare them to Nordic Nutrition Recommendations (NNR) with a focus on content of energy and nutrients.

    Method This study was established through a partnership with ProMeal. Data was collected during five days through a weighed and photographed food record of school lunch among 29 children in the 5th grade. The participants’ portions of food were calculated concerning contents of energy and nutrients through the computer program DietistNet. Data was statistically analyzed in order to detect differences in intake of energy and nutrients between the sexes. A comparison between the participants’ energy and nutrient intake and the NNR was made.

    Results This research showed no statistical significant difference between boys’ and girls’ intake of energy (p=0,226). Regardless of sex the participants’ median intake of energy was lower than the estimated energy demand for the age group according to NNR. There was no statistical significant difference between boys and girls concerning the intake of energy from macronutrients. The share of energy from carbohydrates, protein and fat was relatively even distributed between the sexes. In comparison boys had a significantly higher intake of dietary fiber (p=0,008), iron (p=0,037) and vitamin C (p=0,034) than girls. 

    Conclusion Overall the participants had a noteworthy low intake of energy and micronutrients in relation to the estimated demands and recommendations of NNR. During five days there was no statistical significant difference between boys and girls concerning intake of energy. Further research is needed. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 30.
    Agustin, Melissa B.
    et al.
    Department of Food and Nutrition, Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 66, FI-00014, Helsinki, Finland; VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd., P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044, Espoo, Finland.
    Nematollahi, Neda
    Department of Food and Nutrition, Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 66, FI-00014, Helsinki, Finland.
    Bhattarai, Mamata
    Department of Food and Nutrition, Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 66, FI-00014, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Bioproducts and Biosystems, Aalto University, P.O. Box 16300, 00076, Aalto, Finland.
    Oliaei, Erfan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Lehtonen, Mari
    Department of Food and Nutrition, Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 66, FI-00014, Helsinki, Finland.
    Rojas, Orlando J.
    Department of Bioproducts and Biosystems, Aalto University, P.O. Box 16300, 00076, Aalto, Finland; Bioproducts Institute, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Department of Chemistry and Department of Wood Science, University of British Columbia, 2360, East Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z3, Canada.
    Mikkonen, Kirsi S.
    Department of Food and Nutrition, Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 66, FI-00014, Helsinki, Finland; Helsinki Institute of Sustainability Science, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 65, FI-00014, Helsinki, Finland.
    Lignin nanoparticles as co-stabilizers and modifiers of nanocellulose-based Pickering emulsions and foams2023In: Cellulose, ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 30, no 14, p. 8955-8971Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanocellulose is very hydrophilic, preventing interactions with the oil phase in Pickering emulsions. This limitation is herein addressed by incorporating lignin nanoparticles (LNPs) as co-stabilizers of nanocellulose-based Pickering emulsions. LNP addition decreases the oil droplet size and slows creaming at pH 5 and 8 and with increasing LNP content. Emulsification at pH 3 and LNP cationization lead to droplet flocculation and rapid creaming. LNP application for emulsification, prior or simultaneously with nanocellulose, favors stability given the improved interactions with the oil phase. The Pickering emulsions can be freeze–dried, enabling the recovery of a solid macroporous foam that can act as adsorbent for pharmaceutical pollutants. Overall, the properties of nanocellulose-based Pickering emulsions and foams can be tailored by LNP addition. This strategy offers a unique, green approach to stabilize biphasic systems using bio-based nanomaterials without tedious and costly modification procedures.

  • 31.
    Ahlberg, Sara
    et al.
    Int Livestock Res Inst, Dept Biosci, POB 30709, Nairobi 00100, Kenya;Univ Helsinki, Dept Food & Environm Sci, POB 66, FI-00014 Helsinki, Finland.
    Grace, Delia
    Int Livestock Res Inst, Dept Biosci, POB 30709, Nairobi 00100, Kenya.
    Kiarie, Gideon
    Mt Kenya Univ, POB 342, Thika 01000, Kenya.
    Kirino, Yumi
    Univ Miyazaki, Dept Vet Sci, 1-1 Gakuen Kibanadai Nishi, Miyazaki 8892192, Japan.
    Lindahl, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Int Livestock Res Inst, Dept Biosci, POB 30709, Nairobi 00100, Kenya;Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Clin Sci, POB 7054, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden.
    A Risk Assessment of Aflatoxin M1 Exposure in Low and Mid-Income Dairy Consumers in Kenya2018In: Toxins, E-ISSN 2072-6651, Vol. 10, no 9, article id 348Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aflatoxin M-1 (AFM(1)), a human carcinogen, is found in milk products and may have potentially severe health impacts on milk consumers. We assessed the risk of cancer and stunting as a result of AFM(1) consumption in Nairobi, Kenya, using worst case assumptions of toxicity and data from previous studies. Almost all (99.5%) milk was contaminated with AFM(1). Cancer risk caused by AFM(1) was lower among consumers purchasing from formal markets (0.003 cases per 100,000) than for low-income consumers (0.006 cases per 100,000) purchasing from informal markets. Overall cancer risk (0.004 cases per 100,000) from AFM(1) alone was low. Stunting is multifactorial, but assuming only AFM(1) consumption was the determinant, consumption of milk contaminated with AFM(1) levels found in this study could contribute to 2.1% of children below three years in middle-income families, and 2.4% in low-income families, being stunted. Overall, 2.7% of children could hypothetically be stunted due to AFM(1) exposure from milk. Based on our results AFM(1) levels found in milk could contribute to an average of -0.340 height for age z-score reduction in growth. The exposure to AFM(1) from milk is 46 ng/day on average, but children bear higher exposure of 3.5 ng/kg bodyweight (bw)/day compared to adults, at 0.8 ng/kg bw/day. Our paper shows that concern over aflatoxins in milk in Nairobi is disproportionate if only risk of cancer is considered, but that the effect on stunting children might be much more significant from a public health perspective; however, there is still insufficient data on the health effects of AFM(1).

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 32.
    Ahlberg, Sara
    et al.
    Int Livestock Res Inst, Dept Biosci, POB 30709, Nairobi 00100, Kenya;Univ Helsinki, Dept Food & Environm Sci, POB 66, FI-00014 Helsinki, Finland.
    Randolph, Delia
    Int Livestock Res Inst, Dept Biosci, POB 30709, Nairobi 00100, Kenya.
    Okoth, Sheila
    Univ Nairobi, Sch Biol Sci, POB 30197, Nairobi 00100, Kenya.
    Lindahl, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Int Livestock Res Inst, 298 Kim Ma St, Hanoi, Vietnam;Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Clin Sci, POB 7054, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Aflatoxin Binders in Foods for Human Consumption-Can This be Promoted Safely and Ethically?2019In: Toxins, E-ISSN 2072-6651, Vol. 11, no 7, article id 410Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aflatoxins continue to be a food safety problem globally, especially in developing regions. A significant amount of effort and resources have been invested in an attempt to control aflatoxins. However, these efforts have not substantially decreased the prevalence nor the dietary exposure to aflatoxins in developing countries. One approach to aflatoxin control is the use of binding agents in foods, and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been studied extensively for this purpose. However, when assessing the results comprehensively and reviewing the practicality and ethics of use, risks are evident, and concerns arise. In conclusion, our review suggests that there are too many issues with using LAB for aflatoxin binding for it to be safely promoted. Arguably, using binders in human food might even worsen food safety in the longer term.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 33. Ahlgren, M.
    et al.
    Gustafsson, I.-B.
    Hall, Gunnar
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Attitudes and beliefs directed towards ready meal consumption.2004In: Food Service Technology, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 159-169Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34. Ahlgren, M.
    et al.
    Gustafsson, I.-B.
    Hall, Gunnar
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Buyers' demands for ready meals: Influenced by gender and who will eat them.2006In: Journal of Foodservice, Vol. 7, p. 205-211Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35. Ahlgren, M.
    et al.
    Gustafsson, I.-B.
    Hall, Gunnar
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    The impact of the meal situation on the consumption of ready meals.2005In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, Vol. 29, p. 485-492Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Ahlgren, Mia
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Ready meal consumption - when, where, why and by whom?2004Report (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Ahlgren, Roger
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Bergh, Kurt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Hauer, Cecilia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Jonsson, Mona
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Lindberg, Kerstin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Nygren, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Reivell, Gun-Britt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Rönnlund, Ulla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Sandahl, Carla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Dahlgren, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Kostvetenskaplig kompetens: belyst med kvalitativ metod1996Report (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Ahlgren, S
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Environmental impact of chemical and mechanical weed control in agriculture : a comparing study using Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) methodology2004Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 39.
    Ahlinder, Astrid
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Höglund, Evelina
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Öhgren, Camilla
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Miljkovic, Ana
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food.
    Stading, Mats
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Agriculture and Food. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Towards attractive texture modified foods with increased fiber content for dysphagia via 3D printing and 3D scanning2023In: Frontiers in Food Science and Technology, E-ISSN 2674-1121, Vol. 2, article id 1058641Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As life expectancy increases so do age related problems such as swallowing disorders, dysphagia, which affects 10%–30% of people over 65 years old. For dysphagia patients the texture and rheological properties of the food, and the bolus, is critical to avoid choking and pneumonia. Texture modified foods, timbals, are often served to these patients due to their ease of swallowing. The main concern with these foods is that they do not look visually alike the food they replace, which can decrease the patient’s appetite and lead to reduced food intake and frailty. This study aims to improve both the visual appearance of texturized food as well as the energy density and fiber content of the timbal formulation. 3D scanning and additive manufacturing (3D Printing) were used to produce meals more reminiscent of original food items, increasing their visual appeal. Rheology was used to ensure the original flow profile was maintained as the timbal was reformulated by reducing starch contents and partially replacing with dietary fibers. The amount of starch was reduced from 8.7 wt% in the original formulation to 3.5 wt% and partially replaced with 3 wt% citrus fiber, while maintaining properties suitable for both swallowing and 3D printing. The resulting formulation has improved nutritional properties, while remaining suitable for constructing visually appealing meals, as demonstrated by 3Dprinting a chicken drumstick from a model generated with 3D scanning.

  • 40. Ahlqvist, J.
    et al.
    Dainiak, M.B.
    Kumar, A.
    Hornsten, Gunnar E.
    Galaev, I.Yu.
    Mattiasson, B.
    Monitoring the production of inclusion bodies during fermentation and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis of intact inclusion bodies using cryogel minicolumn plates2006In: Analytical Biochemistry, ISSN 0003-2697, E-ISSN 1096-0309, Vol. 354, no 2, p. 229-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel minicolumn chromatographic method to monitor the production of inclusion bodies during fermentation and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system allowing direct analysis of the particles with surface-displayed antigens are described. A 33-kDa protein containing 306 amino acids with three sulfur bridges produced as inclusion bodies was labeled with polyclonal antibodies against 15 amino acid (anti-A15) and 17 amino acid (anti-B17) residues at the N- and C-terminal ends of the protein, respectively. Labeled particles were bound to macroporous monolithic protein A-cryogel adsorbents inserted into the open-ended wells of a 96-well plate (referred to as protein A-cryogel minicolumn plate). The concept behind this application is that the binding degree of inclusion bodies from lysed fermentation broth to the cryogel minicolumns increases with an increase in their concentration during fermentation. The technique allowed us to monitor the increase in the production levels of the inclusion bodies as the fermentation process progressed. The system also has a built-in quality parameter to ensure that the target protein has been fully expressed. Alternatively, inclusion bodies immobilized on phenyl-cryogel minicolumn plate were used in indirect ELISA based on anti-A15 and anti-B17 antibodies against terminal amino acid residues displayed on the surface of inclusion bodies. Drainage-protected properties of the cryogel minicolumns allow performance of successive reactions with tested immunoglobulin G (IgG) samples and enzyme-conjugated secondary IgG and of enzymatic reaction within the adsorbent. © 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 41. Ahlqvist, J.
    et al.
    Kumar, A.
    Sundstrom, H.
    Ledung, E.
    Hornsten, E.G.
    Enfors, S.-O.
    Affinity binding of inclusion bodies on supermacroporous monolithic cryogels using labeling with specific antibodies2006In: Journal of Biotechnology, ISSN 0168-1656, E-ISSN 1873-4863, Vol. 122, no 2, p. 216-225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new chromatographic method based on affinity supermacroporous monolithic cryogels is developed for binding and analyzing inclusion bodies during fermentation. The work demonstrated that it is possible to bind specific IgG and IgY antibodies to the 15 and 17 amino acids at the terminus ends of a 33 kDa target protein aggregated as inclusion bodies. The antibody treated inclusion bodies from lysed fermentation broth can be specifically retained in protein A and pseudo-biospecific ligand sulfamethazine modified supermacroporous cryogels. The degree of binding of IgG and IgY treated inclusion bodies to the Protein A and sulfamethazine gels are investigated, as well as the influence of pH on the sulfamethazine ligand. Optimum binding of 78 and 72% was observed on both protein A and sulfamethazine modified cryogel columns, respectively, using IgG labeling of the inclusion bodies. The antibody treated inclusion bodies pass through unretained in the sulfamethazine supermacroporous gel at pH that does not favour the binding between the ligand on the gel and the antibodies on the surface of inclusion bodies. Also the unlabeled inclusion bodies went through the gel unretained, showing no non-specific binding or trapping within the gel. These findings may very well be the foundation for the building of a powerful analytical tool during fermentation of inclusion bodies as well as a convenient way to purify them from fermentation broth. These results also support our earlier findings [Kumar, A., Plieva, F.M., Galaev, I.Yu., Mattiasson, B., 2003. Affinity fractionation of lymphocytes using a monolithic cyogel. J. Immunol. Methods 283, 185-194] with mammalian cells that were surface labeled with specific antibodies and recognized on protein A supermacroporous gels. A general binding and separation system can be established on antibody binding cryogel affinity matrices. © 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 42.
    Ahlqvist, Josefin
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Using monolithic cryogels for direct capture of inclusion bodies during fermentation - a way to monitor the process2006Report (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Ahlqvist, Josefin
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Using monolithic cryogels for direct capture of inclusion bodies during fermentation - a way to monitor the process2006Report (Other academic)
  • 44. Ahlstrom, R.
    et al.
    Baird, J.C.
    Jonsson, I.
    School children's preferences for food combinations1990In: Food Quality and Preference, ISSN 0950-3293, E-ISSN 1873-6343, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 155-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Students from the 4th, 8th and 11th grades (N = 177) expressed their opinions as to which foodstuffs belong together in a meal. They did this by selecting and grouping cards that depicted the names and pictures of 25 foodstuffs typically offered in their school lunches. Subjects were allowed to create up to 10 different meals under one of four instructions. The cards were dispensed from a specially designed box that could hold single or multiple copies of each food item. Younger students created significantly more meals with few components than did the older students. The types of foodstuffs selected and their groupings were highly similar across grades and for both boys and girls. The meals tended to correspond to those actually available in the school lunch program, but more than 50% of the creations were unique in that each of them was produced by one or two students. These findings suggest that school nutritionists and administrators should strive for maximum variety in their lunch menus. © 1991.

  • 45.
    Ahrné, Lilia
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Andersson, C.-G.
    Floberg, P.
    Rosen, J.
    Lingnert, Hans
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Effect of crust temperature and water content on acrylamide formation during baking of white bread: Steam and falling temperature baking2007In: Lebensmittel-Wissenschaft + Technologie, ISSN 0023-6438, E-ISSN 1096-1127, Vol. 40, no 10, p. 1708-1715Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of crust temperature and water content on acrylamide formation was studied during the baking of white bread. To assess the effect of over-baking, we used a full factorial experimental design in which the baking time was increased by 5 and 10 min at each baking temperature. Additional experiments were performed with steam baking and falling temperature baking. Immediately after baking, the crust was divided into the outer and inner crust fractions, and the water content and acrylamide concentration of each fraction was measured. The outer crust had a significantly lower water content and higher acrylamide concentration than the inner crust did. Crust temperature in combination with water content had a significant effect on acrylamide formation, higher temperatures resulting in higher acrylamide concentrations. However, at very high temperatures and lower water contents, acrylamide concentration was observed to decrease, though the bread colour was then unacceptable for consumption. Steam and falling temperature baking, on the other hand, decreased the acrylamide content while producing bread crust with an acceptable colour. The lowest acrylamide values and an acceptable crust colour were produced by steam baking. © 2007 Swiss Society of Food Science and Technology.

  • 46.
    Ahrné, Lilia
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Chamayou, A.
    Dewettinck, K.
    Depypere, F.
    Dumoulin, E.
    Fitzpatrick, J.
    Processing of food powders2008In: Food Materials Science: Principles and Practice, p. 341-368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of formulation engineering concepts in food manufacturing and the demand for diversity in food products has driven a substantial market increase for food ingredients. Most ingredients are supplied in powder form and therefore a better understanding of dispersed solid food systems is important both for food ingredient manufactures and food producers. © 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  • 47.
    Ahrné, Lilia
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Frias, J.
    Oliveira, F.A.R.
    Singh, R.P.
    Modelling textural changes of vegetables during acidification under isothermal and non-isothermal conditions2001In: Acta Horticulturae, ISSN 0567-7572, Vol. 566, p. 323-328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acidification can be used to improve the quality of canned vegetables because it can decrease thermal processing requirements. Moreover, there is some evidence that acidified vegetables retain a better texture than non-acidified ones. Optimisation of the acidification processes requires the knowledge of the relationship between texture and thermal process at low/moderate temperature. The main objective of this work was the modelling of textural changes of vegetables during acidification under isothermal conditions, and the application of the model to predict textural changes in non-isothermal processes. Turnip was the vegetable used in the experiments. The effect of pre-treatments (blanching, freezing/thawing, calcium addition and vacuum infusion of water before acidification) on the kinetics of textural changes during acidification was also studied. Turnips were acidified in acetic acid under isothermal (20, 50, 70, 80, 90 and 100°C) and non-isothermal conditions (20 to 90°C). Texture was modelled by a two subtract first order kinetic model, assuming an Arrhenius-type dependence of the rate constants on temperature. The model parameters were estimated by nonlinear regression. At temperatures lower then 70°C no significant changes in texture were detected. At higher temperatures the model showed a good fit to the data for all the conditions tested. Acidification decreased the percentage of heat labile substrate from 96% to 62%, thus improving firmness retention. The parameters of the kinetic model estimated under isothermal conditions provided an adequate prediction of texture changes under non-isothermal conditions. The methodology developed in this work can be further applied to model the textural changes of vegetables during other thermal processes, such as drying, blanching, and frying.

  • 48.
    Ahrné, Lilia
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Pereira, N.R.
    Staack, N.
    Floberg, P.
    Microwave convective drying of plant foods at constant and variable microwave power2007In: Drying Technology, ISSN 0737-3937, E-ISSN 1532-2300, Vol. 25, no 42193, p. 1149-1153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microwave convective drying of plant foods is a promising process due to the shorter drying time and better product quality. High microwave power decreases the drying time but causes charring of the product. In this work, microwave drying under constant and variable microwave power were compared. Temperature-sensitive products, such as plant foods, are especially affected by microwave power during the final drying period. Therefore, drying at variable microwave power was found to be a more suitable drying process. Air (temperature and velocity) has an important role during microwave drying, not only as carrier of evaporated moisture but also as it contributes to a more homogeneous and faster drying.

  • 49.
    Ahrné, Lilia
    et al.
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Prothon, F.
    Funebo, Tomas
    RISE, SP – Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut, SP Sveriges tekniska forskningsinstitut, SIK – Institutet för livsmedel och bioteknik.
    Comparison of drying kinetics and texture effects of two calcium pretreatments before microwave-assisted dehydration of apple and potato2003In: International journal of food science & technology, ISSN 0950-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2621, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 411-420Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects on drying rate and texture of treating two plant tissues with calcium, before drying in air with microwave assistance, were studied in this work. The two tissues, potato and apple cubes, which have different structures and composition, were pretreated by immersion in CaCl2 solutions at 20 or at 70 °C before microwave-assisted air dehydration at 50, 60 and 70 °C. The pretreatments with calcium influenced the strength of the plant tissue cell wall, producing products of varying hardness after rehydration. The effect of the two calcium pretreatments was quite different for apples and potatoes. For apples, calcium pretreatment at 20 °C increased the hardness of rehydrated apples compared with untreated apples, but calcium pretreatment at 70 °C had no effect on texture. For potatoes, both calcium pretreatments at 20 and at 70 °C significantly increased the hardness of rehydrated potatoes. The water diffusivity during drying varied mainly because of the type of plant tissue, with secondary effects caused by the drying temperature and the type of calcium pretreatment.

  • 50.
    Ahuja, Vishal
    et al.
    University Institute of Biotechnology, Chandigarh University, Mohali, India; University Centre for Research and Development, Chandigarh University, Mohali, India.
    Chauhan, Shikha
    University Institute of Biotechnology, Chandigarh University, Mohali, India.
    Purewal, Sukhvinder Singh
    University Institute of Biotechnology, Chandigarh University, Mohali, India; University Centre for Research and Development, Chandigarh University, Mohali, India.
    Mehariya, Sanjeet
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Patel, Anil Kumar
    Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, National Kaohsiung University of Science and Technology, Kaohsiung City, Taiwan.
    Kumar, Gopalakrishnan
    Institute of Chemistry, Bioscience and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Stavanger, Norway.
    Megharaj, Mallavarapu
    Global Centre for Environmental remediation, College of Engineering, Science and Environment, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, Australia.
    Yang, Yung-Hun
    Institute for Ubiquitous Information Technology and Applications, Seoul, South Korea; Department of Biological Engineering, College of Engineering, Konkuk University, Seoul, South Korea.
    Bhatia, Shashi Kant
    Institute for Ubiquitous Information Technology and Applications, Seoul, South Korea; Department of Biological Engineering, College of Engineering, Konkuk University, Seoul, South Korea.
    Microbial alchemy: upcycling of brewery spent grains into high-value products through fermentation2023In: Critical reviews in biotechnology, ISSN 0738-8551, E-ISSN 1549-7801Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spent grains are one of the lignocellulosic biomasses available in abundance, discarded by breweries as waste. The brewing process generates around 25–30% of waste in different forms and spent grains alone account for 80–85% of that waste, resulting in a significant global waste volume. Despite containing essential nutrients, i.e., carbohydrates, fibers, proteins, fatty acids, lipids, minerals, and vitamins, efficient and economically viable valorization of these grains is lacking. Microbial fermentation enables the valorization of spent grain biomass into numerous commercially valuable products used in energy, food, healthcare, and biomaterials. However, the process still needs more investigation to overcome challenges, such as transportation, cost-effective pretreatment, and fermentation strategy. to lower the product cost and to achieve market feasibility and customer affordability. This review summarizes the potential of spent grains valorization via microbial fermentation and associated challenges.

1234567 1 - 50 of 3666
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf