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  • 1.
    Aasa, Björn
    et al.
    Umeå universitet.
    Sandlund, Jonas
    Umeå universitet.
    Rudolfsson, Thomas
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Aasa, Ulrika
    Umeå universitet.
    Acuity of goal-directed arm movements and movement control; evaluation of differences between patients with persistent neck/shoulder pain and healthy controls2022In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 47-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The main aim was to examine whether patients with persistent upper quadrant pain have higher end-point variability in goal directed pointing movements than pain-free controls when the pointing task is performed in total darkness and under full vision. An additional aim was to study associations between the magnitude of end-point variability and a clinical movement control test battery and self-rated functioning among patients.

    Methods

    Seventeen patients and 17 age- and gender-matched pain-free controls performed a pointing task that evaluated end-point variability of repetitive shoulder movements in horizontal adduction and abduction with full vision, and abduction with no visual information, completed a movement control test battery of neck and shoulder control tests and answered questionnaires.

    Results

    Patients had higher end point variability for horizontal abduction when performed with no visual information. For horizontal adduction the variability was higher, but only when it was controlled for movement time. No significant correlations were found between end-point variability and self-rated functioning, nor between end-point variability and neuromuscular control of the glenohumeral joint.

    Conclusions

    This study provides preliminary evidence that patients with persistent neck/shoulder pain can partly compensate proprioceptive deficits in goal-directed arm movement when visual feedback is present.

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  • 2.
    Aasa, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Vryonidis, Efstathios
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Abramsson-Zetterberg, Lilianne
    Törnqvist, Margareta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Internal Doses of Glycidol in Children and Estimation of Associated Cancer Risk2019In: Toxics, E-ISSN 2305-6304, Vol. 7, no 1, article id 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The general population is exposed to the genotoxic carcinogen glycidol via food containing refined edible oils where glycidol is present in the form of fatty acid esters. In this study, internal (in vivo) doses of glycidol were determined in a cohort of 50 children and in a reference group of 12 adults (non-smokers and smokers). The lifetime in vivo doses and intakes of glycidol were calculated from the levels of the hemoglobin (Hb) adduct N-(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)valine in blood samples from the subjects, demonstrating a fivefold variation between the children. The estimated mean intake (1.4 mu g/kg/day) was about two times higher, compared to the estimated intake for children by the European Food Safety Authority. The data from adults indicate that the non-smoking and smoking subjects are exposed to about the same or higher levels compared to the children, respectively. The estimated lifetime cancer risk (200/10(5)) was calculated by a multiplicative risk model from the lifetime in vivo doses of glycidol in the children, and exceeds what is considered to be an acceptable cancer risk. The results emphasize the importance to further clarify exposure to glycidol and other possible precursors that could give a contribution to the observed adduct levels.

  • 3.
    Aasa, Ulrika
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Jensen, B R
    Sandfeld, J
    Lyskov, Eugene
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Richter, Hans O
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Crenshaw, Albert G.
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    The impact of computer mouse work with different size objects on subjective perception of fatigue and performance2007In: 39th Annual Congress of the Nordic Ergonomics Society, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Aasa, Ulrika
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Belastningsskadecentrum.
    Kalezic, Nebojsa
    University of Gävle, Belastningsskadecentrum.
    Lyskov, Eugene
    University of Gävle, Belastningsskadecentrum.
    Barnekow-Bergkvist, Margareta
    University of Gävle, Belastningsskadecentrum.
    Samband mellan självrapporterad stress, salivkortisol och muskuloskeletala besvär: Självrapporteringsmetoder i stressforskning2004In: Stress-conference, 2004Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Aasa, Ulrika
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Kalezic, Nebojsa
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Lyskov, Eugene
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Ängquist, Karl-Axel
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden.
    Barnekow-Bergkvist, Margareta
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Stress monitoring of ambulance personnel during work and leisure time2006In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, Vol. 80, no 1, p. 51-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim of the present study was to assess physiological and subjective stress markers during a 24-h ambulance work shift and during the next two work-free days, and relate these parameters to self-reported health complaints. Methods: Twenty-six ambulance personnel were followed during a 24-h work shift and during the next two work-free days with electrocardiogram, cortisol assessments and diary notes. The ambulance personnel also performed tests of autonomic reactivity before and at the end of the work shift. The subjects were categorized into two groups according to their number of health complaints. Results: In general, stress markers did not show differences between the work shift and leisure time. However, a modest deviation in heart rate variability pattern and higher morning cortisol values during work in comparison with work-free days were observed in personnel with many health complaints. Conclusions: Subjective and physiological characteristics of ambulance personnel did not indicate distinctive stress during the 24-h work shift. Relationships between frequent health complaints and specific work-related factors require further prospective studies.

  • 6.
    Aasa, Ulrika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Wiitavaara, Birgitta
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    Personalens hälsa och arbetsmiljö2009In: Prehospital akutsjukvård / [ed] Björn-Ove Suserud och Leif Svensson, Stockholm: Liber, 2009, p. 33-38Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Aasa, Ulrika
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, physiotherapy, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden.
    Ängquist, Karl-Axel
    Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, University of Umea ̊ , Sweden.
    Barnekow-Bergkvist, Margareta
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    The effects of a 1-year physical exercise programme on development of fatigue during a simulated ambulance work task2008In: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847, Ergonomics, Vol. 51, no 8, p. 1179-1194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of individually prescribed physical exercise programmes on development of fatigue during the carrying of a loaded stretcher up and down the stairs. Nineteen ambulance personnel performed the training for 1 year. Testing occurred before and after 1 year of the training. Both the training group (n = 19) and the control group (n = 15) were assessed for physical capacity and lactate concentration in blood and ratings of perceived exertion during carrying a stretcher on the stairs. When comparisons were made between those who had been training three times/week for 1 year and the control group, lactate concentration was significantly decreased. In conclusion, markers of fatigue during stretcher carrying can be reduced by the use of individually prescribed physical exercise programmes.

  • 8.
    Abbasi, Saeed
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Ekstrand-Hammarström, Barbara
    Division of CBRN Defence and Security, Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI),.
    Bergström, Ulrika
    Division of CBRN Defence and Security, Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI),.
    Bucht, Anders
    Deptartment of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, 901 89, Sweden.
    Olofsson, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Sellgren, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Jansson, Anders
    Department of Applied Environmental Science, Stockholm University, Stockholm, 106 91, Sweden.
    Biological response in lung cells by brake dust from a novel set-up to generate one sourcewear particles2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Abdolahpur Monikh, Fazel
    et al.
    Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML), Leiden University, Leiden, Netherlands; Department of Environmental & Biological Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu, Finland.
    Chupani, Latifeh
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. University of South Bohemia in Ceske Budejovice, Faculty of Fisheries and Protection of Waters, South Bohemian Research Center of Aquaculture and Biodiversity of Hydrocenoses, Vodňany, Czech Republic.
    Vijver, Martina G.
    Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML), Leiden University, Leiden, Netherlands.
    Peijnenburg, Willie J. G. M.
    Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML), Leiden University, Leiden, Netherlands; National Institute of Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Center for Safety of Substances and Products, Bilthoven, Netherlands.
    Parental and trophic transfer of nanoscale plastic debris in an assembled aquatic food chain as a function of particle size2021In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 269, article id 116066Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The existing limitations in analytical techniques for characterization and quantification of nanoscale plastic debris (NPD) in organisms hinder understanding of the parental and trophic transfer of NPD in organisms. Herein, we used iron oxide-doped polystyrene (PS) NPD (Fe-PS-NPD) of 270 nm and Europium (Eu)-doped PS-NPD (Eu-PS-NPD) of 640 nm to circumvent these limitations and to evaluate the influence of particle size on the trophic transfer of NPD along an algae-daphnids food chain and on the reproduction of daphnids fed with NPD-exposed algae. We used Fe and Eu as proxies for the Fe-PS-NPD and Eu-Ps-NPD, respectively. The algae cells (Pseudokirchinella subcapitata) were exposed to 4.8 × 1010 particles/L of Fe-PS-NPD or Eu-PS-NPD for 72 h. A high percentage (>60%) of the NPD was associated with algal cells. Only a small fraction (<11%) of the NPD, however, was transferred to daphnids fed for 21 days on the NPD-exposed algae. The uptake and trophic transfer of the 270 nm Fe-PS-NPD were higher than those for the 640 nm Eu-PS-NPD, indicating that smaller NPD are more likely to transfer along food chains. After exposure to Fe-PS-NPD, the time to first brood was prolonged and the number of neonates per adult significantly decreased compared to the control without any exposure and compared to daphnids exposed to the Eu-Ps-NPD. The offspring of daphnids exposed to Eu-PS-NPD through algae, showed a traceable concentration of Eu, suggesting that NPD are transferred from parents to offspring. We conclude that NPD can be transferred in food chains and caused reproductive toxicity as a function of NPD size. Studies with prolonged exposure and weathered NPD are endeavored to increase environmental realism of the impacts determined.

  • 10.
    Abeid, Muzdalifat
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Muganyizi, Projestine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Olsson, Pia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Darj, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Axemo, Pia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Community perceptions of rape and child sexual abuse: a qualitative study in rural Tanzania2014In: BMC International Health and Human Rights, E-ISSN 1472-698X, Vol. 14, p. 23-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Rape of women and children is recognized as a health and human rights issue in Tanzania and internationally. Exploration of the prevailing perceptions in rural areas is needed in order to expand the understanding of sexual violence in the diversity of Tanzania's contexts. The aim of this study therefore was to explore and understand perceptions of rape of women and children at the community level in a rural district in Tanzania with the added objective of exploring those perceptions that may contribute to perpetuating and/or hindering the disclosure of rape incidences. Methods: A qualitative design was employed using focus group discussions with male and female community members including religious leaders, professionals, and other community members. The discussions centered on causes of rape, survivors of rape, help-seeking and reporting, and gathered suggestions on measures for improvement. Six focus group discussions (four of single gender and two of mixed gender) were conducted. The focus group discussions were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using manifest qualitative content analysis. Results: The participants perceived rape of women and children to be a frequent and hidden phenomenon. A number of factors were singled out as contributing to rape, such as erosion of social norms, globalization, poverty, vulnerability of children, alcohol/drug abuse and poor parental care. Participants perceived the need for educating the community to raise their knowledge of sexual violence and its consequences, and their roles as preventive agents. Conclusions: In this rural context, social norms reinforce sexual violence against women and children, and hinder them from seeking help from support services. Addressing the identified challenges may promote help-seeking behavior and improve care of survivors of sexual violence, while changes in social and cultural norms are needed for the prevention of sexual violence.

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  • 11.
    Aboagye, Emmanuel
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. Institute of Environmental Medicine, Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research for Worker Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Björklund, Christina
    Gustafsson, Klas
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Insurance Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. .
    Hagberg, Jan
    Aronsson, Gunnar
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University.
    Marklund, Staffan
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Insurance Medicine, Karolinska Institutet.
    Leineweber, Constanze
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University.
    Bergström, Gunnar
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Institute of Environmental Medicine, Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research for Worker Health, Karolinska Institutet.
    Exhaustion and impaired work performance in the workplace: Associations with presenteeism and absenteeism2019In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1076-2752, E-ISSN 1536-5948, Vol. 61, no 11, p. e438-e444Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between presenteeism and absenteeism during the previous year and the current levels of exhaustion and impaired work performance in a Swedish university setting.

    METHODS: In a study of 3525 employees, an ordinal logistic regression and general linear model was used to examine the association between presenteeism and absenteeism during the previous year and the current exhaustion and impaired work performance, respectively.

    RESULTS: Presenteeism, but not absenteeism, during the previous year independently increased the risk of having moderate or severe exhaustion. Presenteeism, absenteeism, and exhaustion remained positively associated with impaired work performance when health status and other confounders had been adjusted for.

    CONCLUSIONS: Presenteeism, but not absenteeism, was associated with exhaustion. Both presenteeism and absenteeism were the salient correlates of impaired work performance.

  • 12.
    Aboagye, Emmanuel
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. Karolinska institutet.
    Gustafsson, Klas
    Karolinska institutet.
    Jensen, Irene
    Karolinska institutet.
    Hagberg, Jan
    Karolinska institutet.
    Aronsson, Gunnar
    Stockholms universitet.
    Marklund, Staffan
    Karolinska institutet.
    Leineweber, Constanze
    Karolinska institutet.
    Bergström, Gunnar
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Karolinska institutet.
    What is number of days in number of times? Associations between, and responsiveness of, two sickness presenteeism measures.2020In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1076-2752, E-ISSN 1536-5948, Vol. 62, no 5, p. 180-185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the associations between SP reported as number of days with SP reported as number of times and to evaluate their responsiveness.

    METHODS: The study population (n = 454) consisted of employed individuals, at risk of long-term sickness absence. Correlation analyses were performed to examine associations between the two SP measures and external constructs such as work performance, general health and registered sick leave. Both SP constructs were measured several times to examine responsiveness.

    RESULTS: The SP measures are moderately correlated. They moderately correlated with work performance and health status measures. SP reported as number of times seem to be more sensitive than number of days in detecting changes after rehabilitation.

    CONCLUSIONS: Numerical or categorical constructs are valid sources of data on SP. However, categorized SP seem to be more responsive.

  • 13. Aboagye, Emmanuel
    et al.
    Hagberg, Jan
    Axén, Iben
    Kwak, Lydia
    Lohela-Karlsson, Malin
    Skillgate, Eva
    Dahlgren, Gunilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Jensen, Irene
    Individual preferences for physical exercise as secondary prevention for non-specific low back pain: a discrete choice experiment2017In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 12, article id e0187709Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Exercise is effective in improving non-specific low back pain (LBP). Certain components of physical exercise, such as the type, intensity and frequency of exercise, are likely to influence participation among working adults with non-specific LBP, but the value and relative importance of these components remain unknown. The study's aim was to examine such specific components and their influence on individual preferences for exercise for secondary prevention of non-specific LBP among working adults. Methods: In a discrete choice experiment, working individuals with non-specific LBP answered a webbased questionnaire. Each respondent was given ten pairs of hypothetical exercise programs and asked to choose one option from each pair. The choices comprised six attributes of exercise (i.e., type of training, design, intensity, frequency, proximity and incentives), each with either three or four levels. A conditional logit regression that reflected the random utility model was used to analyze the responses. Results: The final study population consisted of 112 participants. The participants' preferred exercise option was aerobic (i.e., cardiovascular) rather than strength training, group exercise with trainer supervision, rather than individual or unsupervised exercise. They also preferred high intensity exercise performed at least once or twice per week. The most popular types of incentive were exercise during working hours and a wellness allowance rather than coupons for sports goods. The results show that the relative value of some attribute levels differed between young adults (age <= 44 years) and older adults (age <= 45 years) in terms of the level of trainer supervision required, exercise intensity, travel time to exercise location and financial incentives. For active study participants, exercise frequency (i.e., twice per week, 1.15; CI: 0.25; 2.06) influenced choice of exercise. For individuals with more than one child, travel time (i.e., 20 minutes, - 0.55; CI: 0.65; 3.26) was also an influential attribute for choice of exercise, showing that people with children at home preferred to exercise close to home. Conclusions: This study adds to our knowledge about what types of exercise working adults with back pain are most likely to participate in. The exercise should be a cardiovascular type of training carried out in a group with trainer supervision. It should also be of high intensity and preferably performed twice per week during working hours. Coupons for sports goods do not appear to motivate physical activity among workers with LBP. The findings of the study could have a substantial impact on the planning and development of exercise provision and promotion strategies to improve non-specific LBP. Providers and employers may be able to improve participation in exercise programs for adults with non-specific LBP by focusing on the exercise components which are the most attractive. This in turn would improve satisfaction and adherence to exercise interventions aimed at preventing recurrent non-specific LBP.

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  • 14.
    Aboagye, Emmanuel
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet.
    Jensen, Irene
    Karolinska institutet.
    Bergström, Gunnar
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Karolinska institutet.
    Björk Brämberg, Elisabeth
    Karolinska institutet.
    Pico-Espinosa, Oscar Javier
    Karolinska institutet.
    Björklund, Christina
    Karolinska institutet.
    Investigating the association between publication performance and the work environment of university research academics: a systematic review2021In: Scientometrics, ISSN 0138-9130, E-ISSN 1588-2861, Vol. 126, no 4, p. 3283-3301Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this review was to investigate the association between publication performance and the organizational and psychosocial work environment of academics in a university setting. In 2018 we conducted database searches in Web of Science, Medline and other key journals (hand-searched) from 1990 to 2017 based on population, exposure and outcome framework. We examined reference lists, and after a title and abstract scan and full-text reading we identified studies that were original research and fulfilled our inclusion criteria. Articles were evaluated as having a low, moderate or high risk of bias using a quality assessment form. From the studies (n = 32) identified and synthesized, work-environment characteristics could explain the quality and quantity aspects of publication performance of academics. Management practices, leadership and psychosocial characteristics are influential factors that affect academics’ publication productivity. Most of the reviewed studies were judged to be of moderate quality because of issues of bias, related to the measuring of publication outcome. The findings in the studies reviewed suggest that highly productive research academics and departments significantly tend to be influenced by the organizational and psychosocial characteristics of their working environment. The practical relevance of this review is that it highlights where academics’ performance needs support and how the work environment can be improved to bolster publication productivity.

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  • 15.
    Abong'o, Deborah
    et al.
    University of Nairobi, Kenya.
    Wandiga, Shem
    University of Nairobi, Kenya.
    Jumba, Isaac
    University of Nairobi, Kenya.
    Madadi, Vincent
    University of Nairobi, Kenya.
    Kylin, Henrik
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Impacts of pesticides on human health and environment in the River Nyando catchment, Kenya2014In: International Journal of Humanities, Arts, Medicine and Sciences, ISSN 2348-0521, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 1-14Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The population of the River Nyando catchment largely relies on rain fed agriculture for their subsistence.

    Important crops grown include cereals, cash crops fruits and vegetables. Farming is one of the contributors of pollution to Lake Victoria. Organophosphates and other banned organochlorine pesticides such as lindane, aldrin and dieldrin were used by farmers. The pesticides transport was by storm water run-off and air drift into the lake. Environmental risk assessment background information was collected through questionnaire and interviews of farmers to determine knowledge and safe use of pesticides. Fourteen pesticides were identified as commonly used of which four are toxic to bees and five to birds. The farmers identified declines in the number of pollinating insects, the disappearance of Red-billed Oxpecker (Buphagus erythrorthynchus) and wild bird’s fatalities. The general knowledge among farmers about chemicals risks, safety, and chronic illnesses was low. Activities that increases environmental awareness and safety of pesticides should be initiated by the agrochemical firms and government.

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    River Nyando catchment 1
  • 16.
    Abozid, Hazim
    et al.
    Vienna Healthcare Grp, Clin Penzing, Dept Resp & Pulm Dis, Vienna, Austria.;Ludwig Boltzmann Inst Lung Hlth, Sanat Str 2, A-1140 Vienna, Austria..
    Patel, Jaymini
    Imperial Coll London, Natl Heart & Lung Inst, London, England..
    Burney, Peter
    Imperial Coll London, Natl Heart & Lung Inst, London, England..
    Hartl, Sylvia
    Ludwig Boltzmann Inst Lung Hlth, Sanat Str 2, A-1140 Vienna, Austria.;Sigmund Freud Univ, Fac Med, Vienna, Austria..
    Breyer-Kohansal, Robab
    Ludwig Boltzmann Inst Lung Hlth, Sanat Str 2, A-1140 Vienna, Austria.;Vienna Healthcare Grp, Clin Hietzing, Dept Resp & Pulm Dis, Vienna, Austria..
    Mortimer, Kevin
    Univ Cambridge, Cambridge, England.;Liverpool Univ Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, Liverpool, Merseyside, England..
    Nafees, Asaad A.
    Aga Khan Univ, Dept Community Hlth Sci, Karachi, Pakistan..
    Al Ghobain, Mohammed
    King Saud Bin Abdulaziz Univ Hlth Sci, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.;King Abdullah Int Med Res Ctr, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia..
    Welte, Tobias
    German Ctr Lung Res, Hannover Sch Med, Dept Resp Med Infect Dis, Hannover, Germany..
    Harrabi, Imed
    Univ Sousse, Ibn El Jazzar Fac Med Sousse, Sousse, Tunisia..
    Denguezli, Meriam
    Univ Badji Mokhtar Annaba, Fac Med Annaba, Dept Pneumol, Annaba, Algeria..
    Loh, Li Cher
    Royal Coll Surgeons Ireland, Dublin, Ireland.;Univ Coll Dublin, Malaysia Campus, George Town, Malaysia..
    Rashid, Abdul
    Royal Coll Surgeons Ireland, Dublin, Ireland.;Univ Coll Dublin, Malaysia Campus, George Town, Malaysia..
    Gislason, Thorarinn
    Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland.;Natl Univ Hosp Iceland, Dept Neurol, Landspitali, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Barbara, Cristina
    Univ Lisbon, Fac Med, Inst Saude Ambiental, Lisbon, Portugal.;Ctr Hosp Univ Lisboa Norte, Serv Pneumol, Lisbon, Portugal..
    Cardoso, Joao
    Ctr Hosp Univ Lisboa Cent, Pulmunol Dept, Lisbon, Portugal.;Nova Univ Lisbon, NOVA Med Sch, Lisbon, Portugal..
    Rodrigues, Fatima
    Ctr Hosp Univ Lisboa Norte, Serv Pneumol, Lisbon, Portugal.;Lisbon Univ, Inst Environm Hlth, Lisbon Med Sch, Associate Lab TERRA, Lisbon, Portugal..
    Seemungal, Terence
    Univ West Indies St Augustine, Fac Med Sci, St Augustine, Trinidad Tobago..
    Obaseki, Daniel
    Obafemi Awolowo Univ, Dept Med, Ife, Nigeria.;Univ British Columbia, Fac Med, Vancouver, BC, Canada..
    Juvekar, Sanjay
    KEM Hosp Res Ctr, Vadu Rural Hlth Program, Pune, Maharashtra, India..
    Paraguas, Stefanni Nonna
    Philippine Coll Chest Phys, Manila, Philippines..
    Tan, Wan C.
    Univ British Columbia, Ctr Heart Lung Innovat, St Pauls Hosp, Vancouver, BC, Canada..
    Franssen, Frits M. E.
    Maastricht Univ, Med Ctr, Maastricht, Netherlands..
    Mejza, Filip
    Jagiellonian Univ, Ctr Evidence Based Med, Dept Internal Med 2, Med Coll, Krakow, Poland..
    Mannino, David
    Univ Kentucky, Lexington, KY USA.;COPD Fdn, Miami, FL USA..
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
    Cherkaski, Hamid Hacene
    Univ Badji Mokhtar Annaba, Fac Med Annaba, Dept Pneumol, Annaba, Algeria..
    Anand, Mahesh Padukudru
    JSSAHER, JSS Med Coll, Dept Resp Med, Mysuru 570015, India..
    Hafizi, Hasan
    Tirana Univ Hosp Shefqet Ndroqi, Fac Med, Tirana, Albania..
    Buist, Sonia
    Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, Portland, OR 97201 USA..
    Koul, Parvaiz A.
    Sheri Kashmir Inst Med Sci, Dept Pulm Med, Srinagar, India..
    Sony, Asmael
    NIHR Imperial Biomed Res Ctr, London, England..
    Breyer, Marie-Kathrin
    Vienna Healthcare Grp, Clin Penzing, Dept Resp & Pulm Dis, Vienna, Austria.;Ludwig Boltzmann Inst Lung Hlth, Sanat Str 2, A-1140 Vienna, Austria..
    Burghuber, Otto C.
    Ludwig Boltzmann Inst Lung Hlth, Sanat Str 2, A-1140 Vienna, Austria.;Sigmund Freud Univ, Fac Med, Vienna, Austria..
    Wouters, Emiel F. M.
    Ludwig Boltzmann Inst Lung Hlth, Sanat Str 2, A-1140 Vienna, Austria.;NIHR Imperial Biomed Res Ctr, London, England..
    Amaral, Andre F. S.
    Imperial Coll London, Natl Heart & Lung Inst, London, England.;Epi Lab, Khartoum, Sudan.;NIHR Imperial Biomed Res Ctr, London, England..
    Prevalence of chronic cough, its risk factors and population attributable risk in the Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease (BOLD) study: a multinational cross-sectional study2024In: eClinicalMedicine, E-ISSN 2589-5370, Vol. 68, article id 102423Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Chronic cough is a common respiratory symptom with an impact on daily activities and quality of life. Global prevalence data are scarce and derive mainly from European and Asian countries and studies with outcomes other than chronic cough. In this study, we aimed to estimate the prevalence of chronic cough across a large number of study sites as well as to identify its main risk factors using a standardised protocol and definition. Methods We analysed cross-sectional data from 33,983 adults (>= 40 years), recruited between Jan 2, 2003 and Dec 26, 2016, in 41 sites (34 countries) from the Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease (BOLD) study. We estimated the prevalence of chronic cough for each site accounting for sampling design. To identify risk factors, we conducted multivariable logistic regression analysis within each site and then pooled estimates using random -effects metaanalysis. We also calculated the population attributable risk (PAR) associated with each of the identifed risk factors. Findings The prevalence of chronic cough varied from 3% in India (rural Pune) to 24% in the United States of America (Lexington,KY). Chronic cough was more common among females, both current and passive smokers, those working in a dusty job, those with a history of tuberculosis, those who were obese, those with a low level of education and those with hypertension or airflow limitation. The most influential risk factors were current smoking and working in a dusty job. Interpretation Our findings suggested that the prevalence of chronic cough varies widely across sites in different world regions. Cigarette smoking and exposure to dust in the workplace are its major risk factors.

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  • 17. Abrahamsen, Annbjørg Selma
    et al.
    Johannesen, Ása
    Debes, Fróði
    van Leeuwen, Wessel M. A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Stress Research Institute. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology.
    Weihe, Pál
    Working environment and fatigue among fishers in the north Atlantic: a field study2023In: International Maritime Health, ISSN 1641-9251, E-ISSN 2081-3252, Vol. 74, no 1, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This study investigates how Faroese deep-sea fishers’ exposure to work-related stressors affects their sleep, sleepiness, and levels of fatigue. Being constantly exposed to the unpredictable and harsh North Atlantic Ocean, having long work hours and split sleep for up to 40 days consecutively, they will arguably suffer from fatigue.

    Materials and methods: One hundred and fifty seven fishers participated in this study, and data was gathered throughout 202 days at sea. Subjective data was collected at the start and end of trips via questionnaires, sleep and sleepiness diaries and supplemented by objective sleep data through actigraphs. Ship movements were logged with a gyroscope connected to a laptop. A noise metre measured each work station and resting area, and noise exposure profiles were calculated based on each participant’s activity and location. Linear mixed-effect models investigated the effects of work exposure variables on sleep efficiency, and cumulative link mixed models measured effects on the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale and physical fatigue scale.

    Results: Time of day followed by ship movement were the exposure variables with the highest impact on the outcome variables of sleep efficiency, sleepiness and physical fatigue. The number of days at sea revealed correlations to outcome variables either by itself or interacting with the sleep periods per day. Crew size, shift system or noise did not impact outcome variables when in the model with other variables. Larger catches improved sleep efficiency but did not affect sleepiness and physical fatigue ratings.

    Conclusions: The findings indicate a chronically fatigued fisher population, and recommends urgent attention being paid to improving the structure of vessels and installing stabilators for greater stability at sea; work schedules being evaluated for protection of health; and work environments being designed that fulfill human physiological requirements in order to ensure the wellbeing and safety of those at sea.

  • 18. Abrahamsen, Annbjørg Selma
    et al.
    Weihe, Pál
    van Leeuwen, Wessel M. A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Stress Research Institute.
    Debes, Fróði
    Impact of work exposure on cognitive performance in Faroese deep-sea fishers: a field study2022In: International Maritime Health, ISSN 1641-9251, E-ISSN 2081-3252, Vol. 73, no 3, p. 150-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This study examines the impact of work-related exposure on the cognitive performance of Faroese deep-sea fishers. Faroese fishing crews work long hours in demanding and noisy environments amidst highly uncertain and challenging weather conditions. These factors, together with compromised patterns of rest and sleep, are known to increase fatigue. Our aim was to study if changes could be measured in fishers’ cognitive performance at the end of the trip when compared with the baseline measure at the beginning.

    Materials and methods: Data was collected over 15 months (May 2017 to July 2018) from 157 fishers on 18 fishing trips which involved 202 investigative days on board. Questionnaires and six computerised cognitive tests: Simple Reaction Time, Numeric Working Memory, Corsi Blocks, Rapid Visual Information Processing, Digit Vigilance, and Card Sorting Test were used for data collection at the beginning and end of the trip. Differences between the outcomes on the two test points were analysed with one-way ANOVA comparing the performances at the beginning and end of the voyage, and two-way ANOVA to examine the interactive effect of chronotype and test occasions on the outcomes. Mixed models were used to test for the effects of predictor variables.

    Results: Significant declines in cognitive performance were observed from the beginning to the end of the trip, with decreases in visuospatial memory and reaction times, and increases in cognitive lapses. Furthermore, slowing in response times was observed in the second half of the Digit Vigilance test when comparing the halves.

    Conclusions: Declines in performance were observed from the start to the end of the trip. Furthermore, fishers performed significantly worse in the second half of some parted tests, and evening types seem less influenced by irregular work hours. These findings call for improving the safety of the vessels and their crew.

  • 19. Abrahamsen, Annbjørg
    et al.
    Weihe, Pál
    Debes, Fróði
    van Leeuwen, Wessel MA.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Stress Research Institute.
    Sleep, Sleepiness, and Fatigue on Board Faroese Fishing Vessels2022In: Nature and Science of Sleep, ISSN 1179-1608, Vol. 14, p. 347-362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Faroese fishers have four times more accidents than workers on land. The aim was to understand fishers’ fatigue better and how their work and sleep patterns influenced their sleepiness levels and cognitive performance.

    Materials and Methods: A total of 157 Faroese fishers wore wrist-worn actigraphs at sea and one week on land and filled in sleep and sleepiness diaries during the trip. Furthermore, a 3-minute simple reaction time (SRT) test was completed at the beginning and end of the trip. The ship’s movement and noise were also logged. The actiwatch results were analysed with mixed methods repeated measures. The sleepiness registrations and performance on the SRT-test were analysed with paired t-test. The ship movements (Pitch and roll) were divided into approximately three same-sized groups (lowest 1/3, medium 1/3, and highest 1/3) and compared against the Karolinska Sleepiness Scores (KSS ranging from 1– 9) ≥ 7 and physical tiredness (ranging from 1– 9) scores ≥ 7. Chi-square tests were used to determine the significance of these differences. Mean sleepiness scores at sea, and the proportion of sleepiness scores ≥ 7 were calculated, as well as sleepiness scores as a function of the time of day.

    Results: While at sea, fishers had more split sleep, slept less, and had lower sleep efficiency than onshore. Sleepiness was higher at the end of the trip, and cognitive decline was found. The number of major lapses was higher at the end of the trip, but with no significant difference between the median reaction times.

    Conclusion: The crew on-board the freezer longliner, who worked 8– 8 shifts, slept the most, had the longest continuous sleep periods, the highest sleep efficiency, the lowest sleepiness levels, and the highest noise exposure during their time off.

  • 20. Accordini, Simone
    et al.
    Calciano, Lucia
    Johannessen, Ane
    Portas, Laura
    Benediktsdóttir, Bryndis
    Bertelsen, Randi Jacobsen
    Bråbäck, Lennart
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Carsin, Anne-Elie
    Dharmage, Shyamali C.
    Dratva, Julia
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Gomez Real, Francisco
    Heinrich, Joachim
    Holloway, John W.
    Holm, Mathias
    Janson, Christer
    Jögi, Rain
    Leynaert, Bénédicte
    Malinovschi, Andrei
    Marcon, Alessandro
    Martínez-Moratalla Rovira, Jesús
    Raherison, Chantal
    Sánchez-Ramos, José Luis
    Schlünssen, Vivi
    Bono, Roberto
    Corsico, Angelo G.
    Demoly, Pascal
    Dorado Arenas, Sandra
    Nowak, Dennis
    Pin, Isabelle
    Weyler, Joost
    Jarvis, Deborah
    Svanes, Cecilie
    A three-generation study on the association of tobacco smoking with asthma2018In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 1106-1117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Mothers' smoking during pregnancy increases asthma risk in their offspring. There is some evidence that grandmothers' smoking may have a similar effect, and biological plausibility that fathers' smoking during adolescence may influence offspring's health through transmittable epigenetic changes in sperm precursor cells. We evaluated the three-generation associations of tobacco smoking with asthma.

    Methods: Between 2010 and 2013, at the European Community Respiratory Health Survey III clinical interview, 2233 mothers and 1964 fathers from 26 centres reported whether their offspring (aged ≤51 years) had ever had asthma and whether it had coexisted with nasal allergies or not. Mothers and fathers also provided information on their parents' (grandparents) and their own asthma, education and smoking history. Multilevel mediation models within a multicentre three-generation framework were fitted separately within the maternal (4666 offspring) and paternal (4192 offspring) lines.

    Results: Fathers' smoking before they were 15 [relative risk ratio (RRR) = 1.43, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.01-2.01] and mothers' smoking during pregnancy (RRR = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.01-1.59) were associated with asthma without nasal allergies in their offspring. Grandmothers' smoking during pregnancy was associated with asthma in their daughters [odds ratio (OR) = 1.55, 95% CI: 1.17-2.06] and with asthma with nasal allergies in their grandchildren within the maternal line (RRR = 1.25, 95% CI: 1.02-1.55).

    Conclusions: Fathers' smoking during early adolescence and grandmothers' and mothers' smoking during pregnancy may independently increase asthma risk in offspring. Thus, risk factors for asthma should be sought in both parents and before conception.

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  • 21.
    Accordini, Simone
    et al.
    Univ Verona, Dept Diagnost & Publ Hlth, Unit Epidemiol & Med Stat, Verona, Italy..
    Calciano, Lucia
    Univ Verona, Dept Diagnost & Publ Hlth, Unit Epidemiol & Med Stat, Verona, Italy..
    Marcon, Alessandro
    Univ Verona, Dept Diagnost & Publ Hlth, Unit Epidemiol & Med Stat, Verona, Italy..
    Pesce, Giancarlo
    Univ Verona, Dept Diagnost & Publ Hlth, Unit Epidemiol & Med Stat, Verona, Italy.;Sorbonne Univ, INSERM, UMR S 1136, IPLESP,Team EPAR, F-75012 Paris, France..
    Ant, Josep M.
    Ctr Res Environm Epidemiol CREAL, ISGlobal, Barcelona, Spain.;Hosp del Mar Med Res Inst IMIM, Barcelona, Spain.;CIBER Epidemiol & Salud Publ CIBERESP, Barcelona, Spain.;Univ Pompeu Fabra UPF, Barcelona, Spain..
    Beckmeyer-Borowko, Anna B.
    Swiss Trop & Publ Hlth Inst, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Basel, Switzerland.;Univ Basel, Basel, Switzerland..
    Carsin, Anne-Elie
    Ctr Res Environm Epidemiol CREAL, ISGlobal, Barcelona, Spain.;CIBER Epidemiol & Salud Publ CIBERESP, Barcelona, Spain.;Univ Pompeu Fabra UPF, Barcelona, Spain..
    Corsico, Angelo G.
    Univ Pavia, San Matteo Hosp Fdn, IRCCS, Div Resp Dis, Pavia, Italy..
    Imboden, Medea
    Swiss Trop & Publ Hlth Inst, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Basel, Switzerland.;Univ Basel, Basel, Switzerland..
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
    Keidel, Dirk
    Swiss Trop & Publ Hlth Inst, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Basel, Switzerland.;Univ Basel, Basel, Switzerland..
    Locatelli, Francesca
    Univ Verona, Dept Diagnost & Publ Hlth, Unit Epidemiol & Med Stat, Verona, Italy..
    Svanes, Cecilie
    Univ Bergen, Dept Global Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Ctr Int Hlth, Bergen, Norway.;Haukeland Hosp, Dept Occupat Med, Bergen, Norway..
    Burney, Peter G. J.
    Imperial Coll London, Natl Heart & Lung Inst, Populat Hlth & Occupat Dis, London, England.;Imperial Coll London, MRC PHE Ctr Environm & Hlth, London, England..
    Jarvis, Deborah
    Imperial Coll London, Natl Heart & Lung Inst, Populat Hlth & Occupat Dis, London, England.;Imperial Coll London, MRC PHE Ctr Environm & Hlth, London, England..
    Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.
    Swiss Trop & Publ Hlth Inst, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Basel, Switzerland.;Univ Basel, Basel, Switzerland..
    Minelli, Cosetta
    Imperial Coll London, Natl Heart & Lung Inst, Populat Hlth & Occupat Dis, London, England..
    Incidence trends of airflow obstruction among European adults without asthma: a 20-year cohort study2020In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 3452Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Investigating COPD trends may help healthcare providers to forecast future disease burden. We estimated sex- and smoking-specific incidence trends of pre-bronchodilator airflow obstruction (AO) among adults without asthma from 11 European countries within a 20-year follow-up (ECRHS and SAPALDIA cohorts). We also quantified the extent of misclassification in the definition based on pre-bronchodilator spirometry (using post-bronchodilator measurements from a subsample of subjects) and we used this information to estimate the incidence of post-bronchodilator AO (AO(post-BD)), which is the primary characteristic of COPD. AO incidence was 4.4 (95% CI: 3.5-5.3) male and 3.8 (3.1-4.6) female cases/1,000/year. Among ever smokers (median pack-years: 20, males; 12, females), AO incidence significantly increased with ageing in men only [incidence rate ratio (IRR), 1-year increase: 1.05 (1.03-1.07)]. A strong exposure-response relationship with smoking was found both in males [IRR, 1-pack-year increase: 1.03 (1.02-1.04)] and females [1.03 (1.02-1.05)]. The positive predictive value of AO for AO(post-BD) was 59.1% (52.0-66.2%) in men and 42.6% (35.1-50.1%) in women. AO(post-BD) incidence was 2.6 (1.7-3.4) male and 1.6 (1.0-2.2) female cases/1,000/year. AO incidence was considerable in Europe and the sex-specific ageing-related increase among ever smokers was strongly related to cumulative tobacco exposure. AO(post-BD) incidence is expected to be half of AO incidence.

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  • 22. Adam, Martin
    et al.
    Schikowski, Tamara
    Carsin, Anne Elie
    Cai, Yutong
    Jacquemin, Benedicte
    Sanchez, Margaux
    Vierkötter, Andrea
    Marcon, Alessandro
    Keidel, Dirk
    Sugiri, Dorothee
    Al Kanani, Zaina
    Nadif, Rachel
    Siroux, Valérie
    Hardy, Rebecca
    Kuh, Diana
    Rochat, Thierry
    Bridevaux, Pierre-Olivier
    Eeftens, Marloes
    Tsai, Ming-Yi
    Villani, Simona
    Phuleria, Harish Chandra
    Birk, Matthias
    Cyrys, Josef
    Cirach, Marta
    de Nazelle, Audrey
    Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    de Hoogh, Kees
    Declerq, Christophe
    Bono, Roberto
    Piccioni, Pavilio
    Quass, Ulrich
    Heinrich, Joachim
    Jarvis, Deborah
    Pin, Isabelle
    Beelen, Rob
    Hoek, Gerard
    Brunekreef, Bert
    Schindler, Christian
    Sunyer, Jordi
    Krämer, Ursula
    Kauffmann, Francine
    Hansell, Anna L
    Künzli, Nino
    Probst-Hensch, Nicole
    Adult lung function and long-term air pollution exposure. ESCAPE: a multicentre cohort study and meta-analysis2015In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 41, no 5, p. 38-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The chronic impact of ambient air pollutants on lung function in adults is not fully understood. The objective of this study was to investigate the association of long-term exposure to ambient air pollution with lung function in adult participants from five cohorts in the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE). Residential exposure to nitrogen oxides (NO2, NOx) and particulate matter (PM) was modelled and traffic indicators were assessed in a standardised manner. The spirometric parameters forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) from 7613 subjects were considered as outcomes. Cohort-specific results were combined using meta-analysis. We did not observe an association of air pollution with longitudinal change in lung function, but we observed that a 10 μg·m(-3) increase in NO2 exposure was associated with lower levels of FEV1 (-14.0 mL, 95%CI -25.8- -2.1) and FVC (-14.9 mL, 95% CI -28.7- -1.1). An increase of 10 μg·m(-3) in PM10, but not other PM metrics (PM2.5, coarse fraction of PM, PM absorbance), was associated with a lower level of FEV1 (-44.6 mL, 95% CI -85.4- -3.8) and FVC (-59.0 mL, 95% CI -112.3- -5.6). The associations were particularly strong in obese persons. This study adds to the evidence for an adverse association of ambient air pollution with lung function in adults at very low levels in Europe.

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  • 23. Adam-Poupart, Ariane
    et al.
    Labreche, France
    Smargiassi, Audrey
    Duguay, Patrice
    Busque, Marc-Antoine
    Gagne, Charles
    Rintamaki, Hannu
    Kjellström, Tord
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Zayed, Joseph
    Climate Change and Occupational Health and Safety in a Temperate Climate: Potential Impacts and Research Priorities in Quebec, Canada2013In: Industrial Health, ISSN 0019-8366, E-ISSN 1880-8026, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 68-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The potential impacts of climate change (CC) on Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) have been studied a little in tropical countries, while they received no attention in northern industrialized countries with a temperate climate. This work aimed to establish an overview of the potential links between CC and OHS in those countries and to determine research priorities for Quebec, Canada. A narrative review of the scientific literature (2005-2010) was presented to a working group of international and national experts and stakeholders during a workshop held in 2010. The working group was invited to identify knowledge gaps, and a modified Delphi method helped prioritize research avenues. This process highlighted five categories of hazards that are likely to impact OHS in northern industrialized countries: heat waves/increased temperatures, air pollutants, UV radiation, extreme weather events, vector-borne/zoonotic diseases. These hazards will affect working activities related to natural resources (i.e. agriculture, fishing and forestry) and may influence the socioeconomic context (built environment and green industries), thus indirectly modifying OHS. From this consensus approach, three categories of research were identified: 1) Knowledge acquisition on hazards, target populations and methods of adaptation; 2) Surveillance of diseases/accidents/occupational hazards; and 3) Development of new occupational adaptation strategies.

  • 24.
    Adamsson, Mathias
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Construction Engineering and Lighting Science.
    Laike, Thorbjörn
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Morita, Takeshi
    Fukuoka Women's University, Fukuoka, Japan.
    Seasonal variation in bright daylight exposure, mood and behavior among a group of office workers in Sweden2018In: Journal of Circadian Rhythms, E-ISSN 1740-3391, Vol. 16, article id 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study was to investigate seasonal variation in mood and behavior among a group of office workers in Sweden (56°N). Thirty subjects participated in this longitudinal study. The subjects kept a weekly log that included questionnaires for ratings of psychological wellbeing and daily sleep-activity diaries where they also noted time spent outdoors. The lighting conditions in the offices were subjectively evaluated during one day, five times over the year. There was a seasonal variation in positive affect and in sleep-activity behavior. Across the year, there was a large variation in the total time spent outdoors in daylight. The subjects reported seasonal variation concerning the pleasantness, variation and strength of the light in the offices and regarding the visibility in the rooms. Finally, the subjects spent most of their time indoors, relying on artificial lighting, which demonstrates the importance of the lighting quality in indoor environments. 

  • 25.
    Adman, M. A.
    et al.
    Univ Selangor, Dept Hlth Sci, Shah Alam 40000, Selangor, Malaysia.;United Nat Univ Kuala Lumpur, Int Inst Global Hlth, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia..
    Hashim, J. H.
    Univ Selangor, Dept Hlth Sci, Shah Alam 40000, Selangor, Malaysia.;United Nat Univ Kuala Lumpur, Int Inst Global Hlth, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia..
    Manaf, M. R. A.
    Natl Univ Malaysia, Dept Community Hlth, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia..
    Norbäck, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Associations between air pollutants and peak expiratory flow and fractional exhaled nitric oxide in students2020In: The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, ISSN 1027-3719, E-ISSN 1815-7920, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 189-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Studies on the effects of outdoor air pollution on the respiratory health of students in tropical countries such as Malaysia are limited. OBJECTIVE: To assess associations between outdoor air pollutants and peak expiratory flow (PEF) and fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO). METHOD: PEF and FeNO levels of 487 students recruited in Melaka and Putrajaya, Malaysia, were measured in April and June 2014. Multiple linear regression with mutual adjustment was used to analyse the associations between exposure to air pollution and health. RESULTS: PEF was significantly associated with ozone for 1-day exposure (beta = -13.3 l/min, 95% CI -22.7 to -3.8), carbon monoxide for 2-day exposure (beta =-57.2 l/min, 95% CI -90.7 to -23.7) and particulate matter <= 10 mu m in diameter for 3-day exposure (beta =-6.0 l/min, 95% CI -9.2 to -2.8) and 7-day exposure (beta = -8.6 l/min, 95% CI -13.0 to -4.1). Stratified analysis showed that associations between PEF and outdoor air pollutant exposures were similar in students with and without elevated FeNO levels. CONCLUSION: Outdoor air pollution in Malaysia may cause airway obstruction unrelated to eosinophilic airway inflammation among students as measured using FeNO.

  • 26. Adrian, L.
    et al.
    Svanes, C.
    Johannessen, A.
    Lodge, C.
    Bertelsen, R.
    Dratva, J.
    Forsberg, B.
    Gislason, T.
    Benedikstdottir, B.
    Holm, M.
    Jogi, R.
    Modig, L.
    Norbäck, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Omenaas, E.
    Real, F.
    Schlunssen, V
    Sigsgaard, T.
    Skorge, T.
    Timm, S.
    Wieslander, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Dharmage, S.
    Early life parental exposure to cats and dogs reduces the risk of allergic disease in their children: possible intergenerational effect2014In: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995, Vol. 69, p. 577-578Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 27. Aggett, Peter
    et al.
    Nordberg, Gunnar F
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Nordberg, Monica
    Essential metals: assessing risks from dificiency and toxicity2015In: Handbook on the toxicology of metals: Volume I: General considerations / [ed] Gunnar F. Nordberg, Bruce A. Fowler, Monica Nordberg, Academic Press, 2015, 4, p. 281-297Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recommendations aimed at protecting the public from toxicity of essential elements including essential metals have usually been developed separately from those recommendations aimed at protection from deficiency. Because of the uncertainties involved in the evaluations, these recommendations have sometimes been in conflict, emphasizing the need for a new approach, including a balanced consideration of nutritional and toxicological data. In developing these new principles of evaluation, some basic concepts based on interindividual variability in sensitivity to deficiency and toxicity must be considered. Such variation translates into one interval of (low) daily intakes, at which there is a risk of developing deficiency, and another interval of (high) dietary intakes at which toxicity may occur. In most instances, there is a third set of intakes in between, which represents the acceptable range of oral intake (AROI), in which no adverse effects occur. It must be noted, however, that a range cannot be found that protects all persons from adverse effects. Those persons with genetically determined sensitivity may require higher intakes to avoid deficiency or lower intakes to avoid toxicity than those defined by the AROI. The AROI is defined as protecting 95% of an unselected human population from minimal adverse effects of deficiency or toxicity.

  • 28.
    Ahlroth Pind, Caroline
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
    Gunnbjörnsdottír, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research. National University Hospital of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Bjerg, A
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Järvholm, B
    Umeå Univ, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lundbäck, B
    Univ Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Malinovschi, Andrei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Middelveld, R
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nilsson Sommar, J
    Umeå Univ, Umeå, Sweden.
    Norbäck, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
    Patient-reported signs of dampness at home may be a risk factor for chronic rhinosinusitis: A cross-sectional study2017In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 47, no 11, p. 1383-1389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: An association between dampness at home and respiratory conditions has been convincingly demonstrated in children. Fewer studies have been performed in adults, and data are lacking for chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). With a prevalence of 10.9% in Europe, CRS imposes a significant burden on quality of life, as well as economy.

    OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to study CRS and other respiratory conditions in relation to dampness at home in a representative sample of adults.

    METHODS: The Swedish GA2 LEN questionnaire was answered by 26 577 adults (16-75 years) and included questions on respiratory symptoms, smoking, education and environmental exposure. CRS was defined according to the EP3 OS criteria. Dampness was defined as reporting water damage, floor dampness or visible moulds in the home during the last 12 months. The dampness score was ranked from 0 to 3, counting the number of signs of dampness reported.

    RESULTS: Dampness at home was reported by 11.3% and was independently related to respiratory conditions after adjustment for demographic and socio-economic factors and smoking: CRS odds ratio (OR) 1.71; allergic rhinitis OR 1.24; current asthma OR 1.21; wheeze OR 1.37; nocturnal dyspnoea OR 1.80; nocturnal coughing OR 1.34; and chronic bronchitis OR 1.64. The risk of CRS and most of the other respiratory conditions was further elevated in subjects reporting multiple signs of dampness.

    CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: This study demonstrated an independent association between dampness at home and CRS in adults. The high burden of this and the other respiratory conditions studied is a strong argument in favour of countering indoor dampness by improving building standards.

  • 29.
    Ahlstrom, Linda
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Grimby-Ekman, Anna
    Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Hagberg, Mats
    Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Dellve, Lotta
    Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Measures of work ability and association with sick leave, symptoms and health: A prospective study of female workers on long term sick leave2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, E-ISSN 1795-990X, Vol. 36, no 5, p. 404-412Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Ahlstrom, Linda
    et al.
    Högskolan Borås.
    Larsson Fallman, Sara
    Högskolan Borås.
    Dellve, Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics. Public Health and Community Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Return to work from long-term sick leave: a five-year prospective study of the importance of adjustment latitudes at work and home2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Adjustment latitude among employees, i.e. adjusting work to individual’s health capacity, has been associated with successful return to work (RTW) in cross-sectional studies. The aim is to investigate the long-term importance of adjustment latitude at the workplace and at home, as well as attitudes (own and colleagues) for increased work ability (WA), working degree (WD) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among female human service workers (HSW) on long-term sick leave in Sweden.

    Methods

    A cohort of female HSW (n=324) on long-term sick leave (>60 day) received a questionnaire at four times (0, 6, 12, 60 months). Prevalence ratios (PR) were used to examine possible relationships between explanatory factors and outcomes. Linear mixed models were used for longitudinal analysis of the repeated measurements of WA Score (0-10), WD (0-100%) and HRQoL (0-100). Analyses were performed with different models; the explanatory variables for each model were adjustment latitude, attitudes towards breaks at work, shared or single household and amount of household work.

    Result

    Having more adjustment latitude at work was associated with both increased WA and RTW compared to having few adjustment latitude opportunities. Adjustments related to working-pace were strongly associated with increased WD (PR 3.29(95%CI=1.71-6.26)), as were adjustments to working-place. Having opportunities to take short breaks at work, and a general acceptance at work to take short breaks was associated with increased WA. At home, a higher responsibility for household work (PR 1.98(95%CI=1.33-2.95)) was related to increased WA and RTW. Individuals with possibilities for adjustment latitude, especially pace and place, at work, and an acceptance to take breaks at work, increased in WA score significantly more over time and had higher WA score compared with individuals not having such opportunities at work. These prospective results were similar for the outcome WD and HRQoL.

    Conclusions

    The results highlight the importance of possibilities for adjustment latitude at work and at home, as well as accepting attitudes to take short breaks to increase WA and RTW among female human service workers previously on long-term sick leave.

  • 31.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    Fors, Carina
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    Anund, Anna
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    Hallvig, David
    Stockholms Universitet.
    Video-based observer rated sleepiness versus self-reported subjective sleepiness in real road driving2015In: European Transport Research Review, ISSN 1867-0717, E-ISSN 1866-8887, Vol. 7, no 4, article id 38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Observer-rated sleepiness (ORS) based on video recordings of the driver’s face is often used when analysing naturalistic driving data. The aim of this study is to investigate if ORS ratings agree with subjective self-reported sleepiness (SRS).

    Forty raters assessed 54 video-clips showing drivers with varying levels of sleepiness. The video-clips were recorded during a field experiment focusing on driver sleepiness using the same cameras that are typically used in large-scale field studies. The weak results prompted a second test. Ten human factors researchers made pairwise comparisons of videos showing the same four participants in an alert versus a very sleepy condition. The task was simply to select the video-clip where the driver was sleepy.

    The overall average percentage of video segments where ORS and SRS matched was 41 % in Test 1. ORS 0 (alert) and ORS 2 (very sleepy) were easier to score than ORS 1 and it was slightly harder to rate night-time drives. Inter-rater agreement was low, with average Pearson’s r correlations of 0.19 and Krippendorff’s alpha of 0.15. In Test 2, the average Pearson’s r correlations was 0.35 and Krippendorff’s alpha was 0.62. The correspondence between ORS and SRS showed an agreement of 35 %.

    The results indicate that ORS ratings based on real road video recordings correspond poorly with SRS and have low inter-rater agreement. Further research is necessary in order to further evaluate the usefulness of ORS as a measure of sleepiness.

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  • 32.
    Ahmad Termida, Nursitihazlin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science.
    Susilo, Yusak
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science.
    Franklin, Joel P.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science.
    Examining the effects of out-of-home and in-home constraints on leisure activity participation in different seasons of the year2016In: Transportation, ISSN 0049-4488, E-ISSN 1572-9435, p. 1-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using multi-day, multi-period travel diaries data of 56 days (four waves of two-week diaries) for 67 individuals in Stockholm, this study aims to examine the effects of out-of-home and in-home constraints (e.g. teleworking, studying at home, doing the laundry, cleaning and taking care of other household member[s]) on individuals’ day-to-day leisure activity participation decisions in four different seasons. This study also aims to explore the effects of various types of working schedules (fixed, shift, partial- and full-flexible) on individuals’ decisions to participate in day-to-day leisure activities. A pooled model (56 days) and wave-specific models (14 days in each wave) are estimated by using dynamic ordered Probit models. The effects of various types of working schedules are estimated by using 28 days of two waves’ data. The results show that an individual’s leisure activity participation decision is significantly influenced by out-of-home work durations but not influenced by in-home constraints, regardless of any seasons. Individuals with shift working hours engage less in day-to-day leisure activities than other workers’ types in both spring and summer seasons. The thermal indicator significantly affects individuals’ leisure activity participation decisions during the autumn season. Individuals exhibit routine behaviour characterized by repeated decisions in participating in day-to-day leisure activities that can last up to 14 days, regardless of any seasons.

  • 33.
    Ahmadi, Elena
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Macassa, Gloria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Public Health and Sport Science, Public Health Science. University of Porto.
    Larsson, Johan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. LKAB.
    Managers’ work and behaviour patterns in profitable growth SMEs2021In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913, Vol. 57, p. 849-863Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated managers’ work and behaviour patterns in profitable growth small- and medium-sized Swedish companies, and considered how these patterns might be associated with good health outcomes. Specifically, we looked at hours worked by managers, proportion of time spent on working activities, and leadership behaviour orientation. We used a quantitative cross-sectional design and collected data via a standardized questionnaire that was answered by 133 top managers. The data were analyzed with descriptive statistics, linear regression, and compositional data analysis. Our results indicate that the managers worked long hours, which is a health risk both for them as individuals and for their organizations, but also that they engaged in work practices and leadership behaviours that were favourable for organizational health and for their employees. The managers spent a high proportion of their time in touring, which could be beneficial to organizational health, and exercised active leadership through behaviours that contribute to both employee health and company effectiveness. Comparing our results to other studies, we can observe that patterns of managers’ time use differ between small and large companies, confirming that the size of the firm is an important determinant of managerial work.

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  • 34.
    Ahmadi, Elena
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Macassa, Gloria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Public health science.
    Larsson, Johan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Managers’ working hours and time allocation in effective SMEs – an organizational health perspective2018In: FALF KONFERENS 2018 Arbetet – problem eller potential för en hållbar livsmiljö?   10-12 juni 2018 Gävle: Program och abstracts / [ed] Per Lindberg, Gävle: Gävle University Press , 2018, p. 118-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    There is an increased global interest in occupational health across small businesses as they represent a large share of employers in many societies. In the model of healthy work organisations, employee health is a prerequisite for higher productivity and profitability and management practices are considered as determinants of organisational health. A better understanding of how managers in effective companies use their time can offer a better understanding of how this can affect employees’ well-being and business effect-iveness. Managers’ long working hours and share of time spent on Management by Walking Around (MBWA) are considered important characteristics of managers’ work that might have consequences for employees’ and managers’ own health outcomes, as well as for organisational effectiveness. MBWA is a management technique common for successful companies in regard to their effectiveness; providing an opportunity for a spontaneous manager-subordinate interaction that might be important for employee health and wellbeing. Studies of managerial work have to some extent not clearly placed managers’ time use in the broad context of leadership, often missing to link it with leadership behaviour theories, health and effectiveness.

    Objective

    The objective of this study was to explore, on the one hand, the total amount of working hours that managers spent, and on the other, their patterns of time allocation to different activities in effective SMEs. Research questions were: 1) What patterns regarding managers’ working hours can be identified across socio-demographic variables, leader-ship experience factors and leadership profiles in effective SMEs? 2) What patterns regarding proportions of total working hours spent on MBWA can be identified across socio-demographic variables, leadership experience factors and leadership profiles in effective SMEs?

    Method

    The study used data collected within the project, “Successful Companies in Gästrikland”. Annually the project nominates 120 companies for the award based on companies’ financial indicators. The study employed a cross-sectional design and analysed responses to questionnaires collected within the project during years 2014-2018. The inclusion criteria were small and medium sized companies (more than four and less than 250 subordinates), high-level managers having subordinates. Data analysis were carried out using descriptive statistics and regression analysis.

    Results

    The results section is being processed and will be reported on the conference.

  • 35.
    Ahmadi, Fereshteh
    et al.
    Univ Gävle, Fac Hlth & Occupat Studies, Dept Social Work & Criminol, Gävle, Sweden..
    Zandi, Saeid
    Allameh Tabatabai Univ, Fac Psychol & Educ, Dept Counseling, Tehran, Iran..
    Cetrez, Önver
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology.
    Akhavan, Sharareh
    Univ Gävle, Fac Hlth & Occupat Studies, Dept Social Work & Criminol, Gävle, Sweden..
    Job satisfaction and challenges of working from home during the COVID-19 pandemic: A study in a Swedish academic setting2022In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assessment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 71, no 2, p. 357-370Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic changed the academic world in various ways, and most universities are still closed and continue operating via teleworking. OBJECTIVE: This study is intended to investigate how university faculty/staff and students in Sweden have coped with the lockdown and working/studying from home during the pandemic. METHODS: A survey was conducted among 277 women and men working and studying at different universities in Sweden. RESULTS: The results indicate that most (61%) respondents were very or somewhat satisfied with the current work-fromhome arrangement. Additionally, they indicate that, overall, almost 30% were working more than usual due to the pandemic and teleworking. The coping methods having the highest impact on overall job satisfaction were . "thinking about what I can do rather than what I can't do"; "being able to access medical resources and medical services if I need to seek help"; and "having trust in state or health authorities in my country." CONCLUSIONS: The study reveals that Sweden can serve as a good example of how university faculty/staff and students can address the occupational challenges caused by a health pandemic and possible subsequent quarantines.

  • 36. Aili, K
    et al.
    Nyman, T
    Svartengren, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Hillert, L
    Sleep as a predictive factor for the onset and resolution of multi-site pain: A 5-year prospective study2015In: European Journal of Pain, ISSN 1090-3801, E-ISSN 1532-2149, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 341-349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Disturbed sleep and pain often co-exist and the relationship between the two conditions is complex and likely reciprocal. This 5-year prospective study examines whether disturbed sleep can predict the onset of multi-site pain, and whether non-disturbed sleep can predict the resolution of multi-site pain.

    METHODS: The cohort (n = 1599) was stratified by the number of self-reported pain sites: no pain, pain from 1-2 sites and multi-site pain (≥3 pain sites). Sleep was categorized by self-reported sleep disturbance: sleep A (best sleep), sleep B and sleep C (worst sleep). In the no-pain and pain-from-1-2 sites strata, the association between sleep (A, B and C) and multi-site pain 5 years later was analysed. Further, the prognostic value of sleep for the resolution of multi-site pain at follow-up was calculated for the stratum with multi-site pain at baseline. In the analyses, gender, age, body mass index, smoking, physical activity and work-related exposures were treated as potential confounders.

    RESULTS: For individuals with no pain at baseline, a significantly higher odds ratio for multi-site pain 5 years later was seen for the tertile reporting worst sleep [odds ratio (OR) 4.55; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.28-16.12]. Non-disturbed (or less disturbed) sleep had a significant effect when predicting the resolution of multi-site pain (to no pain) (OR 3.96; 95% CI 1.69-9.31).

    CONCLUSION: In conclusion, sleep could be relevant for predicting both the onset and the resolution of multi-site pain. It seems to be a significant factor to include in research on multi-site pain and when conducting or evaluating intervention programmes for pain.

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  • 37. Aili, K.
    et al.
    Nyman, Teresia
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Hillert, L.
    Svartengren, M.
    Sleep disturbances predict future sickness absence among individuals with lower back or neck-shoulder pain: A 5-year prospective study2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 315-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Musculoskeletal pain is one of the most common causes of sickness absence. Sleep disturbances are often co-occurring with pain, but the relationship between sleep and pain is complex. Little is known about the importance of self-reported sleep, when predicting sickness absence among persons with musculoskeletal pain. This study aims to study the association between self-reported sleep quality and sickness absence 5 years later, among individuals stratified by presence of lower back pain (LBP) and neck and shoulder pain (NSP). Methods: The cohort (n = 2286) in this 5-year prospective study (using data from the MUSIC-Norrtälje study) was stratified by self-reported pain into three groups: no LBP or NSP, solely LBP or NSP, and oncurrent LBP and NSP. Odds ratios (ORs) for the effect of self-reported sleep disturbances at baseline on sickness absence (> 14 consecutive days), 5 years later, were calculated. Results: Within all three pain strata, individuals reporting the most sleep problems showed a significantly higher OR for all-cause sickness absence, 5 years later. The group with the most pronounced sleep problems within the concurrent LBP and NSP stratum had a significantly higher OR (OR 2.00; CI 1.09-3.67) also for long-term sickness absence (> 90days) 5 years later, compared to the group with the best sleep. Conclusions: Sleep disturbances predict sickness absence among individuals regardless of co-existing features of LBP and/or NSP. The clinical evaluation of patients should take possible sleep disturbances into account in the planning of treatments.

  • 38.
    Aili, Katarina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Department of Health and Sport, School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad University.
    Hellman, Therese
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Svartengren, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Danielsson, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Including a Three-Party Meeting Using the Demand and Ability Protocol in an Interdisciplinary Pain Rehabilitation Programme for a Successful Return to Work Process2022In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 19, no 24, article id 16614Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Demand and Ability Protocol (DAP) is used in three-party meetings involving an employee, an employer, and a representative from the rehabilitation team. The aim of this study is to investigate the inclusion of an intervention using the DAP in an interdisciplinary pain rehabilitation programme (IPRP) compared to usual care. This non-randomised controlled trial included patients assigned to an IPRP in Sweden. The intervention group received a DAP intervention targeting their work situation in addition to the usual care provided by the IPRP. The control group received IPRP only. Outcome measures were collected from the Swedish Quality Registry for Pain Rehabilitation. Results demonstrated improvements in both groups regarding self-reported anxiety, depression and EQ5D. Sleep was improved in the intervention group but not in the control group. No statistical differences in outcomes were observed between the groups. In conclusion, adding the DAP intervention to IPRP seemed to have the potential to improve sleep among the patients, which may indicate an overall improvement regarding health outcomes from a longer perspective. The results were less clear, however, regarding the work-related outcomes of sickness absence and workability.

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  • 39.
    Aili, Katarina
    et al.
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nyman, T.
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Svartengren, M.
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hillert, L.
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sleep as a predictive factor for the onset and resolution of multi-site pain: A 5-year prospective study2015In: European Journal of Pain, ISSN 1090-3801, E-ISSN 1532-2149, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 341-349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Disturbed sleep and pain often co-exist and the relationship between the two conditions is complex and likely reciprocal. This 5-year prospective study examines whether disturbed sleep can predict the onset of multi-site pain, and whether non-disturbed sleep can predict the resolution of multi-site pain.

    METHODS: The cohort (n = 1599) was stratified by the number of self-reported pain sites: no pain, pain from 1-2 sites and multi-site pain (≥3 pain sites). Sleep was categorized by self-reported sleep disturbance: sleep A (best sleep), sleep B and sleep C (worst sleep). In the no-pain and pain-from-1-2 sites strata, the association between sleep (A, B and C) and multi-site pain 5 years later was analysed. Further, the prognostic value of sleep for the resolution of multi-site pain at follow-up was calculated for the stratum with multi-site pain at baseline. In the analyses, gender, age, body mass index, smoking, physical activity and work-related exposures were treated as potential confounders.

    RESULTS: For individuals with no pain at baseline, a significantly higher odds ratio for multi-site pain 5 years later was seen for the tertile reporting worst sleep [odds ratio (OR) 4.55; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.28-16.12]. Non-disturbed (or less disturbed) sleep had a significant effect when predicting the resolution of multi-site pain (to no pain) (OR 3.96; 95% CI 1.69-9.31).

    CONCLUSION: In conclusion, sleep could be relevant for predicting both the onset and the resolution of multi-site pain. It seems to be a significant factor to include in research on multi-site pain and when conducting or evaluating intervention programmes for pain. © 2014 The Authors. European Journal of Painpublished by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Pain Federation - EFIC.

  • 40. Aili, Katarina
    et al.
    Nyman, Teresia
    Hillert, Lena
    Svartengren, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Sleep disturbances predict future sickness absence among individuals with lower back or neck-shoulder pain: A 5-year prospective study2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 315-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Musculoskeletal pain is one of the most common causes of sickness absence. Sleep disturbances are often co-occurring with pain, but the relationship between sleep and pain is complex. Little is known about the importance of self-reported sleep, when predicting sickness absence among persons with musculoskeletal pain. This study aims to study the association between self-reported sleep quality and sickness absence 5 years later, among individuals stratified by presence of lower back pain (LBP) and neck and shoulder pain (NSP). Methods: The cohort (n = 2286) in this 5-year prospective study (using data from the MUSIC-Norrtalje study) was stratified by self-reported pain into three groups: no LBP or NSP, solely LBP or NSP, and oncurrent LBP and NSP. Odds ratios (ORs) for the effect of self-reported sleep disturbances at baseline on sickness absence (> 14 consecutive days), 5 years later, were calculated. Results: Within all three pain strata, individuals reporting the most sleep problems showed a significantly higher OR for all-cause sickness absence, 5 years later. The group with the most pronounced sleep problems within the concurrent LBP and NSP stratum had a significantly higher OR (OR 2.00; CI 1.09-3.67) also for long-term sickness absence (> 90days) 5 years later, compared to the group with the best sleep. Conclusions: Sleep disturbances predict sickness absence among individuals regardless of co-existing features of LBP and/or NSP. The clinical evaluation of patients should take possible sleep disturbances into account in the planning of treatments.

  • 41.
    Aili, Katarina
    et al.
    Karolinska Instutitet, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nyman, Teresia
    Karolinska Instutitet, Institute of Environmental Medicine, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Technology and Health, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hillert, Lena
    Karolinska Instutitet, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Svartengren, Magnus
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sleep disturbances predict future sickness absence among individuals with lower back or neck-shoulder pain: a 5-year prospective study2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 315-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Musculoskeletal pain is one of the most common causes of sickness absence. Sleep disturbances are often co-occurring with pain, but the relationship between sleep and pain is complex. Little is known about the importance of self-reported sleep, when predicting sickness absence among persons with musculoskeletal pain. This study aims to study the association between self-reported sleep quality and sickness absence 5 years later, among individuals stratified by presence of lower back pain (LBP) and neck and shoulder pain (NSP).

    METHODS: The cohort (n = 2286) in this 5-year prospective study (using data from the MUSIC-Norrtälje study) was stratified by self-reported pain into three groups: no LBP or NSP, solely LBP or NSP, and concurrent LBP and NSP. Odds ratios (ORs) for the effect of self-reported sleep disturbances at baseline on sickness absence (> 14 consecutive days), 5 years later, were calculated.

    RESULTS: Within all three pain strata, individuals reporting the most sleep problems showed a significantly higher OR for all-cause sickness absence, 5 years later. The group with the most pronounced sleep problems within the concurrent LBP and NSP stratum had a significantly higher OR (OR 2.00; CI 1.09-3.67) also for long-term sickness absence (> 90 days) 5 years later, compared to the group with the best sleep. CONCLUSIONS Sleep disturbances predict sickness absence among individuals regardless of co-existing features of LBP and/or NSP. The clinical evaluation of patients should take possible sleep disturbances into account in the planning of treatments. © 2015, the Nordic Societies of Public Health. All rights reserved.

  • 42.
    Aili, Katarina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Department of Health and Sport, School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Svartengren, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Danielsson, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Johansson, Elin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Central Hospital in Karlstad, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Hellman, Therese
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Active engagement of managers in employee RTW and manager-employee relationship: managers’ experiences of participating in a dialogue using the Demand and Ability Protocol2023In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 45, no 26, p. 4394-4403Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To describe how managers of employees on sick-leave, due to chronic pain conditions, experience participating in a three-party meeting using the Demand and Ability Protocol (DAP) in the return-to-work process.

    Materials and methods: This study is based on individual semi-structured interviews with 17 managers of employees with chronic pain. Interviews were conducted after participating in a three-party meeting including the employee, manager, and a representative from the rehabilitation team. The data were analyzed using thematic analysis with an inductive approach.

    Results: Two main themes were identified - "to converse with a clear structure and setup" and "to be involved in the employee's rehabilitation." The first theme describe experiences from the conversation, and the second theme reflected the managers' insights when being involved in the employee's rehabilitation. The themes comprise 11 sub-themes describing how the DAP conversation and the manager ' s involvement in the rehabilitation may influence the manager, the manager-employee relationship, and the organization.

    Conclusions: This study show, from a manager's perspective, how having a dialogue with a clear structure and an active involvement in the employee's rehabilitation may be beneficial for the manager-employee relationship. Insights from participating in the DAP may also be beneficial for the organization.

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  • 43.
    Aili, Katarina
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Occupat Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Åström-Paulsson, Sofia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Stoetzer, Ulrich
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Intervent & Implementat Res, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Svartengren, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Hillert, Lena
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Occupat Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Reliability of Actigraphy and Subjective Sleep Measurements in Adults: the Design of Sleep Assessments2017In: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine (JCSM), ISSN 1550-9389, E-ISSN 1550-9397, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 39-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to investigate how many nights of measurement are needed for a reliable measure of sleep in a working population including adult women and men.

    METHODS: In all, 54 individuals participated in the study. Sleep was assessed for 7 consecutive nights using actigraphy as an objective measure, and the Karolinska sleep diary for a subjective measure of quality. Using intra-class correlation and the Spearman-Brown formula, calculations of how many nights of measurements were required for a reliable measure were performed. Differences in reliability according to whether or not weekend measurements were included were investigated. Further, the correlation between objectively (actigraphy) measured sleep and subjectively measured sleep quality was studied over the different days of the week.

    RESULTS/CONCLUSIONS: The results concerning actigraphy sleep measures suggest that data from at least 2 nights are to be recommended when assessing sleep percent and at least 5 nights when assessing sleep efficiency. For actigraphy-measured total sleep time, more than 7 nights are needed. At least 6 nights of measurements are required for a reliable measure of self-reported sleep. Fewer nights (days) are required if measurements include only week nights. Overall, there was a low correlation between the investigated actigraphy sleep parameters and subjective sleep quality, suggesting that the two methods of measurement capture different dimensions of sleep.

  • 44.
    Aili, Katarina
    et al.
    Unit of Occupational Medicine, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Åström-Paulsson, Sofia
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Stoetzer, Ulrich
    Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Svartengren, Magnus
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hillert, Lena
    Unit of Occupational Medicine, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Reliability of Actigraphy and Subjective Sleep Measurements in Adults: The Design of Sleep Assessments2017In: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine (JCSM), ISSN 1550-9389, E-ISSN 1550-9397, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 39-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to investigate how many nights of measurement are needed for a reliable measure of sleep in a working population including adult women and men.

    METHODS: In all, 54 individuals participated in the study. Sleep was assessed for 7 consecutive nights using actigraphy as an objective measure, and the Karolinska sleep diary for a subjective measure of quality. Using intra-class correlation and the Spearman-Brown formula, calculations of how many nights of measurements were required for a reliable measure were performed. Differences in reliability according to whether or not weekend measurements were included were investigated. Further, the correlation between objectively (actigraphy) measured sleep and subjectively measured sleep quality was studied over the different days of the week.

    RESULTS/CONCLUSIONS: The results concerning actigraphy sleep measures suggest that data from at least 2 nights are to be recommended when assessing sleep percent and at least 5 nights when assessing sleep efficiency. For actigraphy-measured total sleep time, more than 7 nights are needed. At least 6 nights of measurements are required for a reliable measure of self-reported sleep. Fewer nights (days) are required if measurements include only week nights. Overall, there was a low correlation between the investigated actigraphy sleep parameters and subjective sleep quality, suggesting that the two methods of measurement capture different dimensions of sleep.

  • 45. Ainsbury, E A
    et al.
    Bakhanova, E
    Barquinero, J F
    Brai, M
    Chumak, V
    Correcher, V
    Darroudi, F
    Fattibene, P
    Gruel, G
    Guclu, I
    Horn, S
    Jaworska, A
    Kulka, U
    Lindholm, C
    Lloyd, D
    Longo, A
    Marrale, M
    Monteiro Gil, O
    Oestreicher, U
    Pajic, J
    Rakic, B
    Romm, H
    Trompier, F
    Veronese, I
    Voisin, P
    Vral, A
    Whitehouse, C A
    Wieser, A
    Woda, C
    Wojcik, Andrzej
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology.
    Rothkamm, K
    REVIEW OF RETROSPECTIVE DOSIMETRY TECHNIQUES FOR EXTERNAL IONISING RADIATION EXPOSURES.2011In: Radiation Protection Dosimetry, ISSN 0144-8420, E-ISSN 1742-3406, Vol. 147, no 4, p. 573-592Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current focus on networking and mutual assistance in the management of radiation accidents or incidents has demonstrated the importance of a joined-up approach in physical and biological dosimetry. To this end, the European Radiation Dosimetry Working Group 10 on 'Retrospective Dosimetry' has been set up by individuals from a wide range of disciplines across Europe. Here, established and emerging dosimetry methods are reviewed, which can be used immediately and retrospectively following external ionising radiation exposure. Endpoints and assays include dicentrics, translocations, premature chromosome condensation, micronuclei, somatic mutations, gene expression, electron paramagnetic resonance, thermoluminescence, optically stimulated luminescence, neutron activation, haematology, protein biomarkers and analytical dose reconstruction. Individual characteristics of these techniques, their limitations and potential for further development are reviewed, and their usefulness in specific exposure scenarios is discussed. Whilst no single technique fulfils the criteria of an ideal dosemeter, an integrated approach using multiple techniques tailored to the exposure scenario can cover most requirements.

  • 46.
    Ainsbury, Elizabeth A.
    et al.
    Publ Hlth England, England.
    Samaga, Daniel
    Bundesamt Strahlenschutz, Germany.
    Della Monaca, Sara
    Ist Super Sanita, Italy.
    Marrale, Maurizio
    Univ Palermo, Italy; Univ Palermo, Italy.
    Bassinet, Celine
    Inst Radioprotect and Surete Nucl, France.
    Burbidge, Christopher I.
    Environm Protect Agcy, Ireland.
    Correcher, Virgilio
    Ctr Moncloa, Spain.
    Discher, Michael
    Univ Salzburg, Austria.
    Eakins, Jon
    Publ Hlth England, England.
    Fattibene, Paola
    Ist Super Sanita, Italy.
    Guclu, Inci
    Turkish Atom Energy Commiss, Turkey.
    Higueras, Manuel
    Basque Ctr Appl Math, Spain.
    Lund, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Maltar-Strmecki, Nadica
    Rudjer Boskovic Inst, Croatia.
    McKeever, Stephen
    Oklahoma State Univ, OK 74078 USA.
    Raaf, Christopher L.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Sholom, Sergey
    Oklahoma State Univ, OK 74078 USA.
    Veronese, Ivan
    Univ Milan, Italy; Natl Inst Nucl Phys, Italy.
    Wieser, Albrecht
    Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Germany.
    Woda, Clemens
    Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Germany.
    Trompier, Francois
    Inst Radioprotect and Surete Nucl, France.
    UNCERTAINTY ON RADIATION DOSES ESTIMATED BY BIOLOGICAL AND RETROSPECTIVE PHYSICAL METHODS2018In: Radiation Protection Dosimetry, ISSN 0144-8420, E-ISSN 1742-3406, Vol. 178, no 4, p. 382-404Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biological and physical retrospective dosimetry are recognised as key techniques to provide individual estimates of dose following unplanned exposures to ionising radiation. Whilst there has been a relatively large amount of recent development in the biological and physical procedures, development of statistical analysis techniques has failed to keep pace. The aim of this paper is to review the current state of the art in uncertainty analysis techniques across the EURADOS Working Group 10-Retrospective dosimetry members, to give concrete examples of implementation of the techniques recommended in the international standards, and to further promote the use of Monte Carlo techniques to support characterisation of uncertainties. It is concluded that sufficient techniques are available and in use by most laboratories for acute, whole body exposures to highly penetrating radiation, but further work will be required to ensure that statistical analysis is always wholly sufficient for the more complex exposure scenarios.

  • 47.
    Airaksinen, Jaakko
    et al.
    Univ Helsinki, Dept Psychol & Logoped, Med, Haartmaninkatu 3,PL 21, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland; Finnish Inst Occupat Hlth, Dept Occupat Hlth, Helsinki, Finland.
    Ervasti, Jenni
    Department of Occupational Health, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
    Pentti, Jaana
    Clinicum, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Public Health, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Oksanen, Tuula
    Department of Occupational Health, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
    Suominen, Sakari
    Department of Public Health, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Vahtera, Jussi
    Department of Public Health, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
    Virtanen, Marianna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Public Health. Department of Occupational Health, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kivimäki, Mika
    Department of Occupational Health, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland; Clinicum, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK.
    The effect of smoking cessation on work disability risk: a longitudinal study analysing observational data as non-randomized nested pseudo-trials2019In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 48, no 2, p. 415-422Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Smoking increases disability risk, but the extent to which smoking cessation reduces the risk of work disability is unclear. We used non-randomized nested pseudo-trials to estimate the benefits of smoking cessation for preventing work disability.

    Methods

    We analysed longitudinal data on smoking status and work disability [long-term sickness absence (≥90 days) or disability pension] from two independent prospective cohort studies—the Finnish Public Sector study (FPS) (n = 7393) and the Health and Social Support study (HeSSup) (n = 2701)—as ‘nested pseudo-trials’. All the 10 094 participants were smokers at Time 1 and free of long-term work disability at Time 2. We compared the work disability risk after Time 2 of the participants who smoked at Time 1 and Time 2 with that of those who quit smoking between these times.

    Results

    Of the participants in pseudo-trials, 2964 quit smoking between Times 1 and 2. During the mean follow-up of 4.8 to 8.6 years after Time 2, there were 2197 incident cases of work disability across the trials. Quitting smoking was associated with a reduced risk of any work disability [summary hazard ratio = 0.89, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.81–0.98]. The hazard ratio for the association between quitting smoking and permanent disability pension (928 cases) was of similar magnitude, but less precisely estimated (0.91, 95% CI 0.81–1.02). Among the participants with high scores on the work disability risk score (top third), smoking cessation reduced the risk of disability pension by three percentage points. Among those with a low risk score (bottom third), smoking cessation reduced the risk by half a percentage point.

    Conclusions

    Our results suggest an approximately 10% hazard reduction of work disability as a result of quitting smoking.

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  • 48.
    Akerstrom, Magnus
    et al.
    Inst Stress Med, Reg Vastra Gotaland, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Univ Gothenburg, Inst Med, Sahlgrenska Acad, Sch Publ Hlth & Community Med, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Sengpiel, Verena
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Reg Vastra Gotaland, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Univ Gothenburg, Inst Clin Sci, Sahlgrenska Acad, Ctr Perinatal Med & Hlth, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Hadzibajramovic, Emina
    Inst Stress Med, Reg Vastra Gotaland, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Univ Gothenburg, Inst Med, Sahlgrenska Acad, Sch Publ Hlth & Community Med, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Carlsson, Ylva
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Reg Vastra Gotaland, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Univ Gothenburg, Inst Clin Sci, Sahlgrenska Acad, Ctr Perinatal Med & Hlth, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Graner, Sofie
    Karolinska Inst, Ctr Pharmacoepidemiol, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden.;Danderyd Hosp, BB Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Andersson, Ola
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Lund, Paediat, Lund, Sweden.;Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Neonatol, Malmö, Sweden..
    Jonsson, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Clinical Obstetrics.
    Naurin, Elin
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Polit Sci, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Veje, Malin
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Infect Dis, Reg Vastra Gotaland, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Univ Gothenburg, Inst Biomed, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Infect Dis, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Wessberg, Anna
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Reg Vastra Gotaland, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Univ Gothenburg, Inst Hlth & Care Sci, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Linden, Karolina
    Univ Gothenburg, Inst Hlth & Care Sci, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Inst Hlth & Care Sci, POB 457, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    The COPE Staff study: Study description and initial report regarding job satisfaction, work-life conflicts, stress, and burnout among Swedish maternal and neonatal healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic2023In: International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics, ISSN 0020-7292, E-ISSN 1879-3479, Vol. 162, no 3, p. 989-997Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectiveTo describe the study design of the COPE Staff cohort study on working conditions for maternal and neonatal healthcare workers (MNHCWs), and present baseline data regarding job satisfaction, work-life conflicts, stress, and burnout. MethodsBetween January and April 2021, 957 MNHCWs (administrative and medical staff) completed a baseline survey. Average levels of job satisfaction, work-life conflicts, stress, and burnout, and associations to perceived workload were assessed. ResultsThe average levels of job satisfaction, work-life conflicts, stress, and burnout were 68.6 (95% confidence interval [CI] 64.3-72.8), 42.6 (95% CI 37.3-48.0), 42.0 (95% CI 37.7-46.3), and 1.9 (95% CI 1.6-2.2), respectively. The respondents scoring above critical values indicating clinical burnout ranged between 3% and 18%, respectively, for the four burnout sub-dimensions. Women reported significantly higher levels of stress and burnout. Younger participants had lower job satisfaction and higher levels of work-life conflicts, stress, and burnout. Higher perceived workload was significantly associated with lower job satisfaction levels and higher levels of work-life conflicts, stress, and burnout. ConclusionsOur results indicate associations between MNHCWs perceived workload and job satisfaction, work-life conflicts, stress, and burnout during the COVID-19 pandemic. Eighteen percent scored above critical values for exhaustion.

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  • 49. Akesson, Agneta
    et al.
    Barregard, Lars
    Bergdahl, Ingvar A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research.
    Nordberg, Gunnar F.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Nordberg, Monica
    Skerfving, Staffan
    Non-Renal Effects and the Risk Assessment of Environmental Cadmium Exposure2014In: Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives, ISSN 0091-6765, E-ISSN 1552-9924, Vol. 122, no 5, p. 431-438Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Exposure to cadmium (Cd) has long been recognized as a health hazard, both in industry and in general populations with high exposure. Under the currently prevailing health risk assessment, the relationship between urinary Cd (U-Cd) concentrations and tubular proteinuria is used. However, doubts have recently been raised regarding the justification of basing the risk assessment on this relationship at very low exposure. Objectives: Our objective was to review available information on health effects of Cd exposure with respect to human health risk assessment. Discussion: The associations between U-Cd and urinary proteins at very low exposure may not be due to Cd toxicity, and the clinical significance of slight proteinuria may also be limited. More importantly, other effects have been reported at very low Cd exposure. There is reason to challenge the basis of the existing health risk assessment for Cd. Our review of the literature found that exposure to low concentrations of Cd is associated with effects on bone, including increased risk of osteoporosis and fractures, and that this observation has implications for the health risk assessment of Cd. Other effects associated with Cd should also be considered, in particular cancer, although the information is still too limited for appropriate use in quantitative risk assessment. Conclusion: Non-renal effects should be considered critical effects in the health risk assessment of Cd.

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  • 50.
    Akesson, Agneta
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Box 210, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Donat-Vargas, Carolina
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Box 210, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Berglund, Marika
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Box 210, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Glynn, Anders
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Biomed Sci & Vet Publ Hlth, Box 7028, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Wolk, Alicja
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Box 210, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kippler, Maria
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Box 210, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Dietary exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls and risk of heart failure - A population-based prospective cohort study2019In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, Vol. 126, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Beneficial effects of fish consumption on heart failure (HF) may be modified by contaminants in fish. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are of particular concern as they have been associated with well-established risk factors of HF, but current data are limited. Objectives: We aimed to assess the association between dietary PCB exposure and risk of HF, accounting for dietary intake of long-chain omega-3 fish fatty acids. Design: We used the prospective population-based research structure SIMPLER (previously the Swedish Mammography Cohort and Cohort of Swedish Men) comprising 32,952 women and 36,546 men, free from cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes at baseline in 1997. Validated estimates of dietary PCBs and long-chain omega-3 fish fatty acids [eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)] were obtained via a food frequency questionnaire at baseline. Incident cases of HF were ascertained through register linkage. Results: During an average of 12 years of follow-up, we ascertained 2736 and 3128 incident cases of HF in women and men, respectively. In multivariable-adjusted models, mutually adjusted for PCBs and EPA-DHA, the relative risk (RR) for dietary PCB exposure was 1.48 (95% CI 1.12-1.96) in women and 1.42 (95% CI 1.08-1.86) in men, comparing extreme quintiles. Corresponding RRs for EPA-DHA intake were 0.71 (95% CI 0.54-0.93) and 0.82 (95% CI 0.63-1.07), respectively. Conclusions: Dietary exposure to PCBs was associated with an increased risk of HF in both women and men. EPA-DHA intake was associated with a lower risk of HF in women, with a similar tendency in men.

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