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  • 1.
    Aasebö, Kristine Ö.
    et al.
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, Bergen, Norway.
    Dragomir, Anca
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Sundström, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Mezheyeuski, Artur
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Edqvist, Per-Henrik D
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Eide, Geir Egil
    Univ Bergen, Dept Global Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Lifestyle Epidemiol Grp, Bergen, Norway;Haukeland Hosp, Ctr Clin Res, Bergen, Norway.
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Pfeiffer, Per
    Odense Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, Odense, Denmark.
    Glimelius, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Sorbye, Halfdan
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, Bergen, Norway;Haukeland Hosp, Dept Oncol, Bergen, Norway.
    Consequences of a high incidence of microsatellite instability and BRAF-mutated tumors: A population-based cohort of metastatic colorectal cancer patients2019In: Cancer Medicine, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 8, no 7, p. 3623-3635Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Immunotherapy for patients with microsatellite-instable (MSI-H) tumors or BRAF-inhibitors combination treatment for BRAF-mutated (mutBRAF) tumors in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) is promising, but the frequency of these molecular changes in trial patients are low. Unselected population-based studies of these molecular changes are warranted.

    Methods: A population-based cohort of 798 mCRC patients in Scandinavia was studied. Patient and molecular tumor characteristics, overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were estimated.

    Results: Here, 40/583 (7%) tumor samples were MSI-H and 120/591 (20%) were mutBRAF; 87% of MSI-H tumors were mutBRAF (non-Lynch). Elderly (>75 years) had more often MSI-H (10% vs 6%) and MSI-H/mutBRAF (9% vs 4%) tumors. Response rate (5% vs 44%), PFS (4 vs 8 months), and OS (9 vs 18 months) after first-line chemotherapy was all significantly lower in patients with MSI-H compared to patients with microsatellite stable tumors. MSI-H and mutBRAF were both independent poor prognostic predictors for OS (P = 0.049, P < 0.001) and PFS (P = 0.045, P = 0.005) after first-line chemotherapy. Patients with MSI-H tumors received less second-line chemotherapy (15% vs 37%, P = 0.005).

    Conclusions: In unselected mCRC patients, MSI-H and mutBRAF cases were more common than previously reported. Patients with MSI-H tumors had worse survival, less benefit from chemotherapy, and they differed considerably from recent third-line immunotherapy trial patients as they were older and most had mutBRAF tumor (non-Lynch).

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  • 2.
    Abdsaleh, Shahin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Wärnberg, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Azavedo, E
    Lindgren, P G
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Amini, Rose-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Comparison of core needle biopsy and surgical specimens in malignant breast lesions regarding histological features and hormone receptor expression2008In: Histopathology, ISSN 0309-0167, E-ISSN 1365-2559, Vol. 52, no 6, p. 773-775Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Abdulla, Maysaa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Alexsson, Andrei
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Sundström, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Ladenvall, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Mansouri, Larry
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindskog, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Berglund, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Cavelier, Lucia
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Hollander, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Amini, Rose-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    PD-L1 and IDO1 are potential targets for treatment in patients with primary diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the CNS2021In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 60, no 4, p. 531-538Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and its ligands PD-L1 and PD-L2, as well as Indoleamine 2,3-deoxygenase (IDO1) can be expressed both by tumor and microenvironmental cells and are crucial for tumor immune escape. We aimed to evaluate the role of PD-1, its ligands and IDO1 in a cohort of patients with primary diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the CNS (PCNSL).

    Material and methods

    Tissue microarrays (TMAs) were constructed in 45 PCNSL cases. RNA extraction from whole tissue sections and RNA sequencing were successfully performed in 33 cases. Immunohistochemical stainings for PD-1, PD-L1/paired box protein 5 (PAX-5), PD-L2/PAX-5 and IDO1, and Epstein-Barr virus encoding RNA (EBER) in situ hybridization were analyzed.

    Results

    High proportions of PD-L1 and PD-L2 positive tumor cells were observed in 11% and 9% of cases, respectively. High proportions of PD-L1 and PD-L2 positive leukocytes were observed in 55% and 51% of cases, respectively. RNA sequencing revealed that gene expression of IDO1 was high in patients with high proportion of PD-L1 positive leukocytes (p = .01). Protein expression of IDO1 in leukocytes was detected in 14/45 cases, in 79% of these cases a high proportion of PD-L1 positive leukocytes was observed. Gene expression of IDO1 was high in EBER-positive cases (p = .0009) and protein expression of IDO1 was detected in five of six EBER-positive cases.

    Conclusion

    Our study shows a significant association between gene and protein expression of IDO1 and protein expression of PD-L1 in the tumor microenvironment of PCNSL, possibly of importance for prediction of response to immunotherapies.

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  • 4.
    Abdulla, Maysaa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Guglielmo, Priscilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. Brotzu General Hospital, Cagliari, Italy.
    Hollander, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Åström, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Amini, Rose-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Prognostic impact of abdominal lymph node involvement in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma2020In: European Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0902-4441, E-ISSN 1600-0609, Vol. 104, no 3, p. 207-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The prognostic value of site of nodal involvement in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL) is mainly unknown. We aimed to determine the prognostic significance of nodal abdominal involvement in relation to tumour cell markers and clinical characteristics of 249 DLBCL patients in a retrospective single-centre study.

    METHODS: Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and thorax revealed pathologically enlarged abdominal lymph nodes in 156 patients, while in 93 patients there were no pathologically enlarged lymph nodes in the abdomen. In 81 cases, the diagnosis of DLBCL was verified by histopathological biopsy obtained from abdominal lymph node.

    RESULTS: Patients with abdominal nodal disease had inferior lymphoma-specific survival (P = .04) and presented with higher age-adjusted IPI (P < .001), lactate dehydrogenase (P < .001) and more often advanced stage (P < .001), bulky disease (P < .001), B symptoms (P < .001), and double expression of MYC and BCL2 (P = .02) compared to patients without nodal abdominal involvement, but less often extranodal involvement (P < .02). The worst outcome was observed in those where the abdominal nodal involvement was verified by histopathological biopsy.

    CONCLUSION: Diffuse large B-cell lymphomas patients with abdominal nodal disease had inferior outcome and more aggressive behaviour, reflected both in clinical and biological characteristics.

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  • 5.
    Abdulla, Maysaa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Hollander, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Pandzic, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Mansouri, Larry
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ednersson, Susanne Bram
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Pathol, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Andersson, Per-Ola
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden;Sodra Alvsborg Hosp Borås, Dept Med, Borås, Sweden.
    Hultdin, Magnus
    Umeå Univ, Dept Med Biosci, Pathol, Umeå, Sweden.
    Fors, Maja
    Umeå Univ, Dept Med Biosci, Pathol, Umeå, Sweden.
    Erlanson, Martin
    Umeå Univ, Dept Radiat Sci, Oncol, Umeå, Sweden.
    Degerman, Sofie
    Umeå Univ, Dept Med Biosci, Pathol, Umeå, Sweden.
    Petersen, Helga Munch
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Dept Pathol, Rigshosp, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Asmar, Fazila
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Dept Hematol, Rigshosp, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Gronbaek, Kirsten
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Dept Hematol, Rigshosp, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Uppsala Univ, Expt & Clin Oncol, Dept Immunol Genet & Pathol, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Cavelier, Lucia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Amini, Rose-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Cell-of-origin determined by both gene expression profiling and immunohistochemistry is the strongest predictor of survival in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma2020In: American Journal of Hematology, ISSN 0361-8609, E-ISSN 1096-8652, Vol. 95, no 1, p. 57-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The tumor cells in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL) are considered to originate from germinal center derived B-cells (GCB) or activated B-cells (ABC). Gene expression profiling (GEP) is preferably used to determine the cell of origin (COO). However, GEP is not widely applied in clinical practice and consequently, several algorithms based on immunohistochemistry (IHC) have been developed. Our aim was to evaluate the concordance of COO assignment between the Lymph2Cx GEP assay and the IHC-based Hans algorithm, to decide which model is the best survival predictor. Both GEP and IHC were performed in 359 homogenously treated Swedish and Danish DLBCL patients, in a retrospective multicenter cohort. The overall concordance between GEP and IHC algorithm was 72%; GEP classified 85% of cases assigned as GCB by IHC, as GCB, while 58% classified as non-GCB by IHC, were categorized as ABC by GEP. There were significant survival differences (overall survival and progression-free survival) if cases were classified by GEP, whereas if cases were categorized by IHC only progression-free survival differed significantly. Importantly, patients assigned as non-GCB/ABC both by IHC and GEP had the worst prognosis, which was also significant in multivariate analyses. Double expression of MYC and BCL2 was more common in ABC cases and was associated with a dismal outcome. In conclusion, to determine COO both by IHC and GEP is the strongest outcome predictor to identify DLBCL patients with the worst outcome.

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  • 6.
    Abdulla, Maysaa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Laszlo, Sofia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Triumf, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Hedström, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Berglund, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Novum, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Amini, Rose-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    A population-based study of cellular markers in R-CHOP treated diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients2016In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 55, no 9-10, p. 1126-1131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To determine the prognostic significance of co-expression of MYC, BCL-2 and BCL-6 proteins in combination with other biomarkers and clinical characteristics within a population-based cohort of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) patients uniformly treated with R-CHOP.

    Patients and methods: The immunohistochemical (IHC) expression of CD10, BCL-2, BCL-6, MUM1, MYC, CD5, CD30, Ki-67 and p53 was evaluated in a retrospective, population-based study comprising 188 DLBCL patients treated with R-CHOP and diagnosed in Sweden between 2002 and 2012.

    Results: Patients had a median age at diagnosis of 64 years (26-85 years) with a male:female ratio of 1.4:1. Approximately half (52%) of the patients presented with an International Prognostic Index (IPI) age adjusted (IPIaa)2. Median follow-up time was 51 months (range 0.4-158) and the five-year lymphoma-specific survival (LSS) was 76%, five-year overall survival (OS) was 65% and five-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 61%. A high Ki-67 value was found in 59% of patients, while p53 overexpression was detected in 12% of patients and MYC, BCL-2 and BCL-6 expression were detected in 42%, 55% and 74% of patients, respectively. IPIaa2 (p=0.002), Ki-6770% (p=0.04) and p53 overexpression50% (p=0.02) were associated with inferior LSS and OS. Co-expression of both MYC (>40%) and BCL-2 (>70%) proteins was detected in 27% of patients and correlated with a significantly inferior LSS (p=0.0002), OS (p=0.009) and PFS (p=0.03). In addition, triple expression of MYC, BCL-2 and BCL-6, also correlated with a significantly inferior LSS (p=0.02).

    Conclusion: Concurrent expression of MYC and BCL-2 proteins, as detected by IHC, was strongly associated with an inferior survival in DLBCL patients treated with R-CHOP. Other markers affecting survival were triple expression of MYC, BCL-2 and BCL-6, IPIaa, high Ki-67 and p53 overexpression.

  • 7.
    Abdulla, Maysaa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology. Univ Uppsala Hosp, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Laszlo, Sofia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology. Univ Uppsala Hosp, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Triumf, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Univ Uppsala Hosp, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Hedström, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Univ Uppsala Hosp, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Berglund, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Univ Uppsala Hosp, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Univ Uppsala Hosp, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Amini, Rose-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Core needle biopsies for the diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma - a great concern for research2017In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 56, no 1, p. 106-109Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Abu Hamdeh, Sami
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Enblad: Neurosurgery.
    Virhammar, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Enblad: Neurosurgery.
    Sehlin, Dag
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Cesarini, Kristina G
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Enblad: Neurosurgery.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Enblad: Neurosurgery.
    Brain tissue Aβ42 levels are linked to shunt response in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus2019In: Journal of Neurosurgery, ISSN 0022-3085, E-ISSN 1933-0693, Vol. 130, no 1, p. 121-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective The authors conducted a study to test if the cortical brain tissue levels of soluble amyloid beta (Aβ) reflect the propensity of cortical Aβ aggregate formation and may be an additional factor predicting surgical outcome following idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) treatment.

    Methods Highly selective ELISAs (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays) were used to quantify soluble Aβ40, Aβ42, and neurotoxic Aβ oligomers/protofibrils, associated with Aβ aggregation, in cortical biopsy samples obtained in patients with iNPH (n = 20), sampled during ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt surgery. Patients underwent pre- and postoperative (3-month) clinical assessment with a modified iNPH scale. The preoperative CSF biomarkers and the levels of soluble and insoluble Aβ species in cortical biopsy samples were analyzed for their association with a favorable outcome following the VP shunt procedure, defined as a ≥ 5-point increase in the iNPH scale.

    Rrsults The brain tissue levels of Aβ42 were negatively correlated with CSF Aβ42 (Spearman's r = -0.53, p < 0.05). The Aβ40, Aβ42, and Aβ oligomer/protofibril levels in cortical biopsy samples were higher in patients with insoluble cortical Aβ aggregates (p < 0.05). The preoperative CSF Aβ42 levels were similar in patients responding (n = 11) and not responding (n = 9) to VP shunt treatment at 3 months postsurgery. In contrast, the presence of cortical Aβ aggregates and high brain tissue Aβ42 levels were associated with a poor outcome following VP shunt treatment (p < 0.05).

    Conclusions Brain tissue measurements of soluble Aβ species are feasible. Since high Aβ42 levels in cortical biopsy samples obtained in patients with iNPH indicated a poor surgical outcome, tissue levels of Aβ species may be associated with the clinical response to shunt treatment.

  • 9. Adam, A
    et al.
    Robison, J
    Lu, J
    Jose, R
    Badran, N
    Vivas-Buitrago, T
    Rigamonti, D
    Sattar, A
    Omoush, O
    Hammad, M
    Dawood, M
    Maghaslah, M
    Belcher, T
    Carson, K
    Hoffberger, J
    Jusué Torres, I
    Foley, S
    Yasar, S
    Thai, Q A
    Wemmer, J
    Klinge, P
    Al-Mutawa, L
    Al-Ghamdi, H
    Carson, K A
    Asgari, M
    de Zélicourt, D
    Kurtcuoglu, V
    Garnotel, S
    Salmon, S
    Balédent, O
    Lokossou, A
    Page, G
    Balardy, L
    Czosnyka, Z
    Payoux, P
    Schmidt, E A
    Zitoun, M
    Sevestre, M A
    Alperin, N
    Baudracco, I
    Craven, C
    Matloob, S
    Thompson, S
    Haylock Vize, P
    Thorne, L
    Watkins, L D
    Toma, A K
    Bechter, Karl
    Pong, A C
    Jugé, L
    Bilston, L E
    Cheng, S
    Bradley, W
    Hakim, F
    Ramón, J F
    Cárdenas, M F
    Davidson, J S
    García, C
    González, D
    Bermúdez, S
    Useche, N
    Mejía, J A
    Mayorga, P
    Cruz, F
    Martinez, C
    Matiz, M C
    Vallejo, M
    Ghotme, K
    Soto, H A
    Riveros, D
    Buitrago, A
    Mora, M
    Murcia, L
    Bermudez, S
    Cohen, D
    Dasgupta, D
    Curtis, C
    Domínguez, L
    Remolina, A J
    Grijalba, M A
    Whitehouse, K J
    Edwards, R J
    Eleftheriou, A
    Lundin, F
    Fountas, K N
    Kapsalaki, E Z
    Smisson, H F
    Robinson, J S
    Fritsch, M J
    Arouk, W
    Garzon, M
    Kang, M
    Sandhu, K
    Baghawatti, D
    Aquilina, K
    James, G
    Thompson, D
    Gehlen, M
    Schmid Daners, M
    Eklund, A
    Malm, J
    Gomez, D
    Guerra, M
    Jara, M
    Flores, M
    Vío, K
    Moreno, I
    Rodríguez, S
    Ortega, E
    Rodríguez, E M
    McAllister, J P
    Guerra, M M
    Morales, D M
    Sival, D
    Jimenez, A
    Limbrick, D D
    Ishikawa, M
    Yamada, S
    Yamamoto, K
    Junkkari, A
    Häyrinen, A
    Rauramaa, T
    Sintonen, H
    Nerg, O
    Koivisto, A M
    Roine, R P
    Viinamäki, H
    Soininen, H
    Luikku, A
    Jääskeläinen, J E
    Leinonen, V
    Kehler, U
    Lilja-Lund, O
    Kockum, K
    Larsson, Elna-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Riklund, K
    Söderström, L
    Hellström, P
    Laurell, K
    Kojoukhova, M
    Sutela, A
    Vanninen, R
    Vanha, K I
    Timonen, M
    Rummukainen, J
    Korhonen, V
    Helisalmi, S
    Solje, E
    Remes, A M
    Huovinen, J
    Paananen, J
    Hiltunen, M
    Kurki, M
    Martin, B
    Loth, F
    Luciano, M
    Luikku, A J
    Hall, A
    Herukka, S K
    Mattila, J
    Lötjönen, J
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Jurjević, I
    Miyajima, M
    Nakajima, M
    Murai, H
    Shin, T
    Kawaguchi, D
    Akiba, C
    Ogino, I
    Karagiozov, K
    Arai, H
    Reis, R C
    Teixeira, M J
    Valêncio, C G
    da Vigua, D
    Almeida-Lopes, L
    Mancini, M W
    Pinto, F C G
    Maykot, R H
    Calia, G
    Tornai, J
    Silvestre, S S S
    Mendes, G
    Sousa, V
    Bezerra, B
    Dutra, P
    Modesto, P
    Oliveira, M F
    Petitto, C E
    Pulhorn, H
    Chandran, A
    McMahon, C
    Rao, A S
    Jumaly, M
    Solomon, D
    Moghekar, A
    Relkin, N
    Hamilton, M
    Katzen, H
    Williams, M
    Bach, T
    Zuspan, S
    Holubkov, R
    Rigamonti, A
    Clemens, G
    Sharkey, P
    Sanyal, A
    Sankey, E
    Rigamonti, K
    Naqvi, S
    Hung, A
    Schmidt, E
    Ory-Magne, F
    Gantet, P
    Guenego, A
    Januel, A C
    Tall, P
    Fabre, N
    Mahieu, L
    Cognard, C
    Gray, L
    Buttner-Ennever, J A
    Takagi, K
    Onouchi, K
    Thompson, S D
    Thorne, L D
    Tully, H M
    Wenger, T L
    Kukull, W A
    Doherty, D
    Dobyns, W B
    Moran, D
    Vakili, S
    Patel, M A
    Elder, B
    Goodwin, C R
    Crawford, J A
    Pletnikov, M V
    Xu, J
    Blitz, A
    Herzka, D A
    Guerrero-Cazares, H
    Quiñones-Hinojosa, A
    Mori, S
    Saavedra, P
    Treviño, H
    Maitani, K
    Ziai, W C
    Eslami, V
    Nekoovaght-Tak, S
    Dlugash, R
    Yenokyan, G
    McBee, N
    Hanley, D F
    Abstracts from Hydrocephalus 2016.2017In: Fluids and Barriers of the CNS, E-ISSN 2045-8118, Vol. 14, no Suppl 1, article id 15Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Adowan, Mohmad
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Verifiering av metoden för PCT-analys på Alinity i-serie Abbot2023Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Procalcitonin (PCT) is a precursor protein of the hormone calcitonin and is encoded by the gene Calcitonin-1. In the Blekinge Regional, P-PCT is only analyzed in Karlskrona. The analysis is performed in the department of clinical chemistry on the Alinity i-series instrument. PCT indicates bacterial infections and therefore, it is important to have a backup method for the analysis when the instrument in the city of Karlskrona is out of order. The aim of this work was to verify the analysis method of P-PCT on the instrument Alinity i-series in the city of Karlshamn. Analysis method verification means to confirm and prove that the method meets the specified requirements. Verification was performed by analyzing 35 samples with different concentration of PCT on the master instrument in Karlskrona and on “Alinity 1” and “Alinity 2” in Karlshamn. The method was compared by studying correlation coefficient and bias. The precision was measured only on “Alinity 1” which would be the master instrument in Karlshamn. Precision was measured by analyzing 25 replicates at two control levels and then was 5 replicates of each control level analyzed over 5 days. The correlation was good and no significant bias between results from Karlskrona and “Alinity 1” and between results from “Alinity 1” and “Alinity 2”. Precision on “Alinity 1” meets the requirements. The conclusion was that verification of PCT on master instrument “Alinity 1” and slave instrument “Alinity 2” was approved and the backup method for the PCT analysis in Karlshamn was verified.

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  • 11.
    Agnarsdóttir, Margrét
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology. Department of Clinical Pathology, Akademiska University Hospital.
    Popova, Svetlana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology. Department of Clinical Pathology, Akademiska University Hospital.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology. Department of Clinical Pathology, Akademiska University Hospital.
    Expression of CMV protein pp65 in cutaneous malignant melanoma2019In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 10, article id e0223854Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human cytomegalovirus (CVM) has been detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in brain tumours; however, whether CMV antigen is seen in melanomas has not yet been elucidated. Applying IHC, melanoma tissue was assessed for the expression of pp65, a tegument protein of CMV. Two cohorts were available, cohort-I and II, the latter included also related metastasis. In addition to IHC, in situ hybridisation (ISH) was carried out to assess whether CMV related genetic sequences were detectable in a subset of cases. Seventy per cent of the 142 cases in cohort-I and 50% of the 37 cases in cohort-II displayed immunoreactivity (IR). In both cohorts, the IHC outcome correlated with T-stage (Cohort I: Spearman 0.22, p = 0.01, Cohort II: Fisher exact text 0.04). In 30 of cohort-II cases, when IHC staining was carried out on both the primary tumour and the corresponding metastasis, no change in IR was noted in 53%; in 20%, the IR was lower and in 27% higher in the metastasis when compared with the primary tumour. These results were significant (Fisher exact test 0.03). Applying ISH technique on four tumour cases with detectable pp65 protein, CMV related genetic sequence was not detected. Here, we demonstrate, congruent with observations published for brain tumours, that the protein pp65 is indeed observed in substantial number of melanoma cases with IHC; however, no signal was detected with ISH technique. These findings are in line with previously reported studies, demonstrating that the role of CMV in tumours is still debatable.

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  • 12.
    Agnarsdóttir, Margrét
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Päären, Helen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Vassilaki, Ismini
    The impact of standardized care pathway on reporting time for invasive melanoma: results from one pathology department in Sweden2019In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 124, no 4, p. 260-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Standardized care pathway (SCP) was introduced by the Swedish health authorities to eliminate unwanted delay in the diagnostics of cancer patients; for melanoma, SCP started in 2016. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of SCP on reporting time for invasive melanomas.

    Materials and methods: Information on reporting time was collected on all samples handled according to the SCP and on all invasive melanomas diagnosed in 2016–2018 at the Department of Clinical Pathology, Akademiska University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.

    Results: During the study period, 205 samples were handled according to the SCP, resulting in 53 cases (26%) diagnosed with invasive melanomas. A total of 301 invasive melanomas from 286 patients were diagnosed during the study period; 67 (22%) were submitted as SCP, 36 (12%) as a general priority case, and 198 (66%) as non-priority. The reporting time for the SCP cases was 8 days, for general priority cases 6 days, and for non-priority cases it was 24 days. The reporting time increased from 18 to 31 days for the non-priority cases and from 15 to 25 days for all cases with invasive melanomas during the study period.

    Conclusion: This study demonstrates prolonged reporting times for invasive melanomas since the implementation of SCP. This is probably caused by the crowd-out effect of the SCP samples, limited personnel resources, and inaccuracy of the clinical diagnosis. SCP might therefore be a suboptimal method to shorten reporting times for invasive melanomas.

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  • 13. Aho, Leena
    et al.
    Jolkkonen, Jukka
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Kuopio University, Finland.
    Beta-amyloid aggregation in human brains with cerebrovascular lesions.2006In: Stroke, ISSN 0039-2499, E-ISSN 1524-4628, Vol. 37, no 12, p. 2940-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The present study assessed beta-amyloid (Abeta) protein aggregates in postmortem human brains in subjects who had experienced stroke to examine the proposed association between ischemic stress and the accumulation of Abeta reported in rodents.

    METHODS: A sample of 484 postmortem brains from nondemented subjects, lacking isocortical neurodegenerative pathology with verified cerebrovascular lesions, and 57 age-matched controls were assessed with respect to Abeta, Abeta40, and Abeta42 aggregates in the cortex and thalamus by immunohistochemical techniques.

    RESULTS: The load of Abeta aggregates did not display a significant association with cerebrovascular lesions. The load of Abeta, Abeta40, and Abeta42 aggregates increased with age, and there was a tendency toward higher odds ratios for Abeta aggregates, though not statistically significant, in subjects with acute cerebrovascular lesions. In the oldest subjects with cerebrovascular lesions and with both thalamic and cortical Abeta aggregates, the load of thalamic Abeta42 was significantly higher than the load of Abeta40.

    CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that cerebrovascular disease does not influence the load of Abeta, whereas a shift of aggregation from the Abeta40 to the Abeta42 residue is noted in the thalamus but only in aged subjects. It is impossible, however, to state whether this result is attributable to increased Abeta production, its insufficient elimination, or other susceptibility factors.

  • 14. Aho, Leena
    et al.
    Parkkinen, Laura
    Pirttila, Tuula
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Department of Neuroscience and Neurology, University of Kuopio Finland .
    Systematic appraisal using immunohistochemistry of brain pathology in aged and demented subjects.2008In: Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders, ISSN 1420-8008, E-ISSN 1421-9824, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 423-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Abnormal processing of hyperphosphorylated tau (HPtau), amyloid-beta (Abeta) and alpha-synuclein (alphaS) proteins is considered as causative with regard to the clinical symptoms in age-related neurodegenerative diseases.

    METHODS: In this retrospective, postmortem study applying immunohistochemical methodology, we assessed Alzheimer's-disease (AD)-related HPtau and Abeta pathology in 178 subjects with alphaS pathology.

    RESULTS: These pathologies were frequently seen concomitantly, i.e. HPtau in 83% and Abeta in 62% of the alphaS-positive cases. Furthermore, the striatum was frequently involved, particularly in subjects with cognitive impairment (65%). The predictive value of widespread HPtau pathology, i.e. stages V-VI, with respect to cognitive impairment was high, since all 18 subjects presenting with this stage were demented. In contrast, the predictive value of widespread alphaS pathology, i.e. stages 5-6 according to Braak's Parkinson disease staging, was debatable. Fifty-three percent of the subjects with widespread alphaS pathology and no or mild AD-related HPtau pathology were cognitively unimpaired. It is noteworthy that striatal Abeta pathology was more often seen in demented subjects independently of HPtau and/or alphaS status.

    CONCLUSION: The causative pathology in subjects with clinically diagnosed dementia with Lewy bodies needs to be clarified in future studies.

  • 15. Aho, Leena
    et al.
    Pikkarainen, Maria
    Hiltunen, Mikko
    Leinonen, Ville
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Immunohistochemical Visualization of Amyloid-β Protein Precursor and Amyloid-β in Extra- and Intracellular Compartments in the Human Brain2010In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 1015-1028Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide, a cleavage product of the amyloid-beta protein precursor (AbetaPP), has been reported to be detected in the intracellular compartment. Most studies reporting the presence of intracellular Abeta are based on the use of immunohistochemistry. In this study, the presence of AbetaPP and Abeta was assessed by applying immunohistochemistry in postmortem human brain tissue samples obtained from 10 neurologically intact subjects, the youngest being 2 years of age, one aged with mild cognitive impairment, 14 neurologically diseased, and in one brain biopsy sample obtained from a subject with normal pressure hydrocephalus. Intracellular immunoreactivity was detected in all ages independent of the disease state or existence of extracellular Abeta aggregates with all antibodies directed to AbetaPP, with three Abeta antibodies (4G8, 6E10, and 82E1), clones that are unable to distinguish Abeta from AbetaPP. These results suggest that it is AbetaPP rather than Abeta that is detected intracellularly when using the antibodies listed above. Furthermore, the staining results varied when different pretreatment strategies were applied. Interestingly intracellular Abeta was detected with antibodies directed to the C-terminus of Abeta (neoepitope) in subjects with Alzheimer's disease. The lack of intracellular immunoreactivity in unimpaired subjects, when using antibodies against neoepitopes, may be due to a lack or a low level of the protein that is thus undetectable at light microscopic level by immunohistochemistry method. The staining results and conclusions depended strongly on the chosen antibody and the pretreatment strategy and thus multiple antibodies must be used when assessing the intracellular accumulation of Abeta.

  • 16.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Alzheimerin tauti: (Alzheimer’s sjukdom)2012In: Patologia: (Patologi) / [ed] Mäkinen M, Carpen O, Kosma VM, Lehto VP, Paavonen T, Stenbäck F, Helsingfors: Duodecim , 2012, 1, p. 1029-1031Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Alzheimer's disease-related lesions2013In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 33, no Suppl 1, p. S173-S179Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The invitation to contribute to "Alzheimer's Disease: Advances for a New Century" gave me an opportunity to briefly summarize my personal opinions about how the field of neuropathology has evolved. The goal is to briefly exemplify the changes that have influenced the way we conduct our diagnostic work as well as the way we interpret our results. From an era of histological stains, we have moved to visualization of altered proteins in predicted brain regions; we have also realized that in many aged subjects, not one but a plethora of co-pathologies are seen, and finally, we have become aware that the degenerative process is initiated much earlier than we ever suspected.

  • 18.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Department of Neuroscience and Neurology, University of Kuopio Finland .
    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy, hemorrhages and superficial siderosis.2008In: Stroke, ISSN 0039-2499, E-ISSN 1524-4628, Vol. 39, no 10, p. 2699-700Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Frontotemporaaliset lobaariset degeneraatiot: (Frontoremporal degeneration)2012In: Patologia: (Patologi) / [ed] Mäkinen M, Carpen O, Kosma VM, Lehto VP, Paavonen T, Stenbäck F, Helsingfors: Duodecim , 2012, 1, p. 1032-1033Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Minimal neuropathologic diagnosis for brain banking in the normal middle-aged and aged brain and in neurodegenerative disorders.2018In: Handbook of Clinical Neurology, ISSN 0072-9752, E-ISSN 2212-4152, Vol. 150, p. 131-141, article id B978-0-444-63639-3.00010-4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on human brain diseases is currently often conducted on cell cultures and animals. Several questions however can only be addressed by studying human postmortem brain tissue. However, brain tissue obtained postmortem almost always displays pathology that is often related to the aging phenomenon. Thus, in order to be certain that the answers obtained are reliable, a systematic and thorough assessment of the brain tissue to be studied should be carried out. We are currently aware of several protein alterations that are found in middle-aged and aged brains that are obtained from neurologically unimpaired subjects. The most common alteration is hyperphosphorylation of τ, observed in both neurons and glial cells, in certain brain regions, followed by β-amyloid aggregation in the neuropil and vessel walls. Less common protein alterations are those noted for α-synuclein and Tar DNA-binding protein 43. It is noteworthy that these alterations, when found in excess, are diagnostic for various neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer disease, Pick disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, Parkinson disease, Lewy body dementia, and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Since 1990, the neuropathology community has been aware that these protein alterations tend to progress in an orderly neuroanatomically defined manner and have thus designed a method to define a stage or a phase of the protein alteration. The neuropathology community has defined an initiation site, or neuroanatomic area that they presume the alteration originates from, and defined a presumed pattern of progression from the initiation site to other brain areas. Thus a reliable and reproducible description of each case regarding these alterations can be achieved. In addition to the above alterations, the brain tissue is also prone to various vascular alterations that should be registered as seen or not seen even if the significance of these alterations is still unclear.

  • 21.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Neuropatologinen tutkimus: Neuropatologisk undersökning2010In: Muistisairaudet: (Minnestörningar) / [ed] Erkinjuntti T, Rinne J, Soininen H, Helsingfors: Duodecim , 2010, 1, p. 438-446Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Neuropatologinen tutkimus: Neuropatologisk undersökning2015In: Muistisairaudet: (Minnestörningar) / [ed] Erkinjuntti T, Rinne J, Soininen H, Helsingfors: Duodecim , 2015, 2, p. 426-434Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Parkinsonin tauti ja lewynkappaledementia: (Parkinsons sjukdom)2012In: Patologia: (Patologi) / [ed] Mäkinen M, Carpen O, Kosma VM, Lehto VP, Paavonen T, Stenbäck F, Helsingfors: Duodecim , 2012, 1, p. 1031-1032Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Rapeuttavat aivosairaudet: (Degenerativa hjärnsjukdomar)2012In: Patologia: (Patologi) / [ed] Mäkinen M, Carpen O, Kosma VM, Lehto VP, Paavonen T, Stenbäck F, Helsingfors: Duodecim , 2012, 1, p. 1023-1028Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Techniques in neuropathology.2017In: Handbook of Clinical Neurology, ISSN 0072-9752, E-ISSN 2212-4152, Vol. 145, p. 3-7, article id B978-0-12-802395-2.00001-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The primary objective for a neuropathologist is the characterization of the tissue that is being assessed and thus all available techniques ranging from naked-eye examination to assessment of genetic/epigenetic characteristics are currently applied. What is observed in the tissue obtained from a diseased subject is compared with what is observed in a healthy individual and, based on the outcome, neuropathologic definitions of diseases are constructed. Thus, with the naked eye a neuropathologist can confirm that a hemorrhage is observed in the brain, by histologic examination that the hemorrhage is caused by alterations in the brain vessels and, since 1954, applying Congo red dye neuropathologists have been able to state that congophilic angiopathy is detected. Since 1984, applying immunohistochemical methods neuropathologists have been able to verify that the protein seen in the vessel walls is β-amyloid and by genetic/epigenetic analysis eventual mutation or modifications of genome might be detected. The development of new techniques is staggering and throughout this book the authors have listed techniques currently applied while assessing various disease-related hallmark lesions. In the following a general summary of techniques applied is given.

  • 26.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    et al.
    Department of Neuroscience and Neurology, University of Kuopio Finland .
    Arzberger, Thomas
    Al-Sarraj, Safa
    Bodi, Istvan
    Bogdanovic, Nenad
    Braak, Heiko
    Bugiani, Orso
    Del-Tredici, Kelly
    Ferrer, Isidro
    Gelpi, Ellen
    Giaccone, Giorgio
    Graeber, Manuel B
    Ince, Paul
    Kamphorst, Wouter
    King, Andrew
    Korkolopoulou, Penelope
    Kovács, Gábor G
    Larionov, Sergey
    Meyronet, David
    Monoranu, Camelia
    Parchi, Piero
    Patsouris, Efstratios
    Roggendorf, Wolfgang
    Seilhean, Danielle
    Tagliavini, Fabrizio
    Stadelmann, Christine
    Streichenberger, Nathalie
    Thal, Dietmar R
    Wharton, Stephen B
    Kretzschmar, Hans
    Staging of neurofibrillary pathology in Alzheimer's disease: a study of the BrainNet Europe Consortium.2008In: Brain Pathology, ISSN 1015-6305, E-ISSN 1750-3639, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 484-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been recognized that molecular classifications will form the basis for neuropathological diagnostic work in the future. Consequently, in order to reach a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), the presence of hyperphosphorylated tau (HP-tau) and beta-amyloid protein in brain tissue must be unequivocal. In addition, the stepwise progression of pathology needs to be assessed. This paper deals exclusively with the regional assessment of AD-related HP-tau pathology. The objective was to provide straightforward instructions to aid in the assessment of AD-related immunohistochemically (IHC) detected HP-tau pathology and to test the concordance of assessments made by 25 independent evaluators. The assessment of progression in 7-microm-thick sections was based on assessment of IHC labeled HP-tau immunoreactive neuropil threads (NTs). Our results indicate that good agreement can be reached when the lesions are substantial, i.e., the lesions have reached isocortical structures (stage V-VI absolute agreement 91%), whereas when only mild subtle lesions were present the agreement was poorer (I-II absolute agreement 50%). Thus, in a research setting when the extent of lesions is mild, it is strongly recommended that the assessment of lesions should be carried out by at least two independent observers.

  • 27.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Hartikainen, Päivi
    Alpha-synucleinopathies.2017In: Handbook of Clinical Neurology, ISSN 0072-9752, E-ISSN 2212-4152, Vol. 145, p. 339-353, article id B978-0-12-802395-2.00024-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A neurodegenerative disorder displaying an altered α-synuclein (αS) in the brain tissue is called α-synucleinopathy (αS-pathy) and incorporates clinical entities such as Parkinson disease (PD), PD with dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, and multiple-system atrophy. Neuroradiologic techniques visualizing αS pathology in the brain or assays of αS in the cerebrospinal fluid or blood are probably available and will be implemented in the near future but currently the definite diagnosis of αS-pathy relies on a postmortem examination of the brain. Since the 1980s immunohistochemical technique based on the use of antibodies directed to proteins of interest has become a method of choice for neuropathologic diagnosis. Furthermore, since the 1990s it has been acknowledged that progressions of most neurodegenerative pathologies follow a certain predictable time-related neuroanatomic distribution. Currently, for Lewy body disease, two staging techniques are commonly used: McKeith and Braak staging. Thus, the neuropathologic diagnosis of a αS-pathy is based on detection of altered αS in the tissue and registration of the neuroanatomic distribution of this alteration in the brain. The clinicopathologic correlation is not absolute due to the quite frequent observation of incidental and concomitant αS pathology.

  • 28.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Kovacs, Gabor G
    Comorbidities.2017In: Handbook of Clinical Neurology, ISSN 0072-9752, E-ISSN 2212-4152, Vol. 145, p. 573-577, article id B978-0-12-802395-2.00036-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The term comorbidities or mixed pathologies is used when brain tissue, a surgical sample, or postmortem brain displays a mixture of protein alterations or other pathologies. Most of the alterations when seen in sufficient extent are considered causative, are related to a certain clinical phenotype, i.e., when hyperphosphorylated τ (HPτ) is observed in occipital cortex concomitant with β-amyloid (Aβ), the diagnosis is Alzheimer disease (AD). When HPτ is observed in hippocampal structures in a subject with extensive and widespread α-synuclein pathology, a Lewy body disease (LBD), the HPτ pathology is considered as a concomitant alteration. There are numerous reports indicating that when "concomitant" pathologies are seen in a subject with certain neurodegenerative diseases, the clinical phenotype might be altered. In addition there are those cases where many alterations are seen in a sparse extent, but jointly they lead to a clinical syndrome. Thus today it is not sufficient to confirm a certain pathology to be seen, i.e., AD- or LBD-related; in addition the concomitant aging-related alterations have to be looked for.

  • 29.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Libard, Sylwia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Mixed Brain Pathology Is the Most Common Cause of Cognitive Impairment in the Elderly2020In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 78, no 1, p. 453-465Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Systemic diseases, diabetes mellitus (DM), and cardiovascular disease (CaVD) have been suggested being risk factors for cognitive impairment (CI) and/or influence Alzheimer's disease neuropathologic change (ADNC).

    Objective: The purpose was to assess the type and the extent of neuropathological alterations in the brain and to assess whether brain pathology was associated with CaVD or DM related alterations in peripheral organs, i.e., vessels, heart, and kidney.

    Methods: 119 subjects, 15% with DM and 24% with CI, age range 80 to 89 years, were chosen and neuropathological alterations were assessed applying immunohistochemistry.

    Results: Hyperphosphorylated tau (HP tau) was seen in 99%, amyloid-beta (A beta) in 71%, transactive DNA binding protein 43 (TDP43) in 62%, and alpha-synuclein (alpha S) in 21% of the subjects. Primary age related tauopathy was diagnosed in 29% (more common in females), limbic predominant age-related TDP encephalopathy in 4% (14% of subjects with CI), and dementia with Lewy bodies in 3% (14% of subjects with CI) of the subjects. High/intermediate level of ADNC was seen in 47% and the extent of HPt increased with age. The extent of ADNC was not associated with the extent of pathology observed in peripheral organs, i.e., DM or CaVD. Contrary, brain alterations such as pTDP43 and cerebrovascular lesions (CeVL) were influenced by DM, and CeVL correlated significantly with the extent of vessel pathology.

    Conclusion: In most (66%) subjects with CI, the cause of impairment was "mixed pathology", i.e., ADNC combined with TDP43, alpha S, or vascular brain lesions. Furthermore, our results suggest that systemic diseases, DMand CaVD, are risk factors for CI but not related to ADNC.

  • 30.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Parkkinen, Laura
    Staged pathology in Parkinson's disease2014In: Parkinsonism & Related Disorders, ISSN 1353-8020, E-ISSN 1873-5126, Vol. 20, no Suppl. 1, p. S57-S61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been a tremendous development since a regional progression of pathology in subjects with Lewy bodies (LB) was initially proposed 30 years ago. The entity of dementia with Lewy bodies has been acknowledged, the main protein constituent of LBs--aggregated α-synuclein (αS)--has been identified and a stepwise progression of the pathology has been reported. Implementation of the staging strategies published provides a common ground for handling a case with a suspected α-synucleinopathy. It is always important to state the staging strategy implemented while assessing a case, as the strategy applied might influence both the reported stage of LB pathology and, ultimately, the final diagnosis of the patient.

  • 31.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    et al.
    Department of Neuroscience and Neurology, University of Kuopio Finland .
    Parkkinen, Laura
    Al-Sarraj, Safa
    Arzberger, Thomas
    Bell, Jeanne
    Bodi, Istvan
    Bogdanovic, Nenad
    Budka, Herbert
    Ferrer, Isidro
    Gelpi, Ellen
    Gentleman, Stephen
    Giaccone, Giorgio
    Kamphorst, Wouter
    King, Andrew
    Korkolopoulou, Penelope
    Kovács, Gábor G
    Larionov, Sergey
    Meyronet, David
    Monoranu, Camelia
    Morris, Jodie
    Parchi, Piero
    Patsouris, Efstratios
    Roggendorf, Wolfgang
    Seilhean, Danielle
    Streichenberger, Nathalie
    Thal, Dietmar R
    Kretzschmar, Hans
    Assessment of alpha-synuclein pathology: a study of the BrainNet Europe Consortium.2008In: Journal of Neuropathology and Experimental Neurology, ISSN 0022-3069, E-ISSN 1554-6578, Vol. 67, no 2, p. 125-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To determine the reliability of assessment of alpha-synuclein-immunoreactive (alphaS-IR) structures by neuropathologists, 28 evaluators from 17 centers of BrainNet Europe examined current methods and reproducibility of alphaS-IR evaluation using a tissue microarray (TMA) technique. Tissue microarray blocks were constructed of samples from the participating centers that contained alphaS-IR structures. Slides from these blocks were stained in each center and assessed for neuronal perikaryal inclusions, neurites, and glial cytoplasmic inclusions. The study was performed in 2 phases. First, the TMA slides were stained with the antibody of the center's choice. In this phase, 59% of the sections were of good or acceptable quality, and 4 of 9 antibodies used performed consistently. Differences in interpretation and categorization of alphaS-IR structures, however, led to differing results between the laboratories. Prior to the second phase, the neuropathologists participated in a training session on the evaluation of alphaS-IR structures. Based on the results of the first phase, selected antibodies using designated antigen retrieval methods were then applied to TMA slides in the second phase. When the designated methods of both staining and evaluation were applied, all 26 subsequently stained TMA sections evaluated were of good/acceptable quality, and a high level of concordance in the assessment of the presence or absence of specific alphaS-IR structures was achieved. A semiquantitative assessment of alphaS-IR neuronal perikaryal inclusions yielded agreements ranging from 49% to 82%, with best concordance in cortical core samples. These results suggest that rigorous methodology and dichotomized assessment (i.e. determining the presence or absence of alphaS-IR) should be applied, and that semiquantitative assessment can be recommended only for the cortical samples. Moreover, the study demonstrates that there are limitations in the scoring of alphaS-IR structures.

  • 32.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Pikkarainen, M
    Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
    Parkkinen, L
    Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Synucleinopathies2015In: Neuropathology of neurodegenerative diseases: A practical guide / [ed] Gabor G Kovacs, Cambridge University Press, 2015, p. 149-175Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Definition, structure and biochemical background Similar to other “proteinopathies,” the process that links α-synuclein (αS) protein to disease pathogenesis originated from the discovery that a single point mutation in the αS gene (i.e. SNCA) can cause autosomal-dominant Parkinson’s disease (PD) [1]. This was followed by the breakthrough finding that the actual transcribed protein was a major fibrillar component of pathological hallmarks known as Lewy bodies (LBs), Lewy neurites (LNs) and glial cytoplasmic inclusions characterizing a heterogeneous group of diseases, now collectively referred to as “synucleinopathies,” i.e. PD, PD with dementia (PDD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and multiple system atrophy (MSA) [2, 3]. Currently, there are five missense mutations (pA53T, p.A30P, p.E46K, p.H50Q and p.G51D) [1, 4–8] and multiplication mutations (SNCA duplication and triplication) [9–11] that are genetically linked to clinical parkinsonism (Table 9.1). This genetic and pathological linkage establishes αS as an important player in the development of these disorders.

  • 33.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    et al.
    Department of Neuroscience and Neurology, University of Kuopio Finland .
    Pikkarainen, Maria
    Arzberger, Thomas
    Thal, Dietmar R
    Al-Sarraj, Safa
    Bell, Jeanne
    Bodi, Istvan
    Budka, Herbert
    Capetillo-Zarate, Estibaliz
    Ferrer, Isidro
    Gelpi, Ellen
    Gentleman, Stephen
    Giaccone, Giorgio
    Kavantzas, Nikolaos
    King, Andrew
    Korkolopoulou, Penelope
    Kovács, Gábor G
    Meyronet, David
    Monoranu, Camelia
    Parchi, Piero
    Patsouris, Efstratios
    Roggendorf, Wolfgang
    Stadelmann, Christine
    Streichenberger, Nathalie
    Tagliavini, Fabricio
    Kretzschmar, Hans
    Inter-laboratory comparison of neuropathological assessments of beta-amyloid protein: a study of the BrainNet Europe consortium.2008In: Acta Neuropathologica, ISSN 0001-6322, E-ISSN 1432-0533, Vol. 115, no 5, p. 533-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Amyloid-beta-protein (Abeta) is generally assessed by neuropathologists in diagnostics. This BrainNet Europe ( http://www.brainnet-europe.org/ ) (15 centres and 26 participants) study was carried out to investigate the reliability of such an assessment. In the first part of this trial, tissue microarray sections were stained with the antibody of each centre's choice. Reflecting the reality, seven antibodies and a plethora of pretreatment strategies were used. Ninety-two percent of the stainings were of good/acceptable quality and the estimation of presence of Abeta aggregates yielded good results. However, a poor agreement was reached particularly regarding quantitative (density) and qualitative (diffuse/cored plaques) results. During a joint meeting, the clone 4G8 was determined to label best the fleecy/diffuse plaques, and thus, this clone and the formic acid pretreatment technique were selected for the second part of this study. Subsequently, all stained sections were of good/acceptable quality and again a high level of concordance of the dichotomized (presence/absence) assessment of plaques and CAA was achieved. However, even when only one antibody was used, the type of Abeta-aggregates (diffuse/cored), type of vessel and Vonsattel grade, were not reliably assigned. Furthermore, the quantification of lesions was far from reliable. In line with the first trial, the agreement while assessing density (some, moderate and many) was unimpressive. In conclusion, we can confirm the utility of immunohistochemical detection of Abeta-protein in diagnostics and research. It is noteworthy that to reach reproducible results a dichotomized assessment of Abeta-immunoreactivity rather than quantification and assignment of various types of lesions should be applied, particularly when comparing results obtained by different neuropathologists.

  • 34.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Popova, Svetlana N.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Wanders, Alkwin
    Department of Clinical Pathology and Cytology, Umea University Hospital, Umea, Sweden.
    Veress, Bela
    Department of Clinical Pathology and Cytology, Skane University Hospital, Malmo, Sweden.
    Neuronal Protein Alteration in Enteric Dysmotility Syndrome2016In: Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease & Parkinsonism, ISSN 2161-0460, Vol. 6, no 1, article id 1000212Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 35. Alamdari, Nima
    et al.
    Toraldo, Gianluca
    Aversa, Zaira
    Smith, Ira J
    Castillero, Estibaliz
    Renaud, Guillaume
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Qaisar, Rizwan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Larsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Jasuja, Ravi
    Hasselgren, Per-Olof
    Loss of muscle strength during sepsis is in part regulated by glucocorticoids and is associated with reduced muscle fiber stiffness2012In: American Journal of Physiology. Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology, ISSN 0363-6119, E-ISSN 1522-1490, Vol. 303, no 10, p. R1090-R1099Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sepsis is associated with impaired muscle function but the role of glucocorticoids in sepsis-induced muscle weakness is not known. We tested the role of glucocorticoids in sepsis-induced muscle weakness by treating septic rats with the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU38486. In addition, normal rats were treated with dexamethasone to further examine the role of glucocorticoids in the regulation of muscle strength. Sepsis was induced in rats by cecal ligation and puncture and muscle force generation (peak twitch and tetanic tension) was determined in lower extremity muscles. In other experiments, absolute and specific force as well as stiffness (reflecting the function of actomyosin cross-bridges) were determined in isolated skinned muscle fibers from control and septic rats. Sepsis and treatment with dexamethasone resulted in reduced maximal twitch and tetanic force in intact isolated extensor digitorum longus muscles. The absolute and specific maximal force in isolated muscle fibers was reduced during sepsis together with decreased fiber stiffness. These effects of sepsis were blunted (but not abolished) by RU38486. The results suggest that muscle weakness during sepsis is at least in part regulated by glucocorticoids and reflects loss of contractility at the cellular (individual muscle fiber) level. In addition, the results suggest that reduced function of the cross-bridges between actin and myosin (documented as reduced muscle fiber stiffness) may be involved in sepsis-induced muscle weakness. An increased understanding of mechanisms involved in loss of muscle strength will be important for the development of new treatment strategies in patients with this debilitating consequence of sepsis.

  • 36.
    Albertsson-Lindblad, Alexandra
    et al.
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, SE-22185 Lund, Sweden..
    Kolstad, Arne
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, Oslo, Norway..
    Laurell, Anna
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Oncol, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Raty, Riikka
    Helsinki Univ Hosp, Dept Hematol, Helsinki, Finland..
    Gronbaek, Kirsten
    Rigshosp, Dept Hematol, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Sundberg, Jan
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, SE-22185 Lund, Sweden..
    Pedersen, Lone Bredo
    Rigshosp, Dept Hematol, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Ralfkiaer, Elisabeth
    Rigshosp, Dept Pathol, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Karjalainen-Lindsberg, Marja-Liisa
    Univ Helsinki, Cent Hosp, Dept Pathol, Helsinki, Finland..
    Sundström, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology. Department of Pathology, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden; and..
    Ehinger, Mats
    Univ Lund Hosp, Dept Pathol Cytol, Lund, Sweden..
    Geisler, Christian
    Rigshosp, Dept Hematol, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Jerkeman, Mats
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, SE-22185 Lund, Sweden..
    Lenalidomide-bendamustine-rituximab in patients older than 65 years with untreated mantle cell lymphoma2016In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 128, no 14, p. 1814-1820Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For elderly patients with mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), there is no defined standard therapy. In this multicenter, open-label phase 1/2 trial, we evaluated the addition of lenalidomide (LEN) to rituximab-bendamustine (R-B) as first-line treatment for elderly patients with MCL. Patients >65 years with untreated MCL, stages II-IV were eligible for inclusion. Primary end points were maximally tolerable dose (MTD) of LEN and progression-free survival (PFS). Patients received 6 cycles every four weeks of L-B-R (L D1-14, B 90 mg/m(2) IV, days 1-2 and R 375 mg/m(2) IV, day 1) followed by single LEN (days 1-21, every four weeks, cycles 7-13). Fifty-one patients (median age 71 years) were enrolled from 2009 to 2013. In phase 1, the MTD of LEN was defined as 10 mg in cycles 2 through 6, and omitted in cycle 1. After 6 cycles, the complete remission rate (CRR) was 64%, and 36% were MRD negative. At a median follow-up time of 31 months, median PFS was 42 months and 3-year overall survival was 73%. Infection was the most common nonhematologic grade 3 to 5 event and occurred in 21 (42%) patients. Opportunistic infections occurred in 3 patients: 2 Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia and 1 cytomegalovirus retinitis. Second primary malignancies (SPM) were observed in 8 patients (16%). LEN could safely be combined with R-B when added from the second cycle in patients with MCL, and was associated with a high rate of CR and molecular remission. However, we observed a high degree of severe infections and an unexpected high number of SPMs, which may limit its use. This trial is registered at www.Clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00963534.

  • 37.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Aaseth, Jan
    Innlandet Hospital Trust, Norway; Hedmark University of Coll, Norway.
    Alexander, Jan
    Norwegian Institute Public Heatlh, Norway; Norwegian University of Life Science NMBU, Norway.
    Wågsäter, Dick
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Significant changes in circulating microRNA by dietary supplementation of selenium and coenzyme Q10 in healthy elderly males. A subgroup analysis of a prospective randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial among elderly Swedish citizens2017In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 4, article id e0174880Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Selenium and coenzyme Q10 is essential for important cellular functions. A low selenium intake is reported from many European countries, and the endogenous coenzyme Q10 production is decreasing in the body with increasing age. Supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10 in elderly have shown reduced cardiovascular mortality and reduced levels of markers of inflammation. However, microRNA analyses could give important information on the mechanisms behind the clinical effects of supplementation. Methods Out of the 443 healthy elderly participants that were given supplementation with 200 mu g Se/ day as organic selenium yeast tablets, and 200 mg/day of coenzyme Q10 capsules, or placebo for 4 years, 25 participants from each group were randomized and evaluated regarding levels of microRNA. Isolation of RNA from plasma samples and quantitative PCR analysis were performed. Volcano- and principal component analyses (PCA)-plots were used to illustrate the differences in microRNA expression between the intervention, and the placebo groups. Serum selenium concentrations were measured before intervention. Findings On average 145 different microRNAs out of 172 were detected per sample. In the PCA plots two clusters could be identified indicating significant difference in microRNA expression between the two groups. The pre-treatment expression of the microRNAs did not differ between active treatment and the placebo groups. When comparing the post- treatment microRNAs in the active and the placebo groups, 70 microRNAs exhibited significant differences in expression, also after adjustment for multiple measurements. For the 20 microRNAs with the greatest difference in expression the difference was up to more than 4 fold and with a P-value that were less than 4.4e(-8). Conclusions Significant differences were found in expression of more than 100 different microRNAs with up to 4 fold differences as a result of the intervention of selenium and coenzyme Q10 combined. The changes in microRNA could be a part of mechanisms underlying the clinical effects earlier reported that reduced cardiovascular mortality, gave better cardiac function, and showed less signs of inflammation and oxdative stress following the intervention. However, more research is needed to understand biological mechanisms of the protective effects of selenium and Q10 supplementation.

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  • 38.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Shamoun, Levar
    Dept Lab Med, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Dimberg, Jan Ingvar
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Wagsater, Dick
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Increased mortality in the A/A genotype of the SNP rs28372698 of interleukin 322021In: Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine, ISSN 1792-0981, E-ISSN 1792-1015, Vol. 21, no 2, article id 127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the major causes of mortality in the western hemisphere is cardiovascular disease. Therefore, a variety of markers to identify those at risk are required. Interleukin-32 (IL-32) is a cytokine that is associated with inflammation. The aim of the current study was to investigate variations in single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of IL-32 and plasma expression, and their associations with mortality. A population of 486 elderly community-living persons were evaluated. The participants were followed for 7.1 years and underwent a clinical examination and blood sampling. SNP analyses of IL-32 rs28372698 using allelic discrimination and plasma measurement of IL-32, using ELISA, were performed. During the follow-up period, 140 (28.8%) all-cause and 87 (17.9%) cardiovascular deaths were registered. No significant difference between mortality and plasma concentration of IL-32 was observed. The A/A genotype group exhibited significantly higher all-cause mortality (P=0.036), and an almost two-fold increased risk in a multivariate Cox regression model for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. A highly significant difference in all-cause and cardiovascular mortality between the A/A and the T/T groups was demonstrated (P=0.015 resp. P=0.014). In the present study, the cytokine IL-32 was demonstrated to have prognostic information, with an increased risk of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality for those with the A/A genotype rs28372698 of IL-32. The A/A genotype could therefore be regarded as a possible biomarker for mortality risk that may be used to offer optimized cardiovascular patient handling in the future. However, the present study sample was small, and the results should be regarded as hypothesis-generating.

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  • 39. Alfstad, K Å
    et al.
    Lossius, M I
    Røste, G K
    Mowinckel, P
    Scheie, D
    Casar Borota, Olivera
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology. Dept. of Laboratory medicine/Pathology, Umeå University, Umeå Sweden.
    Larsson, P G
    Nakken, K O
    Acute postoperative seizures after epilepsy surgery: a long-term outcome predictor?2011In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 123, no 1, p. 48-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The prognostic value of acute postoperative seizures (APS) after epilepsy surgery is much debated. This study evaluated APS, defined as seizures in the first week post-surgery, as a predictor of long-term seizure outcome, and investigated the utility of other potential outcome predictors.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Medical records of 48 patients with temporal and extra-temporal epilepsy surgery were studied. Forty patients had lesional surgery. All had at least 2 year postoperative follow-up.

    RESULTS: At 2 year follow-up, 25 patients (53%) were seizure free. Univariate analysis showed that APS (P = 0.048), using ≥ six AEDs prior to surgery (P = 0.03), pathological postoperative EEG (P = 0.043) and female gender (P = 0.012) were associated with seizure recurrence.

    CONCLUSIONS: Univariate analysis indicate that APS, a high number of AEDs used prior to surgery, and pathological postoperative EEG are possible predictors of seizure recurrence after epilepsy surgery. Only gender retained significance in the multivariate analysis.

  • 40.
    Ali, Abir Salwa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Perren, Aurel
    Univ Bern, Dept Pathol, Bern, Switzerland..
    Lindskog, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Welin, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Sorbye, Halfdan
    Haukeland Hosp, Dept Oncol, Bergen, Norway.;Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, Bergen, Norway..
    Grönberg, Malin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Tiensuu Janson, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Candidate protein biomarkers in pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms grade 32020In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 10639Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PanNENs) are rare tumours that compose 1-2% of all pancreatic tumours. Patients with metastatic grade 3 neoplasia are usually treated with chemotherapy but have a poor progression-free and overall survival. According to the WHO 2017 classification, they are divided into neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) G3 and neuroendocrine carcinomas (NECs). Despite the new classification, new diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers are needed to sub-categorise the patients and to help guide therapy decisions. Blood from 42 patients and 42 healthy controls were screened for the presence of 92 proteins with the Immuno-Oncology panel using the Proximity Extension Assay provided by Olink Biosciences. Immunohistochemical staining of FAS ligand (FASLG) was performed on 16 patient tumour specimens using a commercial antibody. Fifty-four out of 87 evaluable proteins differed significantly in concentration between blood from patients and blood from healthy controls. FASLG was the only protein for which the concentration in blood was significantly lower in patients compared to controls and the levels correlated negatively to Ki-67 index. Seven of 14 evaluable PanNEN G3 specimens showed FASLG immunoreactivity in the tumour cells while there was scattered immunoreactivity in immune cells. Positive FASLG immunoreactivity correlated to well-differentiated morphology. FASLG concentration in blood was significantly lower in patients with pancreatic NENs G3 compared to controls, and the expression in tumour tissue was variable. Furthermore, FASLG was negatively correlated to Ki-67 and was more frequently expressed in well-differentiated tumours. Taken together, these results may suggest a role of FASLG in PanNENs.

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  • 41.
    Alikadic, Alen
    et al.
    Jönköping University.
    Nguyen, Ella
    Jönköping University.
    Sportklockors bedömning av VO2max i jämförelse med ergospirometri2024Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 42.
    Aljabery, Firas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Staging and tumor biological mechanisms of lymph node metastasis in invasive urinary bladder cancer2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To study the possibility of detecting lymph node metastasis in locally advanced urinary bladder cancer (UBC) treated with radical cystectomy (RC) by using preoperative positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and peroperative sentinel node biopsy (SNB) technique. We also investigate the clinical significance of macrophage traits expression by cancer cells, M2-macrophage infiltration (MI) in tumor stroma and the immunohistochemical expression of biomarkers in cancer cells in relation to clinicopathologic data.

    Patients and Methods: We studied prospectively 122 patients with UBC, pathological stage pT1–pT4 treated with RC and pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND) during 2005–2011 at the Department of Urology, Linköping University Hospital. In the first study, we compared the results of preoperative PET/CT and conventional CT with the findings of postoperative histopathological evaluation of lymph nodes (LNs). In the second study we investigated the value of SNB technique for detecting pathological LNs during RC in patients with UBC. W also examined the significance of the primary tumor location in the bladder in predicting the site of LN metastases, and the prognostic significance of lympho-vascular invasion (LVI) and lymph node metastasis density (LNMD) on survival. In the third study, we investigate the clinical significance of macrophage infiltration (MI) in tumor stroma and macrophage-traits expression by tumor cells. In the fourth study, we investigate the cell cycle suppression proteins p53, p21, pRb, p16, p14 ARF as well as tumors proliferative protein Ki67 and DNA repair protein ERCC1 expression in cancer cells. The results were compared with clinical and pathological characteristics and outcome.

    Results: Prior to RC, PET/CT was used to detect LN metastasis in 54 patients. PET/CT had 41% sensitivity, 86% specificity, 58% PPV, and 76% NPV, whereas the corresponding figures for conventional CT were 41%, 89%, 64%, and 77%. SNB was performed during RC in 103 patients. A median number of 29 (range 7–68) nodes per patient were examined. SNs were detected in 83 out of 103 patients (81%). The sensitivity and specificity for detecting metastatic disease by SNB varied among LN stations, with average values of 67% -90%. LNMD or ≥8% and LVI were significantly related to shorter survival. In 103 patients, MI was high in 33% of cases, while moderate and low infiltration occurred in 42% and 25% of tumors respectively. Patients with tumors containing high and moderate compared to low MI had low rate of LN metastases (P=0.06) and improved survival (P=0.06), although not at significant level. The expression of different tumor suppression proteins was altered in 47-91% of the patients. There were no significant association between cancer specific survival (CSS) and any of the studied biomarkers. In case of altered p14ARF, ERCC1 or p21, CSS was low in case of low p53 immunostaining but increased in case of p53 accumulation, although not at a significant level, indicating a possible protective effect of p53 accumulation in these cases.

    Conclusion: PET/ CT provided no improvement over conventional CT in detection and localization of regional LN metastases in bladder cancer. It is possible to detect the SN but the technique is not a reliable for perioperative localization of LN metastases; however, LVI and LNMD at a cut-off level of 8% had significant prognostic values. MI in the tumor microenvironment but not CD163 expression in tumor cells seems to be synergistic with the immune response against urinary bladder cancer. Our results further indicate that altered p53 might have protective effect on survival in case of altered p14ARF, p21, or ERCC1 indicating an interaction between these biomarkers.

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    Staging and tumor biological mechanisms of lymph node metastasis in invasive urinary bladder cancer
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  • 43. Allander, Susanne Vilhelmsdotter
    et al.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Marké, Lars-Åke
    Svensson, Maria K
    Björn, Wihlén
    Elinder, Carl-Gustaf
    Kreatinin fortfarande den vanligaste njurfunktionsanalysen: Undersökning av praxis i Sverige2012In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 109, no 19, p. 960-962Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Markers of renal function (glomerular filtration rate; GFR) are frequently used. In most cases GFR is estimated based on plasma creatinine, but cystatin C, creatinine clearance (with urine collection), iohexol clearance and 51Cr-EDTA clearance are also used. A questionnaire was sent to representatives for clinical chemistry laboratories in Sweden to collect information regarding the use of these markers during the years 2006 2009. The aim was to compare the use in different parts of Sweden and how it has changed over time. The overall use of markers of renal function, including creatinine, continues to increase on a national level, with the exception for endogenous creatinine clearance and 51Cr-EDTA clearance. Creatinine, the most frequently used marker, continues to grow in numbers. 5,6 million creatinine analyses and about two hundred thousand cystatin C analyses were performed during year 2009. There were considerable variations between counties in the use of the studied markers.

  • 44.
    Ambarki, Khalid
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Radiofysik, Sweden.
    Israelsson, Hanna
    Umeå universitet, Neurologi, Sweden.
    Wåhlin, Anders
    Umeå universitet, Radiofysik, Sweden.
    Birgander, Richard
    Umeå universitet, Diagnostisk radiologi, Sweden.
    Eklund, Anders
    Umeå universitet, Radiofysik, Sweden.
    Malm, Jan
    Umeå universitet, Neurologi, Sweden.
    Brain ventricular size in healthy elderly: comparison between evans index and volume measurement2010In: Neurosurgery, ISSN 0148-396X, E-ISSN 1524-4040, Vol. 67, no 1, p. 94-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: A precise definition of ventricular enlargement is important in the diagnosis of hydrocephalus as well as in assessing central atrophy. The Evans index (EI), a linear ratio between the maximal frontal horn width and the cranium diameter, has been extensively used as an indirect marker of ventricular volume (VV). With modern imaging techniques, brain volume can be directly measured. OBJECTIVE: To determine reference values of intracranial volumes in healthy elderly individuals and to correlate volumes with the EI. METHODS: Magnetic resonance imaging (3 T) was performed in 46 healthy white elderly subjects (mean age +/- standard deviation, 71 +/- 6 years) and in 20 patients (74 +/- 7 years) with large ventricles according to visual inspection. VV, relative VV (RVV), and EI were assessed. Ventricular dilation was defined using VV and EI by a value above the 95th percentile range for healthy elderly individuals. RESULTS: In healthy elderly subjects, we found VV = 37 +/- 18 mL, RVV = 2.47 +/- 1.17%, and EI = 0.281 +/- 0.027. Including the patients, there was a strong correlation between EI and VV (R = 0.94) as well as between EI and RVV (R = 0.95). However, because of a wide 95% prediction interval (VV: +/-45 mL; RVV: +/- 2.54%), EI did not give a sufficiently good estimate of VV and RVV. CONCLUSION: VV (or RVV) and the EI reflect different properties. The exclusive use of EI in clinical studies as a marker of enlarged ventricles should be questioned. We suggest that the definition of dilated ventricles in white elderly individuals be defined as VV >77 mL or RVV >4.96 %. Future studies should compare intracranial volumes with clinical characteristics and prognosis.

  • 45.
    Amini, Rose-Marie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Hollander, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Laszlo, S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Eriksson, Emma
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Gustafsson, Kristin Ayoola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Loskog, Angelica S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Lokon Pharma, AB,Uppsala, Sweden.
    Thörn, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Altered profile of immune regulatory cells in the peripheral blood of lymphoma patients2019In: BMC Cancer, E-ISSN 1471-2407, Vol. 19, article id 316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Regulatory immune cells may modulate the lymphoma microenvironment and are of great interest due to the increasing prevalence of treatment with immunotherapies in lymphoma patients. The aim was to explore the composition of different immune regulatory cell subsets in the peripheral blood of newly diagnosed lymphoma patients in relation to treatment outcome. Methods: Forty-three newly diagnosed patients with lymphoma were included in the study; 24 with high-grade B-cell lymphoma (HGBCL) and 19 with classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL). Peripheral blood was prospectively collected and immune regulatory cells were identified by multi-color flow cytometry and analyzed in relation to healthy blood donors and clinical characteristics and outcome. Results: The percentage of CD3-positive T-cells was lower (p=0.03) in the peripheral blood of lymphoma patients at diagnosis compared to healthy blood donors regardless of lymphoma subtype, although statistically, neither the percentage of monocytes (p=0.2) nor the T-cell/monocyte ratio (p=0.055) differed significantly. A significant decrease in the percentage of a subset of regulatory NK cells (CD7(+)/CD3(-)/CD56(bright)/CD16(dim/-)) was identified in the peripheral blood of lymphoma patients compared to healthy blood donors (p=0.003). Lymphoma patients also had more granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) (p=0.003) compared to healthy blood donors, whereas monocytic MDSCs did not differ significantly (p=0.07). A superior disease-free survival was observed for cHL patients who had an increase in the percentage of granulocytic MDSCs (p=0.04). Conclusions: An altered profile of immune cells in the peripheral blood with a decrease in T-cells and regulatory NK-cells was observed in newly diagnosed lymphoma patients. CHL patients with higher percentages of regulatory NK cells and higher percentages of granulocytic MDSCs might have a better outcome, although the number of patients was low.

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  • 46.
    Amini, Rose-Marie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ljungström, Viktor
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Department of Clinical Genetics, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Abdulla, Maysaa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Cavelier, Lucia
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik. Department of Clinical Genetics, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Djureinovic, Tatjana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Department of Clinical Genetics, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hollander, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Baliakas, Panagiotis
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Department of Clinical Genetics, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Clonal hematopoiesis in patients with high-grade B-cell lymphoma is associated with inferior outcome2020In: American Journal of Hematology, ISSN 0361-8609, E-ISSN 1096-8652, Vol. 95, no 10, p. E287-E289Article in journal (Refereed)
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    fulltext
  • 47.
    Amini, Rose-Marie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Sundström, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    [Core needle biopsies for lymphoma diagnosis seriously affect diagnostics, treatment development and research].2017In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 114, article id EMDHArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Core needle biopsies for lymphoma diagnosis seriously affect diagnostics, treatment development and research Core needle biopsies (CNBs) are widely used in clinical diagnostic labs to aid in the diagnosis of malignant lymphomas and in latter years their use is increasing. CNBs provide a rapid method for obtaining tumour material and may be beneficial when the affected lymph nodes are located deep in the abdominal cavity or mediastinum and surgical excisional biopsies may be difficult to perform. However, according to the Swedish Haematopathology Quality and Standardization Committee, CNBs are insufficient for lymphoma diagnostic purposes and the guidelines state that material from surgical excisional biopsies are mandatory in order to obtain a robust histopathological evaluation of the lymph node architecture, cellular composition and growth pattern. Surgical excision biopsies also ensure that adequate material is available if additional molecular analyses should be required and also to facilitate future research.

  • 48. Amirian, E Susan
    et al.
    Armstrong, Georgina N
    Zhou, Renke
    Lau, Ching C
    Claus, Elizabeth B
    Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S
    Il'yasova, Dora
    Schildkraut, Joellen
    Ali-Osman, Francis
    Sadetzki, Siegal
    Johansen, Christoffer
    Houlston, Richard S
    Jenkins, Robert B
    Lachance, Daniel
    Olson, Sara H
    Bernstein, Jonine L
    Merrell, Ryan T
    Wrensch, Margaret R
    Davis, Faith G
    Lai, Rose
    Shete, Sanjay
    Amos, Christopher I
    Scheurer, Michael E
    Aldape, Kenneth
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Brännström, Thomas
    Broholm, Helle
    Collins, Peter
    Giannini, Caterina
    Rosenblum, Marc
    Tihan, Tarik
    Melin, Beatrice S
    Bondy, Melissa L
    The Glioma International Case-Control Study: A Report From the Genetic Epidemiology of Glioma International Consortium2016In: American Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0002-9262, E-ISSN 1476-6256, Vol. 183, no 2, p. 85-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Decades of research have established only a few etiological factors for glioma, which is a rare and highly fatal brain cancer. Common methodological challenges among glioma studies include small sample sizes, heterogeneity of tumor subtypes, and retrospective exposure assessment. Here, we briefly describe the Glioma International Case-Control (GICC) Study (recruitment, 2010-2013), a study being conducted by the Genetic Epidemiology of Glioma International Consortium that integrates data from multiple data collection sites, uses a common protocol and questionnaire, and includes biospecimen collection. To our knowledge, the GICC Study is the largest glioma study to date that includes collection of blood samples, which will allow for genetic analysis and interrogation of gene-environment interactions.

  • 49.
    Andelin, M.
    et al.
    Department of Medicine, NU Hospital Group, Uddevalla, Sweden..
    Kropff, J.
    Department of Endocrinology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Matuleviciene, V.
    Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Joseph, J.I.
    Department of Anaesthesiology, Sidney Kimmel Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA..
    Attvall, S.
    Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Hirsch, I.B.
    University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
    Imberg, H.
    Statistiska Konsultgruppen, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Dahlqvist, S.
    Department of Medicine, NU Hospital Group, Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Klonoff, D.
    Diabetes Research Institute, Mills-Peninsula Health Services, San Mateo, CA, USA..
    Haraldsson, B.
    Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    DeVries, J.H.
    Department of Endocrinology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Lind, M.
    Department of Medicine, NU Hospital Group, Uddevalla, Sweden Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden lind.marcus@telia.com..
    Assessing the Accuracy of Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) Calibrated With Capillary Values Using Capillary or Venous Glucose Levels as a Reference.2016In: Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, E-ISSN 1932-2968, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 876-884Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Using the standard venous reference for the evaluation of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) systems could possibly negatively affect measured CGM accuracy since CGM are generally calibrated with capillary glucose and venous and capillary glucose concentrations differ. We therefore aimed to quantify the effect of using capillary versus venous glucose reference samples on estimated accuracy in capillary calibrated CGM.less thanbr /greater thanMethods: We evaluated 41 individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) using the Dexcom G4 CGM system over 6 days. Patients calibrated their CGM devices with capillary glucose by means of the HemoCue system. During 2 visits, capillary and venous samples were simultaneously measured by HemoCue and compared to concomitantly obtained CGM readings. The mean absolute relative difference (MARD) was calculated using capillary and venous reference samples.less thanbr /greater thanResults: Venous glucose values were 0.83 mmol/L (15.0 mg/dl) lower than capillary values over all glycemic ranges, P less than .0001. Below 4 mmol/l (72 mg/dl), the difference was 1.25 mmol/l (22.5 mg/dl), P = .0001, at 4-10 mmol/l (72-180 mg/dl), 0.67 mmol/l (12.0 mg/dl), P less than .0001 and above 10 mmol/l (180 mg/dl), 0.95 mmol/l (17.1 mg/dl), P less than .0001. MARD was 11.7% using capillary values as reference compared to 13.7% using venous samples, P = .037. Below 4 mmol/l (72 mg/dl) MARD was 16.6% and 31.8%, P = .048, at 4-10 mmol/l (72-180 mg/dl) 12.1% and 12.6%, P = .32, above 10 mmol/l (180 mg/dl) 8.7% and 9.2%, P = .82.less thanbr /greater thanConclusion: Using capillary glucose concentrations as reference to evaluate the accuracy of CGM calibrated with capillary samples is associated with a lower MARD than using venous glucose as the reference. Capillary glucose concentrations were significantly higher than venous in all glycemic ranges.less thanbr /greater than (© 2016 Diabetes Technology Society.)

  • 50. Andersson, Annika
    et al.
    Remnestål, Julia
    Nellgård, Bengt
    Vunk, Helian
    Kotol, David
    Edfors, Fredrik
    Uhlén, Mathias
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    Ilag, Leopold L.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Zetterberg, Henrik
    Blennow, Kaj
    Månberg, Anna
    Nilsson, Peter
    Fredolini, Claudia
    Development of parallel reaction monitoring assays for cerebrospinal fluid proteins associated with Alzheimer's disease2019In: Clinica Chimica Acta, ISSN 0009-8981, E-ISSN 1873-3492, Vol. 494, p. 79-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Detailed knowledge of protein changes in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) across healthy and diseased individuals would provide a better understanding of the onset and progression of neurodegenerative disorders. In this study, we selected 20 brain-enriched proteins previously identified in CSF by antibody suspension bead arrays (SBA) to be potentially biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and verified these using an orthogonal approach. We examined the same set of 94 CSF samples from patients affected by AD (including preclinical and prodromal), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), non-AD dementia and healthy individuals, which had previously been analyzed by SBA. Twenty-eight parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) assays were developed and 13 of them could be validated for protein quantification. Antibody profiles were verified by PRM. For seven proteins, the antibody profiles were highly correlated with the PRM results (r > 0.7) and GAP43, VCAM1 and PSAP were identified as potential markers of preclinical AD. In conclusion, we demonstrate the usefulness of targeted mass spectrometry as a tool for the orthogonal verification of antibody profiling data, suggesting that these complementary methods can be successfully applied for comprehensive exploration of CSF protein levels in neurodegenerative disorders.

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