Digitala Vetenskapliga Arkivet

Change search
Refine search result
1234567 1 - 50 of 907
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Abd El-Wahed, Aida A.
    et al.
    Agr Res Ctr, Plant Protect Res Inst, Dept Bee Res, Giza 12627, Egypt..
    Khalifa, Shaden A. M.
    Stockholm Univ, Wenner Gren Inst, Dept Mol Biosci, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Elashal, Mohamed H.
    Menoufia Univ, Dept Chem, Fac Sci, Shibin Al Kawm 32512, Egypt..
    Musharraf, Syed G.
    Univ Karachi, Int Ctr Chem & Biol Sci, HEJ Res Inst Chem, Karachi 75270, Pakistan..
    Saeed, Aamer
    Quaid I Azam Univ, Dept Chem, Islamabad 45320, Pakistan..
    Khatib, Alfi
    Int Islamic Univ Malaysia, Pharmacognosy Res Grp, Dept Pharmaceut Chem, Kulliyyah Pharm, Kuantan 25200, Pahang Darul Ma, Malaysia.;Airlangga Univ, Fac Pharm, Surabaya 60155, Indonesia..
    Tahir, Haroon Elrasheid
    Jiangsu Univ, Sch Food & Biol Engn, Zhenjiang 212013, Jiangsu, Peoples R China..
    Zou, Xiaobo
    Jiangsu Univ, Sch Food & Biol Engn, Zhenjiang 212013, Jiangsu, Peoples R China..
    Al Naggar, Yahya
    Martin Luther Univ Halle Wittenberg, Inst Biol, Gen Zool, Hoher Weg 8, D-06120 Halle, Germany.;Tanta Univ, Dept Zool, Fac Sci, Tanta 31527, Egypt..
    Mehmood, Arshad
    Beijing Technol & Business Univ, Beijing Engn & Technol Res Ctr Food Addit, Beijing 100048, Peoples R China..
    Wang, Kai
    Chinese Acad Agr Sci, Inst Apicultural Res, Beijing 100093, Peoples R China..
    El-Seedi, Hesham
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Farmakognosi. Menoufia Univ, Dept Chem, Fac Sci, Shibin Al Kawm 32512, Egypt.;Jiangsu Univ, Int Res Ctr Food Nutr & Safety, Zhenjiang 212013, Jiangsu, Peoples R China..
    Cosmetic Applications of Bee Venom2021In: Toxins, E-ISSN 2072-6651, Vol. 13, no 11, article id 810Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bee venom (BV) is a typical toxin secreted by stingers of honeybee workers. BV and BV therapy have long been attractive to different cultures, with extensive studies during recent decades. Nowadays, BV is applied to combat several skin diseases, such as atopic dermatitis, acne vulgaris, alopecia, vitiligo, and psoriasis. BV is used extensively in topical preparations as cosmetics and used as dressing for wound healing, as well as in facemasks. Nevertheless, the safety of BV as a therapeutic choice has always been a concern due to the immune system reaction in some people due to BV use. The documented unfavorable impact is explained by the fact that the skin reactions to BV might expand to excessive immunological responses, including anaphylaxis, that typically resolve over numerous days. This review aims to address bee venom therapeutic uses in skin cosmetics.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 2. Abd El-Wahed, Aida A.
    et al.
    Khalifa, Shaden A. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Elashal, Mohamed H.
    Musharraf, Syed G.
    Saeed, Aamer
    Khatib, Alfi
    Tahir, Haroon Elrasheid
    Zou, Xiaobo
    Al Naggar, Yahya
    Mehmood, Arshad
    Wang, Kai
    El-Seedi, Hesham R.
    Cosmetic Applications of Bee Venom2021In: Toxins, E-ISSN 2072-6651, Vol. 13, no 11, article id 810Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bee venom (BV) is a typical toxin secreted by stingers of honeybee workers. BV and BV therapy have long been attractive to different cultures, with extensive studies during recent decades. Nowadays, BV is applied to combat several skin diseases, such as atopic dermatitis, acne vulgaris, alopecia, vitiligo, and psoriasis. BV is used extensively in topical preparations as cosmetics and used as dressing for wound healing, as well as in facemasks. Nevertheless, the safety of BV as a therapeutic choice has always been a concern due to the immune system reaction in some people due to BV use. The documented unfavorable impact is explained by the fact that the skin reactions to BV might expand to excessive immunological responses, including anaphylaxis, that typically resolve over numerous days. This review aims to address bee venom therapeutic uses in skin cosmetics.

  • 3.
    Abdelhadi, Saly
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Nordlind, Klas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Johansson, Bjoern
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Clinical Chemistry and Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Holst, Mikael
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Loenndahl, Louise
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide in atopic dermatitis and correlation with distress2024In: Immunopharmacology and immunotoxicology, ISSN 0892-3973, E-ISSN 1532-2513, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 67-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundAtopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, inflammatory, often severely itching skin disorder. It may worsen due to stress, depression, or anxiety. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) may be involved in inflammation signaling. CGRP has also been suggested in relation to stress, depression, and anxiety. This study aimed to investigate the expression of CGRP in the skin of patients with AD.MethodsTwenty-seven adult patients with AD, characterized with clinical and psychodemographic parameters, were investigated regarding CGRP expression in skin biopsies, using an immunohistochemical technique.ResultsThe total number of CGRP-positive nerve-like fibers was found to be higher in lesional skin than in non-lesional skin. Moreover, more inflammatory cells of dendritic shape intruded into the epidermis in lesional skin compared to non-lesional skin. Keratinocytes showing expression of CGRP were also found in lesional skin. Interestingly, the number of CGRP-positive nerve-like fibers in lesional skin correlated with depressive and anxiety scores. Correlation with depressive score was also found for round CGRP-positive inflammatory cells in the epidermis.ConclusionsCGRP may have a role in both the inflammatory process and distress, in AD.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 4.
    Adamic, M.
    et al.
    Dermatol Ctr Parmova, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Pavlovic, M. D.
    Dermatol Ctr Parmova, Ljubljana, Slovenia; Fac Med, Univ Maribor, Maribor, Slovenia.
    Rubin, A. Troilius
    Ctr Laser & Vasc Anomalies, Dept Dermatol, Skåne Univ Hosp, Malmö, Sweden.
    Palmetun-Ekback, M.
    Örebro University Hospital. Dept Dermatol, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Boixeda, P.
    Dept Dermatol, Laser Serv, Ramon & Cajal Hosp, Univ Alcala De Henares, Madrid, Spain.
    Guidelines of care for vascular lasers and intense pulse light sources from the European Society for Laser Dermatology2015In: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 29, no 9, p. 1661-1678Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimLasers and non-coherent intense pulse light sources (IPLS) are based on the principle of selective photothermolysis and can be used for the treatment of many vascular skin lesions. A variety of lasers has been developed for the treatment of congenital and acquired vascular lesions which incorporate these concepts into their design. Although laser and light sources are very popular due to their non-invasive nature, caution should be considered by practitioners and patients to avoid permanent side-effects. The aim of these guidelines is to give evidence-based recommendations for the use of lasers and IPLS in the treatment of vascular lesions. MethodsThese guidelines were produced by a Consensus Panel made up of experts in the field of vascular laser surgery under the auspices of the European Society of Laser Dermatology. Recommendations on the use of vascular lasers and IPLS were made based on the quality of evidence for efficacy, safety, tolerability, cosmetic outcome, patient satisfaction/preference and, where appropriate, on the experts' opinion. The recommendations of these guidelines are graded according to the American College of Chest Physicians Task Force recommendations on Grading Strength of Recommendations and Quality of Evidence in Clinical Guidelines. ResultsLasers and IPLS are very useful and sometimes the only available method to treat various vascular lesions. It is of a paramount importance that the type of laser or IPLS and their specific parameters are adapted to the indication but also that the treating physician is familiar with the device to be used. The crucial issue in treating vascular lesions is to recognize the immediate end-point after laser treatment. This is the single most important factor to ensure both the efficacy of the treatment and avoidance of serious side-effects.

  • 5.
    af Klinteberg, Maja
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Winberg, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Andersson, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Rönmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Hedman, Linnea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Decreasing prevalence of atopic dermatitis in Swedish schoolchildren: three repeated population-based surveys2024In: British Journal of Dermatology, ISSN 0007-0963, E-ISSN 1365-2133, Vol. 190, no 2, p. 191-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The prevalence of atopic dermatitis (AD) has increased over several decades and now affects about one-fifth of all children in high-income countries (HICs). While the increase continues in lower-income countries, the prevalence of AD might have reached a plateau in HICs.

    Objectives: To investigate trends in the prevalence of AD and atopic comorbidity in schoolchildren in Sweden.

    Methods: The study population consisted of three cohorts of children (median age 8 years) in Norrbotten, Sweden, for 1996 (n = 3430), 2006 (n = 2585) and 2017 (n = 2785). An identical questionnaire that included questions from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) protocol was used in all three cohorts. Trends in AD prevalence were estimated, as well as trends in atopic comorbidity. AD prevalence was estimated both according to the ISAAC definition of AD and by adding the reported diagnosis by a physician (D-AD).

    Results: The prevalence of AD decreased in the last decade, from 22.8% (1996) and 21.3% (2006) to 16.3% (2017; P < 0.001). The prevalence of D-AD was lower, but the same pattern of decrease was seen, from 9.3% (1996) and 9.4% (2006) to 5.7% (2017; P < 0.001). In all three cohorts, AD was more common among girls than boys (18.9% vs. 13.8% in 2017; P < 0.001). Children from the mountain inlands had a higher prevalence of AD than children from coastal cities (22.0% vs. 15.1% in 2017; P < 0.001). In comparing D-AD, there were no significant differences between the sexes or between inland or coastal living. Concomitant asthma increased over the years from 12.2% (1996) to 15.8% (2006) to 23.0% (2017; P < 0.001). Concomitant allergic rhinitis and allergic sensitization increased from 1996 (15.0% and 27.5%) to 2006 (24.7% and 49.5%) but then levelled off until 2017 (21.0% and 46.7%).

    Conclusions: The prevalence of AD among schoolchildren in Sweden decreased over the study period, whereas atopic comorbidity among children with AD increased. Although a decrease was seen, AD is still common and the increase in atopic comorbidity among children with AD, especially the increase in asthma, is concerning.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6.
    Agerberg, Klas
    et al.
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Dermatol & Venereol, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Rönnblom, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Gastroenterology/Hepatology.
    Debut of Psoriasis is usually before Debut of Concomitant Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Population-based Retrospective Study2022In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 102, article id adv00714Article in journal (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 7.
    Ahmed, Areeba
    et al.
    Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Koza, Eric
    Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Shi, Victoria
    Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Ma, Melissa
    Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Haq, Misha
    Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Kottner, Jan
    Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Garg, Amit
    Department of Dermatology, Northwell Health, New York, USA.
    Ingram, John R
    Clinical Reader and Consultant Dermatologist, Division of Infection and Immunity, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.
    Ezzedine, Khaled
    Department of Dermatology, Hôpital Henri Mondor, Créteil, France; Epidemiology in Dermatology and Evaluation of Therapeutics (EpiDermE)-EA 7379, Université Paris Est Créteil (UPEC), Créteil, France.
    Spuls, Phyllis I
    TBA, Paris, France.
    Beeckman, Dimitri
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; Swedish Centre for Skin and Wound Research (SCENTR), School of Health Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Wolkenstein, Pierre
    Department of Dermatology, GHU Henri-Mondor, APHP, UPEC, Créteil, France.
    Fransen, Frederike
    Department of Dermatology, Amsterdam Public Health, Infection and Immunity, Amsterdam University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Noe, Megan H
    Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, USA.
    Langbroek, Ginger Beau
    Department of Plastic, Reconstructive and Hand Surgery, Amsterdam University Medical Centers, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Bauer, Andrea
    Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technical University, Dresden, Germany.
    Thorlacius, Linnea
    Department of Dermatology, Zealand University Hospital, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Horbach, Sophie E R
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Amsterdam University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Layton, Alison
    Skin Research Centre, University of York, Heslington Road, York, UK.
    Apfelbacher, Christian
    Institute of Social Medicine and Health Systems Research, Otto Von Guericke University Magdeburg, Leipziger Straße 44, 39120, Magdeburg, Germany.
    Cahn, Brian A
    Department of Dermatology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Pearlman, Ross
    Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Schlessinger, Daniel I
    Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Alam, Murad
    Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Clinical relevance and uptake of core outcome sets in dermatology2024In: Archives of Dermatological Research, ISSN 0340-3696, E-ISSN 1432-069X, Vol. 316, no 2, article id 78Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Ahmed, Areeba
    et al.
    Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Koza, Eric
    Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Shi, Victoria
    Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Ma, Melissa
    Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Haq, Misha
    Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Kottner, Jan
    Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Garg, Amit
    Department of Dermatology, Northwell Health, New York, USA.
    Ingram, John R.
    Clinical Reader and Consultant Dermatologist, Division of Infection and Immunity, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.
    Ezzedine, Khaled
    Department of Dermatology, Hôpital Henri Mondor, Créteil, France and Epidemiology in Dermatology and Evaluation of Therapeutics (EpiDermE) - EA 7379, Université Paris Est Créteil (UPEC), Créteil, France.
    Spuls, Phyllis I
    Department of Dermatology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Beeckman, Dimitri
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; Swedish Centre for Skin and Wound Research (SCENTR), School of Health Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Wolkenstein, Pierre
    Department of Dermatology, GHU Henri-Mondor, APHP, UPEC, Créteil, France.
    Fransen, Frederike
    Department of Dermatology, Amsterdam Public Health, Infection and Immunity, Amsterdam University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Noe, Megan H.
    Dermatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA.
    Langbroek, Ginger Beau
    Department of Plastic, Reconstructive and Hand Surgery, Amsterdam University Medical Centers, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Bauer, Andrea
    Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technical University, Dresden, Germany.
    Thorlacius, Linnea
    Department of Dermatology, Zealand University Hospital, Roskilde, Denmark.
    Horbach, Sophie E. R.
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Amsterdam University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Layton, Alison
    Skin Research Centre, University of York, Heslington Road, York, UK.
    Apfelbacher, Christian
    Institute of Social Medicine and Health Systems Research, Otto Von Guericke University Magdeburg, Leipziger Straße 44, 39120, Magdeburg, Germany.
    Cahn, Brian A.
    Department of Dermatology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Pearlman, Ross
    Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Schlessinger, Daniel I.
    Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Alam, Murad
    Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Methodological innovations and stakeholder involvement in core outcome sets for skin diseases: a survey of the C3 working groups2024In: Archives of Dermatological Research, ISSN 0340-3696, E-ISSN 1432-069X, Vol. 316, no 4, article id 109Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Alaish, Ram
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Lundgren, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Suhr, Ole B.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Werner, Mårten
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Karling, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Safety of azathioprine and 6-mercaptopurine in patients with inflammatory bowel disease naive to thiopurine treatment2017In: International journal of clinical pharmacology and therapeutics, ISSN 0946-1965, Vol. 55, no 7, p. 594-600Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To determine if 6-mercaptopurine (MP) is better tolerated than azathioprine (AZA) as the initial thiopurine treatment in patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Switching patients with IBD from AZA to MP is advocated in patients intolerant to AZA. However, no study has determined if MP is more suited than AZA as a first-line treatment for patients who are naive to thiopurine treatment. Study: The tolerance of AZA and MP treatments in clinical practice was retrospectively evaluated from start to 12 months after initiating treatment in 113 patients with IBD who were all naive to thiopurines (82 patients treated with AZA and 31 patients with MP). Results: 65% of the patients treated with AZA and 61% of the patients treated with MP tolerated their treatment during 12 months (i.e., no group difference, p = 0.742). No difference in reported side effects between the two treatments was observed. The mean equivalent initial dose (0.92 vs. 0.61 mg/kg; p < 0.001) and the mean equivalent dose at 12 months (1.98 vs. 1.65 mg/kg; p = 0.014) was significantly higher in the MP group vs. the AZA group. The proportion of patients with.MCV = 7 at 12 months was numerically higher in the MP group than in the AZA group (53% vs. 31%; p = 0.090). Conclusions: In this retrospective observational study, no differences in tolerance or adherence between AZA and MP were observed in patients naive to thiopurines. However, MP treatment was at a higher equivalent thiopurine dose than AZA treatment, which tended to be associated with better treatment response.

  • 10.
    Albadri, Zeyad
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    AL Bayati, Doua
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Habel, Henrike
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Jerkovic Gulin, Sandra
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Div Dermatol & Venereol, Sweden.
    Groenhagen, Carina
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Seifert, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Incidence of Dermatitis Herpetiformis in Sweden 2005 to 2018: A Nationwide Retrospective Cohort Study2023In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 103, article id adv13210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dermatitis herpetiformis has been investigated in the past; however, only a limited number of studies have reported its incidence based on validated nationwide population-based registries. To address this gap, the aims of this study are to estimate the incidence of dermatitis herpetiformis in Sweden and to validate the National Patient Register (NPR) for diagnosis of dermatitis herpetiformis. A population-based open cohort study was conducted, including all patients diagnosed with dermatitis herpetiformis (International Classification of Diseases 10th revision; ICD-10 code L13.0) in Sweden from 2005 to 2018 (n = 1,724), identified from the NPR. The diagnosis of dermatitis herpetiformis in the NPR was validated using medical records, histopathological and immunopathological data, yielding a positive predictive value (PPV) of 62.5%. The mean annual incidence of dermatitis herpetiformis was 0.93/100,000 (95% confidence interval 0.79-1.08), female to male ratio 1:1, and mean age at diagnosis 60.9 years. In conclusion, this large nationwide cohort study showed a low validity for diagnosis of dermatitis herpetiformis in the NPR, and the adjusted incidence rate of dermatitis herpetiformis in Sweden was estimated to be 0.93/100,000, which is lower than that in previous Swedish studies.

  • 11.
    Albinsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    A Palliative Approach to Dementia Care: Leadership and organisation, existential issues and family support2002Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The main purpose of this thesis was to apply the WHO and NHS palliative care approach to dementia care.

    Thirty-one staff-members in mid-Sweden (studies I and II) and 20 next-of- kin (study IV) were interviewed. In study III, 316 staff-members from dementia care and 121 staff-members from palliative cancer care responded to a questionnaire about family support. The interviews were tape-recorded and analysed with a qualitative phenomenographic (I and II) and a hermeneutic approach (IV). The questionnaires (III) were analysed using qualitative and quantitative content analysis.

    The staff-members stated almost unanimously that daily leadership was lacking, and consequently clear goal formulations and care planning were rare (I). Proper teamwork between the doctor and the staff who worked on a daily basis with the patients was absent (I). With respect to existential issues, education and staff discussions were lacking (II). The staff were at a loss concerning how to deal with these issues. Nevertheless, these issues are central to family-members who have to deal with an existential crisis (IV). Important questions emerged about obligation and guilt, faithfulness, responsibility, and paying back what you once received. Existential isolation could be identified e.g. in the reversal of roles experienced as "being a parent to your parent" and in the burden of "visiting a living dead person".

    There were no routines for bereavement visits. The type of support suggested for dementia family members is partly similar to support in palliative cancer care, but it also differs in other respects such as feelings of guilt because the early signs of the disease are misunderstood, the need for respite because of the long trajectory of dementia diseases, and the occurrence of anticipatory grief because in the late phase family members can no longer make any contact at all with the patient (III).

    A palliative approach can improve the quality of life for the dementia patient and for the family. It can be used as a basis for a clear goal formulation. Some of the suggestions listed in this thesis for improving the quality of care are more a reflection of the need for a change in attitudes rather than the need for substantial budget increases.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 12.
    Alexeyev, Oleg A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Bacterial landscape of human skin: seeing the forest for the trees2013In: Experimental dermatology, ISSN 0906-6705, E-ISSN 1600-0625, Vol. 22, no 7, p. 443-446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Skin harbours large communities of colonizing bacteria. The same bacterial species can exist in different physiological states: viable, dormant, non-viable. Each physiological state can have a different impact on skin health and disease. Various analytical methodologies target different physiological states of bacteria, and this must be borne in mind while interpreting microbiological tests and drawing conclusions about possible cause-effect relationships.

  • 13.
    Alexeyev, Oleg A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Psoriasis, gut and microbiome2019In: British Journal of Dermatology, ISSN 0007-0963, E-ISSN 1365-2133, Vol. 181, no 6, p. 1126-1126Article in journal (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 14.
    Alexeyev, Oleg A.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Dekio, I.
    Layton, A. M.
    Li, H.
    Hughes, H.
    Morris, T.
    Zouboulis, C. C.
    Patrick, S.
    Why we continue to use the name Propionibacterium acnes2018In: British Journal of Dermatology, ISSN 0007-0963, E-ISSN 1365-2133, Vol. 179, no 5, p. 1227-1227Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Alexeyev, Oleg A
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Lundskog, Bertil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Ganceviciene, Ruta
    Palmer, Ruth H
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    McDowell, Andrew
    Patrick, Sheila
    Zouboulis, Christos
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Pattern of tissue invasion by Propionibacterium acnes in acne vulgaris2012In: Journal of dermatological science (Amsterdam), ISSN 0923-1811, E-ISSN 1873-569X, Vol. 67, no 1, p. 63-66Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Alexeyev, Oleg A
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Zouboulis, Christos C
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Shooting at skin propionibacterium acnes: to be or not to be on target2013In: Journal of Investigative Dermatology, ISSN 0022-202X, E-ISSN 1523-1747, Vol. 133, no 9, p. 2292-2294Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Almet, Axel A.
    et al.
    Univ Calif Irvine, Dept Math, Irvine, CA 92697 USA.;Univ Calif Irvine, NSF Simons Ctr Multiscale Cell Fate Res, Irvine, CA 92697 USA..
    Yuan, Hao
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Cell & Mol Biol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Annusver, Karl
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Cell & Mol Biol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ramos, Raul
    Univ Calif Irvine, NSF Simons Ctr Multiscale Cell Fate Res, Irvine, CA 92697 USA.;Univ Calif Irvine, Sch Biol Sci, Dept Dev & Cell Biol, Irvine, CA 92697 USA.;Univ Calif Irvine, Sue & Bill Gross Stem Cell Res Ctr, Irvine, CA 92697 USA..
    Liu, Yingzi
    Univ Calif Irvine, Sch Biol Sci, Dept Dev & Cell Biol, Irvine, CA 92697 USA.;Univ Calif Irvine, Sue & Bill Gross Stem Cell Res Ctr, Irvine, CA 92697 USA..
    Wiedemann, Julie
    Univ Calif Irvine, Sch Biol Sci, Dept Dev & Cell Biol, Irvine, CA 92697 USA.;Univ Calif Irvine, Dept Med, Math Computat & Syst Biol, Irvine, CA 92697 USA..
    Sorkin, Dara H.
    Univ Calif Irvine, Inst Clin & Translat Sci, Irvine, CA 92697 USA.;Univ Calif Irvine, Dept Med, Sch Med, Irvine, CA 92697 USA..
    Landen, Ning Xu
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Dermatol & Venereol Div, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Ctr Mol Med, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Ming Wai Lau Ctr Reparat Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sonkoly, Enikö
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Dermatology and Venereology. Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Dermatol & Venereol Div, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Ctr Mol Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Haniffa, Muzlifah
    Wellcome Sanger Inst, Wellcome Genome Campus, Cambridge, England.;Newcastle Univ, Biosci Inst, Newcastle Upon Tyne, England.;Newcastle Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, Dept Dermatol, Newcastle Upon Tyne, England.;Newcastle Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, NIHR Newcastle Biomed Res Ctr, Newcastle Upon Tyne, England..
    Nie, Qing
    Univ Calif Irvine, Dept Math, Irvine, CA 92697 USA.;Univ Calif Irvine, NSF Simons Ctr Multiscale Cell Fate Res, Irvine, CA 92697 USA.;Univ Calif Irvine, Sch Biol Sci, Dept Dev & Cell Biol, Irvine, CA 92697 USA..
    Lichtenberger, Beate M.
    Med Univ Vienna, Dept Dermatol, Skin & Endothelium Res Div SERD, Vienna, Austria..
    Luecken, Malte D.
    Helmholtz Munich, Inst Computat Biol, Neuherberg, Germany.;German Ctr Lung Res DZL, Inst Lung Hlth & Immun, Helmholtz Munich, Munich, Germany..
    Andersen, Bogi
    Univ Calif Irvine, NSF Simons Ctr Multiscale Cell Fate Res, Irvine, CA 92697 USA.;Univ Calif Irvine, Sue & Bill Gross Stem Cell Res Ctr, Irvine, CA 92697 USA.;Univ Calif Irvine, Sch Med, Dept Biol Chem, Irvine, CA 92697 USA..
    Tsoi, Lam C.
    Univ Michigan, Dept Dermatol, Ann Arbor, MI USA.;Univ Michigan, Dept Computat Med & Bioinformat, Ann Arbor, MI USA.;Univ Michigan, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Ann Arbor, MI USA.;Univ Michigan, Ctr Stat Genet, Sch Publ Hlth, Ann Arbor, MI USA..
    Watt, Fiona M.
    Kings Coll London, Sch Basic & Med Biosci, Fac Life Sci & Med, Ctr Gene Therapy & Regenerat Med, London, England.;European Mol Biol Lab, Directors Res Unit, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Gudjonsson, Johann E.
    Univ Michigan, Dept Dermatol, Ann Arbor, MI USA..
    Plikus, Maksim, V
    Univ Calif Irvine, NSF Simons Ctr Multiscale Cell Fate Res, Irvine, CA 92697 USA.;Univ Calif Irvine, Sch Biol Sci, Dept Dev & Cell Biol, Irvine, CA 92697 USA.;Univ Calif Irvine, Sue & Bill Gross Stem Cell Res Ctr, Irvine, CA 92697 USA.;Univ Calif Irvine, Dept Dev & Cell Biol, 45 Hlth Sci Rd,Room 3018, Irvine, CA 92697 USA..
    Kasper, Maria
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Cell & Mol Biol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    A Roadmap for a Consensus Human Skin Cell Atlas and Single-Cell Data Standardization2023In: Journal of Investigative Dermatology, ISSN 0022-202X, E-ISSN 1523-1747, Vol. 143, no 9, p. 1667-1677Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Single-cell technologies have become essential to driving discovery in both basic and translational investigative dermatology. Despite the multitude of available datasets, a central reference atlas of normal human skin, which can serve as a reference resource for skin cell types, cell states, and their molecular signatures, is still lacking. For any such atlas to receive broad acceptance, participation by many investigators during atlas construction is an essential prerequisite. As part of the Human Cell Atlas project, we have assembled a Skin Biological Network to build a consensus Human Skin Cell Atlas and outline a roadmap toward that goal. We define the drivers of skin diversity to be considered when selecting sequencing datasets for the atlas and list practical hurdles during skin sampling that can result in data gaps and impede comprehensive representation and technical considerations for tissue processing and computational analysis, the accounting for which should minimize biases in cell type enrichments and exclusions and decrease batch effects. By outlining our goals for Atlas 1.0, we discuss how it will uncover new aspects of skin biology.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 18.
    Alsterholm, Mikael
    et al.
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Svedbom, Axel
    Dermatology and Venereology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Anderson, Chris D.
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology, County Council of Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden.
    Holm Sommar, Lena
    Stockholm Hud, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ivert, Lina U.
    Dermatology and Venereology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Josefson, Anna
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    von Kobyletzki, Laura B.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Lundeberg, Lena
    Dermatology and Venereology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Maria
    Dermatology and Venereology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nylander, Elisabet
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venereology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Sandström Falk, MariHelen
    Capio Skin, Carlanderska Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Shayesteh, Alexander
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venereology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Sigurdardottir, Gunnthorunn
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology, County Council of Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sonesson, Andreas
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Svensson, Åke
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Virtanen, Marie
    Department of Medical Sciences, Section of Dermatology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Vrang, Sophie
    Patients' organization Atopikerna, The Swedish Asthma and Allergy Association, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wahlgren, Carl-Fredrik
    Dermatology and Venereology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bradley, Maria
    Dermatology and Venereology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Johansson, Emma K.
    Dermatology and Venereology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Establishment and Utility of SwedAD: A Nationwide Swedish Registry for Patients with Atopic Dermatitis Receiving Systemic Pharmacotherapy2023In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 103, article id adv7312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    SwedAD, a Swedish nationwide registry for patients with atopic dermatitis receiving systemic pharmacotherapy, was launched on 1 September 2019. We describe here the establishment of a user-friendly registry to the benefit of patients with atopic dermatitis. By 5 November 2022, 38 clinics had recorded 931 treatment episodes in 850 patients with an approximate national coverage rate of 40%. Characteristics at enrolment included median Eczema Area and Severity Index (EASI) 10.2 (interquartile range 4.0, 19.4), Patient-Oriented Eczema Measure (POEM) 18.0 (10.0, 24.0), Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) 11.0 (5.0, 19.0) and Peak Itch Numerical Rating Scale-11 (NRS-11) 6.0 (3.0, 8.0). At 3 months, median EASI was 3.2 (1.0, 7.3) and POEM, DLQI, and NRS-11 were improved. Regional coverage varied, reflecting the distribution of dermatologists, the ratio of public to private healthcare, and difficulties in recruiting certain clinics. This study highlights the importance of a nationwide registry when managing systemic pharmacotherapy of atopic dermatitis.

  • 19.
    Alsterholm, Mikael
    et al.
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Svedbom, Axel
    Dermatology and Venereology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Anderson, Chris D.
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology, County Council of Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden.
    Holm Sommar, Lena
    Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ivert, Lina U.
    Dermatology and Venereology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Josefson, Anna
    School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Von Kobyletzki, Laura
    School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Lundeberg, Lena
    Dermatology and Venereology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Maria
    Dermatology and Venereology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nylander, Elisabet
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Sandström Falk, MariHelen
    Carlanderska Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Shayesteh, Alexander
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Sigurdardottir, Gunnthorunn
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology, County Council of Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sonesson, Andreas
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Svensson, Åke
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Virtanen, Marie
    Department of Medical Sciences, Section of Dermatology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Vrang, Sophie
    Patients' organization Atopikerna, Swedish Asthma and Allergy Association, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wahlgren, Carl-Fredrik
    Dermatology and Venereology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bradley, Maria
    Dermatology and Venereology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Johansson, Emma K.
    Dermatology and Venereology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Establishment and utility of SwedAD: a nationwide Swedish registry for patients with atopic dermatitis receiving systemic pharmacotherapy2023In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 103, article id adv7312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    SwedAD, a Swedish nationwide registry for patients with atopic dermatitis receiving systemic pharmacotherapy, was launched on 1 September 2019. We describe here the establishment of a user-friendly registry to the benefit of patients with atopic dermatitis. By 5 November 2022, 38 clinics had recorded 931 treatment episodes in 850 patients with an approximate national coverage rate of 40%. Characteristics at enrolment included median Eczema Area and Severity Index (EASI) 10.2 (interquartile range 4.0, 19.4), Patient-Oriented Eczema Measure (POEM) 18.0 (10.0, 24.0), Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) 11.0 (5.0, 19.0) and Peak Itch Numerical Rating Scale-11 (NRS-11) 6.0 (3.0, 8.0). At 3 months, median EASI was 3.2 (1.0, 7.3) and POEM, DLQI, and NRS-11 were improved. Regional coverage varied, reflecting the distribution of dermatologists, the ratio of public to private healthcare, and difficulties in recruiting certain clinics. This study highlights the importance of a nationwide registry when managing systemic pharmacotherapy of atopic dermatitis.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 20.
    Alsterholm, Mikael
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Inst Clin Sci, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Dermatol & Venereol, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Dermatol & Venereol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.;Univ Goth enburg, Inst Clin Sci, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Dermatol & Venereol, SE-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Svedbom, Axel
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Dermatol & Venereol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Anderson, Chris D.
    Cty Council Ostergotland, Dept Dermatol & Venereol, Linkdping, Sweden.;Linköping Univ, Dept Biomed & Clin Sci, Div Cell Biol, Linköping, Sweden..
    Sommar, Lena Holm
    Stockholm Hud, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ivert, Lina U.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Dermatol & Venereol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Dermatol & Venereol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Josefson, Anna
    Örebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Sch Med Sci, Örebro, Sweden.;Univ Hosp Örebro, Dept Dermatol, Örebro, Sweden..
    Von Kobyletzki, Laura
    Örebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Sch Med Sci, Örebro, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Occupat & Environm Dermatol, Malmö, Sweden..
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Lundeberg, Lena
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Dermatol & Venereol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Dermatol & Venereol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lundqvist, Maria
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Dermatol & Venereol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Dermatol & Venereol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Örebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Sch Med Sci, Örebro, Sweden..
    Nylander, Elisabet
    Umeå Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Dermatol & Venereol, Umeå, Sweden. Carlanderska Hosp, Capio Skin, Gothenburg, Sweden. Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Dermatol & Venereol, Lund, Sweden. Lund Univ, Div Dermatol & Venereol, Clin Sci, Lund, Sweden. Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Sci, Sect Dermatol, Uppsala, Sweden. Swedish Asthma & Allergy Assoc, Patients org Atopikerna, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Falk, Marihelen Sandstroem
    Capio Skin, Carlanderska Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Shayesteh, Alexander
    Umeå Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Dermatol & Venereol, Umeå, Sweden. Carlanderska Hosp, Capio Skin, Gothenburg, Sweden. Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Dermatol & Venereol, Lund, Sweden. Lund Univ, Div Dermatol & Venereol, Clin Sci, Lund, Sweden. Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Sci, Sect Dermatol, Uppsala, Sweden. Swedish Asthma & Allergy Assoc, Patients org Atopikerna, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sigurdardottir, Gunnthorunn
    Cty Council Ostergotland, Dept Dermatol & Venereol, Linkdping, Sweden..
    Sonesson, Andreas
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden..
    Svensson, Ake
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden..
    Virtanen, Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Dermatology and Venereology.
    Vrang, Sophie
    Patients’ organization Atopikerna, The Swedish Asthma and Allergy Association, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wahlgren, Carl-fredrik
    Dermatology and Venereology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Bradley, Maria
    Dermatology and Venereology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Johansson, Emma K.
    Dermatology and Venereology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Establishment and Utility of SwedAD: A Nationwide Swedish Registry for Patients with Atopic Dermatitis Receiving Systemic Pharmacotherapy2023In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 103, article id adv7312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    SwedAD, a Swedish nationwide registry for patients with atopic dermatitis receiving systemic pharma-cotherapy, was launched on 1 September 2019. We describe here the establishment of a user-friendly re-gistry to the benefit of patients with atopic dermati-tis. By 5 November 2022, 38 clinics had recorded 931 treatment episodes in 850 patients with an approxi-mate national coverage rate of 40%. Characteristics at enrolment included median Eczema Area and Seve-rity Index (EASI) 10.2 (interquartile range 4.0, 19.4), Patient-Oriented Eczema Measure (POEM) 18.0 (10.0, 24.0), Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) 11.0 (5.0, 19.0) and Peak Itch Numerical Rating Scale-11 (NRS-11) 6.0 (3.0, 8.0). At 3 months, median EASI was 3.2 (1.0, 7.3) and POEM, DLQI, and NRS-11 were im-proved. Regional coverage varied, reflecting the distri-bution of dermatologists, the ratio of public to private healthcare, and difficulties in recruiting certain clinics. This study highlights the importance of a nationwide registry when managing systemic pharmacotherapy of atopic dermatitis.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 21.
    Alsterholm, Mikael
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Univ Goth enburg, Sweden.
    Svedbom, Axel
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology.
    Sommar, Lena Holm
    Stockholm Hud, Sweden.
    Ivert, Lina U.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Josefson, Anna
    Orebro Univ, Sweden; Univ Hosp Orebro, Sweden.
    Von Kobyletzki, Laura
    Orebro Univ, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lundeberg, Lena
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Maria
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Nylander, Elisabet
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Falk, Marihelen Sandstroem
    Capio Skin, Carlanderska Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Shayesteh, Alexander
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Sigurdardottir, Gunnthorunn
    Region Östergötland, Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sonesson, Andreas
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Svensson, Ake
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Virtanen, Marie
    Department of Medical Sciences, Section of Dermatology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Vrang, Sophie
    Patients’ organization Atopikerna, The Swedish Asthma and Allergy Association, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wahlgren, Carl-fredrik
    Dermatology and Venereology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bradley, Maria
    Dermatology and Venereology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Johansson, Emma K.
    Dermatology and Venereology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Establishment and Utility of SwedAD: A Nationwide Swedish Registry for Patients with Atopic Dermatitis Receiving Systemic Pharmacotherapy2023In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 103, article id adv7312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    SwedAD, a Swedish nationwide registry for patients with atopic dermatitis receiving systemic pharma-cotherapy, was launched on 1 September 2019. We describe here the establishment of a user-friendly re-gistry to the benefit of patients with atopic dermati-tis. By 5 November 2022, 38 clinics had recorded 931 treatment episodes in 850 patients with an approxi-mate national coverage rate of 40%. Characteristics at enrolment included median Eczema Area and Seve-rity Index (EASI) 10.2 (interquartile range 4.0, 19.4), Patient-Oriented Eczema Measure (POEM) 18.0 (10.0, 24.0), Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) 11.0 (5.0, 19.0) and Peak Itch Numerical Rating Scale-11 (NRS-11) 6.0 (3.0, 8.0). At 3 months, median EASI was 3.2 (1.0, 7.3) and POEM, DLQI, and NRS-11 were im-proved. Regional coverage varied, reflecting the distri-bution of dermatologists, the ratio of public to private healthcare, and difficulties in recruiting certain clinics. This study highlights the importance of a nationwide registry when managing systemic pharmacotherapy of atopic dermatitis.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 22.
    Andernord, Daniel
    et al.
    Department of Dermatology, Central Hospital, Karlstad, Sweden; Centre for Clinical Research and Education, Region Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Bruze, Magnus
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Bryngelsson, Ing-Liss
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bråred Christensson, Johanna
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Region Västra Götaland, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Glas, Bo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Hagvall, Lina
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Region Västra Götaland, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Isaksson, Marléne
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Matura, Mihály
    Department of Dermatology, Skaraborg Hospital Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Nyman, Gunnar
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Region Västra Götaland, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Stenberg, Berndt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Svedman, Cecilia
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital and Department of Dermatology, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Contact allergy to haptens in the Swedish baseline series: Results from the Swedish Patch Test Register (2010 to 2017)2022In: Contact Dermatitis, ISSN 0105-1873, E-ISSN 1600-0536, Vol. 86, no 3, p. 175-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Allergic contact dermatitis has considerable public health impact and causative haptens vary over time.

    Objectives: To report the prevalence of contact allergy to allergens in the Swedish baseline series 2010 to 2017, as registered in the Swedish Patch Test Register.

    Methods: Results and demographic information for patients tested with the Swedish baseline series in 2010 to 2017 were analysed.

    Results: Data for 21 663 individuals (females 69%) were included. Females had significantly more positive patch tests (54% vs 40%). The reaction prevalence rates were highest for nickel sulfate (20.7%), fragrance mix I (7.1%), Myroxylon pereirae (6.9%), potassium dichromate (6.9%), cobalt chloride (6.8%), methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone (MCI/MI; 6.4%), MI (3.7%), colophonium (3.5%), fragrance mix II (3.2%), and formaldehyde (3.2%). Myroxylon pereirae reaction prevalence increased from 5% in 2010 to 9% in 2017 and that for methyldibromo glutaronitrile from 3.1% to 4.6%. MCI/MI and MI reactions decreased in prevalence after 2014. Nickel reaction prevalence decreased among females aged 10 to 19 years.

    Conclusions: Nickel remains the most common sensitizing agent, with reaction prevalence decreasing among females younger than 20 years. The changes in MCI/MI and MI reaction prevalence mirrored those in Europe. The register can reveal changes in contact allergy prevalence over time among patients patch tested in Sweden.

  • 23.
    Andernord, Daniel
    et al.
    Department of Dermatology, Central Hospital, Karlstad, Sweden; Centre for Clinical Research and Education, Region Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Bruze, Magnus
    Lund University, Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Bryngelsson, Ing-Liss
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Christensson, Johanna Bråred
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Region Västra Götaland, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Glas, Bo
    Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hagvall, Lina
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Region Västra Götaland, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Isaksson, Marléne
    Lund University, Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Matura, Mihaly
    Department of Dermatology, Skaraborg Hospital Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Nyman, Gunnar
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Region Västra Götaland, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Stenberg, Berndt
    Dept of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Svedman, Cecilia
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Contact allergy to haptens in the Swedish baseline series: Results from the Swedish Patch Test Register (2010 to 2017)2022In: Contact Dermatitis, ISSN 0105-1873, E-ISSN 1600-0536, Vol. 86, no 3, p. 175-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Allergic contact dermatitis has considerable public health impact and causative haptens vary over time.

    OBJECTIVES: To report contact allergy prevalence to allergens in the Swedish baseline series 2010-2017, as registered in the Swedish Patch Test Register.

    METHODS: Results and demographic information for patients tested with the Swedish baseline series in 2010-2017 were analyzed.

    RESULTS: Data for 21 663 individuals (females 69%) were included. Females had significantly more positive patch tests (54% vs 40%). The reaction prevalence rates were highest for nickel sulfate (20.7%), fragrance mix I (7.1%), Myroxylon pereirae (6.9%), potassium dichromate (6.9%), cobalt chloride (6.8%), methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone (6.4%), methylisothiazolinone (3.7%), colophonium (3.5%), fragrance mix II (3.2%) and formaldehyde (3.2%). Myroxylon pereirae reaction prevalence increased from 5% in 2010 to 9% in 2017 and that for methyldibromo glutaronitrile from 3.1% to 4.6%. Methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone and methylisothiazolinone reactions decreased in prevalence after 2014. Nickel reaction prevalence decreased among females aged 10-19 years.

    CONCLUSIONS: Nickel remains the most common sensitizing agent, with reaction prevalence decreasing among females younger than 20 years. The changes in methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone and methylisothiazolinone reaction prevalence mirrored those in Europe. The register can reveal changes in contact allergy prevalence over time among patients patch tested in Sweden. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 24. Andersen, Janice
    et al.
    Nordin, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Lifestyle and rehabilitation in long term illness.
    Sandberg, Sverre
    Illness Perception and Psychological Distress in Persons with Porphyria Cutanea Tarda2016In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 96, no 5, p. 674-678Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) requires long-term treatment and follow-up, although many patients experience life-long remission. The aim of this cross-sectional postal survey was to describe and investigate the association between illness perception, health complaints, self-reported symptoms and distress in persons with PCT. The participants perceived PCT as a chronic condition with high levels of personal and treatment control. Persons who reported active symptoms scored higher on perceived illness threat, total health complaints and psychological distress compared with those in remission or latent phases. However, a higher perception of illness threat and the total burden of health complaints were more closely associated with psychological distress than were perceived PCT symptoms activity. This has implications for clinical consultation; dermatologists should be attentive to symptoms activity, but also recognize that patients in remission with a high perceived illness threat and multiple health complaints might be especially vulnerable to psychological distress with regards to PCT.

  • 25.
    Andersson, Chris D
    et al.
    Linköpings universitetssjukhus, Dermatologi.
    Meding, Birgitta
    Karolinska Institutet, Inst för miljömedicin.
    Stenberg, Berndt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Svensson, Åke
    Malmö Allmänna Sjukhus.
    Working with Population to Treat Individuals: A Report from the Swedish Dermato-Epidemiological Network (SweDEN)2012In: Forum for Nordic Dermato-Venereology, ISSN 1402-2915, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 44-46Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Andersson, Nirina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Boman, Jens
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Nylander, Elisabet
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Rectal chlamydia - should screening be recommended in women?2017In: International Journal of STD and AIDS (London), ISSN 0956-4624, E-ISSN 1758-1052, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 476-479Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common bacterial sexually transmitted infection in Europe and has large impacts on patients' physical and emotional health. Unidentified asymptomatic rectal Chlamydia trachomatis could be a partial explanation for the high Chlamydia trachomatis prevalence. In this study, we evaluated rectal Chlamydia trachomatis testing in relation to symptoms and sexual habits in women and men who have sex with men. Rectal Chlamydia trachomatis prevalence was 9.1% in women and 0.9% in men who have sex with men. None of the patients reported any rectal symptoms; 59.0% of the women with a rectal Chlamydia trachomatis infection denied anal intercourse and 18.8% did not have a urogenital infection; 9.4% did neither have a urogenital infection nor reported anal sex. We suggest that rectal sampling should be considered in women visiting sexually transmitted infection clinics regardless of rectal symptoms and irrespective of anal intercourse, since our data suggest that several cases of rectal Chlamydia trachomatis otherwise would be missed, thus enabling further disease transmission.

  • 27.
    Andersson, Nirina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Carré, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Janlert, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Boman, Jens
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Nylander, Elisabet
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology.
    Gender differences in the well-being of patients diagnosed with Chlamydia trachomatis: a cross-sectional study2018In: Sexually Transmitted Infections, ISSN 1368-4973, E-ISSN 1472-3263, Vol. 94, no 6, p. 401-405Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: We aimed to investigate how an infection with Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) influenced patients' well-being and whether there were differences due to gender, age or relationship status, in an effort to strengthen preventive measures and provide better healthcare for patients with CT.

    Methods: Patients diagnosed with CT in the county of Västerbotten, Sweden, were asked to fill out a questionnaire about their feelings, thoughts and actions after CT diagnosis. The patients were also asked to fill in the validated questionnaires Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test. Between February 2015 and January 2017, 128 patients (74 women and 54 men) were included in the study.

    Results: After being diagnosed with CT, men were generally less worried than women (P<0.001). Women worried more about not being able to have children (P<0.001) and about having other STIs (P=0.001) than men did. Men felt less angry (P=0.001), less bad (P<0.001), less dirty (P<0.001) and less embarrassed (P=0.011) than women did. Nineteen per cent of men and 48% of women reported symptoms of anxiety. The majority of both men (60%) and women (72%) had a risk consumption of alcohol.

    Conclusion: Women and men reacted differently when diagnosed with CT. Women worried more about complications and more often blamed themselves for being infected. Being aware of these gender differences may be important when planning preventive measures and during counselling of CT-infected patients. Persons working with patients with CT must also be aware of the high frequency of harmful alcohol consumption among their patients.

  • 28.
    Andersson, Rolf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Quirk, Chris
    Royal Perth Hospital, WA Australien.
    Sullivan, John
    Liverpool Hospital, NSW Australien.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Cutaneous manifestations of internal disease2008In: Drug Discovery Today : Disease Mechanisms, E-ISSN 1740-6765, Vol. 5, no 1, p. e113-e123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The skin mirrors the individual's well being. Visible for both the patient and the attending physician, it can be a source of information for the diagnosis of multi-system diseases and diseases of internal organs. Therapy is usually directed at the primary disease. Pharmaco-therapeutic options for internal diseases are at present not always optimal and specific management of side effects of drugs with vital indication may be necessary. Better understanding of the mechanisms of the cutaneous manifestations may help develop more efficacious, better tolerated therapy and improve the patient's situation.

  • 29. Andre, M
    et al.
    Odenholt, I
    Schwan, Åke
    Axelsson, Inge
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Upper respiratory tract infections in general practice:: Diagnosis, antibiotic prescribing, duration of symptoms and use of diagnostic tests.2002In: Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0036-5548, Vol. 34, no 12, p. 880-886Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A diagnosis/antibiotic prescribing study was performed in 5 counties in Sweden for 1 week in November 2000. As part of this study, the characteristics and clinical management of patients with upper respiratory tract infections (n = 2899) in primary care were analyzed. Almost half of the patients were aged < 15 y and one-fifth of the patients consulted out of hours. Of all patients seeking primary care for upper respiratory tract infections, 56.0% were prescribed an antibiotic. Almost all patients who were given the diagnoses streptococcal tonsillitis, acute otitis media or acute sinusitis were prescribed antibiotics, compared to 10% of patients with common cold or acute pharyngitis. The most frequently prescribed antibiotic was penicillin V (79.2%) and this was even more pronounced out of hours, when the diagnoses otitis media and streptococcal tonsillitis were more frequently used. In patients with common cold and acute pharyngitis, the percentage who received antibiotics increased with increasing length of symptoms and increasing CRP levels. In patients with acute pharyngitis or streptococcal tonsillitis, antibiotics were prescribed less frequently provided streptococcal tests were performed. The management of patients with upper respiratory tract infections in general practice seems to be in good agreement with current Swedish guidelines. However, the study indicates some areas for improvement. The diagnosis of acute sinusitis seems to have been overestimated and used only to justify antibiotic treatment.

  • 30. Andre, Malin
    et al.
    Molstad, Sigvard
    Stålsby Lundborg, Cecilia
    Odenholt, Inga
    Axelsson, Inge
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Management of urinary tract infections in primary care:: a repeated 1-week diagnosis-prescribing study in five counties in Sweden in 2000 and 2002.2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0036-5548, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 134-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A diagnosis-antibiotic prescribing study was performed in 5 counties in Sweden during 1 week in November in the y 2000 and 2002, respectively. As part of the study, the characteristics and clinical management of patients who received diagnoses of urinary tract infections (UTIs) (n = 1564) in primary care, were analysed. 85% of the visits were by women, and 74% of all consultations were diagnosed as lower UTIs. One or more diagnostic tests were performed in 98% of the women with suspected lower or recurrent UTIs and 95% were prescribed an antibiotic. The most commonly prescribed antibiotics for lower UTIs were trimethoprim followed by pivmecillinam and a quinolone. The study indicated a change in antibiotic prescribing with improved adherence to the national recommendations. There was an increase of prescribed nitrofurantoin and a decrease of prescribed quinolones to women with lower UTIs between the studied y. Furthermore, 3-d treatment with trimethoprim increased although the prescribed duration was mostly 7 d. In contrast to the guidelines, few urine cultures were performed. The study highlights the necessity of updating the guidelines for the management of lower UTIs in general practice.

  • 31. André, Malin
    et al.
    Eriksson, Margareta
    Möstad, Sigvard
    Stålsby Lundborg, Cecilia
    Jacobsson, Anders
    Odenholt, Inga
    Axelsson, Inge
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Runehagen, Arne
    Schwan, Åke
    The management of infections in children in general practice in Sweden.: a repeated 1-week diagnosis-prescribing study in 5 counties in 2000 and 2002.2005In: The Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0022-1899, Vol. 37, no 11-12, p. 863-869Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A diagnosis-prescribing study was performed in 5 Swedish counties during 1 week in November in 2000 and repeated in 2002. The aim of the present study was to analyse data for children 0-15y of age who consulted a general practitioner with symptoms of an infection. During the 2 weeks studied, 4049 children were consulted. Respiratory tract infections (RTI) were the predominant diagnoses, above all among the youngest children, while the proportion of urinary tract infections and skin infections increased with increasing age. Between the y 2000 and 2002, the proportion of children allocated the diagnosis streptococcal tonsillitis and pneumonia decreased (p<0.01 and p<0.001, respectively) while the proportion of common cold increased (p<0.001). Antibiotic prescribing decreased from 55% to 48% (p<0.001) for respiratory infections between the years studied. The only significant changes in type of antibiotics prescribed were the increase of isoxazolylpenicillins (p<0.001) used for skin infection and the decrease of macrolides (p=0.001). A diagnostic test was used in more than half of the consultations. Of children allocated a RTI diagnosis, 36% were prescribed antibiotics when a C-reactive protein test was performed compared to 58% in those not tested. Further studies are needed in general practice to determine the optimal use of near-patient tests in children with RTI.

  • 32. André, Malin
    et al.
    Schwan, Åke
    Odenholt, Inga
    Axelsson, Inge
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    The use of CRP tests in patients with respiratory tract infections in primary care in Sweden care can be questioned.2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0036-5548, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 192-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A diagnosis-antibiotic prescribing study was performed in 5 counties in Sweden during 1 week in November in 2000 and 2002 respectively. As a part of the study, the use and results of C-reactive protein (CRP) tests in relation to duration of symptoms and antibiotic prescribing in 6778 patients assigned a diagnosis of respiratory tract infections were analysed. In almost half (42%) of the patients, a CRP test was performed. The majority of CRP tests (69%) were performed in patients assigned diagnosis upper respiratory tract infection, where the test is not recommended. Overall, there was a minor decrease in antibiotic prescribing when CRP was used (41%), in comparison to 44% of the patients where no CRP was performed (p < 0.01). Patients assigned diagnoses implying a bacterial aetiology were prescribed antibiotics irrespective of result of CRP or length of symptoms before consultation. For patients assigned viral diagnoses, antibiotic prescribing increased with increasing duration of symptoms and increasing value of CRP. The use of CRP decreased antibiotic prescribing in patients assigned to viral diagnoses and with longstanding symptoms (p < 0.001). However, 59% of the patients assigned viral diagnoses with CRP > or = 25 received antibiotics, which seems to indicate a misinterpretation of CRP and a non-optimal use of antibiotics.

  • 33.
    Aneblom, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    The Emergency Contraceptive Pill – a Second Chance: Knowledge, Attitudes and Experiences Among Users and Providers2003Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of this thesis was to study knowledge, attitudes and experience of emergency contraceptive pills among women and providers.

    Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used. Focus-group interviews were conducted with teenage-girls (I) and with women who had purchased ECP without prescription (IV). Self-administered waiting-room questionnaires were administered to women presenting for induced abortion in three large hospitals (II, III), and after the deregulation of ECP, a postal questionnaire was sent to pharmacy staff and nurse-midwives in three counties in mid-Sweden (V).

    Overall, women showed high basic awareness of ECP although specific knowledge such as the level of effectiveness, time-frames and how the method works was lacking. Approval of the method was high and most women were positive to use the method if they needed. Contradictory views as to whether ECP undermines contraceptive behavior were expressed. As many as 43% of women requesting induced abortion had a history of one or more previous abortions. Among the abortion applicants, one out of five, 22%, had previously used ECP and 3% had used it to prevent the current pregnancy. Media and friends were the two most common sources of information on ECP. Half of the women, 52%, were positive to having ECP prescription-free. Those women who had purchased ECP in a pharmacy without prescription, appreciated this possibility, and the major benefits expressed were time saving aspects. No severe side-effects were reported. The women's experiences of interaction with pharmacy staff were both positive and negative. The importance of up-to-date information about ECP and the OTC-availability from the health care providers was emphasized. Both pharmacy staff and nurse-midwives had positive attitudes towards ECP and the OTC availability. Of pharmacy staff, 38% reported that they referred women to nurse-midwives/gynecologists for further counseling and follow-ups. The need for increased communication and collaboration between pharmacies and local family planning clinics was reported by both study groups with suggestions of regular meetings for information and discussions.

    The results suggest that ECP is still underused and that more factual information is needed before the method is becoming a known, accepted and integrated back-up method to the existing family planning repertoire. Longitudinal research to assess the long-term effects of ECP is needed.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 34. Anonym (I.Ax.),
    Två fall av letala neonatala GBS-infektioner [Two cases of lethal neonatal GBS infections].2003Other (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Antelmi, A.
    et al.
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Metsini, Alexandra
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Regnell, S. E.
    Sanofi AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Carlberg, M.
    Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Svensson, Å.
    Department of Dermatology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    von Kobyletzki, L.
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Prevalence of prurigo nodularis in Sweden2024In: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36. Arana, Alejandro
    et al.
    Pottegård, Anton
    Kuiper, Josephina G.
    Booth, Helen
    Reutfors, Johan
    Calingaert, Brian
    Lund, Lars Christian
    Crellin, Elizabeth
    Schmitt-Egenolf, Marcus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Kaye, James A.
    Gembert, Karin
    Rothman, Kenneth J.
    Kieler, Helle
    Dedman, Daniel
    Houben, Eline
    Gutiérrez, Lia
    Hallas, Jesper
    Perez-Gutthann, Susana
    Long-Term Risk of Skin Cancer and Lymphoma in Users of Topical Tacrolimus and Pimecrolimus: Final Results from the Extension of the Cohort Study Protopic Joint European Longitudinal Lymphoma and Skin Cancer Evaluation (JOELLE)2021In: Clinical Epidemiology, E-ISSN 1179-1349, Vol. 13, p. 1141-1153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Evidence is insufficient to infer whether topical calcineurin inhibitors (TCIs; tacrolimus and pimecrolimus) cause malignancy. The study objective was to estimate the long-term risk of skin cancer and lymphoma associated with topical TCI use in adults and children, separately.

    Patients and Methods: A cohort study in Denmark, Sweden, UK, and the Netherlands was conducted. Adjusted incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC), melanoma, cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) excluding CTCL, and Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) in new users of TCIs versus users of moderate/high-potency topical corticosteroids.

    Results: The study included 126,908/61,841 adults and 32,605/27,961 children initiating treatment with tacrolimus/pimecrolimus, respectively. Follow-up was ≥10 years for 19% of adults and 32% of children. Incidence rate ratios and (95% confidence intervals) for tacrolimus versus corticosteroid users in adults were <1 for melanoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and Hodgkin lymphoma; and 1.80 (1.25-2.58) for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. For pimecrolimus, IRRs in adults were <1 for non-Hodgkin lymphoma, cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, and Hodgkin's lymphoma; and 1.21 (1.03-1.41) for melanoma; and 1.28 (1.20-1.35) for nonmelanoma skin cancer. In children, results were inconclusive due to few events. In adults, incidence rate ratios ≥5 years after first topical calcineurin inhibitor exposure were not higher than in overall analyses.

    Conclusion: Overall, we found little evidence associating use of topical calcineurin inhibitors with skin cancer and lymphoma; confounding by indication, surveillance bias, and reverse causation may have influenced these results. Even if causal, the public health impact of these excess risks would be low and confined to the first years of exposure.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 37.
    Arrelöv, Britt
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Towards Understanding of Determinants of Physicians’ Sick-listing Practice and their Interrelations: A Population-based Epidemiological Study2003Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Physicians are supposed to act as sick-listing experts and they possess a role as gate-keepers to the social insurance system. Earlier studies have demonstrated variation between physicians and physician categories regarding sick-listing practice. In addition to the patient's disease and its severity, a number of other factors may be expected to influence sick-listing practice. Most earlier studies have focused on the patient's disease and his or her work place as cause for sickness absence.

    The aims of this study were to analyse variation of sick-listing practice between physician categories and the influence of physician characteristics on sick-listing practice, the influence of structure, organisation and remuneration of health care on physician sick-listing practice, the influence of local structural factors in the community, and the influence of a legislative change on physician sick-listing practice.

    The study was conducted as a cross-sectional epidemiological study of 57563 doctors’ certificates for sickness absence, received by 28 local social insurance offices in eight Swedish counties, during four months in 1995 and two months in 1996.

    Patient age, sex, and diagnostic group, issuing physician category, presence of a hospital in the municipality, municipality population size and county were all significantly and independently correlated to number of net days of sick-listing. Physician characteristics, such as age, sex and degree of specialisation were all associated with number of net days of sick-listing. Physicians working in general practice issued significantly shorter periods of sick-listing than the other physician categories. Reimbursement of general practice and participation in financial co-operation with social insurance were significantly correlated to length of sickness episode issued by general practitioners. A legislative change performed during the study period was associated with small effects in sick-listing practice.

    In conclusion, a number of factors other than disease and disease severity and other patient and physician linked factors were found to influence the variation of sick-listing practice. It appears that the closer the influencing factor was to the place were the decision was taken, i.e., the patient-physician consultation, the higher the impact on the decision appeared to be.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 38.
    Assarsson, Malin
    et al.
    Div Dermatol and Venereol, Sweden.
    Duvetorp, Albert
    Div Dermatol and Venereol, Sweden.
    Dienus, Olaf
    Div Med Diagnost, Sweden.
    Söderman, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Div Med Diagnost, Sweden.
    Seifert, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Div Dermatol and Venereol, Sweden.
    Significant Changes in the Skin Microbiome in Patients with Chronic Plaque Psoriasis after Treatment with Narrowband Ultraviolet B2018In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 98, no 4, p. 428-436Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Changes in the skin microbiome have been shown to promote cutaneous inflammation. The skin microbiome of patients with chronic plaque type psoriasis was analysed before and after treatment with narrowband ultraviolet B (UVB). Swab samples of the microbiome were taken from lesional and non-lesional skin of 26 patients. Microbiotas were characterized by sequencing 16S rRNA bacterial genes on the Illumina MiSeq platform. Lesional skin microbiome diversity correlated with psoriasis severity (measured with the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index; PASI). There was a significantly lower abundance of the phylum Firmicutes and the genus Staphylococcus in lesional skin compared with non-lesional skin before UVB treatment. Responders (amp;gt; 75% target Psoriasis Severity Index (PSI) improvement) had significantly lower abundance of the phyla Firmicutes in lesional and non-lesional skin and lower abundance of the genera Staphylococcus, Finegoldia, Anaerococcus, Peptoniphilus, Gardnerella, Prevotella and Clostridium in lesional skin after UVB treatment. Pseudomonas significantly decreased in lesional and non-lesional skin of treatment responders. These results suggest that skin microbiome alterations after UVB treatment could be related to treatment and treatment response.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 39.
    Assarsson, Malin
    et al.
    Ryhov Hosp, Sweden.
    Soderman, Jan
    Ryhov Hosp, Sweden.
    Duvetorp, Albert
    Skanes Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Mrowietz, Ulrich
    Univ Med Ctr Schleswig Holstein, Germany.
    Skarstedt, Marita
    Ryhov Hosp, Sweden.
    Seifert, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov Hosp, Sweden.
    Narrowband UVB treatment induces expression of WNT7B, WNT10B and TCF7L2 in psoriasis skin2019In: Archives of Dermatological Research, ISSN 0340-3696, E-ISSN 1432-069X, Vol. 311, no 7, p. 535-544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    WNT/beta-catenin signaling pathways play a pivotal role in the human immune defense against infections and in chronic inflammatory conditions as psoriasis. Wnt gene alterations are linked to known comorbidities of psoriasis as obesity, diabetes and Crohns disease. The objective of this study was to investigate WNT7B, WNT10B, WNT16 and TCF7L2 gene and protein expression in lesional and non-lesional skin and in the peripheral blood of patients with chronic plaque psoriasis compared with healthy individuals. To investigate the effect of narrowband UVB radiation, expression of these genes were analyzed before and after narrowband UVB treatment. Associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms for WNT7B, WNT10B, WNT16 and TCF7L2 genes and psoriasis were tested. Our results show significantly decreased WNT7B, WNT10B and TCF7L2 gene expression in lesional skin compared with non-lesional skin and healthy controls. Narrowband UVB treatment significantly increased expression of these genes in lesional skin. Immunohistochemistry shows increased WNT16 expression in lesional skin. No significant differences in allele or genotype frequencies for Wnt or TCF7L2 gene polymorphisms were found between patient and control group. This study shows for the first time significant UVB induced upregulation of WNT7B, WNT10B and TCF7L2 in patients with psoriasis and suggests a potential role of these genes in psoriasis pathogenesis.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 40.
    Assarsson, Malin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Division of Dermatology and Venereology, Region Jönköping County, Sweden.
    Söderman, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Division of Medical Diagnostics, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Dienus, Olaf
    Division of Medical Diagnostics, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Seifert, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Division of Dermatology and Venereology, Region Jönköping County, Sweden.
    Significant Differences in the Bacterial Microbiome of the Pharynx and Skin in Patients with Psoriasis Compared with Healthy Controls2020In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 100, article id adv00273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies have shown differences in the skin and gut bacterial microbiomes in patients with psoriasis, but the pharyngeal microbiome has not been studied previously. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in the bacterial microbiome of the pharynx and skin of patients with psoriasis compared with healthy controls. Swabs were taken from the pharynx and el-bow skin of 39 patients with psoriasis and 70 controls. Microbiomes were characterized by sequencing 16S rRNA genes on the Illumina MiSeq platform. Significant differences were found in alpha and beta diversity in the skin, but not in the pharynx. Significant differences were also found between several phyla and genera in both skin and pharynx. The severity of psoriasis did not correlate with any genera in the pharynx, but with Capnocytophaga, Leptotrichia, Abiotrophia and Tannerella in the skin. The composition of the pharyngeal and skin microbiome may be of importance in the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 41. Aushev, M.
    et al.
    Mussolino, C.
    Cathomen, T.
    Törmä, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Dermatology and Venereology.
    Reichelt, J.
    Molecular surgery for epidermolysis bullosa simplex2014In: British Journal of Dermatology, ISSN 0007-0963, E-ISSN 1365-2133, Vol. 170, no 4, p. E35-E35Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Axelsson, Inge
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Acute otitis media in children: to treat or not to treat?2000In: Paediatric pulmonology and allergology, ISSN 1392-5261, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 1022-1032Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Every day millions of children world-wide take antibiotics against acute otitis media despite the fact that this treatment has not been shown to benefit the otherwise healthy, average AOM patient. Treatment differs greatly between similar, developed countries. These differences do not seem to be based on rational causes but on differences in mentality and culture. An adoptions of Dutch guidelines for AOM in the USA should result in 400.000 fewer US children on antibiotics during one average day! The incidence of severe complications (mastoiditis, meningitis) must be carefully monitored but there is no evidence that these complications are more common in the Netherlands than in the USA. The number of patients who die due to bacteria made antibiotic-resistant by overuse of antibiotics when treating AOM in children is unknown, but is most probably significant (this is never included in "good versus harm" calculations). We know little about what treatment is best for children suffering from AOM in poor countries, but it is probably wise to be more aggressive there and to adapt a freer usage of antibiotics than is advisable in rich countries.

  • 43.
    Axelsson, Inge
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Advances in airway infections. 1. Pneumonia in children: systematic review. 2. Acute otitis media in children: systematic review.2004Other (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Peer reviewed. Also published in Hungarian (translated by Tamas Nyeste) and Swedish (translated by I. Axelsson).

  • 44.
    Axelsson, Inge
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Antibiotika ökar risken för hemolytiskt uremiskt syndrom: Escherichia coli O157:H72000In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, Vol. 97, no 25, p. 3060-3060Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 45.
    Axelsson, Inge
    Lunds universitet.
    Biology of corneal and skeletal proteoglycans1978In: Biochimie des tissus conjonctifs normaux et pathologiques : Biochemistry of normal and pathological connective tissues / 6th Colloquium of the Federation of European connective tissue clubs, Faculté de médecine, Université Paris Val-de Marne Créteil 28-30 août 1978; publ. sous la direction de A.-M. Robert et L. Robert, 1978, , p. 385Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Axelsson, Inge
    Lunds universitet.
    Characterization of proteins and other macromolecules by agarose gel chromatography1978In: Journal of Chromatography, ISSN 0021-9673, Vol. 152, no 1, p. 21-32Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Axelsson, Inge
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Clinical evidence, Cochrane och PubMed (Compendium, 18 pp.).2001Other (Other scientific)
  • 48.
    axelsson, Inge
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Cochrane-översikt om att förebygga navelinfektioner: Antiseptisk lösning är onödig i i-länder men livräddande i u-länder; evidensbaserad medicin2002In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, Vol. 99, no 14, p. 1563-1566Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One million newborn infants die every year by bacterial infections, which often have entered the body via the umbilicus. A Cochrane systematic review on "Topical umbilical cord care at birth" by J Zupan and P Garner is reviewed. Zupan and Garner conclude that simply to keep the umbilical cord dry and clean is sufficient for healthy, term neonates in rich countries; disinfectants do not offer any advantage. However, cleaning the umbilical cord with disinfectants may reduce the risk of serious bacterial infections in babies in poor countries or in neonatal wards. Observational studies in poor countries indicate that the life of numerous infants can be saved if pregnant women are vaccinated against tetanus and disinfectants are substituted for harmful cord care traditions. This Cochrane review is credible, but it should be updated and considered tentative since no data on sepsis are included. The search strategy should be better described and observational studies (case control and cohort studies) from poor countries should be included since there are no randomized control trials from these countries.

  • 49.
    Axelsson, Inge
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Evidence-based Child Health: 1. Evidence-Based Medicine: what it is, and what it isn't. 2. Evidence-Based Child Health: what it is, and why it should be used. 3. A brief history of EBM. 2004Other (Other scientific)
  • 50.
    Axelsson, Inge
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Health Sciences.
    Evidence-based child health and epidemiology: glossary. (Peer-reviewed. Also Hungarian version, translated by T Nyeste, and Swedish version, translated by I. Axelsson: Ordlista för evidensbaserad barnmedicin och epidemiologi.)2004Other (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    About 170 entries

1234567 1 - 50 of 907
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf