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  • 1.
    Abadir Guirgis, Georg
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Ecodriving på SJ: förarperspektiv på tekniska hjälpmedel för beslutsfattande och utbildning i Ecodriving2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Even though all trips with SJ trains in Sweden are labeled “Bra Miljöval” (Good environmental choice), the requirements for reduced emissions and energy usage are constantly increased. Thus, SJ has to constantly develop their environmental profile. To investigate potential energy savings, SJ developed an education program in energy efficient driving (Eco-driving) and also let some of their train drivers use a technical tool supporting eco-driving. This report includes two studies. A critical review of the experimental study conducted by SJ and a complementary study based on observations of the education in energy efficient driving, along with interviews with the train drivers that participated in SJs experimental study. The experimental study provided valuable results, suggesting that energy savings through driver training and support are feasible. At the same time, there are contingencies in the collected energy data, making it difficult to draw any definite conclusions. The results of the interviews with the drivers show that there are ambiguities about what risks and consequences a future introduction of the technical tool for eco-driving could imply. Altogether, there are reasons to conduct further studies on how to best introduce energy-efficient driving in railway traffic as a whole.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 2.
    Abbas, Taimoor
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Elect & Informat Technol Dept, S-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Sjöberg, Katrin
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), Centre for Research on Embedded Systems (CERES).
    Kåredal, Johan
    Lund Univ, Elect & Informat Technol Dept, S-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Tufvesson, Fredrik
    Lund Univ, Elect & Informat Technol Dept, S-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    A Measurement Based Shadow Fading Model for Vehicle-to-Vehicle Network Simulations2015In: International Journal of Antennas and Propagation, ISSN 1687-5869, E-ISSN 1687-5877, article id 190607Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) propagation channel has significant implications on the design and performance of novel communication protocols for vehicular ad hoc networks (VANETs). Extensive research efforts have been made to develop V2V channel models to be implemented in advanced VANET system simulators for performance evaluation. The impact of shadowing caused by other vehicles has, however, largely been neglected in most of the models, as well as in the system simulations. In this paper we present a shadow fading model targeting system simulations based on real measurements performed in urban and highway scenarios. The measurement data is separated into three categories, line-of-sight (LOS), obstructed line-of-sight (OLOS) by vehicles, and non-line-of-sight due to buildings, with the help of video information recorded during the measurements. It is observed that vehicles obstructing the LOS induce an additional average attenuation of about 10 dB in the received signal power. An approach to incorporate the LOS/OLOS model into existing VANET simulators is also provided. Finally, system level VANET simulation results are presented, showing the difference between the LOS/OLOS model and a channel model based on Nakagami-m fading.

  • 3.
    Abbasi, Saeed
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Non-exhaust Nano particle emission in Rail traffic2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Abbasi, Saeed
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Jansson, Anders
    Sellgren, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Olofsson, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Particle emissions from rail traffic: a literature review2013In: Critical reviews in environmental science and technology, ISSN 1064-3389, E-ISSN 1547-6537, Vol. 43, no 23, p. 2211-2244Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Particle emissions are a drawback of rail transport. This work is a comprehensive presentation of recent research into particle emissions from rail vehicles. Both exhaust and non-exhaust particle emissions are considered when examining particle characteristics such as  PM10, and PM2.5 concentration levels, size, morphology, composition, as well as adverse health effects, current legislation, and available and proposed solutions for reducing such emissions. High concentration levels in enclosed rail traffic environments are reported and some toxic effects of the particles. We find that only a few limited studies have examined the adverse health effects of non-exhaust particle emissions and that no relevant legislation exists. Thus further research in this area is warranted.

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    fulltext
  • 5.
    Abbasi, Saeed
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Olofsson, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Sellgren, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Lack of applicable criteria in non-exhaust emission legislation: AWPER index a practical solution2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Abbasi, Saeed
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Olofsson, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Sellgren, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Olander, Lars
    Larsson, christina
    A field investigation of the size, morphology and chemical composition of airborne particles in rail transport2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The health effects of inhalable airborne particles are well documented. In the European Union the European Council mandates that the level of airborne particles with a diameter smaller than 10 µm (PM10) must not exceed an annual average of 40 µg/m3. Examples of possible sources from rail transport are mechanical brakes, wheel rail contact, current collectors, ballast, sleepers and masonry structures. In this regard, a series of field tests have been conducted on a regular Swedish track using a regional train instrumented with: particle measurement devices, temperature sensors in brake pads and sensors to measure the magnitude of train speed and a GPS.

    Two sampling points for airborne particles were designated in the train under frame. One of the sampling points was near a pad to rotor disc brake contact and a second global sampling point was chosen under the frame, but not near a mechanical brake or the wheel-rail contact. The first one was highly influenced by brake pad wear debris and the other one was influenced by all of the brake pads, wheel and rail wear debris as well as re-suspension. In each sampling points, three tubes were linked to three particle measurement devices. Two sets of Ptrak, Dustrak and Grimm devices were used. The Ptrak 8525 was an optical particle measurement device which could measure particle diameter in the size interval of 20 nm up to 1 micrometer. The Dustrak was used to measure particle mass concentration. The Grimm 1.109 was an aerosol spectrometer which counted number of particles from 0.25 micrometer to 32 micrometer in 31 intervals. These two Grimm devices were equipped with Millipore filters in the devices outlets to capture particles for further studies on morphology and matter of particles.

    The total number and size distribution of the particles for these two sampling points were registered and evaluated in different situations such as activating and deactivating electrical brake or train curve negotiating.

    During braking, three peaks of 250 nm, 350 nm and 600 nm in diameter, with the 350 nm peak dominating were identified in the fine particle region. In the coarse particle region, a peak of around 3-6 µm in diameter was discovered. The brake pad temperature effects on particle size distribution were also investigated and the results showed that the peak around 250 nm increased. Furthermore, the activation of electrical braking significantly reduced the number of airborne particles.

    A SEM was used to capture the images from collected particles on filters. Furthermore, an ICP-Ms method was used to investigate the elemental contents of the particulates on the filter.  In this case the main contribution belonged to Fe, Si, Al, Ca, Cu, Zn. The higher amount of some elements weights such as calcium, silicon, sodium and aluminum in the global sampling point filters revealed that ballast and concrete sleepers were the main sources for these particles although some of them originated from rail, wheel, brake disc and brake pad as well.

  • 7.
    Abburu, Sai Kausik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Vehicle Engineering and Solid Mechanics, Vehicle Dynamics.
    Modelling Advanced Air Suspension with Electronic Level Control in ADAMS/Car2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Multi-body simulations are given more emphasis over physical tests owing toenvironmental, financial, and time requirements in the competitive automotive industry. Thus,it is imperative to develop models to accurately predict and analyse the system's behaviour.This thesis focuses on developing an air suspension model with Electronic Level Control thathas the ability to communicate with other air springs in a pneumatic circuit thus replicating thepneumatic connection in actual truck and regulate the ride height of the vehicle.To accomplish this, a comprehensive literature study is performed to identify an effectivecontrol variable to manipulate the air springs. This is done by understanding the working andthermodynamic principles of air suspension, understanding various Scania pneumaticconfigurations, and decrypting the working of the Electronic Level Control.Different methods for implementing the model through the identified control variable arediscussed. A brief explanation of the necessary physical tests performed to validate the modelis given. An extensive description of implementation of the static and dynamic model inADAMS through command batch script coding is provided.The developed static model is validated by comparing the results from simulations and the testdata. The axle weights have an error of maximum 6% and the pressure in the air springs havean error of maximum 9% which can be owed to neglection of hysteresis in the air springcharacteristics and using mean values to compare the data. The dynamic model is validated byaltering the ride height level and observing the response of the model. The results obtainedindicate the developed Electronic Level Control is able to regulate the ride height at the desiredlevel.The robustness of the model is validated by modifying the developed model for longitudinalpneumatic connection and for a truck with trailer model. The results indicate the developedmodel is capable to perform satisfactorily and conform to the Scania tolerance limits.Thus, an appropriate control variable for the air springs model is identified. Static and dynamicmodel to identify the suitable pressure in the air springs and thus, the force in the air springs isdeveloped which helped in drastically reducing the manual iterative work that was required.

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  • 8.
    Abburu, Sai Kausik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics.
    Vehicle Conceptualisation, Compactness, and Subsystem Interaction: A network approach to design and analyse the complex interdependencies in vehicles2023Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The conventional approach to vehicle design is restrictive, limited, andbiased. This often leads to sub-optimal utilisation of vehicle capabilities and allocated resources and ultimately entails the repercussions of designing andlater on an using an inefficient vehicle. To overcome these limitations, it is important to gain a deeper understanding of the interaction effects at component,subsystem, and system level. In this thesis, the research is focused on identifying appropriate methods and developing robust models to facilitate the interaction analysis.

    To scrutinise and identify appropriate methods, criteria were developed.Initially, the Design Structure Matrix (DSM) and its variations were examined.While DSM proved to be fundamental for capturing interaction effects,it lacked the ability to answer questions about the structure and behaviour ofinteractions and to predict unintended effects. Therefore, network theory wasexplored as a complementary method to DSM which was capable of providing insights into interaction structures and identifying influential variables.

    Subsequently, two criteria were established to identify subsystems significant to interaction analysis: high connectivity to other subsystems and multidisciplinary composition. The traction motor was observed to satisfyboth criteria as it had higher connectivity with other subsystems and was composed of multiple disciplines. Therefore, a detailed model of an induction motor was developed to enable the interaction analysis.

    The induction motor model was integrated into a cross-scalar design tool.The tool employed a two-step process: translating operational parametersto motor inputs using Newtonian equations and deriving physical attributes,performance characteristics, and performance attributes of the motor. Comparing the obtained performance characteristics curve against existing studiesvalidated the model’s reliability and capabilities. The design tool demonstrated adaptability to different drive cycles and the ability to modify motor performance without affecting operational parameters. Thus validating the capability of the design tool to capture cross-scalar and intra-subsystem interaction effects. To examine inter-subsystem interaction, a thermal model of an inverter was developed, capturing temperature variations in the power electronics based on motor inputs. The design tool successfully captured interaction effects between motor and inverter designs, highlighting the interplay with operational parameters.

    Thus, this thesis identifies methods for interaction analysis and develops robust subsystem models. The integrated design tool effectively captures intra-subsystem, inter-subsystem, and cross-scalar interaction effects. The research presented contributes to the overarching project goal of developing methods and models that capture interaction effects and in turn serve as a guiding tool for designers to understand the consequences of their design choices.

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    vccsi_sai_licentiate
  • 9.
    Abburu, Sai Kausik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Vehicle Engineering and Solid Mechanics.
    Casanueva, Carlos
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Vehicle Engineering and Solid Mechanics.
    O'Reilly, Ciarán J.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Vehicle Engineering and Solid Mechanics.
    A Holistic Design Approach to the Mathematical Modelling of Induction Motors for Vehicle Design2023In: Procedia CIRP, 2023, Vol. 119, p. 1246-1251Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In early-stage vehicle design, there is a significant lack of knowledge about the impact of design requirements on the design of subsystems, theresulting knock-on effects between subsystems and the vehicle’s overall performance. This leads to a sub-optimal vehicle design with increaseddesign iterations. To mitigate this lack of knowledge, a cross-scalar design tool consisting of an induction motor model is presented in this paper.The tool calculates the motor’s attributes, namely its volume, mass, and the performance it can deliver to satisfy a given drive cycle’s requirements.This is achieved by breaking down the drive cycle requirements into motor parameters from which the various power losses are derived. Thesekey losses are then utilised to develop the torque/speed curve. Furthermore, it is proposed that the motor’s attributes can be used to design othersubsystems and consequently analyse their interaction effects. For example, the motor’s attributes can be used to design regenerative brakes andconsequently analyse their influence on brake wear, lifetime, and energy savings. Thus, the design tool enables the design of efficient vehicles withminimised design iterations by analysing the influence of design requirements on the subsystem’s design and the consequent interaction effectsamong the subsystems and on the vehicle’s overall performance.

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    math_model_motor_vehicle
  • 10.
    Abburu, Sai Kausik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics.
    Casanueva, Carlos
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design.
    O'Reilly, Ciarán J.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design.
    Analyzing interaction effects in a vehicle model using network theory2021In: Resource Efficient Vehicles Conference, rev2021, 2021Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The vehicle industry is moving towards developing more sustainable and efficient solutions. This movement towards sustainable and efficient solutions brings up the need to develop and integrate new subsystem technologies that are beneficial for the overall vehicle system. However, introducing new technology into an existing vehicle architecture may have knock-on effects on the dependent subsystems. Furthermore, there can be a bias towards the existing technological solutions as a large part of the architecture is developed pertaining to the established solutions. Therefore, sufficient knowledge is required to understand the level of impact the interdependencies, both direct and indirect, can have at a subsystem level and at the overall vehicle system level. To address and assess these interdependencies that arise during the conceptual design phase, a bottom-up design model is proposed. The model, utilizing network theory could represent each subsystem as nodes and their interaction effects on each other as edges. Thus, the interaction effects between different subsystems and their complex influence on the overall vehicle system are considered. This model could serve to evaluate an optimal solution in terms of functional density and economic benefits thus providing the opportunity to avoid any unintended negative indirect effects. Furthermore, it could help in identifying the technological limits in the current vehicle system and thus, identifying the areas that can be developed to further enhance the vehicle system performance. The method of implementation, its advantages, disadvantages, applications, and challenges in implementation are discussed.

  • 11.
    Abburu, Sai Kausik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Vehicle engineering and technical acoustics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design.
    Casanueva, Carlos
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design.
    O'Reilly, Ciarán J.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for ECO2 Vehicle design.
    Network Theory Approach to Analysing Knock-On Effects in Rail Vehicle Design2024In: The Sixth International Conference on Railway Technology: Research, Development and Maintenance, 2024Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rail vehicle models have become increasingly complex, posing challenges in extracting insights using traditional model representations as they require numerous iterations to achieve a satisfactory solution. This complexity leads to high computational and time costs and possibly resulting in inefficient vehicle design. To alleviate these limitations, network models are proposed as an alternative representation in this paper. These models enable the analysis of structure, behaviour, and patterns of interactions, facilitating an understanding of knock-on effects across disciplines and subsystems. The terminology, benefits, and capabilities of network theory in early-stage vehicle design are presented in this paper, along with the aspects to consider and methods for developing network models. The applicability of network theory metrics and algorithms is demonstrated using a railway traction system example. Results indicate that the proposed representations can capture complex system knock-on effects across disciplines and subsystems.

  • 12.
    Abou-Senna, Hatem
    et al.
    University of Central Florida, Orlando.
    Radwan, Essam
    University of Central Florida, Orlando.
    Mohamed, Ayman
    University of Central Florida, Orlando.
    A methodology to quantify pedestrian crash rates against statewide averages for roadways and intersections2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To date there are no clear or uniform standards for a method to measure pedestrian crash rates and compare it against a statewide average. In this paper, a novel methodology to measure pedestrian crash rates along roadways and intersections were quantified. The main objective is to identify critical pedestrian crash locations that are operating above its corresponding statewide average.  It was crucial to address the pedestrian-vehicular conflict as the State of Florida currently tops the list in the “Dangerous by Design” report as having the highest four pedestrian incident locations in the Country. The main challenge was to identify a practical and correct exposure measure. In most cases, the exposure measure is either unavailable or can be obtained at a greater cost. The methods and procedures explained in this paper are considered detailed, practical and provide a broad depiction of the main factors that directly contribute to pedestrian crashes. The main parameters used in calculating pedestrian crash rates along roadways included functional classification, number of lanes, area type, AADT and the total length of the roadway category. Conversely, main parameters for computing pedestrian crash rates for intersections included daily pedestrian volumes, distance crossed and the AADT in addition to the number of pedestrian crashes either along the studied roadways or intersections. The pilot studies conducted for the roadways and intersections revealed several critical safety locations within District 5 when compared to the developed statewide average rates which required further investigation to identify main causes and emphasize mitigation improvements.

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  • 13.
    Abrahamsson, Erik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems.
    En övergripande studie av undervattensdockning med obemannade farkoster i ubåt A262019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In this report, a Systems Engineering work is discussed, where an investigation has been carried out on the possibility of docking an autonomous underwater vessel with the new generation submarine A26. In the work, the focus has been on the early steps of the Systems Engineering discipline. A literature review of existing research and work in the field has been carried out in order to identify

    possible technical solutions accessible today. Stakeholders have been identified and people with key positions in each area have been interviewed to be able to compile the requirement of needs. Based on the needs, abilities that the system needs to meet have been mapped. In order to facilitate the analysis of the docking system, a definition as well as a zoning of the various stages of the docking process have been performed. A description of different technologies for underwater communication is shown and discussed. An evaluation and risk analysis of a docking system has been carried out to illustrate the pros and cons of the various communication technologies during a docking procedure. Finally, two mechanical systems for the final phase of a docking have been compared to each other.

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  • 14.
    Adesiyun, Adewole
    et al.
    FEHRL, Brussels.
    Erdelean, Isabela
    Austrian Institute of Technology (AIT), Vienna.
    Hedhli, Abdelmename
    IFSTTAR, Marne la Vallée, France.
    Lamb, Martin
    Maple Consulting, Caerphilly, Wales.
    Ponweiser, Wolfgang
    Austrian Institute of Technology (AIT), Vienna.
    Strand, Niklas
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Driver and vehicle.
    Zofka, Ewa
    Erica Consulting, Warsaw, Poland.
    Overview of connected and automated driving test sites2020In: Proceedings of 8th Transport Research Arena TRA 2020, 2020, p. 7-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Connected and automated vehicles potentially offer solutions to some key challenges for National Road Administrations (NRAs), such as reduction of accidents, increasing network capacity etc. As a result of this potential, both industry and certain national governments are undertaking trials that are mainly focused on technological challenges such as the ability of vehicles to drive safely in “random” situations etc. Far less attention has been paid to questions around the implications for NRAs. The overall aim of the STAPLE project is to provide a comprehensive review of technological and non-technological aspects of the most relevant connected and automated driving test sites in order to understand the impact of these sites on the NRAs’ core business and functions.

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    fulltext
  • 15. Adolph, T.
    et al.
    Schwedhelm, H.
    Lazaro, I.
    Versmissen, T.
    Edwards, M.
    Thomson, Robert
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Traffic safety, society and road-user.
    Johannsen, H.
    Development of compatibility assessments for full-width and offset frontal impact test procedures in FIMCAR2014In: International Journal of Crashworthiness, ISSN 1358-8265, E-ISSN 1754-2111, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 414-430Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The goal of the project FIMCAR (Frontal Impact and Compatibility Assessment Research) was to define an integrated set of test procedures and associated metrics to assess a vehicle's frontal impact protection, which includes self-And partner-protection. For the development of the set, two different full-width tests (full-width deformable barrier [FWDB] test, full-width rigid barrier test) and three different offset tests (offset deformable barrier [ODB] test, progressive deformable barrier [PDB] test, moveable deformable barrier with the PDB barrier face [MPDB] test) have been investigated. Different compatibility assessment procedures were analysed and metrics for assessing structural interaction (structural alignment, vertical and horizontal load spreading) as well as several promising metrics for the PDB/MPDB barrier were developed.The final assessment approach consists of a combination of the most suitable full-width and offset tests. For the full-width test (FWDB), a metric was developed to address structural alignment based on load cell wall information in the first 40 ms of the test. For the offset test (ODB), the existing ECE R94 was chosen. Within the paper, an overview of the final assessment approach for the frontal impact test procedures and their development is given.

  • 16.
    Adolph, Thorsten
    et al.
    Federal Highway Research Institute.
    Eggers, Andre
    Federal Highway Research Institute.
    Thomson, Robert William
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Traffic safety, society and road-user.
    Mizuno, Koji
    Nagoya University.
    Comparison of the dummy response in two different restraint system crash tests2014In: 2014 IRCOBI Conference Proceedings - International Research Council on the Biomechanics of Injury, 2014, p. 545-561Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the European Project FIMCAR, a proposal for a frontal impact test configuration was developed which included an additional full width deformable barrier (FWDB) test. Motivation for the deformable element was partly to measure structural forces as well as to produce a severe crash pulse different from that in the offset test. The objective of this study was to analyse the safety performance of vehicles:

    • in the full width rigid barrier test (FWRB) and
    • in the full width deformable barrier test (FWDB)

    In total, 12 vehicles were crashed in both configurations. Comparison of these tests to real world accident data was used to identify the crash barrier most representative of real world crashes. For all vehicles, the airbag visible times were later in the FWDB configuration. This was attributed to the attenuation of the initial acceleration peak, observed in FWRB tests, by the addition of the deformable element. These findings were in alignment with airbag triggering times seen in real world crash data. Also, the dummy loadings were slightly worse in FWDB compared to FWRB tests, which is possibly linked to the airbag firing and a more realistic loading of the vehicle crash structures in the FWDB configuration. Evaluations of the lower extremities have shown a general increasing of the tibia index with the crash pulse severity.

  • 17.
    Afshari, Davood
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Lightweight Structures.
    Mechanical Properties of Resistance Spot Welds in Lightweight Applications2013Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This licentiate thesis is concerned with residual stresses in aluminum alloy 6061-T6 resistance spot welded joint. Several topics related to mechanical strength of welded structures are treated such as; nugget size and microhardness and microstructures of weld zone and their influence on mechanical strength of welded structure, failure load measurement using tensile-shear test, resistance spot welding simulation, residual stress measurement by X-ray diffraction method and analysis effect of welding parameters on the mechanical strength and the residual stresses.

    To investigate the effect of resistance spot weld parameters on mechanical strength of welded structures, various welding parameters e.g. welding current, welding time and electrode force are selected to produce welded joints with different quality. According to the failure mode, the empirical equation was used to prediction of failure load base on nugget size and hardness of failure line. Microstructure study has been carried out to investigate microstructural changes in the welded joints. Microhardness tests are done to find hardness profiles due to microstructural changes and determine the minimum hardness.

    In addition, an electro-thermal-structural coupled finite element model and X-ray diffraction residual stress measurement have been utilized to analyze residual stresses distribution in weld zone. The electrical and thermal contact conductance, as mandatory factors are applied in contact area between electrode-workpiece and workpiece-workpiece to resolve the complexity of the finite element model. The physical and mechanical properties of the material are defined as thermal-dependent in order to improve the accuracy of the model. Furthermore, the electrodes are removed after holding cycle using the birth and death elements method. Moreover, the effect of welding parameters on maximum residual stress is investigated and a regression model is proposed to predict maximum tensile residual stresses in terms of welding parameters.

    The results obtained from the finite element analysis have been used to build up two back-propagation artificial neural network models for the residual stresses and the nugget size prediction. The results revealed that the neural network models created in this study can accurately predict the nugget size and the residual stresses produced in resistance spot weld. Using a combination of these two developed models, the nugget size and the residual stresses can be predicted in terms of spot weld parameters with high speed and accuracy.

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    Licentaite thesis-Davood Ashari
  • 18.
    Afshari, Davood
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering. Iran University of Science and Technology, Iran.
    Sedighi, M.
    Karimi, M. R.
    Barsoum, Zuheir
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Prediction of residual stresses in resistance spot weld2016In: Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, ISSN 1748-8842, Vol. 88, no 4, p. 492-497Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to predict residual stresses in resistance spot weld of 2 mm thick aluminum 6061-T6 sheets. The joint use of finite element analysis and artificial neural networks can eliminate the high costs of residual stresses measuring tests and significantly shorten the time it takes to arrive at a solution. Design/methodology/approach - Finite element method and artificial neural network have been used to predict the residual stresses. Different spot welding parameters such as the welding current, the welding time and the electrode force have been used for the simulation purposes in a thermal-electrical-structural coupled finite element model. To validate the numerical results, a series of experiments have been performed, and residual stresses have been measured. The results obtained from the finite element analysis have been used to build up a back-propagation artificial neural network model for residual stresses prediction. Findings - The results revealed that the neural network model created in this study can accurately predict residual stresses produced in resistance spot weld. Using a combination of these two developed models, the residual stresses can be predicted in terms of spot weld parameters with high speed and accuracy. Practical implications - The paper includes implication for aircraft and automobile industries to predict residual stresses. Residual stresses can lower the strength and fatigue life of the spot-welded joints and determine the performance quality of the structure. Originality/value - This paper presents an approach to reduce the high costs and long times of residual stresses measuring tests.

  • 19.
    Afshari, Davood
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Lightweight Structures.
    Sedighi, Mohammd
    Iran Univ Sci & Technol, Tehran, Iran.
    Barsoum, Zuhier
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Lightweight Structures.
    Peng, Ru Lin
    Linkoping Tech Univ, Linkoping, Sweden .
    An approach in prediction of failure in resistance spot welded aluminum 6061-T6 under quasi-static tensile test2012In: Proceedings of the Institution of mechanical engineers. Part B, journal of engineering manufacture, ISSN 0954-4054, E-ISSN 2041-2975, Vol. 226, no B6, p. 1026-1032Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to predict the failure load in resistance spot welded aluminum 6061-T6 sheets with 2mm thickness under quasi-static tensile test. Various welding parameters, e. g. welding current, welding time and electrode force are selected to produce welded joints with different quality. The results show that for all the samples in this study only interfacial failure mode was observed in tensile-shear test and no pull-out mode was observed. According to the failure mode, an empirical equation was used for the prediction of failure load based on nugget size and hardness of failure line. Microstructure study has been carried out to investigate microstructural changes in the welded joints. For determination of the minimum hardness, microhardness tests have been carried out to find hardness profiles. The minimum hardness value was observed for a thin layer around the nugget with large and coarse grains. The results show that by using the presented empirical equation, the failure can be predicted with a good agreement only by measuring nugget size.

  • 20.
    Afshari, Davood
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Lightweight Structures.
    Sedighi, Mohammd
    Iran Univ Sci & Technol, Tehran, Iran.
    Karimi, M. R.
    Barsoum, Zuhier
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Lightweight Structures.
    On Residual Stresses in Resistance Spot-Welded Aluminum Alloy 6061-T6: Experimental and Numerical Analysis2013In: Journal of materials engineering and performance (Print), ISSN 1059-9495, E-ISSN 1544-1024, Vol. 22, no 12, p. 3612-3619Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, an electro-thermal-structural-coupled finite element (FE) model and x-ray diffraction residual stress measurements have been utilized to analyze distribution of residual stresses in an aluminum alloy 6061-T6 resistance spot-welded joint with 2-mm-thickness sheet. Increasing the aluminum sheet thickness to more than 1 mm leads to creating difficulty in spot-welding process and increases the complexity of the FE model. The electrical and thermal contact conductances, as mandatory factors are applied in contact areas of electrode-workpiece and workpiece-workpiece to resolve the complexity of the FE model. The physical and mechanical properties of the material are defined as thermal dependent to improve the accuracy of the model. Furthermore, the electrodes are removed after the holding cycle using the birth-and-death elements method. The results have a good agreement with experimental data obtained from x-ray diffraction residual stress measurements. However, the highest internal tensile residual stress occurs in the center of the nugget zone and decreases toward nugget edge; surface residual stress increases toward the edge of the welding zone and afterward, the area decreases slightly.

  • 21.
    Afshari, Davood
    et al.
    School of Mechanical Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran, Iran .
    Sedighi, Mohammd
    Iran Univ Sci & Technol, Tehran, Iran.
    Karimi, M. R.
    Barsoum, Zuhier
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Lightweight Structures.
    Prediction of the nugget size in resistance spot welding with a combination of a finite-element analysis and an artificial neural network2014In: Materiali in tehnologije, ISSN 1580-2949, E-ISSN 1580-3414, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 33-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The goal of this investigation is to predict the nugget size for a resistance spot weld of thick aluminum 6061-T6 sheets 2 mm. The quality and strength of spot welds determine the integrity of the structure, which depends thoroughly on the nugget size. In this study, the finite-element method and artificial neural network were used to predict the nugget size. Different spot welding parameters such as the welding current and the welding time were selected to be used for a coupled, thermal-electrical-structural finite-element model. In order to validate the numerical results a series of experiments were carried out and the nugget sizes were measured. The results obtained with the finite-element analysis were used to build up a back-propagation, artificial-neural-network model for the nugget-size prediction. The results revealed that a combination of these two developed models can accurately and rapidly predict the nugget size for a resistance spot weld.

  • 22.
    Agea, Andrés
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Millán, Iván
    University of Skövde, School of Technology and Society.
    Range Extender for the Renault Fluence Z.E.: Choice of the engine and design of the structural support.2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Electric cars have appeared as an alternative to the big pollution caused by internal combustion engine cars. However, electric cars as the Renault Fluence Z.E. are not very sold in the market because of their small range of autonomy. To make this car an attractive option, it is necessary to add a range extender that extends its autonomy. This range extender is based in the addition of a small internal combustion engine to be attached only when the electric autonomy cannot fulfill the trip. A range extender is chosen by means of a comparison between different electric engines sold in the market. By means of a classification tree, the different places of the car where to mount it are compared and the most appropriate is chosen. By using Solidworks, a structure to support the engine and attach it to the car is designed. The result is a Range Extender device to mount in the hitch hook of the Renault Fluence Z.E. that provides an autonomy of around 665 km. This supposes a good solution for the owner of the Renault Fluence Z.E. who needs to cover trips of more than 180 km, the electric autonomy of this car.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Range Extender for the Renault Fluence Z.E.
  • 23. Aggestam, E.
    et al.
    Nielsen, J. C. O.
    Andersson, Andreas
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges. Swedish Transport Administration, Solna, SE-171 54, Sweden.
    Li, M.
    Multi-objective design optimisation of transition zones between different railway track forms2018In: Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Contact Mechanics and Wear of Rail/wheel Systems, CM 2018, TU Delft , 2018, p. 1-6Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The vertical dynamic interaction between vehicle and railway track is simulated in the time domain using an extended state space vector approach. The track model includes a transition zone between slab track on a bridge and ballasted track on an embankment. By considering a multi-objective optimisation problem, solved using a genetic algorithm, selected vehicle and track responses are simultaneously minimised by optimising the distributions of rail pad stiffness and sleeper spacing in the transition zone. It is shown that the magnitudes of the maximum dynamic loads in the optimised transition zone can be reduced to be similar as the magnitudes far away from the transition zone.

  • 24.
    Aghaali, Habib
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines.
    Exhaust Heat Utilisation and Losses in Internal Combustion Engines with Focus on the Gas Exchange System2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Exhaust gas energy recovery should be considered in improving fuel economy of internal combustion engines. A large portion of fuel energy is wasted through the exhaust of internal combustion engines. Turbocharger and turbocompound can, however, recover part of this wasted heat. The energy recovery depends on the efficiency and mass flow of the turbine(s) as well as the exhaust gas state and properties such as pressure, temperature and specific heat capacity. The exhaust gas pressure is the principal parameter which is required for the turbine energy recovery, but higher exhaust back-pressures on the engines create higher pumping losses. This is in addition to the heat losses in the turbochargers what makes any measurement and simulation of the engines more complex.

    This thesis consists of two major parts. First of all, the importance of heat losses in turbochargers has been shown theoretically and experimentally with the aim of including heat transfer of the turbochargers in engine simulations. Secondly, different concepts have been examined to extract exhaust heat energy including turbocompounding and divided exhaust period (DEP) with the aim of improved exhaust heat utilisation and reduced pumping losses.

    In the study of heat transfer in turbochargers, the turbocharged engine simulation was improved by including heat transfer of the turbocharger in the simulation. Next, the heat transfer modelling of the turbochargers was improved by introducing a new method for convection heat transfer calculation with the support of on-engine turbocharger measurements under different heat transfer conditions. Then, two different turbocharger performance maps were assessed concerning the heat transfer conditions in the engine simulation. Finally, the temperatures of turbocharger’s surfaces were predicted according to the measurements under different heat transfer conditions and their effects are studied on the turbocharger performance. The present study shows that the heat transfer in the turbochargers is very crucial to take into account in the engine simulations, especially in transient operations.

    In the study of exhaust heat utilisation, important parameters concerning turbine and gas exchange system that can influence the waste heat recovery were discussed. In addition to exhaust back-pressure, turbine speed and turbine efficiency, the role of the air-fuel equivalence ratio was demonstrated in details, because lower air-fuel equivalence ratio in a Diesel engine can provide higher exhaust gas temperature. The results of this study indicate that turbocompound engine efficiency is relatively insensitive to the air-fuel equivalence ratio.

    To decrease the influence of the increased exhaust back-pressure of a turbocompound engine, a new architecture was developed by combining the turbocompound engine with DEP. The aim of this study was to utilise the earlier phase (blowdown) of the exhaust stroke in the turbine(s) and let the later phase (scavenging) of the exhaust stroke bypass the turbine(s). To decouple the blowdown phase from the scavenging phase, the exhaust flow was divided between two different exhaust manifolds with different valve timing.

    According to this study, this combination improves the fuel consumption in low engine speeds and deteriorates it at high engine speeds. This is mainly due to long duration of choked flow in the exhaust valves because this approach is using only one of the two exhaust valves on each cylinder at a time.

    Therefore, the effects of enlarged effective flow areas of the exhaust valves were studied. Two methods were used to enlarge the effective flow area i.e. increasing the diameters of the blowdown and scavenging valves by 4 mm; and modifying the valve lift curves of the exhaust valves to fast opening and closing. Both methods improved BSFC in the same order even though they were different in nature. Fast opening and closing of the exhaust valves required shorter blowdown duration and longer scavenging duration. The modified lift curves provided less pumping losses, less available energy into the turbine and larger amplitude of the pulsating flow through the turbine.

    In order for defining a set of important parameters that should be examined in experimental studies, a sensitivity analysis was performed on the turbocompound DEP engine in terms of break specific fuel consumption to different parameters concerning the gas exchange such as blowdown valve timing, scavenging valve timing, blowdown valve size, scavenging valve size, discharge coefficients of blowdown and scavenging ports, turbine efficiency, turbine size and power transmission efficiency.

    Finally, to overcome the restriction in the effective flow areas of the exhaust valves, DEP was implemented externally on the exhaust manifold instead of engine exhaust valves, which is called externally DEP (ExDEP). This innovative engine architecture, which benefits from supercharging, turbocharging and turbocompounding, has a great fuel-saving potential in almost all load points up to 4%.

  • 25.
    Aghaali, Habib
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    On-Engine Turbocharger Performance Considering Heat Transfer2012Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Heat transfer plays an important role in affecting an on-engine turbocharger performance. However, it is normally not taken into account for turbocharged engine simulations.

    Generally, an engine simulation based on one-dimensional gas dynamics uses turbocharger performance maps which are measured without quantifying and qualifying the heat transfer, regardless of the fact that they are measured on the hot-flow or cold-flow gas-stand. Since heat transfer situations vary for on-engine turbochargers, the maps have to be shifted and corrected in the 1-D engine simulation, which mass and efficiency multipliers usually do for both the turbine and the compressor. The multipliers change the maps and are often different for every load point. Particularly, the efficiency multiplier is different for every heat transfer situation on the turbocharger. The heat transfer leads to a deviation from turbocharger performance maps, and increased complexity of the turbocharged engine simulation. Turbochargers operate under different heat transfer situations while they are installed on the engines.

    The main objectives of this thesis are:

    • heat transfer modeling of a turbocharger to quantify and qualify heat transfer mechanisms,
    • improving turbocharged engine simulation by including heat transfer in the turbocharger,
    • assessing the use of two different turbocharger performance maps concerning the heat transfer situation (cold-measured and hot-measured turbocharger performance maps) in the simulation of a measured turbocharged engine,
    • prediction of turbocharger walls’ temperatures and their effects on the turbocharger performance on different heat transfer situations.

    Experimental investigation has been performed on a water-oil-cooled turbocharger, which was installed on a 2-liter GDI engine for different load points of the engine and different heat transfer situations on the turbocharger by using insulators, an extra cooling fan, radiation shields and water-cooling settings. In addition, several thermocouples have been used on accessible surfaces of the turbocharger to calculate external heat transfers.

    Based on the heat transfer analysis of the turbocharger, the internal heat transfer from the bearing housing to the compressor significantly affects the compressor. However, the internal heat transfer from the turbine to the bearing housing and the external heat transfer of the turbine housing mainly influence the turbine. The external heat transfers of the compressor housing and the bearing housing, and the frictional power do not play an important role in the heat transfer analysis of the turbocharger.

    The effect of the extra cooling fan on the energy balance of the turbocharger is significant. However, the effect of the water is more significant on the external heat transfer of the bearing housing and the internal heat transfer from the bearing housing to the compressor. It seems the radiation shield between the turbine and the compressor has no significant effect on the energy balance of the turbocharger.

    The present study shows that the heat transfer in the turbocharger is very crucial to take into account in the engine simulations. This improves simulation predictability in terms of getting the compressor efficiency multiplier equal to one and turbine efficiency multiplier closer to one, and achieving turbine outlet temperature close to the measurement. Moreover, the compressor outlet temperature becomes equal to the measurement without correcting the map.

    The heat transfer situation during the measurement of the turbocharger performance influences the amount of simulated heat flow to the compressor. The heat transfer situation may be defined by the turbine inlet temperature, oil heat flux and water heat flux. However, the heat transfer situation on the turbine makes a difference on the required turbine efficiency multiplier, rather than the amount of turbine heat flow. It seems the turbine heat flow is a stronger function of available energy into the turbine. Of great interest is the fact that different heat situations on the turbocharger do not considerably influence the pressure ratio of the compressor. The turbine and compressor efficiencies are the most important parameters that are affected by that.

    The component temperatures of the turbocharger influence the working fluid temperatures. Additionally, the turbocharger wall temperatures are predictable from the experiment. This prediction enables increased precision in engine simulations for future works in transient operations.

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    Habib Aghaali_Lic
  • 26.
    Aghaali, Habib
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines.
    Ångstrom, Hans-Erik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines.
    Demonstration of Air-Fuel Ratio Role in One-Stage Turbocompound Diesel Engines2013In: SAE Technical Papers, 2013, Vol. 11Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A large portion of fuel energy is wasted through the exhaust of internal combustion engines. Turbocompound can, however, recover part of this wasted heat. The energy recovery depends on the turbine efficiency and mass flow as well as the exhaust gas state and properties such as pressure, temperature and specific heat capacity.

    The main parameter influencing the turbocompound energy recovery is the exhaust gas pressure which leads to higher pumping loss of the engine and consequently lower engine crankshaft power. Each air-fuel equivalence ratio (λ) gives different engine power, exhaust gas temperature and pressure. Decreasing λ toward 1 in a Diesel engine results in higher exhaust gas temperatures of the engine.  λ can be varied by changing the intake air pressure or the amount of injected fuel which changes the available energy into the turbine. Thus, there is a compromise between gross engine power, created pumping power, recovered turbocompound power and consumed compressor power.

    In this study, the effects of different λ values and exhaust back-pressure have been investigated on the efficiency of a heavy-duty Diesel engine equipped with a single-stage electric turbocompounding. A one-dimensional gas dynamics model of a turbocharged engine was utilized that was validated against measurements at different load points. Two configurations of turbocompound engine were made. In one configuration an electric turbocharger was used and the amount of fuel was varied with constant intake air pressure. In another configuration the turbocharger turbine and compressor were disconnected to be able to control the turbine speed and the compressor speed independently; then the compressor pressure ratio was varied with constant engine fuelling and the exhaust back-pressure was optimized for each compressor pressure ratio.

    At each constant turbine efficiency there is a linear relation between the optimum exhaust back-pressure and ideally expanded cylinder pressure until bottom dead center with closed exhaust valves. There is an optimum λ for the turbocharged engine with regard to the fuel consumption. In the turbocompound engine, this will be moved to a richer λ that gives the best total specific fuel consumption; however, the results of this study indicates that turbocompound engine efficiency is relatively insensitive to the air-fuel ratio.

  • 27.
    Aghaali, Habib
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines.
    Ångström, Hans-Erik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines.
    Effects of Effective Flow Areas of Exhaust Valves on a Turbocompound Diesel Engine Combined With Divided Exhaust Period2014In: Proceedings from the FISITA 2014 World Automotive Congress, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research and /or Engineering Questions/Objective: Exhaust gas energy recovery in internal combustion engines is one of the key challenges in the future developments. The objective of this study is to reveal the fuel-saving potential of a turbocompound Diesel engine combined with divided exhaust period (DEP). The exhaust flow is provided for two different manifolds via separate valves, blowdown and scavenging, at different timings. The main challenge in this combination is choked flow through the exhaust valves due to the restricted effective flow areas. Therefore, the effects of enlarged effective flow areas of the exhaust valves are studied.

    Methodology: A commercial 1D gas dynamics code, GT-POWER, was used to simulate a turbocharged Diesel engine which was validated against measurements. Then the turbocharged engine model was modified to a turbocompound engine with DEP. Using statistical analysis in the simulation (design of experiment), the performance of this engine was studied at different sizes, lift curves and timings of the exhaust valves and turbine swallowing capacity.

    Results: In the paper the effects of the effective flow areas of the exhaust valves are presented on the break specific fuel consumption, pumping mean effective pressure and the turbine energy recovery by increasing the valve size and modifying valve lift curve to fast opening and closing. This has been done in a low engine speed and full load. The main finding is that the flow characteristics of the exhaust valves in the turbocompound DEP engine are very important for gaining the full efficiency benefit of the DEP concept.  The turbocompound DEP engine with modified valve lift shape of the exhaust valves could improve the overall brake specific fuel consumption by 3.44% in which 0.64% of the improvement is due to the valve lift curve. Modified valve lift curves contribute mainly in decreasing the period of choked flow through the exhaust valves.

    Limitations of this study: The simulations were not validated against measurements; however, the mechanical and geometrical limitations were tried to keep realistic when manipulating the valve flow area events.

    What does the paper offer that is new in the field in comparison to other works of the author: In addition to the novelty of the engine architecture that combines turbocompound with DEP, the statistical analysis and comparison presented in this paper is new especially with demonstrating the importance of crank angle coupled flow characteristics of the valves.

    Conclusion: To achieve full fuel-saving potential of turbocompound DEP engines, the flow characteristics of the exhaust valves must be considered. The effective flow areas of the exhaust valves play important roles in the choked flow through the valves, the pumping work and the brake specific fuel consumption of the engine.

  • 28.
    Aghaali, Habib
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines.
    Ångström, Hans-Erik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines.
    Externally divided exhaust period on a turbocompound engine for fuel-saving2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    To improve exhaust heat utilization of a turbocharged engine, divided exhaust period (DEP) and turbocompound are integrated. The DEP concept decreases pumping loss created by the turbocompound. In the DEP concept the exhaust flow is divided between two different exhaust manifolds, blowdown and scavenging. One of the two exhaust valves on each engine cylinder is opened to the blowdown manifold at the first phase of exhaust stroke and the other valve is opened to the scavenging manifold at the later phase of exhaust stroke. This leads to lower exhaust back pressure and pumping loss. The combination of turbocompound engine with DEP has been examined previously and the result showed that this combination reduces the fuel consumption in low engine speeds and deteriorates it in high engine speeds. The main restriction of this combination was the low effective flow areas of the exhaust valves at high engine speeds.

    To overcome this restriction and increase the effective flow areas of the exhaust valves, DEP is employed externally on the exhaust manifold instead of engine exhaust valves. In externally DEP (ExDEP), both exhaust valves will be opened and closed similar to the corresponding turbocharged engine and the exhaust flow is divided by flow splits on the exhaust manifold. Two valves on the outlet ports of each flow split are added. One of them is a non-return valve (check valve) and the other one is synchronized with the cam shaft.

    In this study, the fuel-saving potential of ExDEP is analysed on the turbocompound engine at different engine speeds and loads and compared with the corresponding turbocharged engine, turbocompound engine and turbocompound DEP engine equipped. The results show that ExDEP has a great fuel-saving potential in almost all load points.

    ExDEP concept, itself, is a novel concept that there is no available literature about it. Moreover, combination of this new gas exchange system with turbocompound engines is an innovative extension of combined turbocompound DEP engines.

  • 29.
    Aghaali, Habib
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines.
    Ångström, Hans-Erik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines.
    Improving Turbocharged Engine Simulation by Including Heat Transfer in the Turbocharger2012In: 2012 SAE International, SAE international , 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Engine simulation based on one-dimensional gas dynamics is well suited for integration of all aspects arising in engine and power-train developments. Commonly used turbocharger performance maps in engine simulation are measured in non-pulsating flow and without taking into account the heat transfer. Since on-engine turbochargers are exposed to pulsating flow and varying heat transfer situations, the maps in the engine simulation, i.e. GT-POWER, have to be shifted and corrected which are usually done by mass and efficiency multipliers for both turbine and compressor. The multipliers change the maps and are often different for every load point. Particularly, the efficiency multiplier is different for every heat transfer situation on the turbocharger. The aim of this paper is to include the heat transfer of the turbocharger in the engine simulation and consequently to reduce the use of efficiency multiplier for both the turbine and compressor. A set of experiment has been designed and performed on a water-oil-cooled turbocharger, which was installed on a 2 liter GDI engine with variable valve timing, for different load points of the engine and different conditions of heat transfer in the turbocharger. The experiments were the base to simulate heat transfer on the turbocharger, by adding a heat sink before the turbine and a heat source after the compressor. The efficiency multiplier of the turbine cannot compensate for all heat transfer in the turbine, so it is needed to put out heat from the turbine in addition to the using of efficiency multiplier. Results of this study show that including heat transfer of turbocharger in engine simulation enables to decrease the use of turbine efficiency multiplier and eliminate the use of compressor efficiency multiplier to correctly calculate the measured gas temperatures after turbine and compressor.

  • 30.
    Aghaali, Habib
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines.
    Ångström, Hans-Erik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines.
    Performance Sensitivity to Exhaust Valves and Turbine Parameters on a Turbocompound Engine with Divided Exhaust Period2014In: SAE International Journal of Engines, ISSN 1946-3936, E-ISSN 1946-3944, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 1722-1733Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Turbocompound can utilize part of the exhaust energy on internal combustion engines; however, it increases exhaust back pressure, and pumping loss.  To avoid such drawbacks, divided exhaust period (DEP) technology is combined with the turbocompound engine. In the DEP concept the exhaust flow is divided between two different exhaust manifolds, blowdown and scavenging, with different valve timings. This leads to lower exhaust back pressure and improves engine performance.

    Combining turbocompound engine with DEP has been theoretically investigated previously and shown that this reduces the fuel consumption and there is a compromise between the turbine energy recovery and the pumping work in the engine optimization. However, the sensitivity of the engine performance has not been investigated for all relevant parameters. The main aim of this study is to analyze the sensitivity of this engine architecture in terms of break specific fuel consumption to different parameters concerning the gas exchange such as blowdown valve timing, scavenging valve timing, blowdown valve size, scavenging valve size, discharge coefficients of blowdown and scavenging ports, turbine efficiency, turbine size and power transmission efficiency. This study presents the sensitivity analysis of the turbocompound DEP engine to these parameters and defines a set of important parameters that should be examined in experimental studies.

  • 31.
    Aghaali, Habib
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines.
    Ångström, Hans-Erik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines.
    Temperature Estimation of Turbocharger Working Fluids and Walls under Different Engine Loads and Heat Transfer Conditions2013In: SAE Technical Papers, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Turbocharger performance maps, which are used in engine simulations, are usually measured on a gas-stand where the temperatures distributions on the turbocharger walls are entirely different from that under real engine operation. This should be taken into account in the simulation of a turbocharged engine. Dissimilar wall temperatures of turbochargers give different air temperature after the compressor and different exhaust gas temperature after the turbine at a same load point. The efficiencies are consequently affected. This can lead to deviations between the simulated and measured outlet temperatures of the turbocharger turbine and compressor. This deviation is larger during a transient load step because the temperatures of turbocharger walls change slowly due to the thermal inertia. Therefore, it is important to predict the temperatures of turbocharger walls and the outlet temperatures of the turbocharger working fluids in a turbocharged engine simulation.

    In the work described in this paper, a water-oil-cooled turbocharger was extensively instrumented with several thermocouples on reachable walls. The turbocharger was installed on a 2-liter gasoline engine that was run under different loads and different heat transfer conditions on the turbocharger by using insulators, an extra cooling fan, radiation shields and water-cooling settings. The turbine inlet temperature varied between 550 and 850 °C at different engine loads.

    The results of this study show that the temperatures of turbocharger walls are predictable from the experiment. They are dependent on the load point and the heat transfer condition of the turbocharger. The heat transfer condition of an on-engine turbocharger could be defined by the turbine inlet temperature, ambient temperature, oil heat flux, water heat flux and the velocity of the air around the turbocharger. Thus, defining the heat transfer condition and rotational speed of the turbocharger provides temperatures predictions of the turbocharger walls and the working fluids. This prediction enables increased precision in engine simulation for future work in transient operation.

  • 32.
    Aghaali, Habib
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx).
    Ångström, Hans-Erik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx).
    The Exhaust Energy Utilization of a Turbocompound Engine Combined with Divided Exhaust Period2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To decrease the influence of the increased exhaust pressure of a turbocompound engine, a new architecture is developed by combining the turbocompound engine with divided exhaust period (DEP). The aim of this study is to utilize the earlier stage (blowdown) of the exhaust stroke in the turbine(s) and let the later stage (scavenging) of the exhaust stroke bypass the turbine(s). To decouple the blowdown phase from the scavenging phase, the exhaust flow is divided between two different exhaust manifolds with different valve timing. A variable valve train system is assumed to enable optimization at different load points. The fuel-saving potential of this architecture have been theoretically investigated by examining different parameters such as turbine flow capacity, blowdown valve timing and scavenging valve timing. Many combinations of these parameters are considered in the optimization of the engine for different engine loads and speeds.

    This architecture produces less negative pumping work for the same engine load point due to lower exhaust back pressure; however, the exhaust mass flow into the turbine(s) is decreased. Therefore, there is a compromise between the turbine energy recovery and the pumping work. According to this study, this combination shows fuel-saving potential in low engine speeds and limitations at high engine speeds. This is mainly due to the choked flow in the exhaust valves because this approach is using only one of the two exhaust valves at a time. To reveal the full potential of this approach, increasing the effective flow area of the valves should be studied.

  • 33.
    Aghaali, Habib
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines.
    Ångström, Hans-Erik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines.
    Turbocharged SI-Engine Simulation with Cold and Hot-Measured Turbocharger Performance Maps2012In: Proceedings of ASME Turbo Expo 2012, Vol 5, ASME Press, 2012, p. 671-679Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heat transfer within the turbocharger is an issue in engine simulation based on zero and one-dimensional gas dynamics. Turbocharged engine simulation is often done without taking into account the heat transfer in the turbocharger. In the simulation, using multipliers is the common way of adjusting turbocharger speed and parameters downstream of the compressor and upstream of the turbine. However, they do not represent the physical reality. The multipliers change the maps and need often to be different for different load points. The aim of this paper is to simulate a turbocharged engine and also consider heat transfer in the turbocharger. To be able to consider heat transfer in the turbine and compressor, heat is transferred from the turbine volute and into the compressor scroll. Additionally, the engine simulation was done by using two different turbocharger performance maps of a turbocharger measured under cold and hot conditions. The turbine inlet temperatures were 100 and 600°C, respectively. The turbocharged engine experiment was performed on a water-oil-cooled turbocharger (closed waste-gate), which was installed on a 2-liter gasoline direct-injected engine with variable valve timing, for different load points of the engine. In the work described in this paper, the difference between cold and hot-measured turbocharger performance maps is discussed and the quantified heat transfers from the turbine and to/from the compressor are interpreted and related to the maps.

  • 34.
    Aghaali, Habib
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx).
    Ångström, Hans-Erik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Internal Combustion Engines. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Competence Center for Gas Exchange (CCGEx).
    Serrano, Jose R
    Universitat Politècnica de València.
    Evaluation of different heat transfer conditions on an automotive turbocharger2014In: International Journal of Engine Research, ISSN 1468-0874, E-ISSN 2041-3149, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 137-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a combination of theoretical and experimental investigations for determining the main heat fluxes within a turbocharger. These investigations consider several engine speeds and loads as well as different methods of conduction, convection, and radiation heat transfer on the turbocharger. A one-dimensional heat transfer model of the turbocharger has been developed in combination with simulation of a turbocharged engine that includes the heat transfer of the turbocharger. Both the heat transfer model and the simulation were validated against experimental measurements. Various methods were compared for calculating heat transfer from the external surfaces of the turbocharger, and one new method was suggested.

    The effects of different heat transfer conditions were studied on the heat fluxes of the turbocharger using experimental techniques. The different heat transfer conditions on the turbocharger created dissimilar temperature gradients across the turbocharger. The results show that changing the convection heat transfer condition around the turbocharger affects the heat fluxes more noticeably than changing the radiation and conduction heat transfer conditions. Moreover, the internal heat transfers from the turbine to the bearing housing and from the bearing housing to the compressor are significant, but there is an order of magnitude difference between these heat transfer rates.

  • 35.
    Aghaei, Shayan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Vehicle Engineering and Solid Mechanics, Vehicle Dynamics.
    Acoustic Radiation Of An Automotive Component Using Multi-Body Dynamics2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    An important facet of creating high-quality vehicles is to create components that are quiet and smooth under operation. In reality, however, it is challenging to measure the sound that some automotive components make under load because it requires specialist facilities and equipment which are expensive to acquire. Furthermore, the motors used in testbeds drown out the noise emitted from much quieter components, such as a Power Transfer Unit (PTU). This thesis aims to solve these issues by outlining the steps required to virtually estimate the acoustic radiation of a PTU using the Transmission Error (TE) as the input excitation via multi-body dynamics (MBD). MBD is used to estimate the housing vibrations, which can then be coupled with an acoustic tool to create a radiation analysis. Thus, creating a viable method to measure the acoustic performance without incurring significant expenses. Furthermore, it enables noise and vibration analyses to be incorporated more easily into the design stage.

    This thesis analysed the sound radiated due to gear whine which arises due to the TE and occurs at the gear mesh frequency and its multiples. The simulations highlighted that the TE can be accurately predicted using the methods outlined in this thesis. Similarly, the method can reliably obtain the vibrations of the housing. The results from this analysis show that at 2000 rpm the PTU was sensitive to vibrations at 500, 1000 and 1500 Hz, the largest amplitude being at 1000 Hz. Furthermore, the Sound Power Level (SWL) was proportional to the vibration amplitudes in the system. Analytical calculations were conducted to verify the methods and showed a strong correlation. However, it was concluded that experiments are required to further verify the findings in this thesis.

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  • 36. Agirre, J. A.
    et al.
    Etxeberria, L.
    Barbosa, R.
    Basagiannis, S.
    Giantamidis, G.
    Bauer, T.
    Ferrari, E.
    Labayen Esnaola, M.
    Orani, V.
    Öberg, Johnny
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electrical Engineering, Electronics and Embedded systems, Electronic and embedded systems.
    Pereira, D.
    Proença, J.
    Schlick, R.
    Smrčka, A.
    Tiberti, W.
    Tonetta, S.
    Bozzano, M.
    Yazici, A.
    Sangchoolie, B.
    The VALU3S ECSEL project: Verification and validation of automated systems safety and security2021In: Microprocessors and microsystems, ISSN 0141-9331, E-ISSN 1872-9436, Vol. 87, p. 104349-, article id 104349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manufacturers of automated systems and their components have been allocating an enormous amount of time and effort in R&D activities, which led to the availability of prototypes demonstrating new capabilities as well as the introduction of such systems to the market within different domains. Manufacturers need to make sure that the systems function in the intended way and according to specifications. This is not a trivial task as system complexity rises dramatically the more integrated and interconnected these systems become with the addition of automated functionality and features to them. This effort translates into an overhead on the V&V (verification and validation) process making it time-consuming and costly. In this paper, we present VALU3S, an ECSEL JU (joint undertaking) project that aims to evaluate the state-of-the-art V&V methods and tools, and design a multi-domain framework to create a clear structure around the components and elements needed to conduct the V&V process. The main expected benefit of the framework is to reduce time and cost needed to verify and validate automated systems with respect to safety, cyber-security, and privacy requirements. This is done through identification and classification of evaluation methods, tools, environments and concepts for V&V of automated systems with respect to the mentioned requirements. VALU3S will provide guidelines to the V&V community including engineers and researchers on how the V&V of automated systems could be improved considering the cost, time and effort of conducting V&V processes. To this end, VALU3S brings together a consortium with partners from 10 different countries, amounting to a mix of 25 industrial partners, 6 leading research institutes, and 10 universities to reach the project goal.

  • 37.
    Ahlberg, Joakim
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Society, environment and transport, Transport economics, TEK.
    Energimätning på tåg för rundvirkestransporter på sträckan Mora–Borlänge–Gävle2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The third sub-project of ELVIS demonstration project for longer and heavier freight trains aims to analyze and measure energy usage of heavier trains. With heavier refers to a higher overall weight by more wagons, both loaded and unloaded, than would normally run on the route. The assumption is that heavier trains are able to do (freight) transport more energy efficient. The goal is to primarily test the hypothesis: · That energy consumption per ton can be reduced by using heavier trains. The report also illustrates the difficulties of using existing data for the evaluation of energy consumption on trains. The data in these has not been quality assured for the purposes of this study, which has caused a lot of errors and the credibility of some results are lower than otherwise would be needed. Thus, a conclusion from the project is that it would take a review of the databases of the Swedish Transport Administration on energy use should be studied further, at least if equipment such as their energy meter should be used. Alternatively, mount external equipment on locomotives to thereby generate more useful data; the latter, however, was not possible due to the owner of the locomotive. Given all sources of error associated with the data, the report analyze how the energy of a freight train is due to the gross weight of the train, the number of stops the train makes and drivers' driving style. Findings were that driving style plays a major role, between drivers the different in net energy used is up to 20 percent. Furthermore, there is differences in energy consumption connected to gross weights on the train, but then it's a bit unclear how the results should be interpreted in conjunction with the lack of quality of the data, it takes more measurements to be able to say anything definite. The same applies to the number of stops affecting the use of energy. On the first leg the number of stops had no impact on energy consumption, which it had on the investigation route.

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  • 38.
    Ahlberg, Max
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Vehicle Dynamics.
    Optimization based trajectory planning for autonomous racing2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Autonomous driving is one of the three new technologies that are disrupting the classical vehicle industry together with electrification and connectivity. All three are pieces in the puzzle to drastically reduce the number of fatalities and injuries from traffic accidents but also to reduce the total amount of cars, reduce the polluting greenhouse gases, reduce noise pollution and completely eliminate unwanted driving. For example would most people rather rest, read or do anything else instead of driving in congested traffic. It is not small steps to take and it will have to be done incrementally as many other things. Within the vehicle industry racing has always been the natural place to push the boundaries of what is possible. Here new technologies can be tested under controlled circumstances in order to faster find the best solution to a problem.Autonomous driving is no exception, the international student competition ”Formula Student” has introduced a driverless racing class and Formula E are slowly implementing Robo Race. The fact that race cars aim to drive at the limits of what is possible enable engineers to develop algorithms that can handle these conditions even in the every day life. Because even though the situations when normal passenger cars need to perform at the limits are rare, it is at these times it can save peoples lives. When an unforeseen event occurs and a fast manoeuvre has to be done in order to avoid the accident, that is when the normal car is driving at the limits. But the other thing to take into considerations when taking new technology into the consumer market is that the cars cannot cost as much as a race car. This means simpler computers has to be used and this in turn puts a constraint on the algorithms in the car. They can not be too computationally heavy.In this thesis a controller is designed to drive as fast as possible around the track. But in contrast to existing research it is not about how much the limit of speed can be pushed but of how simple a controller can be. The controller was designed with a Model Predictive Controller (MPC) that is based on a point mass model, that resembles the Center of Gravity (CoG) of the car. A g-g diagram that describes the limits of the modeled car is used as the constraints and the cost function is to maximize the distance progressed along the track in a fix time step. Together with constraints on the track boundaries an optimization problem is giving the best possible trajectory with respect to the derived model. This trajectory is then sent to a low level controller, based on a Pure Pursuit and P controller, that is following the predicted race trajectory. Everything is done online such that implementation is possible. This controller is then compared and evaluated to a similar successful controller from the literature but which has a more complicated model and MPC formulation. The comparison is made and some notable differences are that the point mass model is behaving similar to the more complex model from the literature. Though is the hypothesis not correct since the benefits of the simplification of the model, from bicycle to point mass model, is replaced when more complex constraints has to be set up, resulting in similar performance even in computational times.A combination of the two models would probably yield the best result with acceptable computational times, this is left as future work to research.

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  • 39. Ahlman, Tryggve
    2nd Project on Damage Stability for RoRo Passenger ships2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Ro-ro passenger ship services constitute an important part of the European maritime infrastructure, and indeed play a crucial role for Sweden in connecting seaborne transport routes to and from our neighbouring countries. Moreover, northern European countries have been leading the development of, not only the ro-ro passenger ship concept as such, but also the development of relevant safety standards for this fleet. Understandably, it is therefore crucial for the Swedish maritime sector to take part of the legislative process that covers a significant share of the Swedish maritime infrastructure. Thus, in light of the IMO deliberations on the revisions of Chapter II-1 of the SOLAS Convention in general and proposals for an increased safety standard for passenger ships in particular, a first Triple-Helix project, partly funded by the Swedish Maritime Administration, was mobilized by the Swedish Shipowners’ Association, focusing on ro-ro passenger ship safety from a holistic perspective. The conclusions and findings of this Project can be found in the Report “Damage Stability Project for RoRo Passenger Ships – Final Report” [1.]. As the draft proposals for enhanced safety standards for passenger ships materialised into firm amendments to SOLAS Chapter II-1, which have now been adopted by the Marine Safety Committee of the International Maritime Organization during its 98th session, an extension of the Damage Stability Project was granted additional funding in the beginning of 2017 and consequently the 2nd Project on Damage Stability for Ro-Ro Passenger Ships (2nd RoPax DamStab Project) was mobilised. The aim of the 2nd RoPax DamStab Project has been to review and evaluate existing as well as future ro-ro passenger ship safety regulations from a theoretical perspective, with the objectives to: 1. provide in-depth knowledge about and facilitate the understanding of existing as well as future damage stability standards, 2. facilitate understanding of ship type specific characteristics from a safety standard aspect, and 3. assess the consequences for the ro-ro passenger ship fleet. This report outlines the work and findings of the 2nd RoPax DamStab Project as performed during the year of 2017.

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    2nd Project on Damage Stability for RoRo Passenger ships
  • 40. Ahlman, Tryggve
    Incident-reporting system ForeSea. Development of a Maritime safety system. Final report2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The safe operation of ships and the safe handling of cargo are core principles for shipping companies. In addition to focusing on the safety of their own operations, shipping companies take steps to protect the public health and safety in the countries they transit. Safety in shipping has improved significantly in the last decade with shipping losses declining by more than 50% since 2005. While ship owners might only work reactively with safety, the Scandinavian approach has been to establish pro-active methods of working with safety involving humans and learning from each other. SvenskSjöfart, together with the Swedish Transport Agency, has made a joint effort and created ForeSea – an information system on accidents, incidents and near misses at sea. The common incident database transparency, knowledge transfer and shared knowledge is prevailing. What distinguishes ForeSea from other systems is that the information in the database can be used for identification of safety analyzes of specific events, thus contributing to preventive maritime safety. The main goal of the ForeSea system is to reduce risks of maritime accidents, by sharing and transferring safety information between operators and management. Allowing formulation of safety analyses, assessments and safety reports. The main objective of the project has been to perform quality assurance of the system, analyze methods, ensure availability for research project and software training modules, make adaption; technical interface and system customization as well as IT improvements, training materials and dissemination. This report outlines the work and findings of the ForeSea 2.0 - Development of a Maritime safety system project as performed during the year of 2017 and 2018. Humans, especially the crews have an important role in the safe operation of ships. The crews, given the right circumstances are able to safely maneuver, navigate, maintain and operate the vessel. The crews are dependent on many factors that enable this work, from the design of the vessel and work place, the procedures, processes given by the ship management and the business approach the ship owner applies to the vessel. The introduction of more automation requires a systems perspective and will not be a straight forward development. Total autonomy as proposed by some technology developers is often neglecting the functions and roles that humans have on maritime safety and the business case for increased automation neglects the full contribution of humans onboard. Total autonomy will therefore require high-end products that are built on standardized complex systems. Controlling and monitoring these systems will set new requirements on operators to uphold situated understanding in these complex systems. Many aspects will be affected by increased automation towards smart shipping - regulations, organization, workplace, working methods, HMI, roles and skills. To cope with the foreseen changes, it is important to develop further training, skills, experience, openness in the organization and familiarization giving the future crews the right pre-conditions to succeed in the future, as well as mindful design and integration of newly automated systems In the future, the ISM code will likely have to change to improve the interaction between land organisations and crews in order to facilitate better integration of split responsibilities and split physical locations by the management system which in the long run allows for an increased land-based monitoring and control of vessels’ systems and move certain tasks to shore to lower workload onboard, which should be one of the main drivers for automation. The results from this project ensure the quality of the tools and the output and the communication via the new homepage (https://foresea.org/), folders and roll-ups ensures a smooth dissemination and spreading.

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    Incident-reporting system ForeSea. Development of a Maritime safety system. Final report
  • 41. Ahlman, Tryggve
    et al.
    Palmén, Christina
    Hüffmeier, Johannes
    Raggl, Karl-Johan
    Jakobsen, Björn
    Incident-reporting system ForeSea. Development of a Maritime safety system.2020Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The safe operation of ships and the safe handling of cargo are core principles for shipping companies. In addition to focusing on the safety of their own operations, shipping companies take steps to protect the public health and safety in the countries they transit. Safety in shipping has improved significantly in the last decade with shipping losses declining by more than 50% since 2005. While ship owners might only work reactively with safety, the Scandinavian approach has been to establish pro-active methods of working with safety involving humans and learning from each other. SvenskSjöfart, together with the Swedish Transport Agency, has made a joint effort and created ForeSea – an information system on accidents, incidents and near misses at sea. The common incident database transparency, knowledge transfer and shared knowledge is prevailing. What distinguishes ForeSea from other systems is that the information in the database can be used for identification of safety analyzes of specific events, thus contributing to preventive maritime safety.The main goal of the ForeSea system is to reduce risks of maritime accidents, by sharing and transferring safety information between operators and management. Allowing formulation of safety analyses, assessments and safety reports. The main objective of the project has been to perform quality assurance of the system, analyze methods, ensure availability for research project and software training modules, make adaption; technical interface and system customization as well as IT improvements, training materials and dissemination. This report outlines the work and findings of the ForeSea 2.0 - Development of a Maritime safety system project as performed during the year of 2017 and 2018. Humans, especially the crews have an important role in the safe operation of ships. The crews, given the right circumstances are able to safely maneuver, navigate, maintain and operate the vessel. The crews are dependent on many factors that enable this work, from the design of the vessel and workplace, the procedures, processes given by the ship management and the business approach the ship owner applies to the vessel. The introduction of more automation requires a systems perspective and will not be a straightforward development. Total autonomy as proposed by some technology developers is often neglecting the functions and roles that humans have on maritime safety and the business case for increased automation neglects the full contribution of humans onboard. Total autonomy will therefore require high-end products that are built on standardized complex systems. Controlling and monitoring these systems will set new requirements on operators to uphold situated understanding in these complex systems. Many aspects will be affected by increased automation towards smart shipping - regulations, organization, workplace, working methods, HMI, roles and skills. To cope with the foreseen changes, it is important to develop further training, skills, experience, openness in the organization and familiarization giving the future crews the right pre-conditions to succeed in the future, as well as mindful design and integration of newly automated systems In the future, the ISM code will likely have to change to improve the interaction between land organizations and crews in order to facilitate better integration of split responsibilities and split physical locations by the management system which in the long run allows for an increased land-based monitoring and control of vessels’ systems and move certain tasks to shore to lower workload onboard, which should be one of the main drivers for automation. Based on involvement of users and new members, the project has succeeded in increasing the number of reports entered to the system each year has been increased significantly, from around 40-50 per year to above 300. The project hopes to maintain these figures in the continuous work to ensure that experience is shared, and maritime safety improved.

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    Incident-reporting system ForeSea. Development of a Maritime safety system.
  • 42.
    Ahlstrand, Felicia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Vehicle Engineering and Solid Mechanics, Naval Systems.
    Lindbergh, Elin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Vehicle Engineering and Solid Mechanics, Naval Systems.
    Methods to Predict Hull Resistance in the Process of Designing Electric Boats2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Combustion engines in boats cause several environmental problems, such as greenhouse gas emissions and acidication of oceans. Most of these problems can be reduced by replacing the combustion engines with electric boats. The limited range is one of the main constraints for electric boats, and in order to decrease the energy consumption, applicable resistance prediction methods are necessary in the hull design process. X Shore, which is a start-up company in the electric boat sector, lacks a systematic way of predicting resistance in an early design phase. In this study, four well-known methods - CFD, Holtrop & Mennen, the Savitsky method and model test - have been applied in order to predict resistance for a test hull. The study is limited to bare hull resistance and calm water conditions. CFD simulations are applied using the software ANSYS FLUENT 19:0. The simulations were based on the Reynolds Average Navier-Stokes equations with SST k-ω as turbulence model together with the volume of fluid method describing the two-phased ow of both water and air surrounding the hull. The semi-empirical methods, Holtrop & Mennen and the Savitsky method, are applied through a program in Python 3, developed by the authors. The results from each method have been compared and since model tests have been conducted outside of this study, the model test results will serve as reference. To evaluate the methods, a number of evaluation criteria are identied and evaluated through a Pugh Matrix, a systems engineering tool. Holtrop & Mennen predicts the resistance with low accuracy and consistency, and the error varies between 2:2% and 70:6%. The CFD simulations result in acceptable resistance predictions with good precision for the speeds 4 - 6 knots, with an average deviation of the absolute values as12:28% which is slightly higher than the errors found in previous studies. However, the method shows inconsistency for the higher speeds where the deviation varies between 1:77% and - 43:39%. The Savitsky method predicts accurate results with good precision for planing speeds, but also for the speeds 7 and 8 knots. The method is under-predicting the resistance for all speeds except for 7 knots, where the total resistance is 10:7% higher than for model tests. In the speed range 8 - 32 knots, the average error is an under-estimation of 17:58%. Furthermore, the trim angles predicted by the Savitsky method correspond well with the trim angles from the model test. In conclusion, the recommendation to X Shore is to apply the Savitsky method when its applicability criteria are fulfilled, and CFD for the lowest speeds, where the Savitsky method is not applicable.

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  • 43.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    Andersson, Jan
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    Anund, Anna
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    Börjesson, Emma
    Scania.
    Johansson, Hanna
    Scania.
    Johnsson, Johanna
    Scania.
    Detecting sleepiness by Optalert: final report2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Many crashes with heavy vehicle can be attributed to driver sleepiness or driving impairment due to sleepiness, and it is important to find methods to predict those situations and counteract this problem. The Optalert fatigue management system claims to be able to detect sleepiness. The aims of this study are to (a) evaluate if Optalert can detect sleepiness equally well as other sleepiness indicators and (b) if the data patterns obtained by Optalert correlates with these other sleepiness indicators. Twelve sleep deprived truck drivers drove for about 90 minutes in an advanced moving base truck simulator. The experimental setup, including the sleep deprivation, was designed so that the drivers should become increasingly sleepier during the trial and the intention was that they should fall asleep during the experiment.

    Four different indicators of sleepiness or driving impairment due to sleepiness were used to monitor the state of the drivers; the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS), the variability in lateral position (SDLP), the blink duration and the Optalert system. The results show that all four sleepiness indicators increased with time on task. An analysis of variance revealed that the changes were significant for KSS, blink duration and the Optalert system, and a correlation analysis showed that Optalert correlated significantly with blink duration and SDLP. However, even though these correlations were significant, they were all rather low with a maximum correlation coefficient of 0.24.

    In conclusion, the Optalert system is promising and the sleepiness rating provided by the system works at least equally well as the other three sleepiness indicators. There are some practical limitations to the system; there is no reliable threshold which can be used to determine when a driver is getting too sleepy to drive (this is also the case for other available sleepiness indicators), the driver needs to be attached to the vehicle via the spectacle frames and a wire, and the quality of the eye movement recordings often deteriorated when the driver started driving the truck. Moreover, during the experiment the technical reliability was sometimes low.

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  • 44.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    Bolling, Anne
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Vehicle technology and simulation.
    Sörensen, Gunilla
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Traffic safety, society and road-user.
    Eriksson, Olle
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Infrastructure, Infrastructure maintenance.
    Andersson, Anders
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Vehicle technology and simulation.
    Validating speed and road surface realism in VTI driving simulator III2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    New simulator models concerning vibration, noise and graphics have been designed and implemented in the VTI Simulator III. The objective of this study is to validate this simulator in terms of road surface realism. Twenty-four drivers participated in the study and drove the same route both in the simulator and on real roads. Three road sections ranging from very smooth to rather uneven were incorporated in the design. The comparison included the objective driving parameter speed as well as subjective parameters from questionnaires and rating scales (evenness, quietness and comfort level). A road section with five speed limit changes was of particular interest in the analyses. No statistically significant difference could be found between the simulator and the car, neither in the parameter speed (in sections with no speed limit changes) nor in the ratings evenness and quietness. Despite similar speed profiles surrounding the speed limit signs, there was a statistically significant difference between the speed in the car and in the simulator, with more rapid accelerations and decelerations in the simulator. The comfort rating was shown to be higher in the car compared to the simulator, but in both cases the general trend showed higher comfort on smoother roads. These results indicate absolute validity for the ratings evenness and quietness, and for the measure speed, and relative validity for comfort and speed surrounding speed limit signs.

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  • 45.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    Dukic, Tania
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    Ivarsson, Erik
    SmartEye.
    Kircher, Albert
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute.
    Rydbeck, Bosse
    SmartEye.
    Viström, Matias
    Saab Automobile.
    Performance of a one-camera and a three-camera system2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Driving and operating a vehicle is to a great extent a visual task. In driver behaviour studies it is therefore important to be able to measure where the driver is looking. Today this can be done unobtrusively and remotely in real-time with camera based eye tracking. The most common remote eye tracking systems use multiple cameras in order to give satisfactory results. However, promising results using only one camera has recently emerged on the market. The main objective of this study is to compare eye tracking systems with one and three cameras, respectively, during various measurement conditions.

    A total of 53 participants were enrolled in the study. Data from the two eye trackers were acquired and analysed in terms of availability, accuracy and precision. The results indicate that both availability and accuracy are affected by many different factors. The most important factors are the number of cameras that is used and the angular distance from straight ahead. In the central region (straight ahead) both one-camera and three-camera systems have a high degree of accuracy and availability, but with increasing distance from the central region, the results deteriorate. This effect falls harder upon the one-camera system. Interestingly, there were no significant effects when wearing glasses in either availability or accuracy. There was however an interaction effect between distance and glasses.

    Advantages with a one-camera system are that it is cheaper, easier to operate and easier to install in a vehicle. A multi-camera system will, on the other hand, provide higher availability and accuracy for areas that are far from the road centre. A one-camera system is thus mostly suitable for in-vehicle applications such as systems that warn drivers for sleepiness or distraction while multi-camera solutions are preferable for research purposes.

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  • 46.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Georgoulas, George
    Univ Patras, Greece; DataWise Data Engn LLC, GA 30318 USA.
    Kircher, Katja
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Towards a Context-Dependent Multi-Buffer Driver Distraction Detection Algorithm2022In: IEEE transactions on intelligent transportation systems (Print), ISSN 1524-9050, E-ISSN 1558-0016, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 4778-4790Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents initial work on a context-dependent driver distraction detection algorithm called AttenD2.0, which extends the original AttenD algorithm with elements from the Minimum Required Attention (MiRA) theory. Central to the original AttenD algorithm is a time buffer which keeps track of how often and for how long the driver looks away from the forward roadway. When the driver looks away the buffer is depleted and when looking back the buffer fills up. If the buffer runs empty the driver is classified as distracted. AttenD2.0 extends this concept by adding multiple buffers, thus integrating situation dependence and visual time-sharing behaviour in a transparent manner. Also, the increment and decrement of the buffers are now controlled by both static requirements (e.g. the presence of an on-ramp increases the need to monitor the sides and the mirrors) as well as dynamic requirements (e.g., reduced speed lowers the need to monitor the speedometer). The algorithm description is generic, but a real-time implementation with concrete values for different parameters is showcased in a driving simulator experiment with 16 bus drivers, where AttenD2.0 was used to ensure that drivers are attentive before taking back control after an automated bus stop docking and depot procedure. The scalability of AttenD2.0 relative to available data sources and the level of vehicle automation is demonstrated. Future work includes expanding the concept to real-world environments by automatically integrating situational information from the vehicles environmental sensing and from digital maps.

  • 47.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, The Human in the Transport system..
    Georgoulas, George
    Department of Mechanical Engineering and Aeronautics, University of Patras, Greece; DataWise Data Engineering LLC, Atlanta, GA, USA.
    Kircher, Katja
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, The Human in the Transport system..
    Towards a Context-Dependent Multi-Buffer Driver Distraction Detection Algorithm2022In: IEEE transactions on intelligent transportation systems (Print), ISSN 1524-9050, E-ISSN 1558-0016, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 4778-4790Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents initial work on a context-dependent driver distraction detection algorithm called AttenD2.0, which extends the original AttenD algorithm with elements from the Minimum Required Attention (MiRA) theory. Central to the original AttenD algorithm is a time buffer which keeps track of how often and for how long the driver looks away from the forward roadway. When the driver looks away the buffer is depleted and when looking back the buffer fills up. If the buffer runs empty the driver is classified as distracted. AttenD2.0 extends this concept by adding multiple buffers, thus integrating situation dependence and visual time-sharing behaviour in a transparent manner. Also, the increment and decrement of the buffers are now controlled by both static requirements (e.g. the presence of an on-ramp increases the need to monitor the sides and the mirrors) as well as dynamic requirements (e.g., reduced speed lowers the need to monitor the speedometer). The algorithm description is generic, but a real-time implementation with concrete values for different parameters is showcased in a driving simulator experiment with 16 bus drivers, where AttenD2.0 was used to ensure that drivers are attentive before taking back control after an automated bus stop docking and depot procedure. The scalability of AttenD2.0 relative to available data sources and the level of vehicle automation is demonstrated. Future work includes expanding the concept to real-world environments by automatically integrating situational information from the vehicles environmental sensing and from digital maps.

  • 48.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    Kircher, Katja
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, Human-vehicle-transport system interaction.
    Rydström, Annie
    Volvo Car Corperation.
    Nåbo, Arne
    SAAB Automobile.
    Almgren, Susanne
    SAAB Automobile.
    Ricknäs, Daniel
    Scania.
    Effects of visual, cognitive and haptic tasks on driving performance indicators2012In: Advances in Human Aspects of Road and Rail Transportation / [ed] Neville A . Stanton, San Francisco, USA: CRC Press , 2012, p. 673-682Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A driving simulator study was conducted by using the same setup in two driving simulators, one with a moving base and one with a fixed base. The aim of the study was to investigate a selection of commonly used performance indicators (PIs) for their sensitivity to secondary tasks loading on different modalities and levels of difficulty, and to evaluate their robustness across simulator platforms. The results showed that, across platforms, the longitudinal PIs behaved similarly whereas the lateral control and eye movement based performance indicators differed. For modality, there were considerable effects on lateral, longitudinal as well as eye movement PIs. However, there were only limited differences between the baseline and the cognitive and haptic tasks. For difficulty, clear effects on PIs related to lateral control and eye movements were shown. Additionally, it should be noted that there were large individual differences for several of the PIs. In conclusion, many of the most commonly used PIs are susceptible to individual differences, and, especially the PIs for lateral control, to the platform and environment where they are acquired, which is why generalizations should be made with caution.

  • 49.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, The Human in the Transport system..
    Leeuwen, Wessel van
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Krupenia, Stas
    Scania CV AB, Sweden.
    Jansson, Herman
    Smart Eye AB, Sweden.
    Finér, Svitlana
    Smart Eye AB, Sweden.
    Anund, Anna
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Traffic and road users, The Human in the Transport system..
    Kecklund, Göran
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Real-Time Adaptation of Driving Time and Rest Periods in Automated Long-Haul Trucking: Development of a System Based on Biomathematical Modelling, Fatigue and Relaxation Monitoring2022In: IEEE transactions on intelligent transportation systems (Print), ISSN 1524-9050, E-ISSN 1558-0016, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 4758-4766Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hours of service regulations govern the working hours of commercial motor vehicle drivers, but these regulations may become more flexible as highly automated vehicles have the potential to afford periods of in-cab rest or even sleep while the vehicle is moving. A prerequisite is robust continuous monitoring of when the driver is resting (to account for reduced time on task) or sleeping (to account for the reduced physiological drive to sleep). The overall aims of this paper are to raise a discussion of whether it is possible to obtain successful rest during automated driving, and to present initial work on a hypothetical data driven algorithm aimed to estimate if it is possible to gain driving time after resting under fully automated driving. The presented algorithm consists of four central components, a heart rate-based relaxation detection algorithm, a camera-based sleep detection algorithm, a fatigue modelling component taking time awake, time of day and time on task into account, and a component that estimates gained driving time. Real-time assessment of driver fitness is complicated, especially when it comes to the recuperative value of in-cab sleep and rest, as it depends on sleep quality, time of day, homeostatic sleep pressure and on the activities that are carried out while resting. The monotony that characterizes for long-haul truck driving is clearly interrupted for a while, but the long-term consequences of extended driving times, including user acceptance of the key stakeholders, requires further research.

  • 50.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Swedish Natl Rd & Transport Res Inst VTI, S-58195 Linkoping, Sweden.
    van Leeuwen, Wessel
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Krupenia, Stas
    Scania CV AB, Sweden.
    Jansson, Herman
    Smart Eye AB, Sweden.
    Finer, Svitlana
    Smart Eye AB, Sweden.
    Anund, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Swedish Natl Rd & Transport Res Inst VTI, S-58195 Linkoping, Sweden; Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Kecklund, Goran
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Real-Time Adaptation of Driving Time and Rest Periods in Automated Long-Haul Trucking: Development of a System Based on Biomathematical Modelling, Fatigue and Relaxation Monitoring2022In: IEEE transactions on intelligent transportation systems (Print), ISSN 1524-9050, E-ISSN 1558-0016, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 4758-4766Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hours of service regulations govern the working hours of commercial motor vehicle drivers, but these regulations may become more flexible as highly automated vehicles have the potential to afford periods of in-cab rest or even sleep while the vehicle is moving. A prerequisite is robust continuous monitoring of when the driver is resting (to account for reduced time on task) or sleeping (to account for the reduced physiological drive to sleep). The overall aims of this paper are to raise a discussion of whether it is possible to obtain successful rest during automated driving, and to present initial work on a hypothetical data driven algorithm aimed to estimate if it is possible to gain driving time after resting under fully automated driving. The presented algorithm consists of four central components, a heart rate-based relaxation detection algorithm, a camera-based sleep detection algorithm, a fatigue modelling component taking time awake, time of day and time on task into account, and a component that estimates gained driving time. Real-time assessment of driver fitness is complicated, especially when it comes to the recuperative value of in-cab sleep and rest, as it depends on sleep quality, time of day, homeostatic sleep pressure and on the activities that are carried out while resting. The monotony that characterizes for long-haul truck driving is clearly interrupted for a while, but the long-term consequences of extended driving times, including user acceptance of the key stakeholders, requires further research.

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