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  • 1.
    Aarno, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computer Vision and Active Perception, CVAP. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Autonomous Systems, CAS.
    Ekvall, Staffan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computer Vision and Active Perception, CVAP. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Autonomous Systems, CAS.
    Kragic, Danica
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computer Vision and Active Perception, CVAP. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Autonomous Systems, CAS.
    Adaptive virtual fixtures for machine-assisted teleoperation tasks2005In: 2005 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), Vols 1-4, 2005, p. 1139-1144Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been demonstrated in a number of robotic areas how the use of virtual fixtures improves task performance both in terms of execution time and overall precision, [1]. However, the fixtures are typically inflexible, resulting in a degraded performance in cases of unexpected obstacles or incorrect fixture models. In this paper, we propose the use of adaptive virtual fixtures that enable us to cope with the above problems. A teleoperative or human machine collaborative setting is assumed with the core idea of dividing the task, that the operator is executing, into several subtasks. The operator may remain in each of these subtasks as long as necessary and switch freely between them. Hence, rather than executing a predefined plan, the operator has the ability to avoid unforeseen obstacles and deviate from the model. In our system, the probability that the user is following a certain trajectory (subtask) is estimated and used to automatically adjusts the compliance. Thus, an on-line decision of how to fixture the movement is provided.

  • 2.
    Aarno, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Autonomous Systems, CAS. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computer Vision and Active Perception, CVAP.
    Kragic, Danica
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Autonomous Systems, CAS. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computer Vision and Active Perception, CVAP.
    Layered HMM for motion intention recognition2006In: 2006 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, Vols 1-12, NEW YORK: IEEE , 2006, p. 5130-5135Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acquiring, representing and modeling human skins is one of the key research areas in teleoperation, programming. by-demonstration and human-machine collaborative settings. One of the common approaches is to divide the task that the operator is executing into several subtasks in order to provide manageable modeling. In this paper we consider the use of a Layered Hidden Markov Model (LHMM) to model human skills. We evaluate a gestem classifier that classifies motions into basic action-primitives, or gestems. The gestem classifiers are then used in a LHMM to model a simulated teleoperated task. We investigate the online and offline classilication performance with respect to noise, number of gestems, type of HAIM and the available number of training sequences. We also apply the LHMM to data recorded during the execution of a trajectory-tracking task in 2D and 3D with a robotic manipulator in order to give qualitative as well as quantitative results for the proposed approach. The results indicate that the LHMM is suitable for modeling teleoperative trajectory-tracking tasks and that the difference in classification performance between one and multi dimensional HMMs for gestem classification is small. It can also be seen that the LHMM is robust w.r.t misclassifications in the underlying gestem classifiers.

  • 3.
    Abdalrhman, Slah Aldeen
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production Systems.
    Virtual model of a production process: Seam sealing line at Scania2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of digital factories is becoming more popular among the manufactures due to its contributions in simplifying the work of plant engineers and reducing time to market of the products [1]. The main aim of this thesis was to investigate the possible applications of a digital copy of production processes by creating a virtual model of a seam sealing line in the paint department at Scania in Oskarshamn. The main usage of the virtual model was to perform offline programming of the robots. The benefits of offline programming were investigated and compared to online programming. Some comparisons between offline and online programming were made when it comes to the time needed for programming, the accuracy of generated robot paths, the workflow of both approaches and the required knowledge to turn from online programming to offline programming.

    The result of the conducted experiment showed that the time of robot programming can be reduced, and the accuracy of robot paths increases by implementing an offline programming tool. The other application of virtual which was investigated in this thesis was virtual commissioning. Virtual commissioning is a method used to test and validate robot and control (PLC) programs in a virtual environment before implementing in the real plant. The software in the loop was selected as an approach for building the virtual commissioning model after presenting the different existed approaches. The result of the model showed great benefits of virtual commissioning not just in reducing the time of traditional of the new built line but even when replacing parts in an already existing manufacturing. Virtual commissioning is still new in the manufacturing, therefore, there are many issues which should be solved to get an optimal model that imitates perfectly the real plant.

  • 4.
    Abdul Khader, Shahbaz
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Data-Driven Methods for Contact-Rich Manipulation: Control Stability and Data-Efficiency2021Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Autonomous robots are expected to make a greater presence in the homes and workplaces of human beings. Unlike their industrial counterparts, autonomous robots have to deal with a great deal of uncertainty and lack of structure in their environment. A remarkable aspect of performing manipulation in such a scenario is the possibility of physical contact between the robot and the environment. Therefore, not unlike human manipulation, robotic manipulation has to manage contacts, both expected and unexpected, that are often characterized by complex interaction dynamics.

    Skill learning has emerged as a promising approach for robots to acquire rich motion generation capabilities. In skill learning, data driven methods are used to learn reactive control policies that map states to actions. Such an approach is appealing because a sufficiently expressive policy can almost instantaneously generate appropriate control actions without the need for computationally expensive search operations. Although reinforcement learning (RL) is a natural framework for skill learning, its practical application is limited for a number of reasons. Arguably, the two main reasons are the lack of guaranteed control stability and poor data-efficiency. While control stability is necessary for ensuring safety and predictability, data-efficiency is required for achieving realistic training times. In this thesis, solutions are sought for these two issues in the context of contact-rich manipulation.

    First, this thesis addresses the problem of control stability. Despite unknown interaction dynamics during contact, skill learning with stability guarantee is formulated as a model-free RL problem. The thesis proposes multiple solutions for parameterizing stability-aware policies. Some policy parameterizations are partly or almost wholly deep neural networks. This is followed by policy search solutions that preserve stability during random exploration, if required. In one case, a novel evolution strategies-based policy search method is introduced. It is shown, with the help of real robot experiments, that Lyapunov stability is both possible and beneficial for RL-based skill learning.

    Second, this thesis addresses the issue of data-efficiency. Although data-efficiency is targeted by formulating skill learning as a model-based RL problem, only the model learning part is addressed. In addition to benefiting from the data-efficiency and uncertainty representation of the Gaussian process, this thesis further investigates the benefits of adopting the structure of hybrid automata for learning forward dynamics models. The method also includes an algorithm for predicting long-term trajectory distributions that can represent discontinuities and multiple modes. The proposed method is shown to be more data-efficient than some state-of-the-art methods. 

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  • 5.
    Abdul Khader, Shahbaz
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Yin, Hang
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Falco, Pietro
    ABB Corporate Research, Vasteras, 72178, Sweden.
    Kragic, Danica
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL. ABB Corporate Research, Vasteras, 72178, Sweden.
    Learning deep energy shaping policies for stability-guaranteed manipulation2021In: IEEE Robotics and Automation Letters, E-ISSN 2377-3766, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 8583-8590Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Deep reinforcement learning (DRL) has been successfully used to solve various robotic manipulation tasks. However, most of the existing works do not address the issue of control stability. This is in sharp contrast to the control theory community where the well-established norm is to prove stability whenever a control law is synthesized. What makes traditional stability analysis difficult for DRL are the uninterpretable nature of the neural network policies and unknown system dynamics. In this work, stability is obtained by deriving an interpretable deep policy structure based on the energy shaping control of Lagrangian systems. Then, stability during physical interaction with an unknown environment is established based on passivity. The result is a stability guaranteeing DRL in a model-free framework that is general enough for contact-rich manipulation tasks. With an experiment on a peg-in-hole task, we demonstrate, to the best of our knowledge, the first DRL with stability guarantee on a real robotic manipulator.

  • 6.
    Abdul Khader, Shahbaz
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Yin, Hang
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Falco, Pietro
    Kragic, Danica
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Centres, Centre for Autonomous Systems, CAS.
    Learning Deep Neural Policies with Stability GuaranteesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Deep reinforcement learning (DRL) has been successfully used to solve various robotic manipulation tasks. However, most of the existing works do not address the issue of control stability. This is in sharp contrast to the control theory community where the well-established norm is to prove stability whenever a control law is synthesized. What makes traditional stability analysis difficult for DRL are the uninterpretable nature of the neural network policies and unknown system dynamics. In this work, unconditional stability is obtained by deriving an interpretable deep policy structure based on the energy shaping control of Lagrangian systems. Then, stability during physical interaction with an unknown environment is established based on passivity. The result is a stability guaranteeing DRL in a model-free framework that is general enough for contact-rich manipulation tasks. With an experiment on a peg-in-hole task, we demonstrate, to the best of our knowledge, the first DRL with stability guarantee on a real robotic manipulator.

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  • 7.
    Abdul Khader, Shahbaz
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL. ABB Corp Res, Västerås, Sweden..
    Yin, Hang
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Falco, Pietro
    ABB Corp Res, Västerås, Sweden..
    Kragic, Danica
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Learning Stable Normalizing-Flow Control for Robotic Manipulation2021In: 2021 IEEE International Conference On Robotics And Automation (ICRA 2021), Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) , 2021, p. 1644-1650Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reinforcement Learning (RL) of robotic manipulation skills, despite its impressive successes, stands to benefit from incorporating domain knowledge from control theory. One of the most important properties that is of interest is control stability. Ideally, one would like to achieve stability guarantees while staying within the framework of state-of-the-art deep RL algorithms. Such a solution does not exist in general, especially one that scales to complex manipulation tasks. We contribute towards closing this gap by introducing normalizing-flow control structure, that can be deployed in any latest deep RL algorithms. While stable exploration is not guaranteed, our method is designed to ultimately produce deterministic controllers with provable stability. In addition to demonstrating our method on challenging contact-rich manipulation tasks, we also show that it is possible to achieve considerable exploration efficiency-reduced state space coverage and actuation efforts- without losing learning efficiency.

  • 8.
    Abdul Khader, Shahbaz
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Yin, Hang
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Pietro, Falco
    Kragic, Danica
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Centres, Centre for Autonomous Systems, CAS.
    Learning Stable Normalizing-Flow Control for Robotic ManipulationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Reinforcement Learning (RL) of robotic manipu-lation skills, despite its impressive successes, stands to benefitfrom incorporating domain knowledge from control theory. Oneof the most important properties that is of interest is controlstability. Ideally, one would like to achieve stability guaranteeswhile staying within the framework of state-of-the-art deepRL algorithms. Such a solution does not exist in general,especially one that scales to complex manipulation tasks. Wecontribute towards closing this gap by introducing normalizing-flow control structure, that can be deployed in any latest deepRL algorithms. While stable exploration is not guaranteed,our method is designed to ultimately produce deterministiccontrollers with provable stability. In addition to demonstratingour method on challenging contact-rich manipulation tasks, wealso show that it is possible to achieve considerable explorationefficiency–reduced state space coverage and actuation efforts–without losing learning efficiency.

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    fulltext
  • 9.
    Abdul Khaliq, Ali
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Point-to-point safe navigation of a mobile robot using stigmergy and RFID technology2016In: 2016 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS), Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2016, p. 1497-1504, article id 7759243Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reliable autonomous navigation is still a challenging problem for robots with simple and inexpensive hardware. A key difficulty is the need to maintain an internal map of the environment and an accurate estimate of the robot’s position in this map. Recently, a stigmergic approach has been proposed in which a navigation map is stored into the environment, on a grid of RFID tags, and robots use it to optimally reach predefined goal points without the need for internal maps. While effective,this approach is limited to a predefined set of goal points. In this paper, we extend this approach to enable robots to travel to any point on the RFID floor, even if it was not previously identified as a goal location, as well as to keep a safe distance from any given critical location. Our approach produces safe, repeatable and quasi-optimal trajectories without the use of internal maps, self localization, or path planning. We report experiments run in a real apartment equipped with an RFID floor, in which a service robot either reaches or avoids a user who wears slippers equipped with an RFID tag reader.

  • 10.
    Abdullah, Muhammad
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Mobile Robot Navigation using potential fields andmarket based optimization2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    A team of mobile robots moving in a shared area raises the problem of safe and autonomous navigation. While avoiding static and dynamic obstacles, mobile robots in a team can lead to complicated and irregular movements. Local reactive approaches are used to deal with situations where robots are moving in dynamic environment; these approaches help in safe navigation of robots but do not give optimal solution. In this work a 2-D navigation strategy is implemented, where a potential field method is used for obstacle avoidance. This potential field method is improved using fuzzy rules, traffic rules and market based optimization (MBO). Fuzzy rules are used to deform repulsive potential fields in the vicinity of obstacles. Traffic rules are used to deal situations where two robots are crossing each other. Market based optimization (MBO) is used to strengthen or weaken repulsive potential fields generated by other robots based on their importance. For the verification of this strategy on more realistic vehicles this navigation strategy is implemented and tested in simulation. Issues while implementing this method and limitations of this navigation strategy are also discussed. Extensive experiments are performed to examine the validity of MBO navigation strategy over traditional potential field (PF) method.

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  • 11.
    Abdulrazzak, Shahm
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Mattsson, Tor
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology.
    Java Auto Grader2023Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The process of grading code submissions in programming courses is time-consuming and error-prone. To address this issue, we propose a project that automates the testing and grading process for Java code submissions at Halmstad University. Our approach leverages property-based testing using the JUnit Quick-Check library to generate tests and test reports automatically.

     

    The tool we demonstrate in this project is designed to provide students with immediate feedback on their code submissions and reduce the workload for instructors. By automatically generating tests and test reports, our approach ensures that code submissions meet the required specifications and are free from common errors. The com.pholser library is utilized to implement the property-based testing approach.

     

    We believe that our project has the potential to improve the grading process for programming courses and provide a more efficient and effective way of assessing student code submissions. Our implementation can be easily extended to support other programming languages and can be integrated with existing learning management systems to provide a seamless experience for instructors and students alike.

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  • 12.
    Abuibaid, Abdallah
    University West, Department of Engineering Science.
    Enhancement of an assembly linethrough robotization of the manual station2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This work is being carried out in collaboration with the TYRI Light industry to improve their existing assembly line, which currently has 8 stations. Out of these, three stations are operated by humans, and the rest are automated. The main focus of this project is on the first station, which is currently operated manually. While another master’s student from University West focuses on improving an automated second station and enhancing the fourth station, which is operated by a human worker. The seventh station, which operated manually, requires a human worker because of its complexity and flexibility of human.At this first station, there are two tasks involved. The first task is picking up components and placing them on an empty fixture, while the second task is picking up the finished product from the fixture and placing it on the palletizing process. Currently, it takes 19 seconds for a human worker to complete these tasks before sending the fixture to the next station.The goal of this project is to investigate whether this first station can be improved by using a robot instead. If a robot can perform these two tasks faster than 19 seconds, enhance workplace safety, and handle both tasks effectively without a need for more robots or external assistants. To achieve this, a discussion was made with the TYRI supervisor to select a collaborative robot for this task. To validate the work, ABB RobotStudio simulation software is used. The collaborative robot should be equipped with a specially designed gripper, which is suitable for the collaborative mode. Furthermore, in order to make the gripper suitable for TYRI’s components measurements, it was customized by a mechanism feature, which RobotStudio has.With the help of literature studies and various methods, the successful implementation of the robot was achieved. The robot was integrated outside the assembly line and was able to handle both tasks at the first station. Which indeed improved workplace safety. However, the robot took a total of 30.8 seconds to complete the tasks, which is longer than the 19 seconds goal was aimed for. As a result, the robot didn’t meet the desired cycle time required in this case

  • 13.
    Abusultan, Mukhlis
    University West, Department of Engineering Science.
    Robotize pizza making – Robizza: A conceptual model design and analysis for automating pizzerias2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Food Industry Automation is one of the sectors that took an advantage of industry fourth revolution, where food industry robots start to play a significant role in planting, transporting, processing, and even preparing various dishes. Pizza making is one of the food sectors that is entirely done by food experts and pizza chefs in small and medium business pizzerias, and even though pizza factories have mass production of pizza, they still don’t produce the required freshness and good taste pizza like the one you find it in pizza restaurants. The project studies food industry automation and then designs a conceptual model for robotizing pizza making process, providing a fully automated solution for medium and small pizza-making bakeries. Demonstrating what technologies are required to implement the idea and how to overcome challenges such as quality assurance and preserving hygiene standards adds to that, showing technical limitations and opportunities. The project study is based on theoretical and experimental aspects using an application development kit, Arduino IDE, and simulating the whole process with ABB robot studio simulation. 

  • 14.
    Adamson, Göran
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Wang, Lihui
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. Production Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Holm, Magnus
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Moore, Philip
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. Academy for Innovation & Research, Falmouth University, UK.
    Adaptive Robotic Control in Cloud Environments2014In: Proceedings of the 24th International Conference on Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing / [ed] F. Frank Chen, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA: DEStech Publications, Inc , 2014, p. 37-44Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing globalization is a trend which forces manufacturing industry of today to focus on more cost-effective manufacturing systems and collaboration within global supply chains and manufacturing networks. Cloud Manufacturing (CM) is evolving as a new manufacturing paradigm to match this trend, enabling the mutually advantageous sharing of resources, knowledge and information between distributed companies and manufacturing units. Providing a framework for collaboration within complex and critical tasks, such as manufacturing and design, it increases the companies’ ability to successfully compete on a global marketplace. One of the major, crucial objectives for CM is the coordinated planning, control and execution of discrete manufacturing operations in a collaborative and networked environment. This paper describes the overall concept of adaptive Function Block control of manufacturing equipment in Cloud environments, with the specific focus on robotic assembly operations, and presents Cloud Robotics as “Robot Control-as-a-Service” within CM.

  • 15.
    Adamson, Göran
    et al.
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Wang, Lihui
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre. Production Engineering KTH Royal Institute of Technology Stockholm, Sweden.
    Holm, Magnus
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science. University of Skövde, The Virtual Systems Research Centre.
    Moore, Philip
    Academy for Innovation & Research, Falmouth University, Cornwall, United Kingdom.
    Function Block Approach for Adaptive Robotic Control in Virtual and Real Environments2014In: Proceedings of the 14th Mechatronics Forum International Conference, Mechatronics 2014 / [ed] Leo J. De Vin; Jorge Solis, Karlstad: Karlstads universitet, 2014, p. 473-479Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many manufacturing companies are facing an increasing amount of changes and uncertainty, caused by both internal and external factors. Frequently changing customer and market demands lead to variations in manufacturing quantities, product design and shorter product life-cycles, and variations in manufacturing capability and functionality contribute to a high level of uncertainty. The result is unpredictable manufacturing system performance, with an increased number of unforeseen events occurring in these systems. Such events are difficult for traditional planning and control systems to satisfactorily manage. For scenarios like these, with a dynamically changing manufacturing environment, adaptive decision making is crucial for successfully performing manufacturing operations. Relying on real-time information of manufacturing processes and operations, and their enabling resources, adaptive decision making can be realized with a control approach combining IEC 61499 event-driven Function Blocks (FBs) with manufacturing features. These FBs are small decision-making modules with embedded algorithms designed to generate the desired equipment control code. When dynamically triggered by event inputs, parameter values in their data inputs are forwarded to the appropriate algorithms, which generate new events and data output as control instructions. The data inputs also include monitored real-time information which allows the dynamic creation of equipment control code adapted to the actual run-time conditions on the shop-floor. Manufacturing features build on the concept that a manufacturing task can be broken down into a sequence of minor basic operations, in this research assembly features (AFs). These features define atomic assembly operations, and by combining and implementing these in the event-driven FB embedded algorithms, automatic code generation is possible. A test case with a virtual robot assembly cell is presented, demonstrating the functionality of the proposed control approach.

  • 16.
    Adattil, Ruksana
    University of Skövde, School of Engineering Science.
    Review on impact of worker’s psychosocial environment under operator 4.0 framework2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 12 credits / 18 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In manufacturing, emerging digital technologies related to industry 4.0 are playing an assisting role for operators, and just as in previous industrial revolutions the paradigm for operators in the industry is changing. This study has two key goals. The first is to look into the impact of the worker's psychosocial impacts under the operator 4.0 typologies during assembly, training, and maintenance operations, and the second is to look into the potential changes in the operator framework as the industry progresses from 4.0 to 5.0. This study proposed a theoretical framework for assessing psychosocial impacts in operator 4.0 typologies. The proposed framework can be utilized by the company managers, researchers, production engineers, and human resource personnel for the psychosocial risk assessment of the operators in assembly, training, and maintenance operations as self-report questionnaires. This study employed a systematic literature review strategy to answer the study objectives. The findings reveal that the nature of work, the social and organizational environment of work, and individual impacts are all key categories, that might impact operators’ psychosocial environments in assembly, training, and maintenance operations under the operator 4.0 typologies.This study focuses on determining the psychosocial consequences of the operator 4.0 typologies and helps the operators to become more aware, and equipment designers should consider operator psychosocial work conditions when designing new augmented equipment for assisting operators in the work environment. Most advanced technologies are unfamiliar to operators, and they have exhibited a reluctance to accept new technology because it significantly changes their working environment. Which necessitates the training and awareness of operators regarding advanced technologies. Operator 4.0 typologies were introduced with a vision to create a socially sustainable environment for operators. However, the identified psychosocial impacts make it favorable and unfavorable to the operators.

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  • 17.
    Adeboye, Taiyelolu
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences.
    Robot Goalkeeper: A robotic goalkeeper based on machine vision and motor control2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This report shows a robust and efficient implementation of a speed-optimized algorithm for object recognition, 3D real world location and tracking in real time. It details a design that was focused on detecting and following objects in flight as applied to a football in motion. An overall goal of the design was to develop a system capable of recognizing an object and its present and near future location while also actuating a robotic arm in response to the motion of the ball in flight.

    The implementation made use of image processing functions in C++, NVIDIA Jetson TX1, Sterolabs’ ZED stereoscopic camera setup in connection to an embedded system controller for the robot arm. The image processing was done with a textured background and the 3D location coordinates were applied to the correction of a Kalman filter model that was used for estimating and predicting the ball location.

    A capture and processing speed of 59.4 frames per second was obtained with good accuracy in depth detection while the ball was well tracked in the tests carried out.

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    Robot Goalkeeoer
  • 18.
    Adewumi, Oluwatosin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Liwicki, Foteini
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Liwicki, Marcus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Vector Representations of Idioms in Conversational Systems2022In: Sci, E-ISSN 2413-4155, Vol. 4, no 4, article id 37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we demonstrate that an open-domain conversational system trained on idioms or figurative language generates more fitting responses to prompts containing idioms. Idioms are a part of everyday speech in many languages and across many cultures, but they pose a great challenge for many natural language processing (NLP) systems that involve tasks such as information retrieval (IR), machine translation (MT), and conversational artificial intelligence (AI). We utilized the Potential Idiomatic Expression (PIE)-English idiom corpus for the two tasks that we investigated: classification and conversation generation. We achieved a state-of-the-art (SoTA) result of a 98% macro F1 score on the classification task by using the SoTA T5 model. We experimented with three instances of the SoTA dialogue model—the Dialogue Generative Pre-trained Transformer (DialoGPT)—for conversation generation. Their performances were evaluated by using the automatic metric, perplexity, and a human evaluation. The results showed that the model trained on the idiom corpus generated more fitting responses to prompts containing idioms 71.9% of the time in comparison with a similar model that was not trained on the idiom corpus. We have contributed the model checkpoint/demo/code to the HuggingFace hub for public access.

  • 19.
    Adewumi, Tosin
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Alkhaled, Lama
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Mokayed, Hamam
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Liwicki, Foteini
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Liwicki, Marcus
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    ML_LTU at SemEval-2022 Task 4: T5 Towards Identifying Patronizingand Condescending Language2022In: Proceedings of the 16th International Workshop on Semantic Evaluation (SemEval-2022) / [ed] Guy Emerson, Natalie Schluter, Gabriel Stanovsky, Ritesh Kumar, Alexis Palmer, Nathan Schneider, Siddharth Singh, Shyam Ratan, Association for Computational Linguistics , 2022, p. 473-478Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the system used by the Machine Learning Group of LTU in subtask 1 of the SemEval-2022 Task 4: Patronizing and Condescending Language (PCL) Detection. Our system consists of finetuning a pretrained text-to-text transfer transformer (T5) and innovatively reducing its out-of-class predictions. The main contributions of this paper are 1) the description of the implementation details of the T5 model we used, 2) analysis of the successes & struggles of the model in this task, and 3) ablation studies beyond the official submission to ascertain the relative importance of data split. Our model achieves an F1 score of 0.5452 on the official test set.

  • 20.
    Adolfsson, Daniel
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Lowry, Stephanie
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Andreasson, Henrik
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Improving Localisation Accuracy using Submaps in warehouses2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a method for localisation in hybrid metric-topological maps built using only local information that is, only measurements that were captured by the robot when it was in a nearby location. The motivation is that observations are typically range and viewpoint dependent and that a map a discrete map representation might not be able to explain the full structure within a voxel. The localisation system uses a method to select submap based on how frequently and where from each submap was updated. This allow the system to select the most descriptive submap, thereby improving the localisation and increasing performance by up to 40%.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Improving Localisation Accuracy using Submaps in warehouses
  • 21.
    Adolfsson, Daniel
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Magnusson, Martin
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Alhashimi, Anas
    Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Computer Engineering Department, University of Baghdad, Baghdad, Iraq.
    Lilienthal, Achim
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Andreasson, Henrik
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Lidar-Level Localization With Radar? The CFEAR Approach to Accurate, Fast, and Robust Large-Scale Radar Odometry in Diverse Environments2023In: IEEE Transactions on robotics, ISSN 1552-3098, E-ISSN 1941-0468, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 1476-1495Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents an accurate, highly efficient, and learning-free method for large-scale odometry estimation using spinning radar, empirically found to generalize well across very diverse environments—outdoors, from urban to woodland, and indoors in warehouses and mines—without changing parameters. Our method integrates motion compensation within a sweep with one-to-many scan registration that minimizes distances between nearby oriented surface points and mitigates outliers with a robust loss function. Extending our previous approach conservative filtering for efficient and accurate radar odometry (CFEAR), we present an in-depth investigation on a wider range of datasets, quantifying the importance of filtering, resolution, registration cost and loss functions, keyframe history, and motion compensation. We present a new solving strategy and configuration that overcomes previous issues with sparsity and bias, and improves our state-of-the-art by 38%, thus, surprisingly, outperforming radar simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) and approaching lidar SLAM. The most accurate configuration achieves 1.09% error at 5 Hz on the Oxford benchmark, and the fastest achieves 1.79% error at 160 Hz.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Lidar-level localization with radar? The CFEAR approach to accurate, fast and robust large-scale radar odometry in diverse environments
  • 22.
    Adolfsson, Sebastian
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production System.
    RatSLAM with Viso2: Implementation of alternative monocular odometer2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, a ROS (Robot Operating System) version of Open RatSLAM, [1] [2], was tested with Viso2 [3] as an alternative monocular odometer. A land based rover [4] was used to perform data acquisition and a remote control tool was developed to facilitate this procedure, implemented as ROS nodes on both Ubuntu 16.04 and on Android 7.0.An additional requirement that comes from using Viso2 is the need for camera information together with the image stream, which might require camera calibration. A ROS node to manually add this camera information was made as well as a node to change the generated odometry message from Viso2 to a form that RatSLAM uses. The implemented odometer uses feature tracking to estimate motion, which is fundamentally different to matching intensity profiles which the original method does and can hence be used when different properties of the visual odometry function is desired. From experiments, it was seen that the feature tracking method from Viso2 generated amore robust motion estimate in terms of real world scale and it was also able to better handle environments of varying illumination or that contains large continuous surfaces of the same colour. However, the feature tracking may give slight variations in the generated data upon successive runs due to the random selection of features to track. Since the structure of RatSLAM gives the system ability to make loop closures even with large differences in position, an alternative odometry does not necessarily give a significant improvement in performance of the system in environments that the original system operates well in. Even though both algorithms show difficulty with estimating fast rotations, especially when the camera view contains areas with few features, the performance improvement in Viso2 together with its ability to better maintain the real-world scale motivates its usefulness. The source code, as well as instructions for installation and usage is public

  • 23.
    Adolfsson, Sebastian
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Production System.
    RatSLAM with Viso2: Implementation of alternative monocular odometer2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, a ROS (Robot Operating System) version of OpenRatSLAM, [1] [2], was tested with Viso2 [3] as an alternative monocular odometer. A land based rover [4] was used to perform data acquisition and a remote control tool was developed to facilitate this procedure, implemented as ROS nodes on both Ubuntu 16.04 and on Android 7.0.  An additional requirement that comes from using Viso2 is the need for camera information together with the image stream, which might require camera calibration. A ROS node to manually add this camera information was made as well as a node to change the generated odometry message from Viso2 to a form that RatSLAM uses. The implemented odometer uses feature tracking to estimate motion, which is fundamentally different to matching intensity profiles which the original method does and can hence be used when different properties of the visual odometry function is desired. From experiments, it was seen that the feature tracking method from Viso2 generated a more robust motion estimate in terms of real world scale and it was also able to better handle environments of varying illumination or that contains large continuous surfaces of the same colour. However, the feature tracking may give slight variations in the generated data upon successive runs due to the random selection of features to track. Since the structure of RatSLAM gives the system ability to make loop closures even with large differences in position, an alternative odometry does not necessarily give a significant improvement in performance of the system in environments that the original system operates well in. Even though both algorithms show difficulty with estimating fast rotations, especially when the camera view contains areas with few features, the performance improvement in Viso2 together with its ability to better maintain the real-world scale motivates its usefulness.  The source code, as well as instructions for installation and usage is public.

  • 24.
    Aein, Mohamad Javad
    et al.
    Department for Computational Neuroscience at the Bernstein Center Göttingen (Inst. of Physics 3) & Leibniz Science Campus for Primate Cognition, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany.
    Aksoy, Eren
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research.
    Wörgötter, Florentin
    Department for Computational Neuroscience at the Bernstein Center Göttingen (Inst. of Physics 3) & Leibniz Science Campus for Primate Cognition, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany.
    Library of actions: Implementing a generic robot execution framework by using manipulation action semantics2019In: The international journal of robotics research, ISSN 0278-3649, E-ISSN 1741-3176, Vol. 38, no 8, p. 910-934Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drive-thru-Internet is a scenario in cooperative intelligent transportation systems (C-ITSs), where a road-side unit (RSU) provides multimedia services to vehicles that pass by. Performance of the drive-thru-Internet depends on various factors, including data traffic intensity, vehicle traffic density, and radio-link quality within the coverage area of the RSU, and must be evaluated at the stage of system design in order to fulfill the quality-of-service requirements of the customers in C-ITS. In this paper, we present an analytical framework that models downlink traffic in a drive-thru-Internet scenario by means of a multidimensional Markov process: the packet arrivals in the RSU buffer constitute Poisson processes and the transmission times are exponentially distributed. Taking into account the state space explosion problem associated with multidimensional Markov processes, we use iterative perturbation techniques to calculate the stationary distribution of the Markov chain. Our numerical results reveal that the proposed approach yields accurate estimates of various performance metrics, such as the mean queue content and the mean packet delay for a wide range of workloads. © 2019 IEEE.

  • 25.
    Afanasyev, Ilya
    et al.
    Innopolis University, Innopolis, Russia.
    Kolotov, Alexander
    Innopolis University, Innopolis, Russia.
    Rezin, Ruslan
    Innopolis University, Innopolis, Russia.
    Danilov, Konstantin
    Innopolis University, Innopolis, Russia.
    Mazzara, Manuel
    Innopolis University, Innopolis, Russia.
    Chakraborty, Subham
    Innopolis University, Innopolis, Russia.
    Kashevnik, Alexey
    ITMO University, St.Petersburg, Russia.
    Chechulin, Andrey
    ITMO University, St.Petersburg, Russia.
    Kapitonov, Aleksandr
    ITMO University, St.Petersburg, Russia.
    Jotsov, Vladimir
    University of Library Studies and Information, Sofia, Bulgaria.
    Topalov, Andon
    Technical University of Sofia, Branch Plovdiv, Plovdiv, Bulgaria.
    Shakev, Nikola
    Technical University of Sofia, Branch Plovdiv, Plovdiv, Bulgaria.
    Ahmed, Sevil
    Technical University of Sofia, Branch Plovdiv, Plovdiv, Bulgaria.
    Towards Blockchain-based Multi-Agent Robotic Systems: Analysis, Classification and Applications2019Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Decentralization, immutability and transparency make of Blockchain one of the most innovative technology of recent years. This paper presents an overview of solutions based on Blockchain technology for multi-agent robotic systems, and provide an analysis and classification of this emerging field. The reasons for implementing Blockchain in a multi-robot network may be to increase the interaction efficiency between agents by providing more trusted information exchange, reaching a consensus in trustless conditions, assessing robot productivity or detecting performance problems, identifying intruders, allocating plans and tasks, deploying distributed solutions and joint missions. Blockchain-based applications are discussed to demonstrate how distributed ledger can be used to extend the number of research platforms and libraries for multi-agent robotic systems.

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    Towards Blockchain-based Multi-Agent Robotic Systems: Analysis, Classification and Applications
  • 26.
    Afanasyev, Ilya
    et al.
    Innopolis University, Innopolis, Russia.
    Mazzara, Manuel
    Innopolis University, Innopolis, Russia.
    Chakraborty, Subham
    Innopolis University, Innopolis, Russia.
    Zhuchkov, Nikita
    Innopolis University, Innopolis, Russia.
    Maksatbek, Aizhan
    Yildiz Technical University, Istanbul, Turkey.
    Kassab, Mohamad
    Pennsylvania State University, PA, United States.
    Distefano, Salvatore
    University of Messina, Messina, Italy.
    Towards the Internet of Robotic Things: Analysis, Architecture, Components and Challenges2019Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Internet of Things (IoT) and robotics cannot be considered two separate domains these days. Internet of Robotics Things (IoRT) is a concept that has been recently introduced to describe the integration of robotics technologies in IoT scenarios. As a consequence, these two research fields have started interacting, and thus linking research communities. In this paper we intend to make further steps in joining the two communities and broaden the discussion on the development of this interdisciplinary field. The paper provides an overview, analysis and challenges of possible solutions for the Internet of Robotic Things, discussing the issues of the IoRT architecture, the integration of smart spaces and robotic applications.

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    Towards the Internet of Robotic Things: Analysis, Architecture, Components and Challenges
  • 27. Agarwal, Priyanshu
    et al.
    Al Moubayed, Samer
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Robotics, perception and learning, RPL.
    Alspach, Alexander
    Kim, Joohyung
    Carter, Elizabeth J.
    Lehman, Jill Fain
    Yamane, Katsu
    Imitating Human Movement with Teleoperated Robotic Head2016In: 2016 25TH IEEE INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON ROBOT AND HUMAN INTERACTIVE COMMUNICATION (RO-MAN), 2016, p. 630-637Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Effective teleoperation requires real-time control of a remote robotic system. In this work, we develop a controller for realizing smooth and accurate motion of a robotic head with application to a teleoperation system for the Furhat robot head [1], which we call TeleFurhat. The controller uses the head motion of an operator measured by a Microsoft Kinect 2 sensor as reference and applies a processing framework to condition and render the motion on the robot head. The processing framework includes a pre-filter based on a moving average filter, a neural network-based model for improving the accuracy of the raw pose measurements of Kinect, and a constrained-state Kalman filter that uses a minimum jerk model to smooth motion trajectories and limit the magnitude of changes in position, velocity, and acceleration. Our results demonstrate that the robot can reproduce the human head motion in real time with a latency of approximately 100 to 170 ms while operating within its physical limits. Furthermore, viewers prefer our new method over rendering the raw pose data from Kinect.

  • 28. Agarwal, Sahil
    et al.
    Wettlaufer, John S.
    Stockholm University, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita). Yale University, USA; University of Oxford, UK.
    Fluctuations in Arctic sea-ice extent: comparing observations and climate models2018In: Philosophical Transactions. Series A: Mathematical, physical, and engineering science, ISSN 1364-503X, E-ISSN 1471-2962, Vol. 376, no 2129, article id 20170332Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The fluctuation statistics of the observed sea-ice extent during the satellite era are compared with model output from CMIP5 models using a multifractal time series method. The two robust features of the observations are that on annual to biannual time scales the ice extent exhibits white noise structure, and there is a decadal scale trend associated with the decay of the ice cover. It is shown that (i) there is a large inter-model variability in the time scales extracted from the models, (ii) none of the models exhibits the decadal time scales found in the satellite observations, (iii) five of the 21 models examined exhibit the observed white noise structure, and (iv) the multi-model ensemble mean exhibits neither the observed white noise structure nor the observed decadal trend. It is proposed that the observed fluctuation statistics produced by this method serve as an appropriate test bed for modelling studies. This article is part of the theme issue 'Modelling of sea-ice phenomena'.

  • 29. Aguiar, Miguel
    et al.
    Estrela da Silva, Jorge
    Borges de Sousa, João
    Minimal time delivery of multiple robots2020In: 2020 59th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control (CDC), 2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Consider a set of autonomous vehicles, each one with a preassigned task to start at a given region. Due to energy constraints, and in order to minimize the overall task completion time, these vehicles are deployed from a faster carrier vehicle. This paper develops a dynamic programming (DP) based solution for the problem of finding the optimal deployment location and time for each vehicle, and for a given sequence of deployments, so that the global mission duration is minimal. The problem is specialized for ocean-going vehicles operating under time-varying currents. The solution approach involves solving a sequence of optimal stopping problems that are transformed into a set variational inequalities through the application of the dynamic programming principle (DPP). The optimal trajectory for the carrier and the optimal deployment location and time for each vehicle to be deployed are obtained in feedback-form from the numerical solution of the variational inequalities. The solution is computed with our open source parallel implementation of the fast sweeping method. The approach is illustrated with two numerical examples.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 30.
    Aguilar Gómez, Raquel
    University West, Department of Engineering Science, Division of Automation Systems.
    Investigation of a Flexible Manufacturing Scenario for Production Systems: Case study: GKN Aerospace Company2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Nowadays the globalization of the market has a direct impact to the companies. On one hand, gives them the opportunity to spread their business but on the other hand increases the competition and the efforts to succeed. This project is pursuing to investigate and design a system capable to take upon and optimize the production within functional shops by in-troducing automation. Although the system it would be a standard solution for the functional shops, a case study for GKN Aerospace Company with its specifications has been carried out. The task become trickier due to the aeronautic sector requires a lot of work and effort to produce their products. The items and materials are expensive as well as the processes and treatments thus the introduction of automation is quite complex. This case study has accom-plished a research through the concepts and options to introduce automation within this production process. Taking under consideration the costs and efforts that would demand the investment for automation, the project propose a new and innovative manufacturing system "Move & Play", suitable with the features and requirements GKN Aerospace Company may need.The system proposed has been designed regarding to features such as movability, modularity and flexibility. These features have been considered essentials in order to make the system worth it and cost effective. The job-shop approach that the company use in its production contemplate the continuous change of products and introduction of new ones. Hence, the idea is to use the "Move & Play" system when it is required along the production. As a consequence, this system will create a "local product flow" along that point in the production that will organize the rest of the production or "global flow". Moreover it is expected to apply the concept of "plug-in" the processes that the system need at each time and therefore give flexibility to the system. With that purposes, the work has studied three different designs of the "Move & Play" system. Each design have considered different aspects and disposition. These designs have been compared according with criteria such as geometrical, the capacity and investment needed and the cycle time spent. Finally a conclusion on which design is the most suitable has been stated as well as a future work to continue with the work has been proposed.

  • 31. Aguilar, Luis T.
    et al.
    Boiko, Igor M.
    Fridman, Leonid M.
    Freidovich, Leonid B.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Generating oscillations in inertia wheel pendulum via two-relay controller2012In: International Journal of Robust and Nonlinear Control, ISSN 1049-8923, E-ISSN 1099-1239, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 318-330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The problem of generating oscillations of the inertia wheel pendulum is considered. We combine exact feedback linearization with two-relay controller, tuned using frequency-domain tools, such as computing the locus of a perturbed relay system. Explicit expressions for the parameters of the controller in terms of the desired frequency and amplitude are derived. Sufficient conditions for orbital asymptotic stability of the closed-loop system are obtained with the help of the Poincare map. Performance is validated via experiments. The approach can be easily applied for a minimum phase system, provided the behavior of the states of the zero dynamics is of no concern. Copyright (C) 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • 32.
    Aguilar, Luis T.
    et al.
    CITEDI, National Polytechnic Institute, Tijuana, BC, Mexico.
    Freidovich, Leonid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Orlov, Yury
    CICESE Research Center, Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico.
    Merida, Jovan
    CITEDI, National Polytechnic Institute, Tijuana, BC, Mexico.
    Performance Analysis of Relay Feedback Position Regulators for Manipulators with Coulomb Friction2013In: Proc. 12th European Control Conference, NEW YORK, NY 10017 USA: IEEE , 2013, p. 3754-3759Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the paper is to analyze the performance of several global position regulators for robot manipulators with Coulomb friction. All the controllers include a proportional-differential part and a switched part whereas the difference between the controllers is in the way of compensation of the gravitational forces. Stability analysis is also revisited within the nonsmooth Lyapunov function framework for the controllers with and without gravity pre-compensation. Performance issues of the proposed controllers are evaluated in an experimental study of a five degrees-of-freedom robot manipulator. In the experiments, we choose two criteria for performance analysis. In the first set of experiments, we set the same gains to all the controllers. In the second set of experiments, the gains of the controller were chosen such that the work done by the manipulator is similar.

  • 33.
    Ahlberg, Sofie
    et al.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Intelligent Syst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Axelsson, Agnes
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Intelligent Syst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Yu, Pian
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Intelligent Syst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Cortez, Wenceslao Shaw
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Intelligent Syst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gao, Alex Yuan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Shenzhen Inst Artificial Intelligence & Robot Soc, Ctr Intelligent Robots, Shenzhen, Peoples R China..
    Ghadirzadeh, Ali
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Intelligent Syst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Castellano, Ginevra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    Kragic, Danica
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Intelligent Syst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Skantze, Gabriel
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Intelligent Syst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Dimarogonas, Dimos, V
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Intelligent Syst, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Co-adaptive Human-Robot Cooperation: Summary and Challenges2022In: Scientific World Journal, E-ISSN 1537-744X, Vol. 10, no 02, p. 187-203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The work presented here is a culmination of developments within the Swedish project COIN: Co-adaptive human-robot interactive systems, funded by the Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research (SSF), which addresses a unified framework for co-adaptive methodologies in human-robot co-existence. We investigate co-adaptation in the context of safe planning/control, trust, and multi-modal human-robot interactions, and present novel methods that allow humans and robots to adapt to one another and discuss directions for future work.

  • 34.
    Ahlberg, Sofie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Decision and Control Systems (Automatic Control).
    Axelsson, Agnes
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Yu, Pian
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Decision and Control Systems (Automatic Control).
    Shaw Cortez, Wenceslao E.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Decision and Control Systems (Automatic Control).
    Gao, Yuan
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Informat Technol, Uppsala, Sweden.;Shenzhen Inst Artificial Intelligence & Robot Soc, Ctr Intelligent Robots, Shenzhen, Peoples R China..
    Ghadirzadeh, Ali
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Castellano, Ginevra
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Informat Technol, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Kragic, Danica
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL.
    Skantze, Gabriel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Dimarogonas, Dimos V.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Decision and Control Systems (Automatic Control).
    Co-adaptive Human-Robot Cooperation: Summary and Challenges2022In: Unmanned Systems, ISSN 2301-3850, E-ISSN 2301-3869, Vol. 10, no 02, p. 187-203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The work presented here is a culmination of developments within the Swedish project COIN: Co-adaptive human-robot interactive systems, funded by the Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research (SSF), which addresses a unified framework for co-adaptive methodologies in human-robot co-existence. We investigate co-adaptation in the context of safe planning/control, trust, and multi-modal human-robot interactions, and present novel methods that allow humans and robots to adapt to one another and discuss directions for future work.

  • 35.
    Ahlbäck, Sven
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm, Department of Folk Music. Kungliga Musikhögskolan, Stockholm.
    What does AI learn from music?: on the problem of ground truth in music and the power of concepts2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many AI applications on music relates to music theoretical models, in the sense of musical concepts and ideas of how music works, that are not always made explicit, explicitly discussed or questioned. Already the choice of representations of music and sound as well as the selection of data for training models can influence models and creative output greatly. Here we will give some examples of problems arising when modelling basic musical features, from the experience of developing  automatic music notation.

  • 36.
    Ahlen, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Univ Newcastle, Australia.
    Akerberg, Johan
    ABB Corp, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Markus
    Scania CV, Sweden.
    Isaksson, Alf
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Newcastle, Australia; Royal Inst Technol, Sweden; ABB Corp Res, Sweden.
    Iwaki, Takuya
    JGC Corp, Japan; KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Johansson, Karl Henrik
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden.
    Knorn, Steffi
    Univ Newcastle, Australia; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Lindh, Thomas
    Iggesund Mill, Sweden.
    Sandberg, Henrik
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sweden; CALTECH, CA 91125 USA; MIT, MA 02139 USA.
    Toward Wireless Control in Industrial Process Automation: A Case Study at a Paper Mill2019In: IEEE CONTROL SYSTEMS MAGAZINE, ISSN 1066-033X, Vol. 39, no 5, p. 36-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wireless sensors and networks are used only occasionally in current control loops in the process industry. With rapid developments in embedded and highperformance computing, wireless communication, and cloud technology, drastic changes in the architecture and operation of industrial automation systems seem more likely than ever. These changes are driven by ever-growing demands on production quality and flexibility. However, as discussed in "Summary," there are several research obstacles to overcome. The radio communication environment in the process industry is often troublesome, as the environment is frequently cluttered with large metal objects, moving machines and vehicles, and processes emitting radio disturbances [1], [2]. The successful deployment of a wireless control system in such an environment requires careful design of communication links and network protocols as well as robust and reconfigurable control algorithms.

  • 37.
    Ahlén, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Signals and Systems Group. Univ Newcastle, Dept Elect & Comp Engn, Callaghan, NSW, Australia.
    Åkerberg, Johan
    ABB Corp, Vasteras, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Markus
    Scania CV, Sodertalje, Sweden.
    Isaksson, Alf J.
    Linkoping Univ, Linkoping, Sweden;Univ Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW, Australia;Royal Inst Technol, Stockholm, Sweden;ABB Corp Res, Vasteras, Sweden.
    Iwaki, Takuya
    JGC Corp, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan;KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Elect Engn & Comp Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Johansson, Karl Henrik
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Elect Engn & Comp Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Knorn, Steffi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Signals and Systems Group. Univ Newcastle, Ctr Complex Dynam Syst & Control, Callaghan, NSW, Australia.
    Lindh, Thomas
    Iggesund Mill, Maintenance Technol Dev, Iggesund Paperboard, Sweden.
    Sandberg, Henrik
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Div Decis & Control Syst, Stockholm, Sweden;CALTECH, Pasadena, CA 91125 USA;MIT, Lab Informat & Decis Syst, 77 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA.
    Towards Wireless Control in Industrial Process Automation: A Case Study at a Paper Mill2019In: IEEE CONTROL SYSTEMS MAGAZINE, ISSN 1066-033X, Vol. 39, no 5, p. 36-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wireless sensors and networks are used only occasionally in current control loops in the process industry. With rapid developments in embedded and highperformance computing, wireless communication, and cloud technology, drastic changes in the architecture and operation of industrial automation systems seem more likely than ever. These changes are driven by ever-growing demands on production quality and flexibility. However, as discussed in "Summary," there are several research obstacles to overcome. The radio communication environment in the process industry is often troublesome, as the environment is frequently cluttered with large metal objects, moving machines and vehicles, and processes emitting radio disturbances [1], [2]. The successful deployment of a wireless control system in such an environment requires careful design of communication links and network protocols as well as robust and reconfigurable control algorithms.

  • 38.
    Ahmad, Slman
    University West, Department of Engineering Science.
    Flexible automated solutions for an assembly station in collaboration with  TYRI company2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This project is being implemented in cooperation with TYRI Light Company, the company is serving many industrial sectors such as construction, mining, forestry, and transportation. The goal of this project is to provide a simulation of the automatic assembly station for as part of assembly line which assemble a product named 0909 compact lighting. Currently, with semi-automated production line, the average of production is 800 lights per a day (8 work hours), and three glue robots are utilized but componentsare manually assembled and fed. The emphasis will be on automating assembly and feeding as well as developing a mechanical design and a new glue dispenser. the validation and testing of all concepts will be in simulation environment. The fundamental idea behind this approach is flexibility, where just a little adjustment is needed whenever a new variable is added to the assembly line. After validating all the concepts, it turned out that the most suitable robot is articulated IBR 140T, and the mechanical tool with the distribution tool gave promising results, and the feeding system needs a lot of experiments, and it turned out that it is difficult to reduce the cycle time of a full assembly to one minute. But in order to benefit from the proposed solutions, the solution must be generalized to include the rest of the stations, allowing to reduce labour.

  • 39.
    Ahmed, Mobyen Uddin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Altarabichi, Mohammed Ghaith
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Begum, Shahina
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Ginsberg, Fredrik
    Mälardalen University.
    Glaes, Robert
    Mälardalen University.
    Östgren, Magnus
    Mälardalen University.
    Rahman, Hamidur
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Sorensen, Magnus
    Mälardalen University.
    A vision-based indoor navigation system for individuals with visual impairment2019In: International Journal of Artificial Intelligence, E-ISSN 0974-0635, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 188-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Navigation and orientation in an indoor environment are a challenging task for visually impaired people. This paper proposes a portable vision-based system to provide support for visually impaired persons in their daily activities. Here, machine learning algorithms are used for obstacle avoidance and object recognition. The system is intended to be used independently, easily and comfortably without taking human help. The system assists in obstacle avoidance using cameras and gives voice message feedback by using a pre-trained YOLO Neural Network for object recognition. In other parts of the system, a floor plane estimation algorithm is proposed for obstacle avoidance and fuzzy logic is used to prioritize the detected objects in a frame and generate alert to the user about possible risks. The system is implemented using the Robot Operating System (ROS) for communication on a Nvidia Jetson TX2 with a ZED stereo camera for depth calculations and headphones for user feedback, with the capability to accommodate different setup of hardware components. The parts of the system give varying results when evaluated and thus in future a large-scale evaluation is needed to implement the system and get it as a commercialized product in this area.

  • 40.
    Ahmed, Rijon
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Science, Electronics.
    Evaluation, Design & Development of a Prototype 3-Link Mini Robot Manipulator2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    A 3-link robotic arm was designed, constructed, and tested as part of the thesis work. This prototype will assist students in applying their robotics and control system theory knowledge to real results. The kinematic equations are created to help with trajectory planning. Evaluation of different parameters was determined like (angles at which the servo motor operated, link length at which the servo can carry, spatial velocity, DH parameter, and Homogeneous transformation matrix). An Arduino-based closed-loop control system is built. Four Servo motors were used which are being controlled by Arduino UNO and Leonardo. The Arduino IDE is used to write proper codes. The main aim of the study was to apply the knowledge of robotics and control systems to develop a functional mini robot from scratch. Specifically, the thesis presents how to build a robotic arm that can move and lift objects. And, this task is done by using different controlling techniques where potentiometer, Bluetooth Module, and IR senor were used and compared which technique gives better results. The structural components had several issues. The project's linkages foundation and gripper are all 3-D printed pieces that are being designed using Autodesk Inventor Professional 2021 software. Although they did not cause any problems with strength, there were some difficulties with properly tightening the gears onto the shaft. To overcome these difficulties glue is being used so that all servo motors hold with the link properly. In a broad sense, the robot can position and orient the end-effector to pick and place the object accurately from a distance.

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  • 41.
    Aicardi, Christine
    et al.
    King’s College London.
    Akintoye, Simisola
    De Montfort University.
    Fothergill, B. Tyr
    De Montfort University.
    Guerrero, Manuel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Centre for Research Ethics and Bioethics. Departament of Bioethics and Medical Humanities, University of Chile.
    Klinker, Gudrun
    Technical University Munich.
    Knight, William
    De Montfort University.
    Klüver, Lars
    The Danish Board of Technology.
    Morel, Yannick
    University of Maastricht.
    Morin, Fabrice O.
    Technical University Munich.
    Stahl, Bernd
    De Montfort University.
    Ulnicane, Inga
    De Montfort University.
    Ethical and Social Aspectos of Neurorobotics2020In: Science and Engineering Ethics, ISSN 1353-3452, E-ISSN 1471-5546Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interdisciplinary field of neurorobotics looks to neuroscience to overcome limitations of modern robotics technology, to robotics to advance our understanding of the neural system's inner workings, and to information technology to develop tools that support those complementary endeavours. The development of these technologies is still at an early stage, which makes them an ideal candidate for proactive and anticipatory ethical reflection.

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    Ethical and Social Aspects of Neurorobotics
  • 42.
    Ajvazaj, Albina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Informatics.
    Robotic Process Automation (RPA) hos Sveriges kommuner: En kvalitativ studie om möjligheter och utmaningar vid RPA-implementering2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    There are many benefits to Robotic Process Automation (RPA). Despite the benefits, many organizations are hesitant to implement the technology. Even those who implement it, do not always attain the expected outcomes, or in some cases have failed the project altogether (Wewerka & Reichert 2021). It can be difficult to identify processes suitable for RPA automation. Implementing process automation in municipal activities is not only challenging in day-to-day operations but the very idea of process automation is considered to be the savior of the system welfare should be considered with caution (Toll et al. 2021).

    Many Swedish municipalities are facing foremost challenges, such as increased expenses and reduced income, let alone the lack of human resources. Consequently, more and more municipalities are exploring the possibility of an RPA robot taking over administrative tasksto meet impending challenges. This study outlines and describes the opportunities and challenges that arose during RPA implementation in Swedish municipalities.

    The study's question has been answered using a qualitative method where semi-structured interviews have been used for data collection. A conceptual model developed by Santos et al. (2020) has been used as a scheme to carry out and analyze the implementation of RPA in Swedish municipalities.

    To sum up, it can be stated that RPA enables the efficiency of the process as long as clear goals can be developed with RPA. By having an RPA robot perform certain tasks the designated human resources will be freed up. However, the municipalities lack strategies on how to best utilize the freed resources and the time gained, which is a challenge that needs to be prioritized.

    The study concluded that the process mapping has been a challenge for the municipalities, a factor that at the same time is considered crucial for a successful implementation of RPA. Furthermore, it has been identified that unclear duties and responsibilities in the project can lead to project failure. Two main roles have been identified as vital for a project team to succeed with RPA implementation: a business analyst and an RPA developer. 

    RPA is not considered the best solution for automation, and this is why other more stable technologies are backed whenever possible. The following criteria have been used to assess which processes are best suited to automation: (1) the process needs to be rule-based, (2) standardized, (3) digital, (3) have an adapted login method for robots, (4) avoid updates/procurements in a near future, and (5) have a large volume.

    Preliminary work is often required to improve the process before automation. The RPA project as such should run as an iterative process, and that requires the involvement of the business in the entire implementation process. This means that businesses have a better understanding of RPA development and can come up with more suggestions for the automation of certain processes.

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    Albina Ajvazaj
  • 43.
    Akalin, Neziha
    et al.
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Kiselev, Andrey
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Kristoffersson, Annica
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Loutfi, Amy
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    A Taxonomy of Factors Influencing Perceived Safety in Human–Robot Interaction2023In: International Journal of Social Robotics, ISSN 1875-4791, E-ISSN 1875-4805Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Safety is a fundamental prerequisite that must be addressed before any interaction of robots with humans. Safety has been generally understood and studied as the physical safety of robots in human–robot interaction, whereas how humans perceive these robots has received less attention. Physical safety is a necessary condition for safe human–robot interaction. However, it is not a sufficient condition. A robot that is safe by hardware and software design can still be perceived as unsafe. This article focuses on perceived safety in human–robot interaction. We identified six factors that are closely related to perceived safety based on the literature and the insights obtained from our user studies. The identified factors are the context of robot use, comfort, experience and familiarity with robots, trust, the sense of control over the interaction, and transparent and predictable robot actions. We then made a literature review to identify the robot-related factors that influence perceived safety. Based the literature, we propose a taxonomy which includes human-related and robot-related factors. These factors can help researchers to quantify perceived safety of humans during their interactions with robots. The quantification of perceived safety can yield computational models that would allow mitigating psychological harm.

  • 44.
    Akalin, Neziha
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för naturvetenskap och teknik.
    Kiselev, Andrey
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för naturvetenskap och teknik.
    Kristoffersson, Annica
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för naturvetenskap och teknik.
    Loutfi, Amy
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för naturvetenskap och teknik.
    Enhancing Social Human-Robot Interaction with Deep Reinforcement Learning.2018In: Proc. FAIM/ISCA Workshop on Artificial Intelligence for Multimodal Human Robot Interaction, 2018, MHRI , 2018, p. 48-50Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research aims to develop an autonomous social robot for elderly individuals. The robot will learn from the interaction and change its behaviors in order to enhance the interaction and improve the user experience. For this purpose, we aim to use Deep Reinforcement Learning. The robot will observe the user’s verbal and nonverbal social cues by using its camera and microphone, the reward will be positive valence and engagement of the user.

  • 45.
    Akalin, Neziha
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Kiselev, Andrey
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Kristoffersson, Annica
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Loutfi, Amy
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Enhancing Social Human-Robot Interaction with Deep Reinforcement Learning.2018In: Proc. FAIM/ISCA Workshop on Artificial Intelligence for Multimodal Human Robot Interaction, 2018, MHRI , 2018, p. 48-50Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research aims to develop an autonomous social robot for elderly individuals. The robot will learn from the interaction and change its behaviors in order to enhance the interaction and improve the user experience. For this purpose, we aim to use Deep Reinforcement Learning. The robot will observe the user’s verbal and nonverbal social cues by using its camera and microphone, the reward will be positive valence and engagement of the user.

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    Enhancing Social Human-Robot Interaction with Deep Reinforcement Learning
  • 46.
    Akalin, Neziha
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Kristoffersson, Annica
    School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Loutfi, Amy
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Do you feel safe with your robot? Factors influencing perceived safety in human-robot interaction based on subjective and objective measures2022In: International journal of human-computer studies, ISSN 1071-5819, E-ISSN 1095-9300, Vol. 158, article id 102744Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Safety in human-robot interaction can be divided into physical safety and perceived safety, where the later is still under-addressed in the literature. Investigating perceived safety in human-robot interaction requires a multidisciplinary perspective. Indeed, perceived safety is often considered as being associated with several common factors studied in other disciplines, i.e., comfort, predictability, sense of control, and trust. In this paper, we investigated the relationship between these factors and perceived safety in human-robot interaction using subjective and objective measures. We conducted a two-by-five mixed-subjects design experiment. There were two between-subjects conditions: the faulty robot was experienced at the beginning or the end of the interaction. The five within-subjects conditions correspond to (1) baseline, and the manipulations of robot behaviors to stimulate: (2) discomfort, (3) decreased perceived safety, (4) decreased sense of control and (5) distrust. The idea of triggering a deprivation of these factors was motivated by the definition of safety in the literature where safety is often defined by the absence of it. Twenty-seven young adult participants took part in the experiments. Participants were asked to answer questionnaires that measure the manipulated factors after within-subjects conditions. Besides questionnaire data, we collected objective measures such as videos and physiological data. The questionnaire results show a correlation between comfort, sense of control, trust, and perceived safety. Since these factors are the main factors that influence perceived safety, they should be considered in human-robot interaction design decisions. We also discuss the effect of individual human characteristics (such as personality and gender) that they could be predictors of perceived safety. We used the physiological signal data and facial affect from videos for estimating perceived safety where participants’ subjective ratings were utilized as labels. The data from objective measures revealed that the prediction rate was higher from physiological signal data. This paper can play an important role in the goal of better understanding perceived safety in human-robot interaction.

  • 47.
    Akalin, Neziha
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Loutfi, Amy
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Reinforcement Learning Approaches in Social Robotics2021In: Sensors, E-ISSN 1424-8220, Vol. 21, no 4, article id 1292Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article surveys reinforcement learning approaches in social robotics. Reinforcement learning is a framework for decision-making problems in which an agent interacts through trial-and-error with its environment to discover an optimal behavior. Since interaction is a key component in both reinforcement learning and social robotics, it can be a well-suited approach for real-world interactions with physically embodied social robots. The scope of the paper is focused particularly on studies that include social physical robots and real-world human-robot interactions with users. We present a thorough analysis of reinforcement learning approaches in social robotics. In addition to a survey, we categorize existent reinforcement learning approaches based on the used method and the design of the reward mechanisms. Moreover, since communication capability is a prominent feature of social robots, we discuss and group the papers based on the communication medium used for reward formulation. Considering the importance of designing the reward function, we also provide a categorization of the papers based on the nature of the reward. This categorization includes three major themes: interactive reinforcement learning, intrinsically motivated methods, and task performance-driven methods. The benefits and challenges of reinforcement learning in social robotics, evaluation methods of the papers regarding whether or not they use subjective and algorithmic measures, a discussion in the view of real-world reinforcement learning challenges and proposed solutions, the points that remain to be explored, including the approaches that have thus far received less attention is also given in the paper. Thus, this paper aims to become a starting point for researchers interested in using and applying reinforcement learning methods in this particular research field.

  • 48.
    Akan, Batu
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Human Robot Interaction Solutions for Intuitive Industrial Robot Programming2012Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the past few decades the use of industrial robots has increased the efficiency as well as competitiveness of many companies. Despite this fact, in many cases, robot automation investments are considered to be technically challenging. In addition, for most small and medium sized enterprises (SME) this process is associated with high costs. Due to their continuously changing product lines, reprogramming costs are likely to exceed installation costs by a large margin. Furthermore, traditional programming methods for industrial robots are too complex for an inexperienced robot programmer, thus assistance from a robot programming expert is often needed.  We hypothesize that in order to make industrial robots more common within the SME sector, the robots should be reprogrammable by technicians or manufacturing engineers rather than robot programming experts. In this thesis we propose a high-level natural language framework for interacting with industrial robots through an instructional programming environment for the user.  The ultimate goal of this thesis is to bring robot programming to a stage where it is as easy as working together with a colleague.In this thesis we mainly address two issues. The first issue is to make interaction with a robot easier and more natural through a multimodal framework. The proposed language architecture makes it possible to manipulate, pick or place objects in a scene through high level commands. Interaction with simple voice commands and gestures enables the manufacturing engineer to focus on the task itself, rather than programming issues of the robot. This approach shifts the focus of industrial robot programming from the coordinate based programming paradigm, which currently dominates the field, to an object based programming scheme.The second issue addressed is a general framework for implementing multimodal interfaces. There have been numerous efforts to implement multimodal interfaces for computers and robots, but there is no general standard framework for developing them. The general framework proposed in this thesis is designed to perform natural language understanding, multimodal integration and semantic analysis with an incremental pipeline and includes a novel multimodal grammar language, which is used for multimodal presentation and semantic meaning generation.

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  • 49.
    Akan, Batu
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Ameri E., Afsh
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Çürüklü, Baran
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Towards Creation of Robot Programs Through User InteractionManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper proposes a novel system for task-level programming of industrial robots. The user interacts with an industrial robot by giving instructions in a structured natural language and by selecting objects through an augmented reality interface. The proposed system consists of two parts. First, a multimodal framework that provides a natural language interface to the user. This framework performs modality fusion, semantic analysis and helps the user to interact with the system easier and more naturally. The proposed language architecture makes it possible to manipulate, pick or place objects in a scene through high-level commands. The second component is the POPStar planner, which is based on partial order planner (POP), that takes landmarks extracted from user instructions as input, and creates a sequence of actions to operate the robotic cell with minimal makespan. The proposed planner takes advantage of partial order capabilities of POP to plan execution of actions in parallel and employs a best-first search algorithm to seek a series of actions that lead to a minimal makespan. The proposed planner can as well handle robots with multiple grippers, and  parallel machines. Using different topologies for the landmark graphs, we show that it is possible to create schedules for changing object types, which are processed in different stages in the robot cell. Results show that the proposed system can create and adapt schedules for robot cells with changing product types in low volume production based on the user's instructions.

  • 50.
    Akan, Batu
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Ameri E., Afshin
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Curuklu, Baran
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Scheduling for Multiple Type Objects Using POPStar Planner2014In: Proceedings of the 19th IEEE International Conference on Emerging Technologies and Factory Automation (ETFA'14), Barcelona, Spain, September, 2014, 2014, p. Article number 7005148-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, scheduling of robot cells that produce multiple object types in low volumes are considered. The challenge is to maximize the number of objects produced in a given time window as well as to adopt the  schedule for changing object types. Proposed algorithm, POPStar, is based on a partial order planner which is guided by best-first search algorithm and landmarks. The best-first search, uses heuristics to help the planner to create complete plans while minimizing the makespan. The algorithm takes landmarks, which are extracted from user's instructions given in structured English as input. Using different topologies for the landmark graphs, we show that it is possible to create schedules for changing object types, which will be processed in different stages in the robot cell. Results show that the POPStar algorithm can create and adapt schedules for robot cells with changing product types in low volume production.

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