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  • 1.
    Aad, G.
    et al.
    Aix Marseille Univ, CPPM, CNRS IN2P3, Marseille, France..
    Leopold, Alexander
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Lundberg, Olof
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Lund-Jensen, Bengt
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ohm, Christian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ripellino, Giulia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Shaheen, Rabia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Shope, David R.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Strandberg, Jonas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Zwalinski, L.
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland..
    et al.,
    Search for invisible Higgs-boson decays in events with vector-boson fusion signatures using 139 fb(-1) of proton-proton data recorded by the ATLAS experiment2022In: Journal of High Energy Physics (JHEP), ISSN 1126-6708, E-ISSN 1029-8479, no 8, article id 104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A direct search for Higgs bosons produced via vector-boson fusion and subsequently decaying into invisible particles is reported. The analysis uses 139 fb(-1) of pp collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of root s =13 TeV recorded by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The observed numbers of events are found to be in agreement with the background expectation from Standard Model processes. For a scalar Higgs boson with a mass of 125 GeV and a Standard Model production cross section, an observed upper limit of 0.145 is placed on the branching fraction of its decay into invisible particles at 95% confidence level, with an expected limit of 0.103. These results are interpreted in the context of models where the Higgs boson acts as a portal to dark matter, and limits are set on the scattering cross section of weakly interacting massive particles and nucleons. Invisible decays of additional scalar bosons with masses from 50 GeV to 2 TeV are also studied, and the derived upper limits on the cross section times branching fraction decrease with increasing mass from 1.0 pb for a scalar boson mass of 50 GeV to 0.1 pb at a mass of 2 TeV.

  • 2.
    Aagaard, Sunniva M. D.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics.
    Greilhuber, Johann
    University of Vienna, Department of Systematic and Evolutionary Botany.
    Zhang, Xian-Chun
    Institute of Botany,Chinese Academy of Sciences .
    Wikström, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics.
    Occurrence and evolutionary origins of polyploids in the club moss genus Diphasiastrum (Lycopodiaceae)2009In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 52, no 3, p. 746-754Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two polyploid taxa are commonly recognized in the genus Diphasiastrum, D. wightianum from Asia and D. zanclophyllum from South Africa and Madagascar. Here we present results from Feulgen DNA image densitometry analyses providing the first evidence for the polyploid origin of D. zanclophyllum. Reported for the first time is also data confirming that D. multispicatum and D. veitchii, representing putative parent lineages for D. wightianum, are diploids. Phylogenetic analyses of nuclear regions RPB2, LEAFY and LAMB4 reveal that putative tetraploid accessions are of allopolyploid origin. Diphasiastrum zanclophyllum shows close relationships to the North American taxon D. digitatum on the maternal side, but the paternal relationship is less clear. Two accessions from Asia, both found to be polyploid, have D. veitchii as maternal parent, whereas the paternal paralogs show relationships to D. multispicatum and D. tristachyum, respectively. None of these parental combinations have previously been hypothesized.

  • 3.
    Aagaard, Sunniva Margrethe Due
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics.
    Reticulate Evolution in Diphasiastrum (Lycopodiaceae)2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this thesis relationships and the occurrence of reticulate evolutionary events in the club moss genus Diphasiastrum are investigated. Diphasiastrum is initially established as a monophyletic group within Lycopodiaceae using non recombinant chloroplast sequence data. Support is obtained for eight distinct parental lineages in Diphasiastrum, and relationships among the putative parent taxa in the hypothesized hybrid complexes; D. alpinum, D. complanatum, D. digitatum, D. multispicatum, D. sitchense, D. tristachyum and D. veitchii are presented.

    Feulgen DNA image densitometry data and sequence data obtained from three nuclear regions, RPB2, LEAFY and LAMB4, were used to infer the origins of three different taxa confirmed to be allopolyploid; D. zanclophyllum from South Africa, D. wightianum from Malaysia and an undescribed taxon from China. The two Asian polyploids have originated from two different hybrid combinations, D. multispicatum x D. veitchii and D. tristachyum x D. veitchii. Diphasiastrum zanclophyllum originates from a cross between D. digitatum and an unidentified diploid taxon.

    The occurrence of three homoploid hybrid combinations commonly recognized in Europe, D. alpinum x D. complanatum, D. alpinum x D. tristachyum and D. complanatum x D. tristachyum, are verified using the same three nuclear regions. Two of the three hybrid combinations are also shown to have originated from reciprocal crosses. Admixture analyses performed on an extended, dataset similarly identified predominately F1 hybrids and backcrosses. The observations and common recognition of hybrid species in the included populations are hence most likely due to frequent observations of neohybrids in hybrid zones. Reticulate patterns are, however, prominent in the presented dataset. Hence future studies addressing evolutionary and ecological questions in Diphasiastrum should emphasize the impact of gene flow between parent lineages rather than speciation as the result of hybridization.

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  • 4.
    Aagaard, Sunniva M.D.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics.
    Gyllenstrand, Niclas
    Wikström, Niklas
    Homoploid hybridization in Central European Diphasiastrum (Lycopodiaceae).Manuscript (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Three species of homoploid hybrid origin are commonly recognized among Central European Diphasiastrum, and reticulate evolutionary events have for a long time been acknowledged as an important factor contributing to the species count in the genus. Presented evidence obtained from molecular data has until recently been scarce and inconclusive. Recent studies have, however, documented reticulate phylogenetic patterns involving all putative parental combinations reported from Central Europe. Reciprocal crosses involving the same parental combinations have also been confirmed. In order to further explore these putative reticulate events, admixture analyses using a Bayesian approach as implemented in the program NewHybrids are conducted on an expanded dataset obtained from six Central European populations from where putative hybrid taxa are reported. A majority of the accessions included in the analyses were inferred to represent pure bred D. alpinum, D. complanatum, D. tristachyum, F1 hybrids, F2 hybrids or backcrosses with one of the parent species. Accessions displaying ambiguous classification were found in both allopatric parent populations as well as in Central European hybrid populations. Presented results indicate the presence of frequently occurring hybrid zones with first and second generation hybrids as well as backcrosses.

  • 5.
    Aagaard, Sunniva M.D.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics.
    Vogel, Johannes C.
    Wikström, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics.
    Resolving maternal relationships in the clubmoss genus Diphasiastrum (Lycopodiaceae)2009In: Taxon, ISSN 0040-0262, E-ISSN 1996-8175, Vol. 58, no 3, p. 835-848Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Diphasiastrum comprises 20-30 species. In addition to a number of species with a circumboreal distribution, several island endemics and putative diploid hybrid species contribute to the diversity of the group. To assess the integrity and relationships of the recognized species, a global phylogeny of Diphasiastrum is constructed using five chloroplast regions comprising ~9000 bp. Six monophyletic groups are identified. Accessions identified as hybrid species cluster in all but one case together with one of its putative parents. Two microsatellite loci are identified, and allelic information combined with sequence information is found diagnostic for the three putative parental taxa in the Central Europe hybrid complexes. Haplotype screening is performed on six Central European populations, from where one or more putative diploid hybrid species have been reported to grow in sympatry with their parent species. The most common parental haplotypes are identified in all populations. Additional intraspecific variation, restricted to single populations, is identified in all sympatric populations at very low frequencies. Taking the low degree of sequence and microsatellite variation into consideration, the acknowledged morphological diversity in Central Europe is probably best explained by phenotypic plasticity, ancestral polymorphisms or relatively recent events of reticulate evolution.

  • 6.
    Aalberg Haugen, Inger M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Berger, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Gotthard, Karl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    The evolution of alternative developmental pathways: footprints of selection on life-history traits in a butterfly2012In: Journal of Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1010-061X, E-ISSN 1420-9101, Vol. 25, no 7, p. 1377-1388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Developmental pathways may evolve to optimize alternative phenotypes across environments. However, the maintenance of such adaptive plasticity under relaxed selection has received little study. We compare the expression of life-history traits across two developmental pathways in two populations of the butterfly Pararge aegeria where both populations express a diapause pathway but one never expresses direct development in nature. In the population with ongoing selection on both pathways, the difference between pathways in development time and growth rate was larger, whereas the difference in body size was smaller compared with the population experiencing relaxed selection on one pathway. This indicates that relaxed selection on the direct pathway has allowed life-history traits to drift towards values associated with lower fitness when following this pathway. Relaxed selection on direct development was also associated with a higher degree of genetic variation for protandry expressed as within-family sexual dimorphism in growth rate. Genetic correlations for larval growth rate across sexes and pathways were generally positive, with the notable exception of correlation estimates that involved directly developing males of the population that experienced relaxed selection on this pathway. We conclude that relaxed selection on one developmental pathway appears to have partly disrupted the developmental regulation of life-history trait expression. This in turn suggests that ongoing selection may be responsible for maintaining adaptive developmental regulation along alternative developmental pathways in these populations.

  • 7.
    Aalberg Haugen, Inger M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Gotthard, Karl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Diapause induction and relaxed selection on alternative developmental pathways in a butterfly2015In: Journal of Animal Ecology, ISSN 0021-8790, E-ISSN 1365-2656, Vol. 84, no 2, p. 464-472Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Seasonal phenotypic plasticity entails differential trait expression depending on the time of season. The facultative induction of winter diapause in temperate insects is a developmental switch mechanism often leading to differential expression in life-history traits. However, when there is a latitudinal shift from a bivoltine to univoltine life cycle, selection for pathway-specific expression is disrupted, which may allow drift towards less optimal trait values within the non-selected pathway. We use field- and experimental data from five Swedish populations of Pararge aegeria to investigate latitudinal variation in voltinism, local adaptation in the diapause switch and footprints of selection on pathway-specific regulation of life-history traits and sexual dimorphism in larval development. Field data clearly illustrated how natural populations gradually shift from bivoltinism to univoltinism as latitude increases. This was supported experimentally as the decrease in direct development at higher latitudes was accompanied by increasing critical daylengths, suggesting local adaptation in the diapause switch. The differential expression among developmental pathways in development time and growth rate was significantly less pronounced in univoltine populations. Univoltine populations showed no significant signs of protandry during larval development, suggesting that erosion of the direct development pathway under relaxed selection has led to the loss of its sex-specific modifications.

  • 8.
    Aalberg Haugen, Inger M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Gotthard, Karl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Latitudinal phenological adaptation: diapause induction and differentiation between alternative developmental pathways in a butterflyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    1. Seasonal phenotypic plasticity entails differential trait expression depending on the time of season. The facultative induction of winter diapause in temperate insects is a developmental switch mechanism often leading to differential expression in life history traits. However, when there is a latitudinal shift from a bivoltine to univoltine life cycle, selection for pathway-specific expression is disrupted, which may allow drift towards less optimal trait values within the non-selected pathway.

    2. We use field- and experimental data from five Swedish populations of Pararge aegeria to investigate latitudinal variation in voltinism, local adaptation in the diapause switch, and footprints of selection on pathway-specific regulation of life history traits and sexual dimorphism in larval development.

    3. Field data clearly illustrated how natural populations gradually shift from bivoltinism to univoltinism as latitude increases. This was supported experimentally as the decrease in direct development at higher latitudes was accompanied by increasing critical daylengths, suggesting local adaptation in the diapause switch.

    4. The differential expression among developmental pathways in development time and growth rate was significantly less pronounced in univoltine populations. Univoltine populations showed no significant signs of protandry during larval development, suggesting that erosion of the direct development pathway under relaxed selection has led to the loss of its sex-specific modifications.

  • 9.
    Aalberg Haugen, Inger M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Gotthard, Karl
    The development and expression of seasonal polyphenism in life-history traits in the butterfly Pararge aegeriaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Aalberg Haugen, Inger Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    The diapause switch: Evolution of alternative developmental pathways in a butterfly2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Diapause decision is a classic example of a threshold switch mechanism with cascading effects on morphology, behaviour and life-history traits. This thesis addresses the downstream effects of the insect diapause switch, with the main focus on pathway-specific regulation of life-history traits, using the speckled wood butterfly (Pararge aegeria) as a study species. The ultimate pathway decision is made towards the end of larval development and allows the larvae to take into account up-to-date information from the environment about future conditions (Paper I, IV). However, already from an early point in development the larvae are sensitive to environmental cues and continuously adjust their growth trajectory in accordance to current information about the environmental conditions to be expected in future (Paper IV). An asymmetry in the ability to change from one developmental pathway to another at a late point in larval development suggests that the diapause and the direct pathway require different physiological preparations (Paper IV). Pathway-specific regulation of traits downstream of the diapause switch is maintained by ongoing selection. When the direct pathway is not regularly expressed, as with a shift from bivoltinism to univoltinism, relaxed selection on the unexpressed pathway leads to genetic drift and loss of protandry (Paper II, III). Natural populations display local adaptations in the diapause switch with an increase in critical daylengths as there is a gradual shift from bivoltinism to univoltinism (Paper III). This thesis highlights two aspects of the diapause decision, the determination of how and when this decision is made as well as the way the resulting pathways are moulded by selection in order to produce adaptive seasonal polyphenism in life-history traits.

  • 11.
    Aalberse, Rob C
    et al.
    Amsterdam and Landsteiner Laboratory, Department of Immunopathology, Academic Medical Center, Sanquin Research, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Grüber, Christoph
    Department of Pediatric Pneumology and Immunology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Ljungman, Margaretha
    Health Agency of Sweden, Solna, Sweden.
    Kakat, Suzan
    Department of Pediatric Pneumology and Immunology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Wahn, Ulrich
    Department of Pediatric Pneumology and Immunology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Niggemann, Bodo
    Department of Pediatric Pneumology and Immunology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Further investigations of the IgE response to tetanus and diphtheria following covaccination with acellular rather than cellular Bordetella pertussis2019In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 0905-6157, E-ISSN 1399-3038, Vol. 30, no 8, p. 841-847Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    It has previously been shown in an uncontrolled study that the IgE response to vaccine antigens is downregulated by co‐vaccination with cellular Bordetella pertussis vaccine.

    Methods

    In the present study, we compared in a controlled trial the humoral immune response to diphtheria toxoid (D) and tetanus toxoid (T) in relation to co‐vaccinated cellular or acellular B pertussis vaccine. IgE, IgG4, and IgG to D and T were analyzed at 2, 7, and 12 months of age in sera of children vaccinated with D and T (DT, N = 68), cellular (DTPw, N = 68), 2‐ or 5‐component acellular B pertussis vaccine (DTPa2, N = 64; DTPa5, N = 65).

    Results

    One month after vaccination, D‐IgE was detected in 10% sera of DTPw‐vaccinated children, whereas vaccination in the absence of whole‐cell pertussis resulted in 50%‐60% IgE positivity. Six months after vaccination, the IgE antibody levels were found to be more persistent than the IgG antibodies. These diphtheria findings were mirrored by those for tetanus. Only minor differences between vaccine groups were found with regard to D‐IgG and T‐IgG. No immediate‐type allergic reactions were observed.

    Conclusion

    Cellular (but not acellular) B pertussis vaccine downregulates IgE to co‐vaccinated antigens in infants. We assume that the absence of immediate‐type allergic reactions is due to the high levels of IgG antibodies competing with IgE antibodies.

  • 12. Aaldering, L. J.
    et al.
    Poongavanam, V.
    Langkjær, N.
    Natarajan Arul, Murugan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Jørgensen, P. T.
    Wengel, J.
    Veedu, R. N.
    Development of an Efficient G-Quadruplex-Stabilised Thrombin-Binding Aptamer Containing a Three-Carbon Spacer Molecule2017In: ChemBioChem, ISSN 1439-4227, E-ISSN 1439-7633, Vol. 18, no 8, p. 755-763Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA), which shows anticoagulant properties, is one of the most studied G-quadruplex-forming aptamers. In this study, we investigated the impact of different chemical modifications such as a three-carbon spacer (spacer-C3), unlocked nucleic acid (UNA) and 3′-amino-modified UNA (amino-UNA) on the structural dynamics and stability of TBA. All three modifications were incorporated at three different loop positions (T3, T7, T12) of the TBA G-quadruplex structure to result in a series of TBA variants and their stability was studied by thermal denaturation; folding was studied by circular dichroism spectroscopy and thrombin clotting time. The results showed that spacer-C3 introduction at the T7 loop position (TBA-SP7) significantly improved stability and thrombin clotting time while maintaining a similar binding affinity as TBA to thrombin. Detailed molecular modelling experiments provided novel insights into the experimental observations, further supporting the efficacy of TBA-SP7. The results of this study could provide valuable information for future designs of TBA analogues with superior thrombin inhibition properties. 

  • 13.
    Aalto, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Biodiversity and habitat conditions in reaches with high flow velocity along gradients in hydrological and geomorphological alteration: A study of six rivers in Sweden2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The vast majority of rivers in the developed world are affected by human alteration, which in turn negatively affects the species that rely on these highly diverse and species rich areas to survive. Homogenization of previously heterogenic areas due to a change in water discharge and the substrate availability in the rivers is often regarded as the main reason for the loss of species richness in rivers and the riparian zone. Because of this, there are a lot of restoration projects which main goal is to increase heterogeneity. The goal of this thesis is to compare hydrology and geomorphology variables between four types of reaches with high flow velocity (rapids in free-flowing reaches, rapids with regulated flow, impounded reaches and reaches in outlet channels below hydropower plants). In this thesis I wanted to find out how changes in geomorphology and hydrology affect fish species richness, riparian vegetation richness and aquatic vascular plants species richness. The result show that both fish species richness and riparian vegetation species richness are negatively affected by the changes in geomorphology and hydrology. There was no significant difference for aquatic vascular plants when comparing the regulation types. The most altered reach type, outlet channels, had significantly fewer fish species compared to the less altered reach type, impounded reaches. Outlet channels also had less riparian vegetation cover compared to all other regulation types, and fewer riparian vegetation species compared to both free-flowing reaches and impounded reaches. In conclusion, hydropower plants and timber floating have both negatively impacted the riverine ecosystem, and in turn caused a decrease in species richness for fish and riparian plants. The reaches studied in this thesis will continue to be altered and the species richness and species composition will change from an ecosystem that relied on the natural flow regime to an ecosystem more used to the flow regime created by the hydropower plants. 

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  • 14.
    Aalto, Glenn
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS).
    Edman, Hanna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS).
    Social klass och socioekonomisk status i det naturvetenskapliga klassrummet2019Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    I denna kunskapsöversikt har vi samlat empiri från artiklar och litteratur om begreppen social klass och socioekonomisk status. Syftet har varit att undersöka vad forskning säger om hur social klass och socioekonomisk status påverkar elevernas möjligheter i det naturvetenskapliga klassrummet. Frågeställning vi har utgått från har varit ” Vad säger tidigare forskning om hur social klass och socioekonomisk status kommer till uttryck i ett naturvetenskapligt klassrum? ”. Sökmotorerna SwePub, LibSearch och ERIC har använts för att hitta vetenskapliga artiklar som behandlar ämnet. Utöver sökmotorerna har tidigare kurslitteratur använts. Forskningen visar elevernas sociala klass och socioekonomiska status påverkar deras chans att lyckas inom de naturorienterande ämnena. Forskningen visar även att det naturvetenskapliga klassrummet inte är likvärdigt vilket motstrider de krav om likvärdighet som anges i skollagen. Vidare diskuteras även vikten av grupparbeten och kommunikation för att motverka grupperingar hos eleverna efter deras sociala klass. Då majoriteten av forskningen vi tagit del av fokuserar på de högre åldrarna kan vi som slutsats konstatera att det behövs mer forskning kring detta ämne i de lägre åldrarna då resultatet tydligt visar att elevernas sociala klass och socioekonomiska status påverkar no-undervisningen och att det måste diskuteras och motarbetas i klassrummet. Som blivande pedagoger inom naturvetenskap ansåg vi att detta ämne är viktigt att ha kunskap om för att kunna förbättra professionen. Vi har gjort en utblick i forskarvärlden för att ta reda på hur forskare resonerar angående social klass och socioekonomisk status i skolan. Både Sverige och andra länder tas i beaktning.

  • 15. Aarrestad, P. A.
    et al.
    Hytteborn, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Masunga, G.
    Skarpe, C.
    Vegetation: Between Soils and Herbivores2014In: Elephants and Savanna Woodland Ecosystems: A Study from Chobe National Park, Botswana / [ed] Christina Skarpe, Johan T. du Toit and Stein R. Moe, Wiley-Blackwell, 2014, p. 61-88Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The vegetation of the study area in Chobe National Park is influenced by a range of factors, including inundation by the Chobe River, soil moisture and fertility, and the impacts of different-size grazers and browsers. This chapter focuses on how the structure and species composition of the present vegetation in northern Chobe National Park is related to recent herbivory by elephants, as agents shaping the vegetation, and by mesoherbivores acting as controllers or responders, along with abiotic controllers such as soil type and distance to the river. In the study, a two-way indicator species analysis classified the vegetation data into four more or less distinct plant community groups (i) Baikiaea plurijuga-Combretum apiculatum woodland, (ii) Combretum mossambicense-Friesodielsia obovata wooded shrubland, (iii) Capparis tomentosa-Flueggea virosa shrubland and (iv) Cynodon dactylon-Heliotropium ovalifolium floodplain, named after the TWINSPAN indicator or preferential species with high cover, and the relative amount of shrubs and trees.

  • 16. Aarrestad, P. A.
    et al.
    Masunga, G. S.
    Hytteborn, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Pitlagano, M. L.
    Marokane, W.
    Skarpe, C.
    Influence of soil, tree cover and large herbivores on field layer vegetation along a savanna landscape gradient in northern Botswana2011In: Journal of Arid Environments, ISSN 0140-1963, E-ISSN 1095-922X, Vol. 75, no 3, p. 290-297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The response of the field layer vegetation to co-varying resource availability (soil nutrients, light) and resource loss (herbivory pressure) was investigated along a landscape gradient highly influenced by elephants and smaller ungulates at the Chobe River front in Botswana. TWINSPAN classification was used to identify plant communities. Detrended Correspondence Analysis (DCA) and Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) were used to explore the vegetation-environment relationships. Four plant communities were described: Panicum maximum woodland, Tribulus terrestris woodland/shrubland, Chloris virgata shrubland and Cynodon dactylon floodplain. Plant height, species richness and diversity decreased with increasing resource availability and resource loss. The species composition was mainly explained by differences in soil resources, followed by variables related to light availability (woody cover) and herbivory, and by interactions between these variables. The vegetation structure and species richness, on the other hand, followed the general theories of vegetation responses to herbivory more closely than resource related theories. The results suggest a strong interaction between resource availability and herbivory in their influence on the composition, species richness and structure of the plant communities.

  • 17.
    Aarseth Larsson, Kim
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Inhibition of SIRT1 Alters Apoptotic and Sex Related Genes in Zebrafish (Danio rerio)2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide - dependent deacetylase that belongs to the sirtuin protein family. The protein has been linked to both cancer through its effect on p53 and age related illnesses through its effect on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ). Recent data have shown a correlation between SIRT1, male fertility and spermatogenesis. Because the mechanism of sex differentiation in zebrafish is still not wellunderstood the sirt1 gene is an attractive target to study in order to improve our understanding of this topic. Zebrafish of different age were exposed to various concentrations of EX-527 toinhibit the SIRT1 protein. This was followed by qRT-PCR analysis of apoptotic and sex-related genes. Both apoptotic and sex-related gene expression levels were affected by the exposure. There were differences in genes that were affected, both between the concentrations of EX-527, and between the ages of the exposed zebrafish. The male- specific gene sexdetermining region Y box 9A (sox9a) was down-regulated at both studied EX-527 concentrations in both zebrafish larvae and juveniles. The exposure of the EX-527 resulted in no significant difference in sex-ratio. Further studies are required to describe the pathway for SIRT1 gene regulation in zebrafish.

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  • 18.
    Aase-Remedios, Madeleine E.
    et al.
    Univ Durham, Dept Biosci, Durham DH1 3LE, England..
    Janssen, Ralf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Leite, Daniel J.
    Univ Durham, Dept Biosci, Durham DH1 3LE, England..
    Sumner-Rooney, Lauren
    Leibniz Inst Evolut & Biodiversitatsforsch, Museum Nat Kunde, D-10115 Berlin, Germany..
    McGregor, Alistair P.
    Univ Durham, Dept Biosci, Durham DH1 3LE, England..
    Wittkopp, Patricia
    Evolution of the Spider Homeobox Gene Repertoire by Tandem and Whole Genome Duplication2023In: Molecular biology and evolution, ISSN 0737-4038, E-ISSN 1537-1719, Vol. 40, no 12, article id msad239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gene duplication generates new genetic material that can contribute to the evolution of gene regulatory networks and phenotypes. Duplicated genes can undergo subfunctionalization to partition ancestral functions and/or neofunctionalization to assume a new function. We previously found there had been a whole genome duplication (WGD) in an ancestor of arachnopulmonates, the lineage including spiders and scorpions but excluding other arachnids like mites, ticks, and harvestmen. This WGD was evidenced by many duplicated homeobox genes, including two Hox clusters, in spiders. However, it was unclear which homeobox paralogues originated by WGD versus smaller-scale events such as tandem duplications. Understanding this is a key to determining the contribution of the WGD to arachnopulmonate genome evolution. Here we characterized the distribution of duplicated homeobox genes across eight chromosome-level spider genomes. We found that most duplicated homeobox genes in spiders are consistent with an origin by WGD. We also found two copies of conserved homeobox gene clusters, including the Hox, NK, HRO, Irx, and SINE clusters, in all eight species. Consistently, we observed one copy of each cluster was degenerated in terms of gene content and organization while the other remained more intact. Focussing on the NK cluster, we found evidence for regulatory subfunctionalization between the duplicated NK genes in the spider Parasteatoda tepidariorum compared to their single-copy orthologues in the harvestman Phalangium opilio. Our study provides new insights into the relative contributions of multiple modes of duplication to the homeobox gene repertoire during the evolution of spiders and the function of NK genes.

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  • 19. Abafe, Ovokeroye A.
    et al.
    Späth, Jana
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Fick, Jerker
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Jansson, Stina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Buckley, Chris
    Stark, Annegret
    Pietruschka, Bjoern
    Martincigh, Bice S.
    LC-MS/MS determination of antiretroviral drugs in influents and effluents from wastewater treatment plants in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa2018In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 200, p. 660-670Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    South Africa has the largest occurrence of the human immune deficiency virus (HIV) in the world but has also implemented the largest antiretroviral (ARV) treatment programme. It was therefore of interest to determine the presence and concentrations of commonly used antiretroviral drugs (ARVDs) and, also, to determine the capabilities of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) for removing ARVDs. To this end, a surrogate standard based LC-MS/MS method was optimized and applied for the detection of thirteen ARVDs used in the treatment and management of HIV/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) in two major and one modular WWTP in the eThekwini Municipality in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The method was validated and the detection limits fell within the range of 2–20 ng L−1. The analytical recoveries for the ARVDs were mainly greater than 50% with acceptable relative standard deviations. The concentration values ranged from <LOD – 53000 ng L−1 (influent), <LOD – 34000 ng L−1 (effluent) in a decentralized wastewater treatment facility (DEWATS); <LOD – 24000 ng L−1 (influent), <LOD – 33000 ng L−1 (effluent) in Northern WWTP and 61–34000 ng L−1 (influent), <LOD – 20000 ng L−1 (effluent) in Phoenix WWTP. Whilst abacavir, lamivudine and zidovudine were almost completely removed from the effluents, atazanavir, efavirenz, lopinavir and nevirapine persisted in the effluents from all three WWTPs. To estimate the ecotoxicological risks associated with the discharge of ARVDs, a countrywide survey focussing on the occurrence of ARVDs in WWTPs, surface and fresh water bodies, and aquatic organisms, is necessary.

  • 20.
    Abafogi, Abdurhaman Teyib
    et al.
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, South Korea.
    Kim, Jaewon
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, South Korea.
    Lee, Jinyeop
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, South Korea.
    Mohammed, Merem Omer
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, South Korea.
    van Noort, Danny
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biotechnology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Ljubljana, Slovenia; Univ Ingn and Tecnol UTEC, Peru.
    Park, Sungsu
    Sungkyunkwan Univ, South Korea; Sungkyunkwan Univ, South Korea; Sungkyunkwan Univ, South Korea.
    3D-Printed Modular Microfluidic Device Enabling Preconcentrating Bacteria and Purifying Bacterial DNA in Blood for Improving the Sensitivity of Molecular Diagnostics2020In: Sensors, E-ISSN 1424-8220, SENSORS, Vol. 20, no 4, article id 1202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Molecular diagnostics for sepsis is still a challenge due to the presence of compounds that interfere with gene amplification and bacteria at concentrations lower than the limit of detection (LOD). Here, we report on the development of a 3D printed modular microfluidic device (3Dpm mu FD) that preconcentrates bacteria of interest in whole blood and purifies their genomic DNA (gDNA). It is composed of a W-shaped microchannel and a conical microchamber. Bacteria of interest are magnetically captured from blood in the device with antibody conjugated magnetic nanoparticles (Ab-MNPs) at 5 mL/min in the W-shaped microchannel, while purified gDNA of the preconcentrated bacteria is obtained with magnetic silica beads (MSBs) at 2 mL/min in the conical microchamber. The conical microchamber was designed to be connected to the microchannel after the capturing process using a 3D-printed rotary valve to minimize the exposure of the MSBs to interfering compounds in blood. The pretreatment process of spiked blood (2.5 mL) can be effectively completed within about 50 min. With the 3Dpm mu FD, the LOD for the target microorganism Escherichia coli O157:H7 measured by both polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with electrophoresis and quantitative PCR was 10 colony forming unit (CFU) per mL of whole blood. The results suggest that our method lowers the LOD of molecular diagnostics for pathogens in blood by providing bacterial gDNA at high purity and concentration.

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  • 21. Abalaka, J. L.
    et al.
    Ottosson, Ulf
    Tende, Talatu
    Larson, Keith W.
    Rock Firefinch Lagonosticta sanguinodorsalis in the Mandara Mountains, north-east Nigeria: a new subspecies?2010In: African Bird Club Bulletin, ISSN 1352-481X, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 210-211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [fr]

    L’Amarante des rochers Lagonosticta sanguinodorsalis dans les Monts Mandara, Nigeria du sud-est: une nouvelle sous-espèce ? Nous fournissons une description d’un mâle et d’une femelle, ainsi que desphotos d’un mâle, d’un amarante capturé dans les Monts Mandara, au nord-est du Nigeria. Le plumage et le cri de cet amarante sont identiques à ceux de l’Amarante des rochers Lagonosticta sanguinodorsalis, une espèce précédemment rapportée de la zone, excepté que le mâle n’a pas la couronne grise typique de l’espèce. Des travaux supplémentaires sur le terrain sont nécessaires pour déterminer s’il agit d’un individu aberrant ou d’une population de l’Amarante des rochers morphologiquement distincte.

  • 22.
    Abalde, Samuel
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    MATEdb: a new phylogenomic-driven database for Metazoa2022Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • 23.
    Abalde, Samuel
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Crocetta, Fabio
    Department of Integrative Marine Ecology (EMI), Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Villa Comunale, I-80121 Napoli, Italy.
    Tenorio, Manuel J.
    Departamento CMIM y Q. Inorgánica-INBIO, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cádiz, 11510 Puerto Real, Cádiz, Spain.
    D'Aniello, Salvatore
    Department of Biology and Evolution of Marine Organisms (BEOM), Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Villa Comunale, I-80121 Napoli, Italy.
    Fassio, Giulia
    Department of Biology and Biotechnologies “Charles Darwin”, Sapienza University of Rome, Zoology–Viale dell’Università 32, 00185 Rome, Italy.
    Rodríguez-Flores, Paula C.
    Museum of Comparative Zoology, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, 26 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA.
    Uribe, Juan E.
    Departamento de Biodiversidad y Biología Evolutiva, Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales (MNCN-CSIC), José Gutiérrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid, Spain.
    Afonso, Carlos M.L.
    Centre of Marine Sciences (CCMAR), Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005 - 139 Faro, Portugal.
    Oliverio, Marco
    Department of Biology and Biotechnologies “Charles Darwin”, Sapienza University of Rome, Zoology–Viale dell’Università 32, 00185 Rome, Italy.
    Zardoya, Rafael
    Departamento de Biodiversidad y Biología Evolutiva, Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales (MNCN-CSIC), José Gutiérrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid, Spain.
    Hidden species diversity and mito-nuclear discordance within the Mediterranean cone snail, Lautoconus ventricosus2023In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 186, p. 107838-107838, article id 107838Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Mediterranean cone snail, Lautoconus ventricosus, is currently considered a single species inhabiting the whole Mediterranean basin and the adjacent Atlantic coasts. Yet, no population genetic study has assessed its taxonomic status. Here, we collected 245 individuals from 75 localities throughout the Mediterranean Sea and used cox1 barcodes, complete mitochondrial genomes, and genome skims to test whether L. ventricosus represents a complex of cryptic species. The maximum likelihood phylogeny based on complete mitochondrial genomes recovered six main clades (hereby named blue, brown, green, orange, red, and violet) with sufficient sequence divergence to be considered putative species. On the other hand, phylogenomic analyses based on 437 nuclear genes only recovered four out of the six clades: blue and orange clades were thoroughly mixed and the brown one was not recovered. This mito-nuclear discordance revealed instances of incomplete lineage sorting and introgression, and may have caused important differences in the dating of main cladogenetic events. Species delimitation tests proposed the existence of at least three species: green, violet, and red + blue + orange (i.e., cyan). Green plus cyan (with sympatric distributions) and violet, had West and East Mediterranean distributions, respectively, mostly separated by the Siculo-Tunisian biogeographical barrier. Morphometric analyses of the shell using species hypotheses as factor and shell length as covariate showed that the discrimination power of the studied parameters was only 70.2%, reinforcing the cryptic nature of the uncovered species, and the importance of integrative taxonomic approaches considering morphology, ecology, biogeography, and mitochondrial and nuclear population genetic variation.

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  • 24.
    Abalde, Samuel
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Dutertre, Sébastien
    IBMM, Université de Montpellier CNRS.
    Zardoya, Rafael
    Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales.
    A Combined Transcriptomics and Proteomics Approach Reveals the Differences in the Predatory and Defensive Venoms of the Molluscivorous Cone Snail Cylinder ammiralis (Caenogastropoda: Conidae)2021In: Toxins, E-ISSN 2072-6651, Vol. 13, no 9, p. 642-642Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Venoms are complex mixtures of proteins that have evolved repeatedly in the animal kingdom. Cone snail venoms represent one of the best studied venom systems. In nature, this venom can be dynamically adjusted depending on its final purpose, whether to deter predators or hunt prey. Here, the transcriptome of the venom gland and the proteomes of the predation-evoked and defensive venoms of the molluscivorous cone snail Cylinder ammiralis were catalogued. A total of 242 venom-related transcripts were annotated. The conotoxin superfamilies presenting more different peptides were O1, O2, T, and M, which also showed high expression levels (except T). The three precursors of the J superfamily were also highly expressed. The predation-evoked and defensive venoms showed a markedly distinct profile. A total of 217 different peptides were identified, with half of them being unique to one venom. A total of 59 peptides ascribed to 23 different protein families were found to be exclusive to the predatory venom, including the cono-insulin, which was, for the first time, identified in an injected venom. A total of 43 peptides from 20 protein families were exclusive to the defensive venom. Finally, comparisons of the relative abundance (in terms of number of peptides) of the different conotoxin precursor superfamilies showed that most of them present similar abundance regardless of the diet.

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    Abalde_etal_2021_Toxins
  • 25. Abalde, Samuel
    et al.
    Tellgren-Roth, Christian
    Heintz, Julia
    Pettersson, Olga Vinnere
    Jondelius, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Systematic Zoology.
    The draft genome of the microscopic Nemertoderma westbladi sheds light on the evolution of Acoelomorpha genomes2023In: Frontiers in Genetics, E-ISSN 1664-8021, Vol. 14, article id 1244493Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Xenacoelomorpha is a marine clade of microscopic worms that is an important model system for understanding the evolution of key bilaterian novelties, such as the excretory system. Nevertheless, Xenacoelomorpha genomics has been restricted to a few species that either can be cultured in the lab or are centimetres long. Thus far, no genomes are available for Nemertodermatida, one of the group's main clades and whose origin has been dated more than 400 million years ago.Methods: DNA was extracted from a single specimen and sequenced with HiFi following the PacBio Ultra-Low DNA Input protocol. After genome assembly, decontamination, and annotation, the genome quality was benchmarked using two acoel genomes and one Illumina genome as reference. The gene content of three cnidarians, three acoelomorphs, four deuterostomes, and eight protostomes was clustered in orthogroups to make inferences of gene content evolution. Finally, we focused on the genes related to the ultrafiltration excretory system to compare patterns of presence/absence and gene architecture among these clades.Results: We present the first nemertodermatid genome sequenced from a single specimen of Nemertoderma westbladi. Although genome contiguity remains challenging (N50: 60 kb), it is very complete (BUSCO: 80.2%, Metazoa; 88.6%, Eukaryota) and the quality of the annotation allows fine-detail analyses of genome evolution. Acoelomorph genomes seem to be relatively conserved in terms of the percentage of repeats, number of genes, number of exons per gene and intron size. In addition, a high fraction of genes present in both protostomes and deuterostomes are absent in Acoelomorpha. Interestingly, we show that all genes related to the excretory system are present in Xenacoelomorpha except Osr, a key element in the development of these organs and whose acquisition seems to be interconnected with the origin of the specialised excretory system.Conclusion: Overall, these analyses highlight the potential of the Ultra-Low Input DNA protocol and HiFi to generate high-quality genomes from single animals, even for relatively large genomes, making it a feasible option for sequencing challenging taxa, which will be an exciting resource for comparative genomics analyses.

  • 26.
    Abalde, Samuel
    et al.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    Tellgren-Roth, Christian
    Heintz, Julia
    Vinnere Pettersson, Olga
    Jondelius, Ulf
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Zoology.
    The draft genome of the microscopic Nemertoderma westbladi sheds light on the evolution of Acoelomorpha genomes2023In: Frontiers in Genetics, E-ISSN 1664-8021, Vol. 14, article id 1244493Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Abalde, Samuel
    et al.
    Swedish Museum Nat Hist, Dept Zool, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Tellgren-Roth, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Heintz, Julia
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Vinnere Pettersson, Olga
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Jondelius, Ulf
    Swedish Museum Nat Hist, Dept Zool, Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Dept Zool, Stockholm, Sweden..
    The draft genome of the microscopic Nemertoderma westbladi sheds light on the evolution of Acoelomorpha genomes2023In: Frontiers in Genetics, E-ISSN 1664-8021, Vol. 14, article id 1244493Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Xenacoelomorpha is a marine clade of microscopic worms that is an important model system for understanding the evolution of key bilaterian novelties, such as the excretory system. Nevertheless, Xenacoelomorpha genomics has been restricted to a few species that either can be cultured in the lab or are centimetres long. Thus far, no genomes are available for Nemertodermatida, one of the group’s main clades and whose origin has been dated more than 400 million years ago.

    Methods: DNA was extracted from a single specimen and sequenced with HiFi following the PacBio Ultra-Low DNA Input protocol. After genome assembly, decontamination, and annotation, the genome quality was benchmarked using two acoel genomes and one Illumina genome as reference. The gene content of three cnidarians, three acoelomorphs, four deuterostomes, and eight protostomes was clustered in orthogroups to make inferences of gene content evolution. Finally, we focused on the genes related to the ultrafiltration excretory system to compare patterns of presence/absence and gene architecture among these clades.

    Results: We present the first nemertodermatid genome sequenced from a single specimen of Nemertoderma westbladi. Although genome contiguity remains challenging (N50: 60 kb), it is very complete (BUSCO: 80.2%, Metazoa; 88.6%, Eukaryota) and the quality of the annotation allows fine-detail analyses of genome evolution. Acoelomorph genomes seem to be relatively conserved in terms of the percentage of repeats, number of genes, number of exons per gene and intron size. In addition, a high fraction of genes present in both protostomes and deuterostomes are absent in Acoelomorpha. Interestingly, we show that all genes related to the excretory system are present in Xenacoelomorpha except Osr, a key element in the development of these organs and whose acquisition seems to be interconnected with the origin of the specialised excretory system.

    Conclusion: Overall, these analyses highlight the potential of the Ultra-Low Input DNA protocol and HiFi to generate high-quality genomes from single animals, even for relatively large genomes, making it a feasible option for sequencing challenging taxa, which will be an exciting resource for comparative genomics analyses.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 28.
    Abalo, Xesus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Boije: Zebrafish Neuronal Networks. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Lagman, David
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Univ Bergen, Sars Int Ctr Marine Mol Biol, Bergen, Norway.
    Heras, Gabriel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    del Pozo, Ana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Boije: Zebrafish Neuronal Networks. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Eggert, Joel
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Emory Univ, Dept Med, Atlanta, GA 30322 USA.
    Larhammar, Dan
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Larhammar: Pharmacology.
    Circadian regulation of phosphodiesterase 6 genes in zebrafish differs between cones and rods: Implications for photopic and scotopic vision2020In: Vision Research, ISSN 0042-6989, E-ISSN 1878-5646, Vol. 166, p. 43-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A correlation is known to exist between visual sensitivity and oscillations in red opsin and rhodopsin gene expression in zebrafish, both regulated by the clock gene. This indicates that an endogenous circadian clock regulates behavioural visual sensitivity, apart from the regulation exerted by the pineal organ. However, the specific mechanisms for cones (photopic vision) and rods (scotopic vision) are poorly understood. In this work, we performed gene expression, cosinor and immunohistochemical analyses to investigate other key genes involved in light perception, encoding the different subunits of phosphodiesterase pde6 and transducin G alpha(T), in constant lighting conditions and compared to normal light-dark conditions. We found that cones display prominent circadian oscillations in mRNA levels for the inhibitory subunit gene pde6ha that could contribute to the regulation of photopic sensitivity by preventing overstimulation in photopic conditions. In rods, the mRNA levels of the inhibitory subunit gene pde6ga oscillate under normal conditions and dampen down in constant light but continue oscillating in constant darkness. There is an increase in total relative expression for pde6gb in constant conditions. These observations, together with previous data, suggest a complex regulation of the scotopic sensitivity involving endogenous and non-endogenous components, possibly present also in other teleost species. The G alpha(T) genes do not display mRNA oscillations and therefore may not be essential for the circadian regulation of photosensitivity. In summary, our results support different regulation for the zebrafish photopic and scotopic sensitivities and suggest circadian regulation of pde6ha as a key factor regulating photopic sensitivity, while the regulatory mechanisms in rods appear to be more complex.

  • 29. Abarenkov, Kessy
    et al.
    Adams, Rachel I.
    Irinyi, Laszlo
    Agan, Ahto
    Ambrosio, Elia
    Antonelli, Alexandre
    Bahram, Mohammad
    Bengtsson-Palme, Johan
    Bok, Gunilla
    Cangren, Patrik
    Coimbra, Victor
    Coleine, Claudia
    Gustafsson, Claes
    He, Jinhong
    Hofmann, Tobias
    Kristiansson, Erik
    Larsson, Ellen
    Larsson, Tomas
    Liu, Yingkui
    Martinsson, Svante
    Meyer, Wieland
    Panova, Marina
    Pombubpa, Nuttapon
    Ritter, Camila
    Ryberg, Martin
    Svantesson, Sten
    Scharn, Ruud
    Svensson, Ola
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Box 461, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Topel, Mats
    Unterseher, Martin
    Visagie, Cobus
    Wurzbacher, Christian
    Taylor, Andy F. S.
    Koljalg, Urmas
    Schriml, Lynn
    Nilsson, R. Henrik
    Annotating public fungal ITS sequences from the built environment according to the MIxS-Built Environment standard - a report from a May 23-24, 2016 workshop (Gothenburg, Sweden)2016In: MycoKeys, ISSN 1314-4057, E-ISSN 1314-4049, no 16, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent molecular studies have identified substantial fungal diversity in indoor environments. Fungi and fungal particles have been linked to a range of potentially unwanted effects in the built environment, including asthma, decay of building materials, and food spoilage. The study of the built mycobiome is hampered by a number of constraints, one of which is the poor state of the metadata annotation of fungal DNA sequences from the built environment in public databases. In order to enable precise interrogation of such data - for example, "retrieve all fungal sequences recovered from bathrooms" - a workshop was organized at the University of Gothenburg (May 23-24, 2016) to annotate public fungal barcode (ITS) sequences according to the MIxS-Built Environment annotation standard (http:// gensc.org/ mixs/). The 36 participants assembled a total of 45,488 data points from the published literature, including the addition of 8,430 instances of countries of collection from a total of 83 countries, 5,801 instances of building types, and 3,876 instances of surface-air contaminants. The results were implemented in the UNITE database for molecular identification of fungi (http://unite.ut.ee) and were shared with other online resources. Data obtained from human/animal pathogenic fungi will furthermore be verified on culture based metadata for subsequent inclusion in the ISHAM-ITS database (http:// its. mycologylab.org).

  • 30.
    Abarenkov, Kessy
    et al.
    Univ Tartu, Nat Hist Museum, Tartu, Estonia..
    Adams, Rachel I.
    Univ Calif Berkeley, Plant & Microbial Biol, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Irinyi, Laszlo
    Westmead Hosp, Ctr Infect Dis & Microbiol, Mol Mycol Res Lab, Sydney Med Sch, Sydney, NSW, Australia.;Univ Sydney, Marie Bashir Inst Infect Dis & Biosecur, Sydney, NSW, Australia.;Westmead Inst Med Res, Westmead, NSW, Australia..
    Agan, Ahto
    Univ Tartu, Inst Ecol & Earth Sci, Tartu, Estonia..
    Ambrosio, Elia
    Univ Tartu, Nat Hist Museum, Tartu, Estonia.;Univ Tartu, Inst Ecol & Earth Sci, Tartu, Estonia.;Via Calamandrei 2, I-53035 Siena, Italy..
    Antonelli, Alexandre
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Box 461, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.;Gothenburg Bot Garden, Carl Skottsbergs Gata 22A, S-41319 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Bahram, Mohammad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology. Univ Tartu, Inst Ecol & Earth Sci, Tartu, Estonia.
    Bengtsson-Palme, Johan
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Infect Dis, Guldhedsgatan 10, S-41346 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Bok, Gunilla
    SP Tech Res Inst Sweden, Box 857, S-50115 Boras, Sweden..
    Cangren, Patrik
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Box 461, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Coimbra, Victor
    Univ Fed Pernambuco UFPE, Dept Micol, CCB, Av Prof Nelson Chaves S-N, BR-50670901 Recife, PE, Brazil..
    Coleine, Claudia
    Univ Tuscia, Dept Ecol & Biol Sci, I-01100 Viterbo, Italy..
    Gustafsson, Claes
    Univ Gothenburg, Herbarium GB, Box 461, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    He, Jinhong
    Chinese Acad Sci, South China Bot Garden, 723 Xingke Rd, Guangzhou 510650, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Hofmann, Tobias
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Box 461, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Kristiansson, Erik
    Chalmers, Dept Math Sci, S-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Larsson, Ellen
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Box 461, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Larsson, Tomas
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Marine Sci, Box 460, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Liu, Yingkui
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Box 461, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Martinsson, Svante
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Box 461, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Meyer, Wieland
    Westmead Hosp, Ctr Infect Dis & Microbiol, Mol Mycol Res Lab, Sydney Med Sch, Sydney, NSW, Australia.;Westmead Inst Med Res, Westmead, NSW, Australia..
    Panova, Marina
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Marine Sci Tjarno, S-45296 Stromstad, Sweden..
    Pombubpa, Nuttapon
    Univ Calif Riverside, Dept Plant Pathol & Microbiol, Riverside, CA 92521 USA.;Univ Calif Riverside, Inst Integrat Genome Biol, Riverside, CA 92521 USA..
    Ritter, Camila
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Box 461, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Ryberg, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Svantesson, Sten
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Box 461, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Scharn, Ruud
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Earth Sci, Box 460, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Svensson, Ola
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Box 461, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Töpel, Mats
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Marine Sci, Box 460, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Unterseher, Martin
    Ernst Moritz Arndt Univ Greifswald, Inst Bot & Landscape Ecol, Soldmannstr 15, D-17487 Greifswald, Germany..
    Visagie, Cobus
    Agr & Agri Food Canada, Biodivers Mycol, 960 Carling Ave, Ottawa, ON K1A 0C6, Canada.;Univ Ottawa, Dept Biol, 30 Marie Curie, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5, Canada..
    Wurzbacher, Christian
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Box 461, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Taylor, Andy F. S.
    James Hutton Inst, Aberdeen AB15 8QH, Scotland.;Univ Aberdeen, Inst Biol & Environm Sci, Cruickshank Bldg, Aberdeen AB24 3UU, Scotland..
    Köljalg, Urmas
    Univ Tartu, Nat Hist Museum, Tartu, Estonia.;Univ Tartu, Inst Ecol & Earth Sci, Tartu, Estonia..
    Schriml, Lynn
    Univ Maryland, Sch Med, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA.;Univ Maryland, Sch Med, Inst Genome Sci, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA..
    Nilsson, R. Henrik
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Box 461, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Annotating public fungal ITS sequences from the built environment according to the MIxS-Built Environment standard - a report from a May 23-24, 2016 workshop (Gothenburg, Sweden)2016In: MycoKeys, ISSN 1314-4057, E-ISSN 1314-4049, no 16, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent molecular studies have identified substantial fungal diversity in indoor environments. Fungi and fungal particles have been linked to a range of potentially unwanted effects in the built environment, including asthma, decay of building materials, and food spoilage. The study of the built mycobiome is hampered by a number of constraints, one of which is the poor state of the metadata annotation of fungal DNA sequences from the built environment in public databases. In order to enable precise interrogation of such data - for example, "retrieve all fungal sequences recovered from bathrooms" - a workshop was organized at the University of Gothenburg (May 23-24, 2016) to annotate public fungal barcode (ITS) sequences according to the MIxS-Built Environment annotation standard (http:// gensc.org/ mixs/). The 36 participants assembled a total of 45,488 data points from the published literature, including the addition of 8,430 instances of countries of collection from a total of 83 countries, 5,801 instances of building types, and 3,876 instances of surface-air contaminants. The results were implemented in the UNITE database for molecular identification of fungi (http://unite.ut.ee) and were shared with other online resources. Data obtained from human/animal pathogenic fungi will furthermore be verified on culture based metadata for subsequent inclusion in the ISHAM-ITS database (http:// its. mycologylab.org).

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  • 31.
    Abarenkov, Kessy
    et al.
    Univ Tartu, Nat Hist Museum, Vanemuise 46, EE-51014 Tartu, Estonia..
    Kristiansson, Erik
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Math Sci, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Univ Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Ryberg, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Nogal-Prata, Sandra
    Real Jardin Bot CSIC, Dept Mycol, Madrid, Spain..
    Gomez-Martinez, Daniela
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Box 461, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Stueer-Patowsky, Katrin
    Tech Univ Munich, Chair Urban Water Syst Engn, Coulombwall 3, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Jansson, Tobias
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Box 461, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Polme, Sergei
    Univ Tartu, Nat Hist Museum, Vanemuise 46, EE-51014 Tartu, Estonia..
    Ghobad-Nejhad, Masoomeh
    Iranian Res Org Sci & Technol, Dept Biotechnol, POB 3353-5111, Tehran 3353136846, Iran..
    Corcoll, Natalia
    Univ Gothenburg, Gothenburg Global Biodivers Ctr, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Box 461, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Scharn, Ruud
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Earth Sci, Box 460, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Sanchez-Garcia, Marisol
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Forest Mycol & Plant Pathol, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Khomich, Maryia
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, Box 7804, N-5020 Bergen, Norway..
    Wurzbacher, Christian
    Tech Univ Munich, Chair Urban Water Syst Engn, Coulombwall 3, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Nilsson, R. Henrik
    Univ Gothenburg, Gothenburg Global Biodivers Ctr, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Box 461, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    The curse of the uncultured fungus2022In: MycoKeys, ISSN 1314-4057, E-ISSN 1314-4049, no 86, p. 177-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The international DNA sequence databases abound in fungal sequences not annotated beyond the kingdom level, typically bearing names such as "uncultured fungus". These sequences beget lowresolution mycological results and invite further deposition of similarly poorly annotated entries. What do these sequences represent? This study uses a 767,918-sequence corpus of public full-length that represent truly unidentifiable fungal taxa - and what proportion of them that would have deposition. Our results suggest that more than 70% of these sequences would have been trivial to identify to at least the order/family level at the time of sequence deposition, hinting that factors other than poor availability of relevant reference sequences explain the low-resolution names. We speculate that researchers' perceived lack of time and lack of insight into the ramifications of this problem are the main explanations for the low-resolution names. We were surprised to find that more than a fifth of these sequences seem to have been deposited by mycologists rather than researchers unfamiliar with the consequences of poorly annotated fungal sequences in molecular repositories. The proportion of these needlessly poorly annotated sequences does not decline over time, suggesting that this problem must not be left unchecked.

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  • 32.
    Abascal, Angela
    et al.
    University of Navarra, Spain; University of Twente, Netherlands.
    Georganos, Stefanos
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Kuffer, Monika
    University of Twente, Netherlands.
    Vanhuysse, Sabine
    Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Belgium.
    Thomson, Dana
    University of Twente, Netherlands.
    Wang, Jon
    University of Twente, Netherlands.
    Manyasi, Lawrence
    Community Researcher Non-affiliated, Nairobi, Kenya.
    Otunga, Daniel Manyasi
    Community Researcher Single Mother Association of Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya.
    Ochieng, Brighton
    Community Researcher Non-affiliated, Nairobi, Kenya.
    Ochieng, Treva
    Community Researcher Non-affiliated, Nairobi, Kenya.
    Klinnert, Jorge
    University of Maryland, USA.
    Wolff, Eléonore
    Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Belgium.
    Making Urban Slum Population Visible: Citizens and Satellites to Reinforce Slum Censuses2024In: Urban Inequalities from Space: Earth Observation Applications in the Majority World / [ed] Monika Kuffer, Stefanos Georganos, Springer, 2024, Vol. 26, p. 287-302Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In response to the “Leave No One Behind” principle (the central promise of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development), reliable estimate of the total number of citizens living in slums is urgently needed but not available for some of the most vulnerable communities. Not having a reliable estimate of the number of poor urban dwellers limits evidence-based decision-making for proper resource allocation in the fight against urban inequalities. From a geographical perspective, urban population distribution maps in many low- and middle-income cities are most often derived from outdated or unreliable census data disaggregated by coarse administrative units. Moreover, slum populations are presented as aggregated within bigger administrative areas, leading to a large diffuse in the estimates. Existing global and open population databases provide homogeneously disaggregated information (i.e. in a spatial grid), but they mostly rely on census data to generate their estimates, so they do not provide additional information on the slum population. While a few studies have focused on bottom-up geospatial models for slum population mapping using survey data, geospatial covariates, and earth observation imagery, there is still a significant gap in methodological approaches for producing precise estimates within slums. To address this issue, we designed a pilot experiment to explore new avenues. We conducted this study in the slums of Nairobi, where we collected in situ data together with slum dwellers using a novel data collection protocol. Our results show that the combination of satellite imagery with in situ data collected by citizen science paves the way for generalisable, gridded estimates of slum populations. Furthermore, we find that the urban physiognomy of slums and population distribution patterns are related, which allows for highlighting the diversity of such patterns using earth observation within and between slums of the same city. 

  • 33.
    Abbas, Amira
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Education and Society (LS).
    Digitala verktyg i modersmålsundervisningen2016Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Digital tools in the mother tongue education. The purpose of my work is to find out how digital tools can be used in the mother tongue education. As a teacher in different schools, I have seen how my teaching colleagues are using the computer as a tool in teaching. This has caused me to be inspired by my colleagues 'and students' interest in computers. My thought and my purpose with this work is to develop mother tongue education, thereby bringing it in to year 2016. I will find out what the difficulties and obstacles that modernization may face, and how it can be tackled and how we can overcome the difficulties. To answer this I will carry out a qualitative study in the form of semi-structured interviews. I'm not going to interview other teachers, but am using my educational capital to answer my questions but will, however, conduct interviews with my students who have mother tongue education. I analyzed the collected material from the interviews based on the motivation theory, but I also used and applied what previous research had said about digital tools in the education/mother tongue education. Based on the results from my interviews, as well as my analysis, I have come up with my development for my field that is a process that takes just five steps. Introduce compulsory mother tongue education for all students. Develop the mother tongue education and produce new, modern school textbooks and literature. Further educate mother tongue teachers. Using software like Fronter, SchoolSoft, Unikum, Google Drive and other school programs. Introduce a balanced, varied teaching with the help of Power Point, Smart Boards, the Internet and various Apps / learning games.

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  • 34. Abbas, Muhammad Ghazanfar
    et al.
    Haris, Abdullah
    Binyameen, Muhammad
    Nazir, Abdul
    Mozūratis, Raimondas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Nature Research Centre, Lithuania.
    Azeem, Muhammad
    Chemical Composition, Larvicidal and Repellent Activities of Wild Plant Essential Oils against Aedes aegypti2023In: Biology, E-ISSN 2079-7737, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bio-degradable and eco-friendly essential oils (EOs) extracted from Mentha longifolia, Salsola imbricata, Erigeron bonariensis, E. canadensis, Ailanthus altissima, and Zanthoxylum armatum were investigated for their repellent and larvicidal potential against Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. The EOs of M. longifolia, S. imbricata, E. bonariensis, E. canadensis, A. altissima, and Z. armatum exhibited 99.0%, 96.8%, 40.2%, 41.7%, 29.1%, and 13.2% repellency against mosquitoes at a tested dose of 33.3 μg/cm2, respectively. In time span bioassays, the EOs of M. longifolia, S. imbricata, E. bonariensis, and E. canadensis showed more than 40% repellency for 60 min at a tested dose of 330 μg/cm2. Larvicidal bioassays revealed that larvae of Ae. aegypti were the most susceptible to M. longifolia (LC50, 39.3 mg/L), E. bonariensis (LC50, 26.0 mg/L), E. canadensis (LC50, 35.7 mg/L), and Z. armatum (LC50, 35.9 mg/L) EOs upon 48 h exposure. The most abundant constituents in the EOs of M. longifolia, S. imbricata, E. bonariensis, E. canadensis and A. altissima were piperitone oxide (45.5%), carvone (39.9%), matricaria ester (43.1%), (31.7%) and eugenol (24.4%), respectively. Our study demonstrates that EOs of M. longifolia, S. imbricata, E. bonariensis, and E. canadensis might be used to control Ae. aegypti mosquitoes without harming humans or the environment.

  • 35. Abbasi, Arshad Mehmood
    et al.
    Khan, Mir Ajab
    Khan, Nadeem
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Shah, Munir H
    Ethnobotanical survey of medicinally important wild edible fruits species used by tribal communities of Lesser Himalayas-Pakistan2013In: Journal of Ethnopharmacology, ISSN 0378-8741, E-ISSN 1872-7573, Vol. 148, no 2, p. 528-536Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ethnopharmacological relevance: Present survey was conducted to explore ethnomedicinal uses and cultural importance of wild edible fruits species by the inhabitants of Lesser Himalayas-Pakistan. Materials and methods: Information was obtained through informed consent semi-structured interviews, questionnaires, market survey, focus group conversation, unceremonious dialogue and village walks with key informants. Cultural significance of each species was calculated based on use report by participants at each study site. Results: A total of 35 wild edible fruits belonging to 21 genera and 17 families were used for the treatment of various ailments and consumed. Rosaceae was found dominating family with (8 spp.), followed by Moraceae (6 spp.), Rhamnaceae (5 spp.), Palmae and Vitaceae (2 spp. each) and remaining families were represented by one species each. Fruits (48%) were found highly utilized plant parts, followed by leaves (34%), bark, flowers and seeds (4% each), branches, latex and roots (2% each). Water was used as a medium for preparation while milk, ghee, oil, egg and butter are used for application. Modes of preparation were fall into seven categories like fresh parts eaten raw (38%), powder (24%), decoction (20%), extract (12 %), paste (4%), juice and latex (2% each). Based on cultural important index (CI) Morus nigra was found most significant species within top ten fruit plants followed by Morus alba, Olea ferruginea, Berberis lycium, Pyrus pashia, Ficus carica, Ficus palmata, Ziziphus mauritiana, Diospyros lotus and Ziziphus nummularia. Conclusions: Traditional uses of wild edible plant depend mainly on socio-economic factors rather than climatic conditions or wealth of flora. Use reports and citation demonstrated that there is a common cultural heritage regarding the gathered food plants. Further investigation is required for Antioxidant study, essential and toxic components, pharmacological applications; dietary requirements and biotechnological techniques to improve yields.

    (C) 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 36.
    Abbasi, Saeed
    et al.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Machine Design, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jansson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Sellgren, Ulf
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Machine Design, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Olofsson, Ulf
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Machine Design, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Particle Emissions From Rail Traffic: A Literature Review2013In: Critical reviews in environmental science and technology, ISSN 1064-3389, E-ISSN 1547-6537, Vol. 43, no 23, p. 2511-2544Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Particle emissions are a drawback of rail transport. This work is a comprehensive presentation of recent research into particle emissions from rail vehicles. Both exhaust and nonexhaust particle emissions are considered when examining particle characteristics such as PM10, and PM2.5 concentration levels, size, morphology, composition, and adverse health effects, current legislation, and available and proposed solutions for reducing such emissions. High concentration levels in enclosed rail traffic environments are reported and some toxic effects of the particles. The authors find that only a few limited studies have examined the adverse health effects of nonexhaust particle emissions and that no relevant legislation exists. Thus further research in this area is warranted.

  • 37. Abbasi, Umar Aftab
    et al.
    Mattsson, Eskil
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Nissanka, Sarath Premalal
    Ali, Arshad
    Biological, structural and functional responses of tropical forests to environmental factors2022In: Biological Conservation, ISSN 0006-3207, E-ISSN 1873-2917, Vol. 276, p. 109792-109792, article id 109792Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here, we hypothesize that the biological, structural and functional attributes of tropical forests respond to water-related climatic and soil nutrient-related factors.

    Thus, we quantified 27 forest attributes and 20 environmental factors across 189 plots of Sri Lankan tropical forests. Our results suggest that environmental conditions were characterized by both water-related and temperature-related factors, and as such, both coarse-textured and compacted-structured soils determined soil conditions.

    Forest conditions were characterized by high species-functional diversity, structural complexity and aboveground biomass-related functions. We found strong positive effects of water-related climatic factors followed by temperature-related climatic factors but negligible positive to negative effects of textured-related and nutrient-related soil factors on most of the biological, structural and functional attributes.

    Overall the biodiversity and carbon stocks of Sri Lankan tropical forests are likely to increase with water-energy balance and improved soil conditions, and thus, studied forests could offset a substantial quantity of anthropogenic carbon emissions to achieve carbon neutrality which can have both regional and global significance if protected from anthropogenic disturbances. 

  • 38. Abbasi, Umar Aftab
    et al.
    Mattsson, Eskil
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Nissanka, Sarath Premalal
    Ali, Arshad
    Species α-diversity promotes but β-diversity restricts aboveground biomass in tropical forests, depending on stand structure and environmental factors2022In: Journal of Forestry Research, ISSN 1007-662X, E-ISSN 1993-0607Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Forest plays a vital role in the global biogeochemical cycles through a high rate of carbon sequestration and harboring biodiversity. However, local species diversity is declining while also becoming increasingly homogenized across communities. Although effects of local biotic processes (e.g., species α-diversity and stand structural heterogeneity) and environmental factors on aboveground biomass (AGB) have been widely tested, there is a huge knowledge gap for the effect of regional biotic processes (i.e., taxonomic and functional β-diversity) in forests. Here, we hypothesized that regional and local environmental factors along with biotic processes jointly regulate AGB through species shifts in tropical forests.

    Using piecewise structural equation modeling (pSEM), we linked climatic water availability, soil fertility, stand structural heterogeneity (either tree DBH inequality, height inequality, or stand density), species α-diversity, taxonomic or functional β-diversity (and its two components; β-turnover and β-richness), and AGB across 189 inventory plots in tropical forests of Sri Lanka. Soil fertility and climatic water availability shaped local and regional biotic processes. Stand structural heterogeneity promoted species α-diversity but declined β-diversity (but increased β-taxonomic turnover). Species α-diversity and stand structural heterogeneity promoted AGB whereas taxonomic and functional β-diversity declined (but β-taxonomic turnover increased) AGB.

    The relationships of AGB with species α-diversity and β-diversity varied from significant to nonsignificant positive depending on the specific combinations of stand structural heterogeneity metrics used. This study shows that local biotic processes could increase AGB due to the local and regional niche complementarity effect whereas the regional biotic processes could restrict AGB due to the regional selection or functional redundancy effect under favorable environmental conditions. We argue that biotic homogenization, as well as drought conditions, may have strong divergent impacts on forest functions and that the impacts of tree diversity loss may greatly reduce carbon sequestration.

  • 39.
    Abbassi, Nasrollah
    et al.
    Univ Zanjan, Dept Geol, Fac Sci, Zanjan, Iran..
    Kundrat, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Ataabadi, Majid Mirzaie
    Univ Zanjan, Dept Geol, Fac Sci, Zanjan, Iran..
    Ahlberg, Per E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology. Uppsala Univ, Sub Dept Evolut & Dev, Evolutionary Biol Ctr, Dept Organismal Biol, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Avian ichnia and other vertebrate trace fossils from the Neogene Red Beds of Tarom valley in north-western Iran2016In: Historical Biology, ISSN 0891-2963, E-ISSN 1029-2381, Vol. 28, no 8, p. 1075-1089Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Neogene Red Beds of the Tarom valley (north-western Iran) include conglomerate, sandstone, marl and gypsum. Avian and mammal footprints were discovered in one of the sandstone layers at the base of a third Miocene stratigraphical unit in the Gilankesheh area located in the east Tarom valley. The avian ichnia include Aviadactyla vialovi, Avipeda filiportatis, Charadriipeda disjuncta, Charadriipeda isp. A and B and cf. Ornithotarnocia lambrechti. Bird feeding traces are preserved as bilobate, loop-shaped, sinusoidal and ring-like traces. We have also identified a reticulate texture of sole scale imprints in some of the avian ichnia. Two mammal footprints of camelid-like artiodactyls are also present with the avian ichno-assemblage.

  • 40.
    Abbey-Lee, Robin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Max Planck Inst Ornithol, Germany.
    Araya-Ajoy, Yimen G.
    Norwegian Univ Sci and Technol, Norway.
    Mouchet, Alexia
    Max Planck Inst Ornithol, Germany.
    Moiron, Maria
    Max Planck Inst Ornithol, Germany.
    Stuber, Erica F.
    Univ Nebraska Lincoln, NE USA.
    Kempenaers, Bart
    Max Planck Inst Ornithol, Germany.
    Dingemanse, Niels J.
    Max Planck Inst Ornithol, Germany; Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Germany.
    Does perceived predation risk affect patterns of extra-pair paternity? A field experiment in a passerine bird2018In: Functional Ecology, ISSN 0269-8463, E-ISSN 1365-2435, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 1001-1010Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Non-consumptive predator effects have been shown to influence a wide range of behavioural, life history and morphological traits. Extra-pair reproduction is widespread among socially monogamous birds and may incur predation costs. Consequently, altered rates of extra-pair reproduction are expected in circumstances characterized by increased adult perceived predation risk. In addition, extra-pair reproduction is expected to be most affected for birds with phenotypes that generally increase predation risk (such as more active individuals). In two consecutive years, perceived predation risk was manipulated for great tits Parus major breeding in 12 nest-box plots by broadcasting sounds of their main predator (European sparrowhawk Accipiter nisus; six plots). As a control treatment, sounds of a sympatric, avian non-predator species were broadcast (Eurasian blackbird Turdus merula; six plots). Levels of extra-pair paternity did not differ between plots with different predation risk treatments. Males that moved more in a novel environment (more active or faster exploring) tended to have offspring with fewer partners, but this effect did not vary with predation risk treatment. From an adaptive viewpoint, predation costs associated with extra-pair reproduction may be small and may not outweigh the benefits of extra-pair behaviour. Research on a broader range of taxa with different mating strategies is now needed to confirm the generality of our findings.

  • 41.
    Abbey-Lee, Robin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Max Planck Inst Ornithol, Germany.
    Dingemanse, Niels J.
    Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Germany.
    Adaptive individual variation in phenological responses to perceived predation levels2019In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 10, article id 1601Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The adaptive evolution of timing of breeding (a component of phenology) in response to environmental change requires individual variation in phenotypic plasticity for selection to act upon. A major question is what processes generate this variation. Here we apply multi-year manipulations of perceived predation levels (PPL) in an avian predator-prey system, identifying phenotypic plasticity in phenology as a key component of alternative behavioral strategies with equal fitness payoffs. We show that under low-PPL, faster (versus slower) exploring birds breed late (versus early); the pattern is reversed under high-PPL, with breeding synchrony decreasing in conjunction. Timing of breeding affects reproductive success, yet behavioral types have equal fitness. The existence of alternative behavioral strategies thus explains variation in phenology and plasticity in reproductive behavior, which has implications for evolution in response to anthropogenic change.

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  • 42.
    Abbey-Lee, Robin N.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kreshchenko, Anastasia
    Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering Division L5, Department of Mechanical, Aerospace & Civil Engineering, Dalton Nuclear Institute, FSE Research Institutes,The University of Manchester, UK.
    Fernandez Sala, Xavier
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology.
    Petkova, Irina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. School of Biological Sciences, Centre for Ecology,Evolution and Behaviour, Royal Holloway University of London, Egham UK.
    Løvlie, Hanne
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Effects of monoamine manipulations on the personality and gene expression of three-spined sticklebacks2019In: Journal of Experimental Biology, ISSN 0022-0949, E-ISSN 1477-9145, Vol. 222, no 20, article id jeb211888Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Among-individual behavioral differences (i.e. animal personality) are commonly observed across taxa, although the underlying, causal mechanisms of such differences are poorly understood. Animal personality has been correlated with physiological functions as well as fitness-related traits. Variation in many aspects of monoamine systems, such as metabolite levels and gene polymorphisms, has been linked to behavioral variation. Therefore, here we experimentally investigated the potential role of monoamines in explaining individual variation in personality, using two common pharmaceuticals that respectively alter the levels of serotonin and dopamine in the brain: fluoxetine and ropinirole. We exposed three-spined sticklebacks, a species that shows animal personality, to either chemical alone or to a combination of the two chemicals, for 18 days. During the experiment, fish were assayed at four time points for the following personality traits: exploration, boldness, aggression and sociability. To quantify brain gene expression on short- and longer-term scales, fish were sampled at two time points. Our results show that monoamine manipulations influence fish behavior. Specifically, fish exposed to either fluoxetine or ropinirole were significantly bolder, and fish exposed to the two chemicals together tended to be bolder than control fish. Our monoamine manipulations did not alter the gene expression of monoamine or stress-associated neurotransmitter genes, but control, untreated fish showed covariation between gene expression and behavior. Specifically, exploration and boldness were predicted by genes in the dopaminergic, serotonergic and stress pathways, and sociability was predicted by genes in the dopaminergic and stress pathways. These results add further support to the links between monoaminergic systems and personality, and show that exposure to monoamines can causally alter animal personality.

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  • 43.
    Abbey-Lee, Robin N.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kreshchenko, Anastasia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fernandez Sala, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Petkova, Irina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Løvlie, Hanne
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Effects of monoamine manipulations on the personality and gene expression of three-spined sticklebacks2019Data set
    Abstract [en]

    Among-individual behavioral differences (i.e. animal personality) are commonly observed across taxa, although the underlying, causal mechanisms of such differences are poorly understood. Animal personality has been implicated in correlations with physiological functions as well as affecting fitness-related traits. Variation in many aspects of monoamine systems, such as metabolite levels and gene polymorphisms, has been linked to behavioral variation. Therefore, here we investigated the potential role of monoamines in explaining individual variation in personality, using two common pharmaceuticals that respectively alter the levels of serotonin and dopamine in the brain: fluoxetine and ropinirole. We exposed three- spined sticklebacks, a species that shows animal personality, to either chemical alone or to a combination of the two chemicals, for 18 days. During the experiment, fish were assayed at four time points for the following personality traits: exploration, boldness, aggression and sociability. To quantify brain gene expression on short- and longer-term scales, fish were sampled at two time points. Our results show that monoamine manipulations influence fish behavior. Specifically, fish exposed to either fluoxetine or ropinirole were significantly bolder, and fish exposed to the two chemicals together tended to be bolder than control fish. Our monoamine manipulations did not alter the gene expression of monoamine or stress-associated neurotransmitter genes, but control, untreated fish showed covariation between gene expression and behavior. Specifically, exploration and boldness were predicted by genes in the dopaminergic, serotonergic and stress pathways, and sociability was predicted by genes in the dopaminergic and stress pathways. These results add further support to the links between monoaminergic systems and personality, and show that exposure to monoamines can causally alter animal personality.

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  • 44.
    Abbey-Lee, Robin N.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Uhrig, Emily J.
    Department of Zoology, Stockholm University, 10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Zidar, Josefina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Favati, Anna
    Department of Zoology, Stockholm University, 10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Almberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dahlblom, Josefin
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala Biomedical Centre BMC, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Winberg, Svante
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala Biomedical Centre BMC, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Løvlie, Hanne
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    The influence of rearing on behavior, brain monoamines and gene expression in three-spined sticklebacks2018Data set
    Abstract [en]
    1. The causes of individual variation in behavior are often not well understood, and potential underlying mechanisms include both intrinsic and extrinsic factors, such as early environmental, physiological, and genetic differences.
    2. In an exploratory laboratory study, we raised three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) under 4 different environmental conditions (simulated predator environment, complex environment, variable social environment, and control). We investigated how these manipulations related to behavior, brain physiology and gene expression later in life, with focus on brain dopamine and serotonin levels, turnover rates, and gene expression.
    3. The different rearing environments influenced behavior and gene expression, but did not alter monoamine levels or metabolites. Specifically, compared to control fish, fish exposed to a simulated predator environment tended to be less aggressive, more exploratory, and more neophobic; and fish raised in both complex and variable social environments tended to be less neophobic. Exposure to a simulated predator environment tended to lower expression of dopamine receptor DRD4A, a complex environment increased expression of dopamine receptor DRD1B, while a variable social environment tended to increase serotonin receptor 5-HTR2B and increased serotonin transporter SLC6A4A expression. Despite both behavior and gene expression varying with early environment, there was no evidence that gene expression mediated the relationship between early environment and behavior.
    4. Our results confirm that environmental conditions early in life can affect phenotypic variation. However, the mechanistic pathway of the monoaminergic systems translating early environmental variation into observed behavioral responses was not detected.
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  • 45.
    Abbey-Lee, Robin N.
    et al.
    Linkoping Univ, IFM Biol, Dept Phys Chem & Biol, SE-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Uhrig, Emily J.
    Linkoping Univ, IFM Biol, Dept Phys Chem & Biol, SE-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Zidar, Josefina
    Linkoping Univ, IFM Biol, Dept Phys Chem & Biol, SE-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Favati, Anna
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Zool, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Almberg, Johan
    Linkoping Univ, IFM Biol, Dept Phys Chem & Biol, SE-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Dahlbom, Josefin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Winberg, Svante
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Lövlie, Hanne
    Linkoping Univ, IFM Biol, Dept Phys Chem & Biol, SE-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.
    The Influence of Rearing on Behavior, Brain Monoamines, and Gene Expression in Three-Spined Sticklebacks2018In: Brain, behavior, and evolution, ISSN 0006-8977, E-ISSN 1421-9743, Vol. 91, no 4, p. 201-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The causes of individual variation in behavior are often not well understood, and potential underlying mechanisms include both intrinsic and extrinsic factors, such as early environmental, physiological, and genetic differences. In an exploratory laboratory study, we raised three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) under 4 different environmental conditions (simulated predator environment, complex environment, variable social environment, and control). We investigated how these manipulations related to behavior, brain physiology, and gene expression later in life, with focus on brain dopamine and serotonin levels, turnover rates, and gene expression. The different rearing environments influenced behavior and gene expression, but did not alter monoamine levels or metabolites. Specifically, compared to control fish, fish exposed to a simulated predator environment tended to be less aggressive, more exploratory, and more neophobic; and fish raised in both complex and variable social environments tended to be less neophobic. Exposure to a simulated predator environment tended to lower expression of dopamine receptor DRD4A, a complex environment increased expression of dopamine receptor DRD1B, while a variable social environment tended to increase serotonin receptor 5-HTR2B and serotonin transporter SLC6A4A expression. Despite both behavior and gene expression varying with early environment, there was no evidence that gene expression mediated the relationship between early environment and behavior. Our results confirm that environmental conditions early in life can affect phenotypic variation. However, the mechanistic pathway of the monoaminergic systems translating early environmental variation into observed behavioral responses was not detected.

  • 46. Abbey-Lee, Robin N.
    et al.
    Uhrig, Emily J.
    Zidar, Josefina
    Favati, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Almberg, Johan
    Dahlbom, Josefin
    Winberg, Svante
    Løvlie, Hanne
    The Influence of Rearing on Behavior, Brain Monoamines, and Gene Expression in Three-Spined Sticklebacks2018In: Brain, behavior, and evolution, ISSN 0006-8977, E-ISSN 1421-9743, Vol. 91, no 4, p. 201-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The causes of individual variation in behavior are often not well understood, and potential underlying mechanisms include both intrinsic and extrinsic factors, such as early environmental, physiological, and genetic differences. In an exploratory laboratory study, we raised three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) under 4 different environmental conditions (simulated predator environment, complex environment, variable social environment, and control). We investigated how these manipulations related to behavior, brain physiology, and gene expression later in life, with focus on brain dopamine and serotonin levels, turnover rates, and gene expression. The different rearing environments influenced behavior and gene expression, but did not alter monoamine levels or metabolites. Specifically, compared to control fish, fish exposed to a simulated predator environment tended to be less aggressive, more exploratory, and more neophobic; and fish raised in both complex and variable social environments tended to be less neophobic. Exposure to a simulated predator environment tended to lower expression of dopamine receptor DRD4A, a complex environment increased expression of dopamine receptor DRD1B, while a variable social environment tended to increase serotonin receptor 5-HTR2B and serotonin transporter SLC6A4A expression. Despite both behavior and gene expression varying with early environment, there was no evidence that gene expression mediated the relationship between early environment and behavior. Our results confirm that environmental conditions early in life can affect phenotypic variation. However, the mechanistic pathway of the monoaminergic systems translating early environmental variation into observed behavioral responses was not detected.

  • 47.
    Abbey-Lee, Robin N.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Uhrig, Emily
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zidar, Josefina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Favati, A.
    Department of Zoology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Almberg, J.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dahlbom, J.
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala Biomedical Centre BMC, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Winberg, S.
    Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala Biomedical Centre BMC, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Løvlie, Hanne
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    The Influence of Rearing on Behavior, Brain Monoamines, and Gene Expression in Three-Spined Sticklebacks2018In: Brain, behavior, and evolution, ISSN 0006-8977, E-ISSN 1421-9743, Vol. 91, no 4, p. 201-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The causes of individual variation in behavior are often not well understood, and potential underlying mechanisms include both intrinsic and extrinsic factors, such as early environmental, physiological, and genetic differences. In an exploratory laboratory study, we raised three-spined sticklebacks <i>(Gasterosteus aculeatus)</i> under 4 different environmental conditions (simulated predator environment, complex environment, variable social environment, and control). We investigated how these manipulations related to behavior, brain physiology, and gene expression later in life, with focus on brain dopamine and serotonin levels, turnover rates, and gene expression. The different rearing environments influenced behavior and gene expression, but did not alter monoamine levels or metabolites. Specifically, compared to control fish, fish exposed to a simulated predator environment tended to be less aggressive, more exploratory, and more neophobic; and fish raised in both complex and variable social environments tended to be less neophobic. Exposure to a simulated predator environment tended to lower expression of dopamine receptor DRD4A, a complex environment increased expression of dopamine receptor DRD1B, while a variable social environment tended to increase serotonin receptor 5-HTR2B and serotonin transporter SLC6A4A expression. Despite both behavior and gene expression varying with early environment, there was no evidence that gene expression mediated the relationship between early environment and behavior. Our results confirm that environmental conditions early in life can affect phenotypic variation. However, the mechanistic pathway of the monoaminergic systems translating early environmental variation into observed behavioral responses was not detected.

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  • 48.
    Abbey-Lee, Robin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Uhrig, Emily
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Southern Oregon Univ, OR 97520 USA.
    Garnham, Laura
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lundgren, Kristoffer
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Child, Sarah
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Manchester, England.
    Lovlie, Hanne
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Experimental manipulation of monoamine levels alters personality in crickets2018In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 16211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Animal personality has been described in a range of species with ecological and evolutionary consequences. Factors shaping and maintaining variation in personality are not fully understood, but monoaminergic systems are consistently linked to personality variation. We experimentally explored how personality was influenced by alterations in two key monoamine systems: dopamine and serotonin. This was done using ropinirole and fluoxetine, two common human pharmaceuticals. Using the Mediterranean field cricket (Gryllus bimaculatus), we focused on the personality traits activity, exploration, and aggression, with confirmed repeatability in our study. Dopamine manipulations explained little variation in the personality traits investigated, while serotonin manipulation reduced both activity and aggression. Due to limited previous research, we created a dose-response curve for ropinirole, ranging from concentrations measured in surface waters to human therapeutic doses. No ropinirole dose level strongly influenced cricket personality, suggesting our results did not come from a dose mismatch. Our results indicate that the serotonergic system explains more variation in personality than manipulations of the dopaminergic system. Additionally, they suggest that monoamine systems differ across taxa, and confirm the importance of the mode of action of pharmaceuticals in determining their effects on behaviour.

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  • 49.
    Abbott, Jessica K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal Ecology.
    Intra-locus sexual conflict and sexually antagonistic genetic variation in hermaphroditic animals2011In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 278, no 1703, p. 161-169Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intra-locus sexual conflict results when sex-specific selection pressures for a given trait act against the intra-sexual genetic correlation for that trait. It has been found in a wide variety of taxa in both laboratory and natural populations, but the importance of intra-locus sexual conflict and sexually antagonistic genetic variation in hermaphroditic organisms has rarely been considered. This is not so surprising given the conceptual and theoretical association of intra-locus sexual conflict with sexual dimorphism, but there is no a priori reason why intra-locus sexual conflict cannot occur in hermaphroditic organisms as well. Here, I discuss the potential for intra-locus sexual conflict in hermaphroditic animals and review the available evidence for such conflict, and for the existence of sexually antagonistic genetic variation in hermaphrodites. I argue that mutations with asymmetric effects are particularly likely to be important in mediating sexual antagonism in hermaphroditic organisms. Moreover, sexually antagonistic genetic variation is likely to play an important role in inter-individual variation in sex allocation and in transitions to and from gonochorism (separate sexes) in simultaneous hermaphrodites. I also describe how sequential hermaphrodites may experience a unique form of intra-locus sexual conflict via antagonistic pleiotropy. Finally, I conclude with some suggestions for further research.

  • 50.
    Abbott, Jessica K.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal Ecology.
    Bedhomme, Stéphanie
    Evolutionary Systems Virology Group, University of Valencia.
    Chippindale, Adam K.
    Biology Department, Queen's University.
    Sexual conflict in wing size and shape in Drosophila melanogaster2010In: Journal of Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1010-061X, E-ISSN 1420-9101, Vol. 23, no 9, p. 1989-1997Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intralocus sexual conflict occurs when opposing selection pressures operate on loci expressed in both sexes, constraining the evolution of sexual dimorphism and displacing one or both sexes from their optimum. We eliminated intralocus conflict in Drosophila melanogaster by limiting transmission of all major chromosomes to males, thereby allowing them to win the intersexual tug-of-war. Here, we show that this male-limited (ML) evolution treatment led to the evolution (in both sexes) of masculinized wing morphology, body size, growth rate, wing loading, and allometry. In addition to more male-like size and shape, ML evolution resulted in an increase in developmental stability for males. However, females expressing ML chromosomes were less developmentally stable, suggesting that being ontogenetically more male-like was disruptive to development. We suggest that sexual selection over size and shape of the imago may therefore explain the persistence of substantial genetic variation in these characters and the ontogenetic processes underlying them.

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    FULLTEXT03
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