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  • 1.
    ., .
    et al.
    Swedish Environmental Protection Agency. Melica.
    ., .
    Swedish Environmental Protection Agency. Sportfiskarna.
    Flodpärlmusslans status i Västra Götaland: En inventering av nio av länets musselvattendrag 20132014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Under sommaren 2013 har Melica, och Sportfiskarna, på uppdrag av Länsstyrelsen Västra Götalands län inventerat flodpärlmussla i Enningdalsälven, Kolarebäcken, Sollumsån, Verkälven, Tattarströmmarna och Önnarp enligt metoden

    enkel statusbeskrivning. I Gärebäcken, Slereboån och Tidan har metoden statusbeskrivning använts. Syftet med övervakningen är att följa status och trender för de ingående vattendragen med avseende på flodpärlmussla och jämföra resultaten med tidigare inventeringar. Ett av vattendragen har inventerats tidigare, Gärebäcken, de resterande 8 är nyinventeringar.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2. ., .
    Sweden’s Seventh National Communication on Climate Change2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change poses an unprecedented threat to our lives and societies. It has immense consequences for human security across the globe. It is obvious that the way we organise our society and make use of natural resources are having a global long term impact on the ecosystem of our planet. The old model of achieving wealth through excessive use of natural resources has proved to be outdated. Some may argue that the call for a paradigm shift of development is too challenging. Sweden, however, sees a land of opportunities in transforming Sweden and the world towards sustainable development.

    It falls on governments to demonstrate political leadership to realize the Paris Agreement. As governments, we should introduce the necessary legislation to provide a long-term and predictable environment for society. Sweden is willing to show leadership. The policy instruments introduced have had a significant effect so far, and emissions have fallen by around 25 % in absolute numbers between 1990 and 2015, while the economy has grown by 75 %. That is good, but far from enough. With broad support from the parliament the government introduced a climate policy framework with a climate act for Sweden in June 2017. This framework is the most important climate reform in Sweden's history and sets out implementation of the Paris Agreement in Sweden. The framework contains new ambitious climate goals, a climate act and plans for a new climate policy council. The framework contains the following climate goals for Sweden:

    • Net zero emissions of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere by 2045, and thereafter negative emissions. Emissions from activities in Sweden must be at least 85 % lower than in 1990. Based on current population forecasts for Sweden, this means that emissions in Sweden will be less than one tonne per person by 2045.
    • By 2030, emissions from domestic transport, excluding domestic aviation, shall be reduced by at least 70 % compared with 2010.
    • Emissions in the sectors outside the EU emission trading scheme should be at least 63 % lower in 2030 and at least 75 % lower in 2040, as compared to 1990.

    These goals mean Sweden undertakes to achieve emission reductions that far exceed Sweden's required emission reductions under EU legislation. Sweden therefore is already moving beyond the commitment by the EU within the Paris Agreement, and encourages other countries to do the same.

    In this seventh Swedish National Communication to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), a comprehensive summary of Sweden's efforts to combat climate change is provided. Emissions and removals of greenhouse gases are reported for each sector and adopted and planned policy measures and their impact on emissions are described. The report contains projections for emissions up to 2020 and 2030. According to these projections, emissions will continue to decrease, and the national target for 2020 is within reach with national measures alone.

    The National Communication also describes Sweden's vulnerability and efforts to adapt to climate change. Sweden's contributions to climate finance are presented, as are research and development. Finally, a description is provided of Sweden's work on education, training and public awareness regarding climate change. The material on which the National Communication is based has been obtained through extensive activity and input from around ten government agencies, led by the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency.

  • 3. A. Marques, Ana F.
    et al.
    Roerdink, Desiree L.
    Baumberger, Tamara
    de Ronde, Cornel E. J.
    Ditchburn, Robert G.
    Denny, Alden
    Thorseth, Ingunn H.
    Okland, Ingeborg
    Lilley, Marvin D.
    Whitehouse, Martin J.
    Swedish Museum of Natural History, Department of Geology.
    Pedersen, Rolf B.
    The Seven Sisters Hydrothermal System: First Record of Shallow Hybrid Mineralization Hosted in Mafic Volcaniclasts on the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge2020Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We document the discovery of an active, shallow, seafloor hydrothermal system (known as the Seven Sisters Vent Field) hosted in mafic volcaniclasts at a mid-ocean ridge setting. The vent field is located at the southern part of the Arctic mid-ocean ridge where it lies on top of a flat-topped volcano at ~130 m depth. Up to 200 deg C phase-separating fluids vent from summit depressions in the volcano, and from pinnacle-like edifices on top of large hydrothermal mounds. The hydrothermal mineralization at Seven Sisters manifests as a replacement of mafic volcaniclasts, as direct intraclast precipitation from the hydrothermal fluid, and as elemental sulfur deposition within orifices. Barite is ubiquitous, and is sequentially replaced by pyrite, which is the first sulfide to form, followed by Zn-Cu-Pb-Ag bearing sulfides, sulfosalts, and silica. The mineralized rocks at Seven Sisters contain highly anomalous concentrations of ‘epithermal suite’ elements such as Tl, As, Sb and Hg, with secondary alteration assemblages including silica and dickite. Vent fluids have a pH of ~5 and are Ba and metal depleted. Relatively high dissolved Si (~7.6 mmol/L Si) combined with low (0.2–0.4) Fe/Mn suggest high-temperature reactions at ~150 bar. A delta-13C value of -5.4 permil in CO2 dominated fluids denotes magmatic degassing from a relatively undegassed reservoir. Furthermore, low CH4 and H2 (<0.026 mmol/kg and <0.009 mmol/kg, respectively) and 3He/4He of ~8.3 R/Racorr support a MORB-like, sediment-free fluid signature from an upper mantle source. Sulfide and secondary alteration mineralogy, fluid and gas chemistry, as well as delta-34S and 87Sr/86Sr values in barite and pyrite indicate that mineralization at Seven Sisters is sustained by the input of magmatic fluids with minimal seawater contribution. 226Ra/Ba radiometric dating of the barite suggests that this hydrothermal system has been active for at least 4670 +/- 60 yr.

  • 4. Aabrekk, S.
    et al.
    Tommerup, H.
    Svendsen, S.
    Mahapatra, Krushna
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Gustavsson, Leif
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development.
    Paiho, S.
    Ala-Juusela, M.
    Deliverable 2.2 Possible market strategies for one stop shops of renovation of single family house.: Report prepared for Nordic Innovation Centre2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The document describes examples of missions, visions and strategies based on the potentialpiloting models defined in report 3.2. It is based on status of interest amongst thestakeholders, and the information, figures and challenges which were discussed in the reportD 2.1 Stakeholder interests. The different service models will request different missionsdepending on the stakeholder in charge of the model. Also visions and strategies could bedifferent depending on the composition of services (core business) offered within each pilot aswell as the additional services offered by sub suppliers and the network connected to the pilot.In the report D2.1 Stakeholders interests, the following 5 different piloting models aresuggested:Type 1 Joint venture of industry, retailers and contractorsType 2 Joint venture of construction/renovation, industry and architect/engineering companiesType 3 Complementary businesses expand their business into renovationType 4 Joint venture of type house producer, bank and home owner associationType 5 Energy/building consultant, real estate agent and financing institutions, e.g. bankIn this report we have described mission, vision and market strategies for 4 existing orproposed models; The Project Manager by Bolig Enøk, from Norway (type 1), ENRA concept(type 2) and K-Rauta & Rautia (type 3) from Finland, and ProjectLavenergi (type 2) fromDenmark. Cleantech by Dong Energy (type 3) from Denmark is also addressed, but notdescribed in detail. As there is no concrete examples representing two of the models fromD2.1 (types 4 and 5), we have made a theoretical exercise in developing mission, vision andmarket strategies for type 5 model, while type 4 is not handled.It may be concluded that there are commercial actors in different parts of the value chainwhich see an opportunity in developing different approaches of “one stop shops” for energyefficient holistic renovations. The concepts are still in a development phase and differ inrespect to how they are organised (as supply side). We may say that the pilots in the differentcountries also find inspiration from each other through this research project. Due to thecomplexity of a holistic renovation project, it is a prerequisite with good partnerships even inthe development phase. In all identified models there is however one main actor taking thelead and ownership to the business model.Independent of the business model the responsible company needs to make some strategicchoices. The starting point is the SWOT analysis which sums up all major challenges for therespective business model. How the strategies should be developed is described in this report.Although the main target group for this report is companies seeing an interest in developingbusiness models for renovation, we found some important issues identified in the SWOTanalysis which the authorities may influence including lack of interest in the market (need ofmore public attention through holistic campaigns), fragmented solutions (stop subsidisingsingle measures without a holistic plan), serious vs unserious companies (need of certificationsystems to build credibility), cost focus leads to limited renovation (need of subventionschemes for holistic retrofitting including tax deduction measures) and finally lack incompetence within companies (need of support to training and collaboration acrosscompanies).

  • 5.
    Aage, Hans
    Roskilde University, Denmark.
    25. Economic Instruments: Three Interlinkages Between Ecology and Economics2012In: Rural Development and Land Use / [ed] Lars Rydén and Ingrid Karlsson, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2012, 1, p. 280-293Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Download full text (pdf)
    ehsa 3-25
  • 6.
    Aage, Hans
    Roskilde University, Denmark.
    51. The environment2002In: The Baltic Sea Region: Cultures, Politics, Societies / [ed] Witold Maciejewski, Uppsala: Baltic University Press , 2002, 1, p. 639-650Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Download full text (pdf)
    BSR 8-51
  • 7.
    Aalberg, Asbjørn Lein
    et al.
    SINTEF, Norway.
    Aamodt, Edvard
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Fire and Safety.
    Steen-Hansen, Anne
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Safety and Transport, Fire and Safety.
    Holen, Siri Mariane
    SINTEF, Norway.
    Læring etter branner i Norge – forutsetninger, barrierer og fremmende faktorer2022Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Denne rapporten presenterer resultater fra et prosjekt som er utført av Fire Research and Innovation Centre - FRIC fra 2020 til 2022. Første versjon av rapporten ble publisert på engelsk i mars 2022. Denne norske versjonen er oversatt av SINTEF Digital og RISE Fire Research i samarbeid. En spesiell takk til Caroline Kristensen for arbeidet med oversettelsen. Rapporten er også oppdatert på enkelte punkter, uten at fokus og konklusjoner skal være endret.

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    fulltext
  • 8. Aalto, Juha
    et al.
    Riihimäki, Henri
    Meineri, Eric
    Hylander, Kristoffer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Luoto, Miska
    Revealing topoclimatic heterogeneity using meteorological station data2017In: International Journal of Climatology, ISSN 0899-8418, E-ISSN 1097-0088, Vol. 37, no Suppl. 1, p. 544-556Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate is a crucial driver of the distributions and activity of multiple biotic and abiotic processes, and thus high-quality and high-resolution climate data are often prerequisite in various environmental research. However, contemporary gridded climate products suffer critical problems mainly related to sub-optimal pixel size and lack of local topography-driven temperature heterogeneity. Here, by integrating meteorological station data, high-quality terrain information and multivariate modelling, we aim to explicitly demonstrate this deficiency. Monthly average temperatures (1981-2010) from Finland, Sweden and Norway were modelled using generalized additive modelling under (1) a conventional (i.e. considering geographical location, elevation and water cover) and (2) a topoclimatic framework (i.e. also accounting for solar radiation and cold-air pooling). The performance of the topoclimatic model was significantly higher than the conventional approach for most months, with bootstrapped mean R-2 for the topoclimatic model varying from 0.88 (January) to 0.95 (October). The estimated effect of solar radiation was evident during summer, while cold air pooling was identified to improve local temperature estimates in winter. The topoclimatic modelling exposed a substantial temperature heterogeneity within coarser landscape units (>5 degrees C/1 km(-2) in summer) thus unveiling a wide range of potential microclimatic conditions neglected by the conventional approach. Moreover, the topoclimatic model predictions revealed a pronounced asymmetry in average temperature conditions, causing isotherms during summer to differ several hundreds of metres in altitude between the equator and pole facing slopes. In contrast, cold-air pooling in sheltered landscapes lowered the winter temperatures ca. 1.1 degrees C/100m towards the local minimum altitude. Noteworthy, the analysis implies that conventional models produce biassed predictions of long-term average temperature conditions, with errors likely to be high at sites associated with complex topography.

  • 9. Aamaas, Borgar
    et al.
    Boggild, Carl Egede
    Stordal, Frode
    Berntsen, Terje
    Holmen, Kim
    Ström, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Elemental carbon deposition to Svalbard snow from Norwegian settlements and long-range transport2011In: Tellus. Series B, Chemical and physical meteorology, ISSN 0280-6509, E-ISSN 1600-0889, Vol. 63, no 3, p. 340-351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The impact on snow pack albedo from local elemental carbon (EC) sources in Svalbard has been investigated for the winter of 2008. Highly elevated EC concentrations in the snow are observed around the settlements of Longyearbyen and Svea (locally > 1000 ng g(-1), about 200 times over the background level), while EC concentrations similar to the background level are seen around Ny-Alesund. Near Longyearbyen and Svea, darkened snow influenced by wind transported coal dust from open coal stockpiles is clearly visible from satellite images and by eye at the ground. As a first estimate, the reduction in snow albedo caused by local EC pollution from the Norwegian settlements has been compared to the estimated reduction caused by long-range transported EC for entire Svalbard. The effect of local EC from Longyearbyen, Svea and all Norwegian settlements are estimated to 2.1%, 7.9% and 10% of the total impact of EC, respectively. The EC particles tend to stay on the surface during melting, and elevated EC concentrations due to the spring melt was observed. This accumulation of EC enhances the positive albedo feedbacks. The EC concentrations were observed to be larger in metamorphosed snow than in fresh snow, and especially around ice lenses.

  • 10. Aaro, Sven
    et al.
    Sjöström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Solid Earth Geology.
    Airborne and ground geophysics used for regional tectonic analysis2003In: IUGG 2003, Sapporo, Japan: No GAV.06/10P/A11-004, B260., 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11. Aas, W.
    et al.
    Tsyro, S.
    Bieber, E.
    Bergström, Robert
    SMHI, Research Department, Air quality.
    Ceburnis, D.
    Ellermann, T.
    Fagerli, H.
    Froelich, M.
    Gehrig, R.
    Makkonen, U.
    Nemitz, E.
    Otjes, R.
    Perez, N.
    Perrino, C.
    Prevot, A. S. H.
    Putaud, J. -P
    Simpson, D.
    Spindler, G.
    Vana, M.
    Yttri, K. E.
    Lessons learnt from the first EMEP intensive measurement periods2012In: Atmospheric Chemistry And Physics, ISSN 1680-7316, E-ISSN 1680-7324, Vol. 12, no 17, p. 8073-8094Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first EMEP intensive measurement periods were held in June 2006 and January 2007. The measurements aimed to characterize the aerosol chemical compositions, including the gas/aerosol partitioning of inorganic compounds. The measurement program during these periods included daily or hourly measurements of the secondary inorganic components, with additional measurements of elemental- and organic carbon (EC and OC) and mineral dust in PM1, PM2.5 and PM10. These measurements have provided extended knowledge regarding the composition of particulate matter and the temporal and spatial variability of PM, as well as an extended database for the assessment of chemical transport models. This paper summarise the first experiences of making use of measurements from the first EMEP intensive measurement periods along with EMEP model results from the updated model version to characterise aerosol composition. We investigated how the PM chemical composition varies between the summer and the winter month and geographically. The observation and model data are in general agreement regarding the main features of PM10 and PM2.5 composition and the relative contribution of different components, though the EMEP model tends to give slightly lower estimates of PM10 and PM2.5 compared to measurements. The intensive measurement data has identified areas where improvements are needed. Hourly concurrent measurements of gaseous and particulate components for the first time facilitated testing of modelled diurnal variability of the gas/aerosol partitioning of nitrogen species. In general, the modelled diurnal cycles of nitrate and ammonium aerosols are in fair agreement with the measurements, but the diurnal variability of ammonia is not well captured. The largest differences between model and observations of aerosol mass are seen in Italy during winter, which to a large extent may be explained by an underestimation of residential wood burning sources. It should be noted that both primary and secondary OC has been included in the calculations for the first time, showing promising results. Mineral dust is important, especially in southern Europe, and the model seems to capture the dust episodes well. The lack of measurements of mineral dust hampers the possibility for model evaluation for this highly uncertain PM component. There are also lessons learnt regarding improved measurements for future intensive periods. There is a need for increased comparability between the measurements at different sites. For the nitrogen compounds it is clear that more measurements using artefact free methods based on continuous measurement methods and/or denuders are needed. For EC/OC, a reference methodology (both in field and laboratory) was lacking during these periods giving problems with comparability, though measurement protocols have recently been established and these should be followed by the Parties to the EMEP Protocol. For measurements with no defined protocols, it might be a good solution to use centralised laboratories to ensure comparability across the network. To cope with the introduction of these new measurements, new reporting guidelines have been developed to ensure that all proper information about the methodologies and data quality is given.

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    fulltext
  • 12.
    Aasa, Jenny
    et al.
    Executive, Forskningsinstitut, IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Sandberg, Jasmin
    Executive, Forskningsinstitut, IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Viktor, Tomas
    Executive, Forskningsinstitut, IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Fång, Johan
    Executive, Forskningsinstitut, IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Rodenticide screening 2016–2018 Exposures in birds (raptors and gulls) and red foxes2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Rodenticides are biocidal products that are used in order to control rats and mice. This screening study aims at investigating whether chemical substances belonging to the group anticoagulant rodenticides can be detected in Swedish non-target biota, and to investigate if the levels are different compared with the results from a previous study.

    The levels of anticoagulant rodenticides detected in the present screening study are similar to those found in earlier studies in Sweden and elsewhere. The literature indicates that toxic effects can occur in birds at levels > 100 ng/g (liver) whereas the level > 200 ng/g has been proposed to be a threshold level in foxes. Some individuals of raptors (n =2) and several foxes (n = 7) exceed these levels in the present study. These data suggest that anticoagulant rodenticides that are transferred in the food web may cause secondary toxicity in non-target mammals and birds in Sweden. However, no pathology has been performed for the individuals of the present study that can confirm any concentration-effect relationship or reason for mortality.

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    fulltext
  • 13.
    Aastrup Lotta, Mats
    et al.
    Executive, Myndigheter, Sveriges geologiska undersökning, SGU.
    Lewin-Pihlblad, Lotta
    Executive, Myndigheter, Sveriges geologiska undersökning, SGU.
    Gierup, Jonas
    Executive, Myndigheter, Sveriges geologiska undersökning, SGU.
    McCarthy, Jenny
    Executive, Myndigheter, Sveriges geologiska undersökning, SGU.
    Åsman, Magnus
    Executive, Myndigheter, Sveriges geologiska undersökning, SGU.
    Förslag till nytt nationellt miljöövervakningsprogram för grundvatten inom Sötvattenprogrammet2006Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vi har utrett i vilken utsträckning en kombination av trendstationer och omdrevsstationerkan svara upp till ramdirektivets krav avseende den kontrollerande övervakningen avförekomster som inte bedömts vara utsatta för risk att inte nå målen.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 14.
    Aastrup, Mats
    et al.
    Executive, Myndigheter, Sveriges geologiska undersökning, SGU.
    Lewin Pihlblad, Lotta
    Executive, Myndigheter, Sveriges geologiska undersökning, SGU.
    McCarthy, Jenny
    Executive, Myndigheter, Sveriges geologiska undersökning, SGU.
    Screening av miljögifter i grundvatten - sammanställning av undersökningar gjorda 2003-20092010Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 15.
    Aastrup, Mats
    et al.
    Executive, Länstyrelserna, länsstyrelsen, lst, Länsstyrelsen Blekinge län.
    Lång, Lars-Ove
    Executive, Länstyrelserna, länsstyrelsen, lst, Länsstyrelsen Blekinge län.
    Thunholm, Bo
    Executive, Länstyrelserna, länsstyrelsen, lst, Länsstyrelsen Blekinge län.
    Åsman, Magnus
    Executive, Länstyrelserna, länsstyrelsen, lst, Länsstyrelsen Blekinge län.
    Utvärdering av grundvattendata från den regionalamiljöövervakningen i Blekinge: Rapport till Länsstyrelsen Blekinge län2001Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Sveriges geologiska undersökning (SGU) har fått i uppdrag av länsstyrelsen i Blekinge

    län att utvärdera länets nuvarande program för övervakning av grundvatten. Programmet

    omfattar regelbundna analyser av grundvatten från 13 brunnar vid vattenverk, 21 privata

    brunnar i jordbruks- eller skogsmark samt 30 källor. I uppdraget ingår att bedöma

    grundvattenstatusen enligt Naturvårdsverkets ”Bedömningsgrunder för miljökvalitet –

    Grundvatten” samt att göra tidseriestudier av vissa parametrar. Ett förslag till framtida

    övervakningsprogram lämnas. Uppdraget redovisas i denna rapport och som underlag

    har legat mätdata tillgängliga i mars 2001.

    Länsstyrelsens mål med programmet är att kunna kontrollera att grundvattnet kan ge en

    tillräcklig mängd dricksvatten med fullgod kvalitet. Tyngdpunkten ligger på övervakning av

    försurning av grundvattnet. Genom att bevaka både grunda grundvattentäkter med snabb

    omsättning av grundvattnet samt djupa med långsam omsättning är avsikten att både

    långtidseffekter och tidiga miljöförändringar skall kunna spåras. Detta syfte illustreras av att

    den genomsnittliga alkaliniteten för lokalerna ligger inom hela intervallet 0 till 236 mg/l.

    Enligt bedömningsgrunder för miljökvalitet – Grundvatten finns tre geografiska regioner

    representerade inom Blekinge: A – Sydsveriges sedimentära berggrundsområde, B –

    Sydsvenska höglandet och C – Väst- och sydostkusten. Efter indelning i grundvattenmiljö

    och djup hamnade 20 av lokalerna i

    B3g = ”grunda brunnar (<4 m) i öppna akviferer i

    morän eller svallsediment i region Sydsvenska höglandet”. Vid indelningen erhölls för

    övriga typområden-djup få lokaler. Resultaten visar ändå god samstämmighet med

    referensvärden. Alkaliniteten för lokalerna i morän i både region B och C är dock låg vilket

    visar på att övervakningsnätet bevakar grundvatten med mycket låg buffertförmåga.

    Mätseriernas längd och frekvens i provtagning varierar för lokalerna i de olika

    undersökningsprogrammen. För tolkningen av tidsmässiga förändringar används i första

    hand lokaler med tidsserier från en 15 års-period och där minst åtta analyser har utförts. De

    övriga, korta tidsserierna återspeglar främst tendenser från 90-talet. Resultaten visar att i

    jonsvaga grundvatten har en viss ökning skett av pH, alkalinitet och färg medan halterna av

    kalcium, magnesium och sulfat minskat. Förändringarna i halter som ger de signifikanta

    trenderna är oftast små. Det finns inget tydligt mönster i förändringar av klorid och

    konduktivitet. Halterna av kväve och fosfor minskar i flera lokaler.

    Det är av värde att de analyser som utförs är så samstämmiga som möjligt inom hela

    övervakningsprogrammet. För samtliga prov bör huvudkomponenterna kalcium,

    magnesium, kalium, natrium, alkalinitet, sulfat, klorid och kväve ingå för att jonbalanser

    skall kunna beräknas och kvaliteten i analyserna kunna kontrolleras. En översiktlig

    prioritering av källor och brunnar har föreslagits. För slutlig bedömning av programmets

    framtida omfattning behöver informationen om respektive lokal utökas, främst med en

    hydrogeologisk dokumentation i fält.

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    fulltext
  • 16.
    Aava Olsson, Birgitta
    et al.
    Swedish Transport Administration.
    Prokopov, Andrej
    Swedish Transport Administration.
    Beräknade utsläpp av växthusgaser: En jämförande studie av två spårformer i tunnel2023Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Trafikverkets klimatmål kan uppfyllas bland annat genom att öka kunskapen om klimatpåverkan inom projekten. Syftet med denna studie var att få en bild över de totala utsläppen av växthusgaser vid byggande, underhåll och renovering av de två spårformerna ballastspår och ballastfritt spår. Som studieobjekt användes uppgifter för två enkelspår (2 400 spårmeter [spm] vardera) genom Hallsberg–Stenkumla-tunneln. Beräkningarna utfördes i Trafikverkets klimatkalkylverktyg.  

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  • 17.
    Abad, Esteban
    et al.
    CSIC, Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research, Laboratory of Dioxins, Barcelona, Spain.
    Abalos, Manuela
    CSIC, Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research, Laboratory of Dioxins, Barcelona, Spain.
    Fiedler, Heidelore
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Air monitoring with passive samplers for dioxin-like persistent organic pollutants in developing countries (2017-2019)2021In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 287, no Pt 1, article id 131931Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As part of the global monitoring plan on persistent organic pollutants (GMP) under the Stockholm Convention passive air samplers equipped with polyurethane foam disks (PUFs) were applied to monitor dioxin-like POPs. For sampling, toluene-pretreated PUFs were exposed for three months during two years. Chemical analysis was performed in one accredited expert laboratory using internationally accepted methods; for comparison, all results were normalized to one PUF and 3 month exposure. Total TEQs, using WHO2005-TEFs, were lowest in the Pacific Islands countries (PAC) and had similar mean values in Africa (16.8 pg TEQ/PUF), Asia (16.9 pg TEQ/PUF), and Latin American and Caribbean countries (GRULAC, 13.3 pg TEQ/PUF). Using median values, Asia (13.4 pg TEQ/PUF) and GRULAC (13.1 pg TEQ/PUF) had higher amounts than Africa (6.1 pg TEQ/PUF) and PAC (2.1 pg TEQ/PUF). The contribution of PCDD/PCDF to the total TEQ was 2-3-times higher than from the dl-PCB. Mono-ortho PCB did not play a role in any of the samples. The previous 40 samples during 2010/2011 and the present 195 samples from 2017/2018 did not show a statistical difference (p value = 0.3), only for GRULAC, a downward trend was identified. It is recommended combining 4 PUFs to ‘annual’ samples.

  • 18.
    Abadi, Mehrdad Sardar
    et al.
    Leibniz Inst Appl Geophys, LIAG, Rock Phys & Borehole Geophys, Hannover, Germany..
    Voeten, Dennis F. A. E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Kulagina, Elena, I
    Russian Acad Sci, Ufa Fed Res Ctr, Inst Geol, Ufa, Russia..
    Boulvain, Frederic
    Univ Liege, Dept Geol, Lab Petrol Sedimentaire, Bat B20, Liege, Belgium..
    Da Silva, Anne-Christine
    Univ Liege, Dept Geol, Lab Petrol Sedimentaire, Bat B20, Liege, Belgium..
    A comment on overlooked storm sensitivity of the carbonate factory recorded in the Mississippian Mobarak Formation (Alborz Mountains, Iran)2022In: Geological Journal, ISSN 0072-1050, E-ISSN 1099-1034, Vol. 57, no 10, p. 4388-4392Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    New interpretations of depositional palaeoenvironments in the Mississippian (Lower Carboniferous) Mobarak Formation (Alborz Mountains, Iran) suggest a significant and persistent influence of storms. This deviates from previous conclusions that these deposits recorded mounds, patch reefs, and extensive lagoons deposited under stagnant environmental conditions. We here clarify and discuss the origin and nature of this misconception by explaining "unexpected" observations that are informed by outdated interpretations of the depositional environment of the Mobarak Formation. This evaluation offers the context required for appropriately interpreting and correlating Mississippian depositional records across the Alborz Basin.

  • 19. Abafe, Ovokeroye A.
    et al.
    Späth, Jana
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Fick, Jerker
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Jansson, Stina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Buckley, Chris
    Stark, Annegret
    Pietruschka, Bjoern
    Martincigh, Bice S.
    LC-MS/MS determination of antiretroviral drugs in influents and effluents from wastewater treatment plants in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa2018In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 200, p. 660-670Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    South Africa has the largest occurrence of the human immune deficiency virus (HIV) in the world but has also implemented the largest antiretroviral (ARV) treatment programme. It was therefore of interest to determine the presence and concentrations of commonly used antiretroviral drugs (ARVDs) and, also, to determine the capabilities of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) for removing ARVDs. To this end, a surrogate standard based LC-MS/MS method was optimized and applied for the detection of thirteen ARVDs used in the treatment and management of HIV/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) in two major and one modular WWTP in the eThekwini Municipality in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The method was validated and the detection limits fell within the range of 2–20 ng L−1. The analytical recoveries for the ARVDs were mainly greater than 50% with acceptable relative standard deviations. The concentration values ranged from <LOD – 53000 ng L−1 (influent), <LOD – 34000 ng L−1 (effluent) in a decentralized wastewater treatment facility (DEWATS); <LOD – 24000 ng L−1 (influent), <LOD – 33000 ng L−1 (effluent) in Northern WWTP and 61–34000 ng L−1 (influent), <LOD – 20000 ng L−1 (effluent) in Phoenix WWTP. Whilst abacavir, lamivudine and zidovudine were almost completely removed from the effluents, atazanavir, efavirenz, lopinavir and nevirapine persisted in the effluents from all three WWTPs. To estimate the ecotoxicological risks associated with the discharge of ARVDs, a countrywide survey focussing on the occurrence of ARVDs in WWTPs, surface and fresh water bodies, and aquatic organisms, is necessary.

  • 20. Abarca, R. R. M.
    et al.
    Gaudio, M. T.
    Chakraborty, S.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Water and Environmental Engineering.
    Metals toxic pollutants in the environment: Anthropogenic and geological causes and remediation2019In: Current Trends and Future Developments on (Bio-) Membranes: Membranes in Environmental Applications, Elsevier Inc. , 2019, p. 109-124Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Heavy metals are naturally present in nature, but if their concentration is higher than the normal accepted threshold levels, they constitute one of the pollutants that is more difficult to remove and also to rehabilitate the contaminated site by them. There are many heavy-metal pollutants-the most common among them are arsenic (As), chromium (Cr), lead (Pb), mercury (Hg), cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), magnesium (Mg), manganese (Mn), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), selenium (Se), and zinc (Zn), along with the less common ones, which produced, for example, by the nuclear process, such as uranium (U)-in different configuration; hence, many possibilities of contamination in the world exist, and they are more difficult to remove.Thus heavy-metal pollution is more and more becoming one of the principal issues of the global interest, because it is common to both industrialized countries and developing countries. These issues are getting hard to be recognized and cannot be followed the simple rules concerning safety and environmental protection, thus fall into the same errors of the already industrialized countries. At the same time, new environment-remediation techniques are developed in the last decade, especially, in these last years. Some of these technologies concern physical or chemical process or effects, such as ion exchanges, flotations, and photocatalysis, while other technologies concern the use of membrane process, especially ultrafiltration or membrane integrated process or hybrid systems, where membranes are generally submerged and used together with another process.In this chapter a review of this problem and some example of technologies for removing and remediation of the environment are reported. 

  • 21.
    Abarca-Guerrero, Lilliana
    et al.
    Univ Tecnol Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Maas, Ger
    Univ Tecnol Eindhoven, Netherlands.
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Desafíos en la gestión de residuos sólidos para las ciudades de países en desarrollo [Solid waste management challenges for cities in developing countries]2015In: Tecnología en Marcha, ISSN 0379-3982, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 141-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Solid waste management is a challenge for the cities' authorities in developing countries mainly due to the increasing generation of waste, the burden posed on the municipal budget as a result of the high costs associated to its management, the lack of understanding over a diversity of factors that affect the different stages of waste management and linkages necessary to enable the entire handling system functioning. An analysis of literature on the work done and reported mainly in publications from 2005 to 2011, related to waste management in developing countries, showed that few articles give quantitative information. The analysis was conducted in two of the major scientific journals, Waste Management Journal and Waste Management and Research. The objective of this research was to determine the stakeholders' action/behavior that have a role in the waste management process and to analyze influential factors on the system, in more than thirty urban areas in 22 developing countries in 4 continents. A combination of methods was used in this study in order to assess the stakeholders and the factors influencing the performance of waste management in the cities. Data was collected from scientific literature, existing data bases, observations made during visits to urban areas, structured interviews with relevant professionals, exercises provided to participants in workshops and a questionnaire applied to stakeholders. Descriptive and inferential statistic methods were used to draw conclusions. The outcomes of the research are a comprehensive list of stakeholders that are relevant in the waste management systems and a set of factors that reveal the most important causes for the systems' failure. The information provided is very useful when planning, changing or implementing waste management systems in cities.

  • 22.
    Abba, Alia Besma
    et al.
    Laboratory of Water and Environment Engineering in Saharan Environment, University of Ouargla, PB 147 RP, Ouargla 30000, Algeria.
    Saggai, Sofiane
    Laboratory of Water and Environment Engineering in Saharan Environment, University of Ouargla, PB 147 RP, Ouargla 30000, Algeria.
    Touil, Youcef
    Laboratory of Biogeochemical of Desert Environment, University of Ouargla, PB 147 RP, Ouargla 30000, Algeria.
    Al-Ansari, Nadhir
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering.
    Kouadri, Saber
    Laboratory of Water and Environment Engineering in Saharan Environment, University of Ouargla, PB 147 RP, Ouargla 30000, Algeria.
    Nouasria, Fatima Zohra
    Dynamic Interactions and Reactivity of Systems, University of Ouargla, PB 147 RP, Ouargla 30000, Algeria.
    Najm, Hadee Mohammed
    Department of Civil Engineering, Zakir Husain Engineering College, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202002, India.
    Mashaan, Nuha S.
    Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Civil and Mechanical Engineering, Curtin University, Bentley, WA 6102, Australia.
    Eldirderi, Moutaz Mustafa A.
    Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, King Khalid University, Abha 61421, Saudi Arabia.
    Khedher, Khaled Mohamed
    Department of Civil Engineering, College of Engineering, King Khalid University, Abha 61421, Saudi Arabia; Department of Civil Engineering, High Institute of Technological Studies, Mrezgua University Campus, Nabeul 8000, Tunisia.
    Copper and Zinc Removal from Wastewater Using Alum Sludge Recovered from Water Treatment Plant2022In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 16, article id 9806Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study aimed to determine Aluminum sludge composition and structure for its valorisation as an alternative natural material for heavy metals removal from wastewater for further reuse as treated water in different applications. The study was conducted to investigate the introduction of Al-bearing sludge composition. The physical and chemical properties were examined using X-ray diffraction tests (XRD), scanning electron microscope tests (SEM), Fourier-transform infrared tests (FTIR), and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller tests (BET). Furthermore, the heavy metal concentrations of synthetic wastewater were measured using the spectrophotometry method. The experimental procedure is based on testing different pH limits and amounts of aluminum sludge to find the optimum conditions for copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) removal. The results demonstrated a high removal efficiency where its value reached up to 97.4% and 96.6% for Zn and Cu, respectively, in an acidic medium (pH = 6) using a relatively high amount of sludge (1400 mg). Nevertheless, a low efficiency was obtained in the strongly acidic medium (pH = 4) and a smaller sludge amount of about 480 mg.

  • 23. Abbak, Ramazan A.
    et al.
    Sjöberg, Lars E.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Geodesy and Geoinformatics.
    Ellmann, Artu
    Ustun, Aydin
    A precise gravimetric geoid model in a mountainous area with scarce gravity data: a case study in central Turkey2012In: Studia Geophysica et Geodaetica, ISSN 0039-3169, E-ISSN 1573-1626, Vol. 56, no 4, p. 909-927Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In mountainous regions with scarce gravity data, gravimetric geoid determination is a difficult task that needs special attention to obtain reliable results satisfying the demands, e.g., of engineering applications. The present study investigates a procedure for combining a suitable global geopotential model and available terrestrial data in order to obtain a precise regional geoid model for Konya Closed Basin (KCB). The KCB is located in the central part of Turkey, where a very limited amount of terrestrial gravity data is available. Various data sources, such as the Turkish digital elevation model with 3 '' x 3 '' resolution, a recently published satellite-only global geopotential model from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment satellite (GRACE) and the ground gravity observations, are combined in the least-squares sense by the modified Stokes' formula. The new gravimetric geoid model is compared with Global Positioning System (GPS)/levelling at the control points, resulting in the Root Mean Square Error (RMS) differences of +/- 6.4 cm and 1.7 ppm in the absolute and relative senses, respectively. This regional geoid model appears to he more accurate than the Earth Gravitational Model 2008, which is the best global model over the target area, with the RMS differences of +/- 8.6 cm and 1.8 ppm in the absolute and relative senses, respectively. These results show that the accuracy of a regional gravimetric model can be augmented by the combination of a global geopotential model and local terrestrial data in mountainous areas even though the quality and resolution of the primary terrestrial data are not satisfactory to the geoid modelling procedure.

  • 24. Abbasi, Alireza
    et al.
    Geranmayeh, Shokoofeh
    Skripkin, Mikhail Y.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Potassium ion-mediated non-covalent bonded coordination polymers2012In: Dalton Transactions, ISSN 1477-9226, E-ISSN 1477-9234, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 850-859Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Crystal structures and vibrational spectra of three related network-forming coordination complexes have been studied. Two novel thermodynamically stable pseudo-polymorphic solvated rhodium chloro compounds, [cis-RhCl4(DMSO-kappa S)(2)K](n), 1, and [cis-RhCl4(DMSO-kappa S)(2)K center dot 3H(2)O](n), 2, and one metastable compound [trans-RhCl4(DMSO-kappa S)(2)K center dot 0.25H(2)O](n), 3, crystallize at ambient temperature in the orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) for 1, and the monoclinic space groups P2(1)/n and P2(1)/c for 2 and 3, respectively. All three structures contain [RhCl4(DMSO-kappa S)(2)]-complexes in which the rhodium(III) ions bind to two dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) sulfur atoms and four chloride ions in distorted octahedral coordination geometries. The complexes are connected in networks via potassium ions interacting with the Cl- and the DMSO oxygen atoms. As the sum of Shannon ionic radii of K+ and Cl- exceeds the K-Cl distances in compounds under study, these compounds can be described as Rh-Cl-K coordination polymers with non-covalent bonding, which is not common in these systems, forming 1- and 2-D networks for 1/2 and 3, respectively. The 2-D network with nano-layered sheets for compound 3 was also confirmed by TEM images. Further evaluation of the bonding in the cis- and trans-[RhCl4(DMSO-kappa S)(2)](-) entities was obtained by recording Raman and FT-IR absorption spectra and assigning the vibrational frequencies with the support of force-field calculations. The force field study of complexes reveals the strong domination of trans-effect (DMSO-kappa S > Cl) over the effect of non-covalent bonding in coordination polymeric structures. The comparison of calculated RhCl, RhS and SO stretching force constants showed evidence of K+-ligand interactions whereas direct experimental evidences of K+-Cl- interaction were not obtained because of strong overlap of the corresponding spectral region with that where lattice modes and Rh-ligand bendings appear.

  • 25. Abbasi, Hassan
    Nedbrytning, avdunstning, adsorption och extraherbarhet av oljehaltiga jordar. Laboratorieförsök1993Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    (1) Jordterminologi och teori; (2) Oljor, förändringsprocesser; (3) Fakta om oljeprodukter; (4) Experiment

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  • 26. Abbasi, Saeed
    et al.
    Jansson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Olander, Lars
    Olofsson, Ulf
    Sellgren, Ulf
    A pin-on-disc study of the rate of airborne wear particle emissions from railway braking materials2012In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 284, p. 18-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current study investigates the characteristics of particles generated from the wear of braking materials, and provides an applicable index for measuring and comparing wear particle emissions. A pin-on-disc tribometer equipped with particle measurement instruments was used. The number concentration, size, morphology, and mass concentration of generated particles were investigated and reported for particles 10 nm-32 mu m in diameter. The particles were also collected on filters and investigated using EDS and SEM. The effects of wear mechanisms on particle morphology and changes in particle concentration are discussed. A new index, the airborne wear particle emission rate (AWPER), is suggested that could be used in legislation to control non-exhaust emissions from transport modes, particularly rail transport.

  • 27.
    Abbasi, Saeed
    et al.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Machine Design, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jansson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Sellgren, Ulf
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Machine Design, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Olofsson, Ulf
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Machine Design, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Particle Emissions From Rail Traffic: A Literature Review2013In: Critical reviews in environmental science and technology, ISSN 1064-3389, E-ISSN 1547-6537, Vol. 43, no 23, p. 2511-2544Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Particle emissions are a drawback of rail transport. This work is a comprehensive presentation of recent research into particle emissions from rail vehicles. Both exhaust and nonexhaust particle emissions are considered when examining particle characteristics such as PM10, and PM2.5 concentration levels, size, morphology, composition, and adverse health effects, current legislation, and available and proposed solutions for reducing such emissions. High concentration levels in enclosed rail traffic environments are reported and some toxic effects of the particles. The authors find that only a few limited studies have examined the adverse health effects of nonexhaust particle emissions and that no relevant legislation exists. Thus further research in this area is warranted.

  • 28. Abbasi, Saeed
    et al.
    Olander, Lars
    Larsson, Christina
    Olofsson, Ulf
    Jansson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Sellgren, Ulf
    A field test study of airborne wear particles from a running regional train2012In: Proceedings of the Institution of mechanical engineers. Part F, journal of rail and rapid transit, ISSN 0954-4097, E-ISSN 2041-3017, Vol. 226, no 1, p. 95-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inhalable airborne particles have inverse health effects. In railways, mechanical brakes, the wheel–rail contact, current collectors, ballast, sleepers, and masonry structures yield particulate matter. Field tests examined a Swedish track using a train instrumented with particle measurement devices, brake pad temperature sensors, and speed and brake sensors. The main objective of this field test was to study the characteristics of particles generated from disc brakes on a running train with an on-board measuring set-up. Two airborne particle sampling points were designated, one near a pad–rotor disc brake contact and a second under the frame, not near a mechanical brake or the wheel–rail contact; the numbers and size distributions of the particles detected were registered and evaluated under various conditions (e.g. activating/deactivating electrical brakes or negotiating curves). During braking, three speed/temperature-dependent particle peaks were identified in the fine region, representing particles 280, 350, and 600 nm in diameter. In the coarse region, a peak was discerned for particles 3–6 µm in diameter. Effects of brake pad temperature on particle size distribution were also investigated. Results indicate that the 280 nm peak increased with increasing temperature, and that electrical braking significantly reduced airborne particle numbers. Field emission scanning electron microscope images captured particles sizing down to 50 nm. The inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry results indicated that Fe, Cu, Zn, Al, Ca, and Mg were the main elements constituting the particles.

  • 29.
    Abbasian, Maryam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    2D Reflection Seismic Imaging of Sparse 3D Data in the Zinkgruvan Mine, Central Sweden2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Zinkgruvan mining area in the southern Bergslagen mineral district of central Sweden holds over 30 million tons of massive sulphide mineralization. The ever-increasing global demand for mineral/metal resources, together with metal consumption growth especially for high-tech purposes has made the exploration of these resources of particular importance. In this thesis work, as a part of the larger research-industry SIT4ME project, Seismic Image Techniques for Mineral Exploration, project sponsored by the EIT Raw Materials, three 2D-crooked reflection seismic profiles were extracted from a sparse 3D dataset in the Zinkgruvan mining area and processed in a combination since approximately 600 receivers simultaneously recorded 368 shots along these three different profiles. One of the profiles (P1) was acquired using 10 m receiver and source intervals, while the other two profiles (P3 and P4) were acquired using 20 m receiver and 10 m source intervals. The data show notable reflections on several shot gathers presenting reasonable quality, although parts are severely contaminated with electricity grid noise from a major powerline crossing the profiles. The study mainly aims at providing information applicable for near surface structural imaging in this complex geological setting. Three different combinations of CDP lines for every two different profiles were binned and processed together in order to examine 3D nature of reflections and their corresponding geological origins. Through a number of tests and careful parameter selections, reflections in the raw shot gathers were enhanced. The final sections (both unmigrated and migrated stacks) show clear reflections associated with important geological units. This thesis presents the acquisition setup, reflection seismic processing procedure, results obtained and the interpretation of the three cross profiles in conjunction with available geological data from the site. The sections show a good correlation with the available borehole data from the site. 

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  • 30.
    Abbaszade, Yegana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Sustainability priorities of Swedish companies: an analysis of materiality matrixes2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, I used quantitative content analysis to analyze the materiality matrixes of sustainability reports to identify the sustainability priorities of major companies in Sweden. I focus on the 131 largest listed companies in the country within six industries: material, consumer goods, capital goods, daily goods, banks, and investment companies. The research questions include: (1) What are the primary focus areas of materiality for the largest listed companies in Sweden by industry? (2) On an overarching level, is the focus among all companies more environmental or social? (3) What are the primary applications of materiality analysis in the context of corporate decision-making in Sweden? The findings reveal that the primary materiality topics for Swedish companies are business ethics and climate impact. The focus is slightly more environmental, with 54% of companies having more of an environmental focus. Interestingly, only 22% of companies mentioned using materiality strategically, while a larger portion (40%) use materiality to identify their sustainability priorities. This research highlights the need for companies in Sweden to prioritize strategic sustainability in the face of new legislation, such as the Corporate Sustainability Reporting Directive (CSRD). Overall, this study demonstrates the value of analyzing materiality matrixes for identifying sustainability priorities in different industries and provides insights into using materiality analysis in corporate decision-making. The results can inform future sustainability strategies for Swedish companies and contribute to the broader conversation around sustainable business practices.

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  • 31.
    Abbaszadeh Shahri, Abbas
    et al.
    Department of Civil Engineering, Islamic Azad University, Roudehen Branch, Tehran, Iran Johan Lundberg AB, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Larsson, Stefan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Soil and Rock Mechanics.
    Renkel, Crister
    Johan Lundberg AB, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Correction to: Artificial intelligence models to generate visualized bedrock level: a case study in Sweden (Modeling Earth Systems and Environment, (2020), 6, 3, (1509-1528), 10.1007/s40808-020-00767-0)2020In: Modeling Earth Systems and Environment, ISSN 2363-6203, E-ISSN 2363-6211, Vol. 6, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the original version of this article, unfortunately a character of the Journal no in the reference 10 has been published incorrectly.

  • 32.
    Abbaszadeh Shahri, Abbas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Soil and Rock Mechanics.
    Spross, Johan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Soil and Rock Mechanics.
    Johansson, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Soil and Rock Mechanics.
    Larsson, Stefan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Soil and Rock Mechanics.
    Landslide susceptibility hazard map in southwest Sweden using artificial neural network2019In: Catena (Cremlingen. Print), ISSN 0341-8162, E-ISSN 1872-6887, Vol. 183, article id UNSP 104225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Landslides as major geo-hazards in Sweden adversely impact on nearby environments and socio-economics. In this paper, a landslide susceptibility map using a proposed subdivision approach for a large area in southwest Sweden has been produced. The map has been generated by means of an artificial neural network (ANN) model developed using fourteen causative factors extracted from topographic and geomorphologic, geological, land use, hydrology and hydrogeology characteristics. The landslide inventory map includes 242 events identified from different validated resources and interpreted aerial photographs. The weights of the causative factors employed were analyzed and verified using accepted mathematical criteria, sensitivity analysis, previous studies, and actual landslides. The high accuracy achieved using the ANN model demonstrates a consistent criterion for future landslide susceptibility zonation. Comparisons with earlier susceptibility assessments in the area show the model to be a cost-effective and potentially vital tool for urban planners in developing cities and municipalities.

  • 33.
    Abbott, Benjamin
    et al.
    Univ Rennes 1, OSUR, CNRS, ECOBIO,UMR 6553, Rennes, France.
    Baranov, Viktor
    Leibniz Inst Freshwater Ecol & Inland Fisheries, Berlin, Germany.
    Mendoza-Lera, Clara
    Ctr LyonVilleurbanne, UR MALY, Irstea, F-69616 Villeurbanne, France.
    Nikolakopoulou, Myrto
    Naturalea, Barcelona, Spain.
    Harjung, Astrid
    Univ Barcelona, E-08007 Barcelona, Spain.
    Kolbe, Tamara
    Univ Rennes 1, CNRS, OSURGeosci Rennes, UMR 6118, F-35014 Rennes, France.
    Balasubramanian, Mukundh
    BioSistemika Ltd, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Vaessen, Timothy N
    CEAB CSIC, Girona, Spain.
    Ciocca, Francesco
    Silixa, Elstree, England.
    Campeau, Audrey
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Wallin, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Romeijn, Paul
    Univ Birmingham, Sch Geog Earth & Environm Sci, Birmingham B15 2TT, W Midlands, England.
    Antonelli, Marta
    LIST, Esch Sur Alzette, Luxembourg.
    Goncalves, José
    Natl Inst Biol, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Datry, Thibault
    Ctr LyonVilleurbanne, UR MALY, Irstea, F-69616 Villeurbanne, France.
    Laverman, Anniet
    Univ Rennes 1, OSUR, CNRS, ECOBIO,UMR 6553, Rennes, France.
    de Dreuzý, Jean-Raynald
    Univ Rennes 1, CNRS, OSURGeosci Rennes, UMR 6118, F-35014 Rennes, France.
    David, Hannah M.
    Univ Birmingham, Sch Geog Earth & Environm Sci, Birmingham B15 2TT, W Midlands, England.
    Krause, Stefan
    Univ Birmingham, Sch Geog Earth & Environm Sci, Birmingham B15 2TT, W Midlands, England.
    Oldham, Carolyn
    Univ Western Australia, Civil Environm & Min Engn, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Pinay, Gilles
    Univ Rennes 1, OSUR, CNRS, ECOBIO,UMR 6553, Rennes, France.
    Using multi-tracer inference to move beyond single-catchment ecohydrology2016In: Earth-Science Reviews, ISSN 0012-8252, E-ISSN 1872-6828, Vol. 160, p. 19-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Protecting or restoring aquatic ecosystems in the face of growing anthropogenic pressures requires an understanding of hydrological and biogeochemical functioning across multiple spatial and temporal scales. Recent technological and methodological advances have vastly increased the number and diversity of hydrological, biogeochemical, and ecological tracers available, providing potentially powerful tools to improve understanding of fundamental problems in ecohydrology, notably: 1. Identifying spatially explicit flowpaths, 2. Quantifying water residence time, and 3. Quantifying and localizing biogeochemical transformation. In this review, we synthesize the history of hydrological and biogeochemical theory, summarize modem tracer methods, and discuss how improved understanding of flowpath, residence time, and biogeochemical transformation can help ecohydrology move beyond description of site-specific heterogeneity. We focus on using multiple tracers with contrasting characteristics (crossing proxies) to infer ecosystem functioning across multiple scales. Specifically, we present how crossed proxies could test recent ecohydrological theory, combining the concepts of hotspots and hot moments with the Damkohler number in what we call the HotDam framework.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 34. Abbott, Benjamin W.
    et al.
    Brown, Michael
    Carey, Joanna C.
    Ernakovich, Jessica
    Frederick, Jennifer M.
    Guo, Laodong
    Hugelius, Gustaf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Lee, Raymond M.
    Loranty, Michael M.
    Macdonald, Robie
    Mann, Paul J.
    Natali, Susan M.
    Olefeldt, David
    Pearson, Pam
    Rec, Abigail
    Robards, Martin
    Salmon, Verity G.
    Sayedi, Sayedeh Sara
    Schädel, Christina
    Schuur, Edward A. G.
    Shakil, Sarah
    Shogren, Arial J.
    Strauss, Jens
    Tank, Suzanne E.
    Thornton, Brett
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Treharne, Rachael
    Turetsky, Merritt
    Voigt, Carolina
    Wright, Nancy
    Yang, Yuanhe
    Zarnetske, Jay P.
    Zhang, Qiwen
    Zolkos, Scott
    We Must Stop Fossil Fuel Emissions to Protect Permafrost Ecosystems2022In: Frontiers in Environmental Science, E-ISSN 2296-665X, Vol. 10, article id 889428Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change is an existential threat to the vast global permafrost domain. The diverse human cultures, ecological communities, and biogeochemical cycles of this tenth of the planet depend on the persistence of frozen conditions. The complexity, immensity, and remoteness of permafrost ecosystems make it difficult to grasp how quickly things are changing and what can be done about it. Here, we summarize terrestrial and marine changes in the permafrost domain with an eye toward global policy. While many questions remain, we know that continued fossil fuel burning is incompatible with the continued existence of the permafrost domain as we know it. If we fail to protect permafrost ecosystems, the consequences for human rights, biosphere integrity, and global climate will be severe. The policy implications are clear: the faster we reduce human emissions and draw down atmospheric CO2, the more of the permafrost domain we can save. Emissions reduction targets must be strengthened and accompanied by support for local peoples to protect intact ecological communities and natural carbon sinks within the permafrost domain. Some proposed geoengineering interventions such as solar shading, surface albedo modification, and vegetation manipulations are unproven and may exacerbate environmental injustice without providing lasting protection. Conversely, astounding advances in renewable energy have reopened viable pathways to halve human greenhouse gas emissions by 2030 and effectively stop them well before 2050. We call on leaders, corporations, researchers, and citizens everywhere to acknowledge the global importance of the permafrost domain and work towards climate restoration and empowerment of Indigenous and immigrant communities in these regions.

  • 35. Abbott, Benjamin W.
    et al.
    Jones, Jeremy B.
    Schuur, Edward A. G.
    Chapin, F. Stuart
    Bowden, William B.
    Bret-Harte, M. Syndonia
    Epstein, Howard E.
    Flannigan, Michael D.
    Harms, Tamara K.
    Hollingsworth, Teresa N.
    Mack, Michelle C.
    McGuire, A. David
    Natali, Susan M.
    Rocha, Adrian V.
    Tank, Suzanne E.
    Turetsky, Merritt R.
    Vonk, Jorien E.
    Wickland, Kimberly P.
    Aiken, George R.
    Alexander, Heather D.
    Amon, Rainer M. W.
    Benscoter, Brian W.
    Bergeron, Yves
    Bishop, Kevin
    Blarquez, Olivier
    Bond-Lamberty, Ben
    Breen, Amy L.
    Buffam, Ishi
    Cai, Yihua
    Carcaillet, Christopher
    Carey, Sean K.
    Chen, Jing M.
    Chen, Han Y. H.
    Christensen, Torben R.
    Cooper, Lee W.
    Cornelissen, J. Hans C.
    de Groot, William J.
    DeLuca, Thomas H.
    Dorrepaal, Ellen
    Fetcher, Ned
    Finlay, Jacques C.
    Forbes, Bruce C.
    French, Nancy H. F.
    Gauthier, Sylvie
    Girardin, Martin P.
    Goetz, Scott J.
    Goldammer, Johann G.
    Gough, Laura
    Grogan, Paul
    Guo, Laodong
    Higuera, Philip E.
    Hinzman, Larry
    Hu, Feng Sheng
    Hugelius, Gustaf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Jafarov, Elchin E.
    Jandt, Randi
    Johnstone, Jill F.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Kasischke, Eric S.
    Kattner, Gerhard
    Kelly, Ryan
    Keuper, Frida
    Kling, George W.
    Kortelainen, Pirkko
    Kouki, Jari
    Kuhry, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Laudon, Hjalmar
    Laurion, Isabelle
    Macdonald, Robie W.
    Mann, Paul J.
    Martikainen, Pertti J.
    McClelland, James W.
    Molau, Ulf
    Oberbauer, Steven F.
    Olefeldt, David
    Pare, David
    Parisien, Marc-Andre
    Payette, Serge
    Peng, Changhui
    Pokrovsky, Oleg S.
    Rastetter, Edward B.
    Raymond, Peter A.
    Raynolds, Martha K.
    Rein, Guillermo
    Reynolds, James F.
    Robards, Martin
    Rogers, Brendan M.
    Schaedel, Christina
    Schaefer, Kevin
    Schmidt, Inger K.
    Shvidenko, Anatoly
    Sky, Jasper
    Spencer, Robert G. M.
    Starr, Gregory
    Striegl, Robert G.
    Teisserenc, Roman
    Tranvik, Lars J.
    Virtanen, Tarmo
    Welker, Jeffrey M.
    Zimov, Sergei
    Biomass offsets little or none of permafrost carbon release from soils, streams, and wildfire: an expert assessment2016In: Environmental Research Letters, E-ISSN 1748-9326, Vol. 11, no 3, article id 034014Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the permafrost region warms, its large organic carbon pool will be increasingly vulnerable to decomposition, combustion, and hydrologic export. Models predict that some portion of this release will be offset by increased production of Arctic and boreal biomass; however, the lack of robust estimates of net carbon balance increases the risk of further overshooting international emissions targets. Precise empirical or model-based assessments of the critical factors driving carbon balance are unlikely in the near future, so to address this gap, we present estimates from 98 permafrost-region experts of the response of biomass, wildfire, and hydrologic carbon flux to climate change. Results suggest that contrary to model projections, total permafrost-region biomass could decrease due to water stress and disturbance, factors that are not adequately incorporated in current models. Assessments indicate that end-of-the-century organic carbon release from Arctic rivers and collapsing coastlines could increase by 75% while carbon loss via burning could increase four-fold. Experts identified water balance, shifts in vegetation community, and permafrost degradation as the key sources of uncertainty in predicting future system response. In combination with previous findings, results suggest the permafrost region will become a carbon source to the atmosphere by 2100 regardless of warming scenario but that 65%-85% of permafrost carbon release can still be avoided if human emissions are actively reduced.

  • 36.
    Abbott, Benjamin W.
    et al.
    Univ Rennes 1, OSUR, CNRS, UMR ECOBIO 6553, F-35014 Rennes, France.;Univ Alaska Fairbanks, Inst Arctic Biol, Fairbanks, AK USA.;Univ Alaska Fairbanks, Dept Biology& Wildlife, Fairbanks, AK USA..
    Jones, Jeremy B.
    Univ Alaska Fairbanks, Inst Arctic Biol, Fairbanks, AK USA.;Univ Alaska Fairbanks, Dept Biology& Wildlife, Fairbanks, AK USA..
    Schuur, Edward A. G.
    No Arizona Univ, Ctr Ecosyst Sci & Soc, Flagstaff, AZ 86011 USA..
    Chapin, F. Stuart, III
    Univ Alaska Fairbanks, Inst Arctic Biol, Fairbanks, AK USA.;Univ Alaska Fairbanks, Dept Biology& Wildlife, Fairbanks, AK USA..
    Bowden, William B.
    Univ Vermont, Rubenstein Sch Environm & Nat Resources, Burlington, VT 05405 USA..
    Bret-Harte, M. Syndonia
    Univ Alaska Fairbanks, Inst Arctic Biol, Fairbanks, AK USA.;Univ Alaska Fairbanks, Dept Biology& Wildlife, Fairbanks, AK USA..
    Epstein, Howard E.
    Univ Virginia, Dept Environm Sci, Charlottesville, VA 22903 USA..
    Flannigan, Michael D.
    Univ Alberta, Dept Renewable Resources, Edmonton, AB T6G 2M7, Canada..
    Harms, Tamara K.
    Univ Alaska Fairbanks, Inst Arctic Biol, Fairbanks, AK USA.;Univ Alaska Fairbanks, Dept Biology& Wildlife, Fairbanks, AK USA..
    Hollingsworth, Teresa N.
    Univ Alaska Fairbanks, PNW Res Stn, USDA Forest Serv, Fairbanks, AK USA..
    Mack, Michelle C.
    No Arizona Univ, Ctr Ecosyst Sci & Soc, Flagstaff, AZ 86011 USA..
    McGuire, A. David
    Univ Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska Cooperat Fish & Wildlife Res Unit, US Geol Survey, Anchorage, AK USA..
    Natali, Susan M.
    Woods Hole Res Ctr, Woods Hole, MA USA..
    Rocha, Adrian V.
    Univ Notre Dame, Dept Biol Sci, Notre Dame, IN 46556 USA.;Univ Notre Dame, Environm Change Initiat, Notre Dame, IN 46556 USA..
    Tank, Suzanne E.
    Univ Alberta, Dept Biol Sci, Edmonton, AB T6G 2M7, Canada..
    Turetsky, Merritt R.
    Univ Guelph, Dept Integrat Biol, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada..
    Vonk, Jorien E.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Dept Earth Sci, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Wickland, Kimberly P.
    US Geol Survey, Natl Res Program, Boulder, CO USA..
    Aiken, George R.
    US Geol Survey, Natl Res Program, Boulder, CO USA..
    Alexander, Heather D.
    Mississippi State Univ, Forest & Wildlife Res Ctr, Mississippi State, MS 39762 USA..
    Amon, Rainer M. W.
    Texas A&M Univ, Galveston, TX USA..
    Benscoter, Brian W.
    Florida Atlantic Univ, Boca Raton, FL 33431 USA..
    Bergeron, Yves
    Univ Quebec Abitibi Temiscamingue, Forest Res Inst, Rouyn Noranda, PQ, Canada..
    Bishop, Kevin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. wedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Aquat Sci & Assessment, S-90183 Umea, Sweden..
    Blarquez, Olivier
    Univ Montreal, Dept Geog, Montreal, PQ H3C 3J7, Canada..
    Bond-Lamberty, Ben
    Pacific NW Natl Lab, Richland, WA 99352 USA..
    Breen, Amy L.
    Univ Alaska Fairbanks, Int Arctic Res Ctr, Scenarios Network Alaska & Arctic Planning, Fairbanks, AK USA..
    Buffam, Ishi
    Univ Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221 USA..
    Cai, Yihua
    Xiamen Univ, State Key Lab Marine Environm Sci, Xiamen, Peoples R China..
    Carcaillet, Christopher
    Ecole Prat Hautes Etud, UMR5023, CNRS Lyon 1, Lyon, France..
    Carey, Sean K.
    McMaster Univ, Hamilton, ON L8S 4L8, Canada..
    Chen, Jing M.
    Univ Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 1A1, Canada..
    Chen, Han Y. H.
    Lakehead Univ, Fac Nat Resources Management, Thunder Bay, ON P7B 5E1, Canada..
    Christensen, Torben R.
    Lund Univ, Arctic Res Ctr, S-22100 Lund, Sweden.;Aarhus Univ, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark..
    Cooper, Lee W.
    Univ Maryland, Ctr Environm Sci, Bethesda, MD USA..
    Cornelissen, J. Hans C.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Syst Ecol, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    de Groot, William J.
    Nat Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Serv, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    DeLuca, Thomas H.
    Univ Washington, Sch Environm & Forest Sci, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Dorrepaal, Ellen
    Umea Univ, Dept Ecol & Environm Sci, Climate Impacts Res Ctr, S-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Fetcher, Ned
    Wilkes Univ, Inst Environm Sci & Sustainabil, Wilkes Barre, PA 18766 USA..
    Finlay, Jacques C.
    Univ Minnesota, Dept Ecol Evolut & Behav, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA..
    Forbes, Bruce C.
    Univ Lapland, Arctic Ctr, Rovaniemi, Finland..
    French, Nancy H. F.
    Michigan Technol Univ, Michigan Tech Res Inst, Houghton, MI 49931 USA..
    Gauthier, Sylvie
    Nat Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Serv, Laurentian Forestry Ctr, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Girardin, Martin P.
    Nat Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Serv, Laurentian Forestry Ctr, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Goetz, Scott J.
    Woods Hole Res Ctr, Woods Hole, MA USA..
    Goldammer, Johann G.
    Max Planck Inst Chem, Global Fire Monitoring Ctr, Berlin, Germany..
    Gough, Laura
    Towson Univ, Dept Biol Sci, Towson, MD USA..
    Grogan, Paul
    Queens Univ, Dept Biol, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6, Canada..
    Guo, Laodong
    Univ Wisconsin Milwaukee, Sch Freshwater Sci, Milwaukee, WI USA..
    Higuera, Philip E.
    Univ Montana, Dept Ecosyst & Conservat Sci, Missoula, MT 59812 USA..
    Hinzman, Larry
    Univ Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK USA..
    Hu, Feng Sheng
    Univ Illinois, Dept Plant Biol, Chicago, IL 60680 USA.;Univ Illinois, Dept Geol, Chicago, IL 60680 USA..
    Hugelius, Gustaf
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys Geog, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Jafarov, Elchin E.
    Univ Colorado Boulder, Inst Arctic & Alpine Res, Boulder, CO USA..
    Jandt, Randi
    Univ Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska Fire Sci Consortium, Fairbanks, AK USA..
    Johnstone, Jill F.
    Univ Saskatchewan, Dept Biol, Saskatoon, SK S7N 0W0, Canada..
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umea Univ, Dept Ecol & Environm Sci, Climate Impacts Res Ctr, S-90187 Umea, Sweden..
    Kasischke, Eric S.
    Univ Maryland, Dept Geog Sci, Bethesda, MD USA..
    Kattner, Gerhard
    Helmholtz Ctr Polar & Marine Res, Alfred Wegener Inst, Berlin, Germany..
    Kelly, Ryan
    Neptune & Co Inc, North Wales, PA USA..
    Keuper, Frida
    Umea Univ, Dept Ecol & Environm Sci, Climate Impacts Res Ctr, S-90187 Umea, Sweden.;INRA, AgroImpact UPR1158, New York, NY USA..
    Kling, George W.
    Univ Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA..
    Kortelainen, Pirkko
    Finnish Environm Inst, Helsinki, Finland..
    Kouki, Jari
    Univ Eastern Finland, Sch Forest Sci, Joensuu, Finland..
    Kuhry, Peter
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys Geog, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Laudon, Hjalmar
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Forest Ecol & Management, S-90183 Umea, Sweden..
    Laurion, Isabelle
    Inst Natl Rech Sci, Ctr Eau Terre Environm, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Macdonald, Robie W.
    Inst Ocean Sci, Dept Fisheries & Oceans, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Mann, Paul J.
    Northumbria Univ, Dept Geog, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 8ST, Tyne & Wear, England..
    Martikainen, Pertti J.
    Univ Eastern Finland, Dept Environm & Biol Sci, Joensuu, Finland..
    McClelland, James W.
    Univ Texas Austin, Inst Marine Sci, Austin, TX 78712 USA..
    Molau, Ulf
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Oberbauer, Steven F.
    Florida Int Univ, Dept Biol Sci, Miami, FL 33199 USA..
    Olefeldt, David
    Univ Alberta, Dept Revewable Resources, Edmonton, AB T6G 2M7, Canada..
    Pare, David
    Nat Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Serv, Laurentian Forestry Ctr, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Parisien, Marc-Andre
    Nat Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Serv, No Forestry Ctr, Toronto, ON, Canada..
    Payette, Serge
    Univ Laval, Ctr Etud Nord, Quebec City, PQ G1K 7P4, Canada..
    Peng, Changhui
    Univ Quebec, Ctr CEF, ESCER, Montreal, PQ H3C 3P8, Canada.;Northwest A&F Univ, Coll Forestry, State Key Lab Soil Eros & Dryland Farming Loess P, Xian, Peoples R China..
    Pokrovsky, Oleg S.
    CNRS, Georesources & Environm, Toulouse, France.;Tomsk State Univ, BIO GEO CLIM Lab, Tomsk, Russia..
    Rastetter, Edward B.
    Marine Biol Lab, Ctr Ecosyst, Woods Hole, MA 02543 USA..
    Raymond, Peter A.
    Yale Univ, Sch Forestry & Environm Studies, New Haven, CT 06520 USA..
    Raynolds, Martha K.
    Univ Alaska Fairbanks, Inst Arctic Biol, Fairbanks, AK USA..
    Rein, Guillermo
    Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Dept Mech Engn, London SW7 2AZ, England..
    Reynolds, James F.
    Lanzhou Univ, Sch Life Sci, Lanzhou 730000, Peoples R China.;Duke Univ, Nicholas Sch Environm, Durham, NC 27706 USA..
    Robards, Martin
    Arctic Beringia Program, Wildlife Conservat Soc, New York, NY USA..
    Rogers, Brendan M.
    Woods Hole Res Ctr, Woods Hole, MA USA..
    Schaedel, Christina
    No Arizona Univ, Ctr Ecosyst Sci & Soc, Flagstaff, AZ 86011 USA..
    Schaefer, Kevin
    Univ Colorado Boulder, Cooperat Inst Res Environm Sci, Natl Snow & Ice Data Ctr, Boulder, CO USA..
    Schmidt, Inger K.
    Univ Copenhagen, Dept Geosci & Nat Resource Management, DK-1168 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Shvidenko, Anatoly
    Int Inst Appl Syst Anal, A-2361 Laxenburg, Austria.;Sukachev Inst Forest, Moscow, Russia..
    Sky, Jasper
    Cambridge Ctr Climate Change Res, Cambridge, England..
    Spencer, Robert G. M.
    Florida State Univ, Dept Earth Ocean & Atmospher Sci, Tallahassee, FL 32306 USA..
    Starr, Gregory
    Univ Alabama, Dept Biol Sci, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 USA..
    Striegl, Robert G.
    US Geol Survey, Natl Res Program, Boulder, CO USA..
    Teisserenc, Roman
    Univ Toulouse, CNRS, INPT, ECOLAB,UPS, Toulouse, France..
    Tranvik, Lars J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Virtanen, Tarmo
    Univ Helsinki, Dept Environm Sci, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland..
    Welker, Jeffrey M.
    Univ Alaska Anchorage, Anchorage, AK USA..
    Zimov, Sergei
    Russian Acad Sci, Northeast Sci Stn, Moscow 117901, Russia..
    Biomass offsets little or none of permafrost carbon release from soils, streams, and wildfire: an expert assessment2016In: Environmental Research Letters, E-ISSN 1748-9326, Vol. 11, no 3, article id 034014Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the permafrost region warms, its large organic carbon pool will be increasingly vulnerable to decomposition, combustion, and hydrologic export. Models predict that some portion of this release will be offset by increased production of Arctic and boreal biomass; however, the lack of robust estimates of net carbon balance increases the risk of further overshooting international emissions targets. Precise empirical or model-based assessments of the critical factors driving carbon balance are unlikely in the near future, so to address this gap, we present estimates from 98 permafrost-region experts of the response of biomass, wildfire, and hydrologic carbon flux to climate change. Results suggest that contrary to model projections, total permafrost-region biomass could decrease due to water stress and disturbance, factors that are not adequately incorporated in current models. Assessments indicate that end-of-the-century organic carbon release from Arctic rivers and collapsing coastlines could increase by 75% while carbon loss via burning could increase four-fold. Experts identified water balance, shifts in vegetation community, and permafrost degradation as the key sources of uncertainty in predicting future system response. In combination with previous findings, results suggest the permafrost region will become a carbon source to the atmosphere by 2100 regardless of warming scenario but that 65%-85% of permafrost carbon release can still be avoided if human emissions are actively reduced.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 37. Abbott, Benjamin W.
    et al.
    Jones, Jeremy B.
    Schuur, Edward A. G.
    Chapin, F. Stuart, III
    Bowden, William B.
    Bret-Harte, M. Syndonia
    Epstein, Howard E.
    Flannigan, Michael D.
    Harms, Tamara K.
    Hollingsworth, Teresa N.
    Mack, Michelle C.
    McGuire, A. David
    Natali, Susan M.
    Rocha, Adrian V.
    Tank, Suzanne E.
    Turetsky, Merritt R.
    Vonk, Jorien E.
    Wickland, Kimberly P.
    Aiken, George R.
    Alexander, Heather D.
    Amon, Rainer M. W.
    Benscoter, Brian W.
    Bergeron, Yves
    Bishop, Kevin
    Blarquez, Olivier
    Bond-Lamberty, Ben
    Breen, Amy L.
    Buffam, Ishi
    Cai, Yihua
    Carcaillet, Christopher
    Carey, Sean K.
    Chen, Jing M.
    Chen, Han Y. H.
    Christensen, Torben R.
    Cooper, Lee W.
    Cornelissen, J. Hans C.
    de Groot, William J.
    DeLuca, Thomas H.
    Dorrepaal, Ellen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Fetcher, Ned
    Finlay, Jacques C.
    Forbes, Bruce C.
    French, Nancy H. F.
    Gauthier, Sylvie
    Girardin, Martin P.
    Goetz, Scott J.
    Goldammer, Johann G.
    Gough, Laura
    Grogan, Paul
    Guo, Laodong
    Higuera, Philip E.
    Hinzman, Larry
    Hu, Feng Sheng
    Hugelius, Gustaf
    Jafarov, Elchin E.
    Jandt, Randi
    Johnstone, Jill F.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Kasischke, Eric S.
    Kattner, Gerhard
    Kelly, Ryan
    Keuper, Frida
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Kling, George W.
    Kortelainen, Pirkko
    Kouki, Jari
    Kuhry, Peter
    Laudon, Hjalmar
    Laurion, Isabelle
    Macdonald, Robie W.
    Mann, Paul J.
    Martikainen, Pertti J.
    McClelland, James W.
    Molau, Ulf
    Oberbauer, Steven F.
    Olefeldt, David
    Pare, David
    Parisien, Marc-Andre
    Payette, Serge
    Peng, Changhui
    Pokrovsky, Oleg S.
    Rastetter, Edward B.
    Raymond, Peter A.
    Raynolds, Martha K.
    Rein, Guillermo
    Reynolds, James F.
    Robards, Martin
    Rogers, Brendan M.
    Schaedel, Christina
    Schaefer, Kevin
    Schmidt, Inger K.
    Shvidenko, Anatoly
    Sky, Jasper
    Spencer, Robert G. M.
    Starr, Gregory
    Striegl, Robert G.
    Teisserenc, Roman
    Tranvik, Lars J.
    Virtanen, Tarmo
    Welker, Jeffrey M.
    Zimov, Sergei
    Biomass offsets little or none of permafrost carbon release from soils, streams, and wildfire: an expert assessment2016In: Environmental Research Letters, E-ISSN 1748-9326, Vol. 11, no 3, article id 034014Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the permafrost region warms, its large organic carbon pool will be increasingly vulnerable to decomposition, combustion, and hydrologic export. Models predict that some portion of this release will be offset by increased production of Arctic and boreal biomass; however, the lack of robust estimates of net carbon balance increases the risk of further overshooting international emissions targets. Precise empirical or model-based assessments of the critical factors driving carbon balance are unlikely in the near future, so to address this gap, we present estimates from 98 permafrost-region experts of the response of biomass, wildfire, and hydrologic carbon flux to climate change. Results suggest that contrary to model projections, total permafrost-region biomass could decrease due to water stress and disturbance, factors that are not adequately incorporated in current models. Assessments indicate that end-of-the-century organic carbon release from Arctic rivers and collapsing coastlines could increase by 75% while carbon loss via burning could increase four-fold. Experts identified water balance, shifts in vegetation community, and permafrost degradation as the key sources of uncertainty in predicting future system response. In combination with previous findings, results suggest the permafrost region will become a carbon source to the atmosphere by 2100 regardless of warming scenario but that 65%-85% of permafrost carbon release can still be avoided if human emissions are actively reduced.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 38. Abbott, P. M.
    et al.
    Austin, W. E. N.
    Davies, S. M.
    Pearce, N. J. G.
    Rasmussen, T. L.
    Wastegård, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Brendryen, J.
    Re-evaluation and extension of the Marine Isotope Stage 5 tephrostratigraphy of the Faroe Islands region: The cryptotephra record2014In: Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, ISSN 0031-0182, E-ISSN 1872-616X, Vol. 409, p. 153-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies of marine sequences from the Faroe Islands region have identified a series of coarse-grained tephra horizons deposited during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5. Here we reassess the MIS 5 tephrostratigraphy of the Faroe Islands region and focus on the cryptotephra deposits preserved within the fine-grained fraction of marine core LINK 16. We also extend the record to encompass the late MIS 6 and early MIS 4 periods. A density separation technique, commonly used for tephra investigations in lacustrine settings but rarely applied to marine sediments, is utilised to explore the fine-grained material and EPMA and LA-ICP-MS are employed to determine the major and trace element composition of individual tephra shards. In total, 3 basaltic and 3 rhyolitic Icelandic cryptotephra deposits with homogeneous geochemical compositions are identified - all of which have the potential to act as isochronous tie-lines. Geochemical results highlight that the Grimsvotn volcanic system of Iceland is the predominant source of the basaltic horizons and the Oraefajokull or Torfajokull systems are the likely sources of the rhyolitic deposits. Three of the horizons have been previously recognised in Faroe Islands region marine sequences, with two of these deposits traceable into a Norwegian Sea sequence. An early MIS 4 rhyolitic horizon is the most widespread deposit as it can be traced into the Norwegian Sea and to the south into a record from the Rockall Trough. Basaltic and rhyolitic horizons deposited during late MIS 6 have not been recognised in other sequences and represent new additions to the regional tephrostratigraphy.

  • 39. Abbott, Peter M.
    et al.
    Davies, Siwan M.
    Steffensen, Jorgen Peder
    Pearce, Nicholas J. G.
    Bigler, Matthias
    Johnsen, Sigfus J.
    Seierstad, Inger K.
    Svensson, Anders
    Wastegård, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    A detailed framework of Marine Isotope Stages 4 and 5 volcanic events recorded in two Greenland ice-cores2012In: Quaternary Science Reviews, ISSN 0277-3791, E-ISSN 1873-457X, Vol. 36, p. 59-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sulphate records from Greenland ice-cores indicate that Marine Isotope Stages 4 and 5 were charactensed by a higher incidence of large volcanic eruptions than other periods during the last glacial period, however, few investigations have focused on tephra deposits associated with these volcanic eruptions and the nature and origin of the events. Here we present a detailed tephrochronological framework of the products of 15 volcanic events spanning this interval: the majority of which have been preserved as cryptotephra horizons within the Greenland records. The major element compositions of individual glass shards within these horizons indicate that 13 of the eruptions originated from Iceland and 6 of these events can be correlated to the specific volcanic systems of Katla, Grimsvotn, Grimsvotn-Kverkfjoll and either Reykjanes or Veidivotn-Bardarbunga. For the remaining Icelandic horizons a source from either the rift zone or a flank zone can be suggested based on rock suite affinities. Two horizons have been correlated to a source from the Jan Mayen volcanic system which represents the first discovery of material from this system within any Greenland ice-cores. The robust geochemical characterisations, independent ages for these horizons (derived from the GICCO5 ice-core chronology) and stratigraphic positions relative to the Dansgaard-Oeschger climate events recorded in the Greenland ice-cores represent a critical framework that provides new information on the frequency and nature of volcanic events occurring in the North Atlantic region during MIS 4 and 5. This framework can now be utilised in the assessment of the differential timing and rate of response to the millennial-scale climatic events that characterised this period, through the use of the tephra horizons as time-synchronous tie-lines to other palaeoclimatic sequences.

  • 40.
    Abboud, Sarah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    The Role of Municipal Planning in the Permit Decisions on Large Onshore Wind Power Projects in Sweden2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden wants to produce 100% of its electricity from renewable energy sources by 2040 and achieve net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2045. While wind power is key to this transition, the permit process for large onshore wind power projects is one of the major challenges the country is currently facing, specifically the provision on municipal approval in the Environmental Code, the so-called municipal veto.

    To facilitate the expansion of wind projects in Sweden, the double testing of wind power applications was abolished in 2009, and the municipal veto was introduced to preserve the municipalities’ planning influence. However, the municipal veto contributed to a less predictable and legally secure permit process and became the main reason behind the rejections of wind power applications. Today, in 2021, the Swedish Government assigned a special investigator to examine and propose possible changes to the municipal veto provision.

    Though the municipalities believe that the veto is essential for their self-government and planning monopoly, the Swedish Energy Agency and the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency argue that the municipal authority should be exercised through the municipal general planning documents. Therefore, this thesis aims to verify the authorities’ argument by examining the relationship between the municipalities’ planning conditions for wind power and the permit decisions.

    The study is performed in collaboration with Westander Klimat och Energi and is based on 206 large onshore wind power applications between 2014 and 2020. The main research methods consist of a document analysis and of statistical analyses, namely simple percentages, and the chi-square test of independence, along with Cramer’s V calculation.

    The projects are categorized mainly based on the municipal planning conditions, and the permit decisions are analyzed accordingly. Essentially, it is shown that, even if not legally binding, the municipal general spatial planning documents constitute a valuable tool for the planning of onshore wind power projects in Sweden.

    Furthermore, the municipal planning conditions and permit decisions are not independent, however, their strength of association is weak. Nonetheless, the statistics indicate that in areas designated as suitable, more cases are likely to receive an approval than expected, and in areas not designated as suitable, the applications are more likely to be revoked than one would expect.

    In conclusion, it is important to invest resources into the strategic wind power planning at the local level. Also, the municipal plans must be kept updated to consistently reflect the municipalities’ intentions towards the use of their land and water areas.

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  • 41. Abbuehl, Luca M.
    et al.
    Norton, Kevin P.
    Schlunegger, Fritz
    Kracht, Oliver
    Aldahan, Ala
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Possnert, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, För teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten gemensamma enheter, Tandem Laboratory.
    El Niño forcing on 10Be-based surface denudation rates in the northwestern Peruvian Andes?2010In: Geomorphology, ISSN 0169-555X, E-ISSN 1872-695X, Vol. 123, no 3-4, p. 257-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High magnitude precipitation events provide large contributions to landscape formation and surface denudation in arid environments. Here, we quantify the precipitation-dependent geomorphic processes within the Rio Piura drainage basin located on the Western Escarpment of the northern Peruvian Andes at 5 degrees S latitude. In this region, monsoonal easterly winds bring precipitation to the >3000 m asl high headwaters, from where the annual amount of precipitation decreases downstream toward the Pacific coast. Denudation rates are highest in the knickzones near the headwaters, similar to 200-300 mm ky(-1), and sediment discharge is limited by the transport capacity of the channel network. Every few years, this situation is perturbed by westerly, wind-driven heavy precipitation during El Nino events and results in supply-limited sediment discharge as indicated by bedrock channels. The detailed analysis of the stream-long profiles of two river basins within the Rio Piura catchment reveals a distinct knickzone in the transition zone between the easterly and westerly climatic influences, suggesting an En Nino forcing on the longitudinal channel profiles over at least Holocene timescales. Measured trunk stream catchment-wide denudation rates are up to ca. 300 mm ky(-1) and decrease successively downstream along the river profiles. Denudation rates of tributary rivers are ca. 200 mm ky(-1) near the plateau and show a stronger downstream decreasing trend than trunk stream rates. This suggests that the landscape is in a transient stage of local relief growth, which is driven by fluvial incision. This corroborates the results of paleoclimate studies that point towards higher El Nino frequencies during the past ca. 3000 years, leading to higher runoff and more erosion in the trunk channel compared to the hillslopes and thus growth of local relief. Downstream increases in channel gradient spatially coincide with the reaches of highest precipitation rates during El Nino events, we therefore interpret that Holocene landscape evolution has largely been controlled by climate. The ky-timescale of the Be-10 data together with the transience of the landscape implies that El Nino events in northwestern Peru have occurred since at least the Holocene, and that adjustment to channel incision is still taking place.

  • 42.
    Abd El‑Hameed, Mona M.
    et al.
    Agricultural Engineering Department, Faculty of Agriculture, Cairo University, Giza, 12613, Egypt.
    Abuarab, Mohamed E.
    Agricultural Engineering Department, Faculty of Agriculture, Cairo University, Giza, 12613, Egypt.
    Al-Ansari, Nadhir
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering.
    Abdel Mottaleb, Shady
    Agricultural Botany Department - Plant Physiology Division, Faculty of Agriculture, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt.
    Bakeer, Gomaa A.
    Agricultural Engineering Department, Faculty of Agriculture, Cairo University, Giza, 12613, Egypt.
    Gyasi‑Agyei, Yeboah
    School of Engineering and Built Environment, Griffith University, Nathan, QLD, 4111, Australia.
    Mokhtar, Ali
    Agricultural Engineering Department, Faculty of Agriculture, Cairo University, Giza, 12613, Egypt.
    Phycoremediation of contaminated water by cadmium (Cd) using two cyanobacterial strains (Trichormus variabilis and Nostoc muscorum)2021In: Environmental Sciences Europe, ISSN 2190-4707, E-ISSN 2190-4715, Vol. 33, no 1, article id 135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Water pollution with heavy metals is a severe dilemma that concerns the whole world related to its risk to natural ecosystems and human health. The main objective was to evaluate the removal efficiency of Cd of various concentrations from contaminated aqueous solution by use of two cyanobacterial strains (Nostoc muscorum and Trichormus variabilis). For this purpose, a specially designed laboratory pilot-scale experiment was conducted using these two cyanobacterial strains on four different initial concentrations of Cd (0, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mg L−1) for 21 days.

    Results

    N. muscorum was more efficient than T. variabilis for removing Cd (II), with the optimum value of residual Cd of 0.033 mg L−1 achieved by N. muscorum after 21 days with initial concentration of 0.5 mg L−1, translating to removal efficiency of 93.4%, while the residual Cd (II) achieved by T. variabilis under the same conditions was 0.054 mg L−1 (89.13% removal efficiency). Algal growth parameters and photosynthetic pigments were estimated for both cyanobacterial strains throughout the incubation period.

    Conclusions

    High Cd concentration had a more toxic impact on algal growth. The outcomes of this study will help to produce treated water that could be reused in agrarian activities.

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  • 43. Abd-El Azeem, Hoda H.
    et al.
    Osman, Gamalat Y.
    El-Seedi, Hesham R.
    Fallatah, Ahmed M.
    Khalifa, Shaden A. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Gharib, Mohamed M.
    Antifungal Activity of Soft Tissue Extract from the Garden Snail Helix aspersa (Gastropoda, Mollusca)2022In: Molecules, ISSN 1431-5157, E-ISSN 1420-3049, Vol. 27, no 10, article id 3170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gastropods comprise approximately 80% of molluscans, of which land snails are used variably as food and traditional medicines due to their high protein content. Moreover, different components from land snails exhibit antimicrobial activities. In this study, we evaluated the antifungal activity of soft tissue extracts from Helix aspersa against Candida albicans, Aspergillus flavus, and Aspergillus brasiliensis by identifying extract components using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS). Two concentrations of three extracts (methanol, acetone, and acetic acid) showed antifungal activity. Both acetone (1 g/3 mL) and acetic acid extracts (1 g/mL) significantly inhibited C. albicans growth (p = 0.0001, 5.2 +/- 0.2 mm and p = 0.02, 69.7 +/- 0.6 mm, respectively). A. flavus and A. brasiliensis growth were inhibited by all extracts at 1 g/mL, while inhibition was observed for acetic acid extracts against A. brasiliensis (p = 0.02, 50.3 +/- 3.5 mm). The highest growth inhibition was observed for A. flavus using acetic acid and acetone extracts (inhibition zones = 38 +/- 1.7 mm and 3.1 +/- 0.7 mm, respectively). LC-MS-MS studies on methanol and acetone extracts identified 11-α-acetoxyprogesterone with a parent mass of 372.50800 m/z and 287.43500 m/z for luteolin. Methanol extracts contained hesperidin with a parent mass of 611.25400 m/z, whereas linoleic acid and genistein (parent mass = 280.4 and 271.48900 m/z, respectively) were the main metabolites.

  • 44.
    Abdel-Fattah, Dina
    et al.
    UiT – The Arctic University of Norway, Norway; University of Alaska Fairbanks, USA.
    Danielson, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences. International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Austria.
    Ekenberg, Love
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences. International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Austria.
    Hock, Regine
    University of Alaska Fairbanks, USA; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Trainor, Sarah
    University of Alaska Fairbanks, USA.
    Application of a structured decision-making process in cryospheric hazard planning: Case study of Bering Glacier surges on local state planning in Alaska2024In: Journal of Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis, ISSN 1057-9214, E-ISSN 1099-1360, Vol. 31, no 1-2, article id e1825Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Surging glaciers are glaciers that experience rapidly accelerated glacier flow over a comparatively short period of time. Though relatively rare worldwide, Alaska is home to the largest number of surge-type glaciers globally. However, their impact on the broader socioecological system in the state is both poorly understood and under-researched, which poses a challenge in developing appropriate sustainability decisions in Alaska. We investigated how the surge patterns of the Bering Glacier in Alaska have potentially devastating effects on the local ecological biodiversity of its watershed via a structured decision-making analysis of the different possible consequences. Specifically, this analysis was conducted to explore the various outcomes of a Bering Glacier surge particularly if humans have an increased presence near the glacier due to the area potentially becoming a state park. This work explored the benefits of applying a risk and decision analytical framework in a cryosphere context, to better understand the socioeconomic impact of glacier surges. This is a novel approach in which a decision analysis tool was used to better understand an environmental sustainability challenge, offering an innovative method to support the achievement of the United Nations Sustainability Development Goals in Alaska. We therefore emphasise the need for integrated biophysical and socioeconomic analyses when it comes to understanding glacier hazards. Our research highlights the importance of understanding and researching biophysical changes as well as using a structured decision-making process for complicated hazard planning scenarios, exemplified via glaciated regions in Alaska, in order to create adaptation strategies that are sustainable and encompass the range of possible outcomes.

  • 45.
    Abdelgadir, Mohanad
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Alharbi, Randa
    University of Tabuk, Saudi Arabia.
    AlRashidi, Monif
    University of Ha'il, Saudi Arabia.
    Alatawi, Abdulaziz S.
    University of Tabuk, Saudi Arabia.
    Sjöling, Sara
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Dinnétz, Patrik
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Distribution of denitrifiers predicted by correlative niche modeling of changing environmental conditions and future climatic scenarios across the Baltic Sea2023In: Ecological Informatics, ISSN 1574-9541, E-ISSN 1878-0512, Vol. 78, article id 102346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Denitrifying microbial communities provide an important ecosystem function in aquatic systems. Yet, knowledge on predictive and modeling of these complex and changing communities is limited. The emergently challenging question of how the geographical distribution of denitrifiers responds to ongoing and future environmental change is not yet fully understood. In our study we use metadata-based correlative niche modeling to analyze the geographical distribution of selected putative denitrifiers in the genus Sphingomonas, Mycoplana, Shewanella, and Alteromonas at different predicted environmental conditions and future climatic scenarios across the Baltic Sea. Using the predictive power of an ensemble modeling approach and eight different machine-learning algorithms, habitat suitability and the distribution of the selected denitrifiers were evaluated using geophysical and bioclimatic variables, benthic conditions, and four Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) trajectories of future global warming scenarios. All algorithms provided successful prediction capabilities both for variable importance, and for habitat suitability with Area Under the Curve (AUC) values between 0.89 and 1.00. Model findings revealed that salinity and nitrate concentrations significantly explained the variation in distribution of the selected denitrifiers. Rising temperatures of 0.8 to 1.8 °C at future RCP60–2050 trajectories are predicted to diminish or eliminate the bioclimatic suitable habitats for denitrifier distributions across the Baltic Sea. Multi-collated terrestrial and marine environmental variables contributed to the successful prediction of denitrifier distributions within the study area. The correlative niche modeling approach with high AUC values presented in the study allowed for accurate projections of the future distributions of the selected denitrifiers. The modeling approach can be used to improve our understanding of how ongoing and predicted future environmental changes may affect habitat suitability for organisms with denitrification capacity across the Baltic Sea.

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  • 46.
    Abdelgadir, Mohanad
    et al.
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science. Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies (CBEES), Baltic & East European Graduate School (BEEGS).
    Broman, Elias
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Dinnétz, Patrik
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Sjöling, Sara
    Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Environmental Science.
    Multiple realm models of marine, terrestrial, and future climate change scenarios predict increased filamentous cyanobacteria occurrences in coastal Baltic SeaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 47. Abdelkader, M.
    et al.
    Metzger, S.
    Mamouri, R. E.
    Astitha, M.
    Barrie, Leonard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Levin, Z.
    Lelieveld, J.
    Dust-air pollution dynamics over the eastern Mediterranean2015In: Atmospheric Chemistry And Physics, ISSN 1680-7316, E-ISSN 1680-7324, Vol. 15, no 16, p. 9173-9189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interactions of desert dust and air pollution over the eastern Mediterranean (EM) have been studied, focusing on two distinct dust transport events on 22 and 28 September 2011. The atmospheric chemistry-climate model EMAC has been used at about 50 km grid spacing, applying an on-line dust emission scheme and calcium as a proxy for dust reactivity. EMAC includes a detailed tropospheric chemistry mechanism, aerosol microphysics and thermodynamics schemes to describe dust aging. The model is evaluated using ground-based observations for aerosol concentrations and aerosol optical depth (AOD) as well as satellite observations. Simulation results and back trajectory analysis show that the development of synoptic disturbances over the EM can enhance dust transport from the Sahara and Arabian deserts in frontal systems that also carry air pollution to the EM. The frontal systems are associated with precipitation that controls the dust removal. Our results show the importance of chemical aging of dust, which increases particle size, dust deposition and scavenging efficiency during transport, overall reducing the lifetime relative to non-aged dust particles. The relatively long travel periods of Saharan dust result in more sustained aging compared to Arabian dust. Sensitivity simulations indicate 3 times more dust deposition of aged relative to pristine dust, which significantly decreases the dust lifetime and loading.

  • 48. Abdelkader, Mohamed
    et al.
    Metzger, Swen
    Steil, Benedikt
    Klingmüller, Klaus
    Tost, Holger
    Pozzer, Andrea
    Stenchikov, Georgiy
    Barrie, Leonard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Lelieveld, Jos
    Sensitivity of transatlantic dust transport to chemical aging and related atmospheric processes2017In: Atmospheric Chemistry And Physics, ISSN 1680-7316, E-ISSN 1680-7324, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 3799-3821Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a sensitivity study on transatlantic dust transport, a process which has many implications for the atmosphere, the ocean and the climate. We investigate the impact of key processes that control the dust outflow, i.e., the emission flux, convection schemes and the chemical aging of mineral dust, by using the EMAC model following Abdelkader et al. (2015). To characterize the dust outflow over the Atlantic Ocean, we distinguish two geographic zones: (i) dust interactions within the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), or the dust-ITCZ interaction zone (DIZ), and (ii) the adjacent dust transport over the Atlantic Ocean (DTA) zone. In the latter zone, the dust loading shows a steep and linear gradient westward over the Atlantic Ocean since particle sedimentation is the dominant removal process, whereas in the DIZ zone aerosol-cloud interactions, wet deposition and scavenging processes determine the extent of the dust outflow. Generally, the EMAC simulated dust compares well with CALIPSO observations; however, our reference model configuration tends to overestimate the dust extinction at a lower elevation and underestimates it at a higher elevation. The aerosol optical depth (AOD) over the Caribbean responds to the dust emission flux only when the emitted dust mass is significantly increased over the source region in Africa by a factor of 10. These findings point to the dominant role of dust removal (especially wet deposition) in transatlantic dust transport. Experiments with different convection schemes have indeed revealed that the transatlantic dust transport is more sensitive to the convection scheme than to the dust emission flux parameterization. To study the impact of dust chemical aging, we focus on a major dust outflow in July 2009. We use the calcium cation as a proxy for the overall chemical reactive dust fraction and consider the uptake of major inorganic acids (i.e., H2SO4, HNO3 and HCl) and their anions, i.e., sulfate (SO42-), bisulfate (HSO4-), nitrate (NO 3) and chloride (Cl), on the surface of mineral particles. The subsequent neutralization reactions with the calcium cation form various salt compounds that cause the uptake of water vapor from the atmosphere, i.e., through the chemical aging of dust particles leading to an increase of 0.15 in the AOD under subsaturated conditions (July 2009 monthly mean). As a result of the radiative feedback on surface winds, dust emissions increased regionally. On the other hand, the aged dust particles, compared to the non-aged particles, are more efficiently removed by both wet and dry deposition due to the increased hygroscopicity and particle size (mainly due to water uptake). The enhanced removal of aged particles decreases the dust burden and lifetime, which indirectly reduces the dust AOD by 0.05 (monthly mean). Both processes can be significant (major dust outflow, July 2009), but the net effect depends on the region and level of dust chemical aging.

  • 49.
    Abdelmaksoud, Ahmed
    et al.
    Khalifa Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Earth Sci, Abu Dhabi, U Arab Emirates.;Assiut Univ, Dept Geol, Assiut, Egypt..
    Ali, Mohammed Y.
    Khalifa Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Earth Sci, Abu Dhabi, U Arab Emirates..
    Al Suwaidi, Aisha
    Khalifa Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Earth Sci, Abu Dhabi, U Arab Emirates..
    Koyi, Hemin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Khalifa Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Earth Sci, Abu Dhabi, U Arab Emirates..
    Petroleum system of the fold-and-thrust belt of the United Arab Emirates: New insights based on 1D and 2D basin modeling2023In: Marine and Petroleum Geology, ISSN 0264-8172, E-ISSN 1873-4073, Vol. 158, article id 106567Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The hydrocarbon potential of the fold-and-thrust belt (FTB) in the United Arab Emirates (UAE)-Oman mountains has received limited attention to date, leading to a poor understanding of the petroleum systems in this region. Despite the existence of hydrocarbon fields within the FTB, the source rock potential has not been adequately studied. This study aims to address this knowledge gap using 1D and 2D basin modeling approaches to evaluate the petroleum system of the FTB. In addition, gas chromatographs are also used to correlate hydrocarbon occurrences with their source rock. This study's findings identify the Silurian, Upper Cretaceous, Paleocene-Eocene, and Oligocene formations as the primary source rocks in the study area. Silurian shales, encountered in a well in the northern UAE, are currently considered overmature. The Cenozoic source rocks exhibit a spectrum of Total Organic Carbon (TOC) content, ranging from less than 1 to as high as 2 wt%, leading to variable degrees of expulsion efficiency. The maturity of these rocks varies based on their position in relation to the FTB and foredeep, with increasing maturity towards the north. The Upper Cretaceous sequences display low TOC and Hydrogen Index, indicating very low expulsion efficiency. The present-day distribution of maturity is largely influenced by Late Cretaceous and Oligocene-Miocene compressional events that affected the northern and northeastern Arabian Plate. This analysis shows that hydrocarbon expulsion from the Silurian source rocks was initiated during the Middle-Late Jurassic. These hydrocarbons are presumed to have migrated through Upper Permian, Jurassic, and Lower and middle Cretaceous reservoirs. Westward hydrocarbon migration, towards a regional bulge, may have also occurred following compressional events that resulted in lithospheric flexure and formation of the foreland basin. Notably, certain exceptions to migration towards the bulge include structural entrapment of hydrocarbons beneath the main frontal thrust zone of FTB and some structural traps beneath the Lower Fiqa Formation.

  • 50.
    Abdelnasser, Amr
    et al.
    Geological Engineering Department, Faculty of Mines, Istanbul Technical University. Geology Department, Faculty of Science, Benha University, Benha.
    Kumral, Mustafa
    Geological Engineering Department, Faculty of Mines, Istanbul Technical University.
    Zoheir, Basem
    Geology Department, Faculty of Science, Benha University, Benaha.
    Karaman, Muhittin
    Geological Engineering Department, Faculty of Mines, Istanbul Technical University.
    Weihed, Pär
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Geosciences and Environmental Engineering.
    REE geochemical characteristics and satellite-based mapping of hydrothermal alteration in Atud gold deposit, Egypt2018In: Journal of African Earth Sciences, ISSN 0899-5362, Vol. 145, p. 317-330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New geochemical data of the hydrothermal alteration zones associated with gold-bearing quartz veins at Atud mine are used for better understanding the ore evolution and exploration vectoring. ASTER and Landsat 8 OLI data are used to elucidate the distribution of gold-associated alteration zones. Three alteration zones are defined; zone 1 (sericite-kaolinite-quartz-pyrite), zone 2 (quartz-sericite-albite-pyrite), and zone 3 (chlorite-carbonate-epidote ± pyrite). Sericite and hydrothermal quartz are confined to the mineralized quartz veins. Fe-OH and OH-bearing minerals are observed along NW- and NE-trending shear zones in the Main Atud mine. The association of gold-bearing quartz veins and sericite alteration is constrained by processing ASTER- and OLI-imagery data. The geochemical data of the ore-enveloping hydrothermally altered rocks are used to assess the behavior of the REEs during the mineralization process. Mild enrichment in LREE and significant enrichment in the HREE are associated with sericite in zones (1) and (2) alterations. Carbonate alteration (zone 3) is enriched in LREE and in immobile HREE. Moreover, LREE and Eu anomalies have negative correlated with the Alteration Index (A.I.) and K2O index (K.I.) in zones 1 and 2, suggesting high mobility of LREE in K-rich hydrothermal fluids. On the other hand, HREE anomalies with increasing MgO index (M.I.) in alteration zone 3 may imply low solubility of these elements in alkaline solutions. Au anomalies linked to sericite/silica alteration is a rather meaningful vector for further exploration in the area.

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