Digitala Vetenskapliga Arkivet

Change search
Refine search result
1234567 1 - 50 of 36103
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    A. da Cruz, Marcia Gabriely
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Budnyak, Tetyana M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    M. Rodrigues, Bruno V.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Budnyk, Serhiy
    Slabon, Adam
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Biocoatings and additives as promising candidates for ultralow friction systems2021In: Green Chemistry Letters and Reviews, ISSN 1751-8253, E-ISSN 1751-7192, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 356-379Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The achievement of frictionless systems, known as superlubricity, has become of great importance concerning energy saving and emission reduction. In parallel, the drive toward sustainability and environmental aspects has led to intense advances in the research and development of biobased materials. From the standpoint of Green Chemistry principles, this review presents a critical overview of the latest findings and future perspectives on the application of biobased materials aiming at superlubricant pursuits. The progress in the use of biomacromolecules, such as chitosan, cellulose, and lignin, as additives to lubricants or coating materials, are addressed, as well as the advances on sustainable coatings based on diamond-like carbon (DLC). Deeper investigations on the development of non-hazardous processes dedicated to the tribological properties of DLC, such as electrochemical synthesis using environment-friendly solvents to generate molecular precursors, widen the perspectives to achieve sustainable materials. Besides, the exploration of the tribochemical interactions between the DLC surface and lubricants containing biobased materials arises as a promising strategy to achieve green superlubricity as a viable and scalable process, through different pathways: by hydrogen bonds between lubricant and additives, via surface passivation of the functional groups present in these biomacromolecules or by biomimicking natural joints.

  • 2.
    A. da Cruz, Marcia Gabriely
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    M. Rodrigues, Bruno V.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Ristic, Andjelka
    Budnyk, Serhiy
    Das, Shoubhik
    Slabon, Adam
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    On the product selectivity in the electrochemical reductive cleavage of 2-phenoxyacetophenone, a lignin model compound2022In: Green Chemistry Letters and Reviews, ISSN 1751-8253, E-ISSN 1751-7192, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 151-159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research towards the production of renewable chemicals for fuel and energy industries has found lignin valorization as key. With a high carbon content and aromaticity, a fine-tuning of the depolymerization process is required to convert lignin into valuable chemicals. In context, model compounds have been used to understand the electrocatalyzed depolymerization for mimicking the typical linkages of lignin. In this investigation, 2-phenoxyacetophenone, a model compound for lignin beta-O-4 linkage, was electro-catalytically hydrogenated (ECH) in distinct three-electrode setups: an open and a membrane cell. A deep eutectic solvent based on ethylene-glycol and choline chloride was used to pursue sustainable routes to dissolve lignin. Copper was used as electrocatalyst due to the economic feasibility and low activity towards hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), a side reaction of ECH. By varying the cell type, we demonstrate a simple ECH route for the generation of different monomers and oligomers from lignin. Gas chromatography of the products revealed a higher content of carbonyl groups in those using the membrane cell, whereas the open cell produced mostly hydroxyl-end chemicals. Aiming at high value-added products, our results disclose the cell type influence on electrochemical reductive depolymerization of lignin. This approach encompasses cheap transition metal electrodes and sustainable solvents.

  • 3.
    A. da Cruz, Márcia G.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Gueret, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Chen, Jianhong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Piątek, Jędrzej
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Beele, Björn
    Sipponen, Mika H.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Frauscher, Marcella
    Budnyk, Serhiy
    M. Rodrigues, Bruno V.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Bergische Universität Wuppertal, Germany.
    Slabon, Adam
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Bergische Universität Wuppertal, Germany.
    Electrochemical Depolymerization of Lignin in a Biomass-based Solvent2022In: ChemSusChem, ISSN 1864-5631, E-ISSN 1864-564X, Vol. 15, no 15, article id e202200718Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Breaking down lignin into smaller units is the key to generate high value-added products. Nevertheless, dissolving this complex plant polyphenol in an environment-friendly way is often a challenge. Levulinic acid, which is formed during the hydrothermal processing of lignocellulosic biomass, has been shown to efficiently dissolve lignin. Herein, levulinic acid was evaluated as a medium for the reductive electrochemical depolymerization of the lignin macromolecule. Copper was chosen as the electrocatalyst due to the economic feasibility and low activity towards the hydrogen evolution reaction. After depolymerization, high-resolution mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed lignin-derived monomers and dimers. A predominance of aryl ether and phenolic groups was observed. Depolymerized lignin was further evaluated as an anti-corrosion coating, revealing enhancements on the electrochemical stability of the metal. Via a simple depolymerization process of biomass waste in a biomass-based solvent, a straightforward approach to produce high value-added compounds or tailored biobased materials was demonstrated. 

  • 4.
    A. da Cruz, Márcia G.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Onwumere, Joy N.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Chen, Jianhong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Beele, Björn
    Yarema, Maksym
    Budnyk, Serhiy
    Slabon, Adam
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). University of Wuppertal, Germany.
    M. Rodrigues, Bruno V.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). University of Wuppertal, Germany.
    Solvent-free synthesis of photoluminescent carbon nanoparticles from lignin-derived monomers as feedstock2023In: Green Chemistry Letters and Reviews, ISSN 1751-8253, E-ISSN 1751-7192, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 2196031Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Photoluminescent carbon nanoparticles (CNPs), such as carbon dots (CDs), have attracted much attention owing to a unique set of properties, like high and tunable fluorescence. In this way, the use of carbon-rich lignin has been demonstrated to be a sustainable approach to producing a broad range of photoluminescent CNPs. However, the valorization of this complex polyphenol is limited when it comes to green and efficient ways of conversion. In addition, the existing solvothermal approaches using lignin often result in CDs with low photoluminescence, while flammable and/or toxic solvents are employed. Here, we depolymerized technical lignins, i.e. kraft and soda, through electroreductive cleavage in two different sustainable media: deep eutectic solvent and levulinic acid. After depolymerization, lignin-derived monomers were generated, with a predominance of aryl ether and phenolic groups, which were further combined with 1,2-Phenylenediamine to produce N-doped CNPs in a solvent-free approach. Photoluminescent CNPs with varied sizes were generated (5–50 nm), which presented a wide photoluminescence emission, from blue to red, depending on solvent polarity. These results demonstrate a feasible and sustainable route for the solvent-free synthesis of photoluminescent CNPs using lignin-derived monomers as carbon source, which may find applications in a wide range of fields.

  • 5.
    A. Strumpfer, Johan
    et al.
    University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA; Beckman Institute, Urbana, IL, USA.
    von Castelmur, Eleonore
    Institute of Integrative Biology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, IL, USA.
    Franke, Barbara
    Institute of Integrative Biology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom.
    Barbieri, Sonia
    Institute of Integrative Biology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom.
    Bogomolovas, Julijus
    Universitätsmedizin Mannheim, Mannheim, Germany.
    Qadota, Hiroshi
    Department of Pathology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
    Konarv, Petr
    European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Hamburg, Germany.
    Svergun, Dmitri
    European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Hamburg, Germany.
    Labeit, Siegfried
    Department for Integrative Pathophysiology, Universitätsmedizin Mannheim, Mannheim, Germany.
    Schulten, Klaus
    University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA Beckman Institute, Urbana, IL, USA.
    Benian, Guy
    Department of Pathology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
    Mayans, Olga
    Institute of Integrative Biology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom.
    Stretching of Twitchin Kinase2012In: Biophysical Journal, ISSN 0006-3495, E-ISSN 1542-0086, Vol. 102, no 3 Supplement 1, p. 361a-362aArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The giant proteins from the titin family, that form cytoskeletal filaments, have emerged as key mechanotransducers in the sarcomere. These proteins contain a conserved kinase region, which is auto-inhibited by a C-terminal tail domain. The inhibitory tail domain occludes the active sites of the kinases, thus preventing ATP from binding. It was proposed that through application of a force, such as that arising during muscle contraction, the inhibitory tail becomes detached, lifting inhibition. The force-sensing ability of titin kinase was demonstrated in AFM experiments and simulations [Puchner, et al., 2008, PNAS:105, 13385], which showed indeed that mechanical forces can remove the autoinhibitory tail of titin kinase. We report here steered molecular dynamics simulations (SMD) of the very recently resolved crystal structure of twitchin kinase, containing the kinase region and flanking fibronectin and immuniglobulin domains, that show a variant mechanism. Despite the significant structural and sequence similarity to titin kinase, the autoinhibitory tail of twitchin kinase remains in place upon stretching, while the N-terminal lobe of the kinase unfolds. The SMD simulations also show that the detachment and stretching of the linker between fibronectin and kinase regions, and the partial extension of the autoinhibitory tail, are the primary force-response. We postulate that this stretched state, where all structural elements are still intact, may represent the physiologically active state.

  • 6. Aabloo, A
    et al.
    Klintenberg, M
    Thomas, John Oswald
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Structural Chemistry. strukturkemi.
    Molecular dynamics simulation of a polymer-inorganic interface.2000In: Electrochim.Acta, Vol. 45, p. 1425-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7. Aabloo, A.
    et al.
    Thomas, John Oswald
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Structural Chemistry. strukturkemi.
    Molecular dynamics simulation of lithium ion mobility in a PEO surface.2001In: Solid State Ionics, Vol. 143, p. 83-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Aabloo, A
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Structural Chemistry. strukturkemi.
    Thomas, John Oswald
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Structural Chemistry. strukturkemi.
    Molecular dynamics simulation of Nd3+ ions in a crystalline PEO surface1998In: ELECTROCHIMICA ACTA, ISSN 0013-4686, Vol. 43, no 10-11, p. 1361-1364Article in journal (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Poly(ethylene oxide) based electrolytes are systems in which ionic salts are dissolved into an amorphous EO matrix. Potentials developed earlier to model crystalline and amorphous bulk PEO systems are here used for the MD simulation at 400 K of the behavi

  • 9.
    Aabloo, A
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Structural Chemistry. strukturkemi.
    Thomas, John Oswald
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Structural Chemistry. strukturkemi.
    Molecular dynamics simulations of a poly(ethylene oxide) surface1997In: POLYMER, ISSN 0032-3861, Vol. 38, no 18, p. A47-A51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Potentials developed earlier for crystalline and amorphous bulk PEO systems have been used for the MD simulation of a PEO surface model. The surface comprises the outer region of a 122 Angstrom-thick sheet of PEO in which the PEO, -(CH2-CH2-O)(n)- chains

  • 10. Aaditya, V. B.
    et al.
    Bharathesh, Badada Math
    KTH.
    Harshitha, R.
    Chaluvaraju, B. V.
    Raghavendra, U. P.
    Murugendrappa, M. V.
    Study of dielectric properties of polypyrrole/titanium dioxide and polypyrrole/titanium dioxide-MWCNT nano composites2018In: Journal of materials science. Materials in electronics, ISSN 0957-4522, E-ISSN 1573-482X, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 2848-2859Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The polypyrrole/titanium dioxide nano composites and polypyrrole/titanium dioxide-MWCNT nano composites were synthesized by chemical polymerization technique in the presence of an ammonium persulphate (oxidizing agent). Different concentrations viz. 15, 30, 45 and 60 wt% of titanium dioxide (TiO2) as well as mixture of TiO2-MWCNT in polypyrrole (PPy) respectively were used in the present study. The nano composites have almost spherical type shaped particles which have cluster formation as confirmed from SEM photos. The XRD graphs reveal that the PPy/TiO2 (PT) nano composites have shown the semi-crystalline nature and also, the graphs indicate the changeover of the structure of PPy/TiO2-MWCNT (PTM) nano composites from amorphous to semi-crystalline nature. From the FTIR figures, shift in wavenumber towards lower side is noticed in the case of PT and PTM nano composites when compared to PPy. The dielectric properties such as dielectric constant, dielectric loss and tangent loss have shown good behavior. This reveals that, the TiO2 as well as mixture of TiO2-MWCNT particles have shown strong dependence on PPy and helps to form good composites. So, the nano composites are good dielectric materials.

  • 11. Aaldering, L. J.
    et al.
    Poongavanam, V.
    Langkjær, N.
    Natarajan Arul, Murugan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Jørgensen, P. T.
    Wengel, J.
    Veedu, R. N.
    Development of an Efficient G-Quadruplex-Stabilised Thrombin-Binding Aptamer Containing a Three-Carbon Spacer Molecule2017In: ChemBioChem, ISSN 1439-4227, E-ISSN 1439-7633, Vol. 18, no 8, p. 755-763Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA), which shows anticoagulant properties, is one of the most studied G-quadruplex-forming aptamers. In this study, we investigated the impact of different chemical modifications such as a three-carbon spacer (spacer-C3), unlocked nucleic acid (UNA) and 3′-amino-modified UNA (amino-UNA) on the structural dynamics and stability of TBA. All three modifications were incorporated at three different loop positions (T3, T7, T12) of the TBA G-quadruplex structure to result in a series of TBA variants and their stability was studied by thermal denaturation; folding was studied by circular dichroism spectroscopy and thrombin clotting time. The results showed that spacer-C3 introduction at the T7 loop position (TBA-SP7) significantly improved stability and thrombin clotting time while maintaining a similar binding affinity as TBA to thrombin. Detailed molecular modelling experiments provided novel insights into the experimental observations, further supporting the efficacy of TBA-SP7. The results of this study could provide valuable information for future designs of TBA analogues with superior thrombin inhibition properties. 

  • 12.
    Aarik, J.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. oorganisk kemi.
    Aidla, A.
    Mändar, H.
    Uustare, T.
    Schuisky, M.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. oorganisk kemi.
    Hårsta, A.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. oorganisk kemi.
    Atomic layer growth of epitaxial TiO2 thin films from TiCl4 and H2O on a-Al2O3 substrates2002In: J. Cryst. Growth, no 242, p. 189-198Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Aarik, J.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. oorganisk kemi.
    Sundqvist, J.
    Aidla, A.
    Lu, J.
    Sajavaara, T.
    Kukli, K.
    Hårsta, Anders
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. oorganisk kemi.
    Hafnium tetraiodide and oxygen as precursors for atomic layer deposition of hafnium oxide thin films2002In: Thin Solid Films, Vol. 418, p. 69-72Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Aarseth Larsson, Kim
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Chemical Characterisation of Nitrocellulose2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Nitrocellulose is the main component in many types of ammunition, propellants and explosives. The principles of production for nitrocellulose have not changed much since the 19th century when it started being industrially produced for this purpose. The character of the nitrocellulose has a large effect on the end products abilities. The aim of this study was to develop a method that would be able to characterise and distinguish between nitrocellulose from different manufacturers to be able to relate the character of the nitrocellulose to the properties of ammunition, propellants and explosives. Samples were dissolved in acetone and analysed by GC/MS and data were then analysed by multivariable statistics. FTIR was also used to characterise the nitrocellulose. Results from both methods showed very small differences when chromatograms and spectra were analysed. This study shows that GC/MS and FTIR are not suitable for this type of characterisation. The differences between the data were not sufficient to be able to separate the samples from each other.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 15. Aas, Wenche
    et al.
    Szabo, Zoltan
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Chemistry.
    Grenthe, Ingmar
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Chemistry.
    Equilibria and dynamics in binary and ternary uranyl oxalate and acetate/fluoride complexes1999In: Journal of the Chemical Society - Dalton Transactions, ISSN 0300-9246, no 8, p. 1311-1317Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The formation of ternary UO2(ac)pFq2-p-q (p = 1 or 2 and q = 1-3) complexes, and their equilibrium constants were investigated by potentiometric titrations and 19F NMR spectroscopy. The equilibrium constants have been determined from the emf data in a NaClO4 medium at constant sodium concentration, [Na+] = 1.00 M at 25°C, except for the UO2(ac)F32- complex where 19F NMR at -5°C was used. The magnitude of the equilibrium constant for the stepwise addition of fluoride indicates that prior co-ordination of acetate has only a small effect on the subsequent bonding of fluoride. The acetate exchange in the ternary UO2(ac)F32- complex was studied using 19F NMR. Through magnetisation transfer experiments, it was possible to confirm the provisional mechanism from a previous study and also the consistency of the rate constants for the five different exchange pathways required to describe the fluoride exchange. The exchange takes place via the intermediate UO2F3(H2O)2-, indicating that the acetate exchange follows an interchange mechanism with solvent participation in the transition state. The rates and mechanisms of the ligand exchange reactions in UO2(ox)2(H2O)2- and UO2(ac)2(H2O) have been studied using 13C NMR techniques at -5°C. The rate law is v = k-[complex][ligand], and the second order rate constant and the activation parameters for both systems have been determined. The reactions most likely take place through an Eigen-Wilkins type of mechanism, where the first step is a pre-equilibrium of an outer-sphere complex followed by a rate determining exchange of water. The rate constants for the water exchange reactions are very similar to that in UO2(H2O)52+. The information from the binary oxalate system rules out the formation of UO2(ox)2(H2O)2- as an intermediate in the exchange reactions in the previously studied UO2(ox)2F3-, also in this case confirming a previously suggested exchange mechanism. The H+/D+ isotope effects and a linear free energy relationship suggest that the main catalytic effect of H+ on ligand exchange rates is due to the formation of a protonated precursor. Hence, the catalytic effect depends on the basicity of the ligand and the site for the proton attack.

  • 16.
    Aasa, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Cancer Risk Assessment of Glycidol: Evaluation of a Multiplicative Risk Model for Genotoxic Compounds2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Humans are exposed to chemical compounds in everyday life, both from the environment and from endogenous processes. Some compounds constitute a risk for cancer development. One such compound is glycidol, which is genotoxic and an animal carcinogen. It is the model compound of this work, partly due to its presence in food. Glycidol, often together with 3-monochloropropane-1,2-diol (3-MCPD), occurs in the form of esters particularly in refined cooking oils, which are used in a variety of food products. The esters are hydrolyzed in the gastrointestinal tract to form glycidol (and 3-MCPD).

    The aim of the thesis has been to evaluate an approach for cancer risk estimation of genotoxic carcinogens based on a multiplicative (relative) risk model and genotoxic potency. Further, the aim was to estimate the cancer risk for exposure to glycidol via food. Measurement of the internal doses (concentration × time) of glycidol in the studied biological systems, including humans, has been crucial. Glycidol is electrophilic and forms adducts with nucleophilic sites in proteins and DNA. The doses of glycidol were quantified by mass spectrometry: in vivo from adduct levels to hemoglobin (Hb); in vitro from adducts to cob(I)alamin.

    The first part of the thesis concerns the genotoxic potency (genotoxic response per internal dose) of glycidol, measured in vitro by mutation studies and in vivo by micronuclei as a biomarker for genotoxicity (short-term studies in mice). The results were compared to that of ionizing radiation, used as a standard, to estimate the relative genotoxic potency of glycidol: 10 and 15 rad-equ./mMh from mutations and micronuclei, respectively. No induction of micronuclei was observed for the related compound 3-MCPD.

    Tumor incidence from published carcinogenicity studies of glycidol in mice and rats, together with the measured in vivo doses, was evaluated with the relative cancer risk model. A good agreement between predicted and observed tumor incidence was shown, and no significant difference of the obtained cancer risk coefficients (risk per dose) between mice (5.1 % per mMh) and rats (5.4 % per mMh) was observed. The overall results support that the relative risk coefficient (β) is independent of sex, tumor site, and species, and indicated that it can be transferred also to humans. The doubling dose, expressed as 1/β, is the dose that is required to double the background tumor incidence. The mean of the doubling doses from mice and rats (19 mMh) was assumed valid for risk estimation for humans. Transfer of β of glycidol to rad-equ. via its relative genotoxic potency showed a risk coefficient in agreement with the relative cancer risk coefficient of ionizing radiation.

    In the final work, the lifetime (70 years) in vivo doses of glycidol were calculated from measured Hb adduct levels in blood from 50 children and 12 adults, and compared to the doubling dose. A fivefold variation was observed in the in vivo doses. The estimated lifetime excess cancer risk from glycidol exceeds 1/1000. This is much higher than what is considered as an acceptable risk.

    To conclude, the multiplicative (relative) risk model together with relative genotoxic potency is promising to use in an approach for cancer risk estimation and in line with 3R (reduce-refine-replace) initiatives.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Cancer Risk Assessment of Glycidol
    Download (png)
    Omslagsframsida
  • 17.
    Aasa, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Abramsson-Zetterberg, Lilianne
    Carlsson, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Törnqvist, Margareta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    The genotoxic potency of glycidol established from micronucleus frequency and hemoglobin adduct levels in mice2017In: Food and Chemical Toxicology, ISSN 0278-6915, E-ISSN 1873-6351, Vol. 100, p. 168-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glycidol is a genotoxic animal carcinogen that has raised concern due to its presence in food, as glycidyl fatty acid esters. Here we investigated the genotoxicity of glycidol in BalbC mice (0-120 mg/kg) by monitoring the induction of micronuclei in peripheral blood as a marker of chromosomal damage. The scoring of the micronuclei was assessed by flow cytometry. In the treated mice, the internal dose of glycidol, expressed as area under the concentration-time curve, AUC (mol x L-1 x h; Mh), was measured by dihydroxypropyl adducts to hemoglobin (Hb). The study showed that glycidol induced linear dose dependent increases of Hb adducts (20 pmol/g Hb per mg/kg) and of micronuclei frequencies (12 parts per thousand per mMh). Compared to calculations based on administered dose, an improved dose-response relationship was observed when considering internal dose, achieved through the applied combination of sensitive techniques used for the scoring of micronuclei and AUC estimation of glycidol in the same mice. By comparing with earlier studies on micronuclei induction in mice exposed to ionizing radiation we estimated the radiation dose equivalent (rad-eq.) of glycidol to be ca 15 rad-eq./mMh.

  • 18.
    Aasa, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Törnqvist, Margareta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Abramsson-Zetterberg, Lilianne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry. National Food Agency, Sweden.
    Measurement of micronuclei and internal dose in mice demonstrates that 3-monochloropropane-1,2-diol (3-MCPD) has no genotoxic potency in vivo2017In: Food and Chemical Toxicology, ISSN 0278-6915, E-ISSN 1873-6351, Vol. 109, p. 414-420Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study 3-monochloropropane-1,2-diol (3-MCPD), a compound that appears as contaminant in refined cooking oils, has been studied with regard to genotoxicity in vivo (mice) with simultaneous measurement of internal dose using state-of-the-art methodologies. Genotoxicity (chromosomal aberrations) was measured by flow cytometry with dual lasers as the frequency of micronuclei in erythrocytes in peripheral blood from BalbC mice intraperitoneally exposed to 3-MCPD (0, 50, 75, 100, 125 mg/kg). The internal doses of 3-MCPD in the mice were calculated from N-(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)-valine adducts to hemoglobin (Hb), quantified at very low levels by high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    Convincing evidence for absence of genotoxic potency in correlation to measured internal doses in the mice was demonstrated, despite relatively high administered doses of 3-MCPD. The results are discussed in relation to another food contaminant that is formed as ester in parallel to 3-MCPD esters in oil processing, i.e. glycidol, which has been studied previously by us in a similar experimental setup. Glycidol has been shown to be genotoxic, and in addition to have ca. 1000 times higher rate of adduct formation compared to that observed for 3-MCPD. The conclusion is that at simultaneous exposure to 3-MCPD and glycidol the concern about genotoxicity would be glycidol.

  • 19.
    Aasa, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Törnqvist, Margareta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Granath, Fredrik
    Cancer risk estimation of glycidol based on rodent carcinogenicity studies, a multiplicative risk model and in vivo dosimetryManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Here we evaluate a multiplicative (relative) risk model for more reliable cancer risk estimations of genotoxic compounds. According to this model, cancer risk is proportional to background tumor incidence and to internal dose of the genotoxic compound. A relative risk coefficient is considered to be common across species, sex, and tumor sites. The model has previously been shown to be successfully applied to rodent carcinogenicity data for a few genotoxic compounds. The aim of the present study was to evaluate this risk model for glycidol, a common food contaminant. Tumor data from published glycidol carcinogenicity studies in mice and rats were evaluated with the model, using internal doses estimated from hemoglobin adduct measurements in blood of B6C3F1 mice and Sprague Dawley rats treated with glycidol in short-term exposure studies.

    The evaluation demonstrated that the relative risk model is valid for glycidol. A good agreement between predicted and observed tumor incidence was demonstrated in the animals, supporting a relative risk coefficient that is independent of species, sex, and tumor site. There was no significant difference of the risk coefficients between mice (5.1 % per mMh) and rats (7.1 % per mMh) when the internal doses of glycidol were considered. Altogether, this mechanism-based risk model gives a common and more reliable risk coefficient which could be extrapolated to humans via internal dose measurements, and by considering the background cancer incidence.

  • 20.
    Aasa, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Vare, Daniel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Motwani, Hitesh V.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Jenssen, Dag
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Törnqvist, Margareta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Quantification of the mutagenic potency and repair of glycidol-induced DNA lesions2016In: Mutation research. Genetic toxicology and environmental mutagenesis, ISSN 1383-5718, E-ISSN 1879-3592, Vol. 805, p. 38-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glycidol (Gly) is an electrophilic low-molecular weight epoxide that is classified by IARC as probably carcinogenic to humans. Humans might be exposed to Gly from food, e.g. refined vegetable oils, where Gly has been found as a food process contaminant. It is therefore important to investigate and quantify the genotoxicity of Gly as a primary step towards cancer risk assessment of the human exposure. Here, quantification of the mutagenic potency expressed per dose (AUC: area under the concentration time curve) of Gly has been performed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, using the HPRT assay. The dose of Gly was estimated in the cell exposure medium by trapping Gly with a strong nucleophile, cob(I)alamin, to form stable cobalamin adducts for analysis by LC-MS/MS. Gly was stable in the exposure medium during the time for cell treatment, and thus the dose in vitro is the initial concentration x cell treatment time. Gly induced mutations in the hprt-gene at ante of 0.08 +/- 0:01 mutations/10(5) cells/mMh. Through comparison with the effect of ionizing radiation in the same system a relative mutagenic potency of 9.5 rad-eq./mMh was obtained, which could be used for comparison of genotoxicity of chemicals and between test systems and also in procedures for quantitative cancer risk assessment. Gly was shown to induce strand breaks, that were repaired by base excision repair. Furthermore, Gly-induced lesions, present during replication, were found to delay the replication fork elongation. From experiments with repair deficient cells, homologous recombination repair and the ERCC1-XPF complex were indicated to be recruited to support in the repair of the damage related to the stalled replication elongation. The type of DNA damage responsible for the mutagenic effect of Gly could not be concluded from the present study.

  • 21.
    Aasa, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Vryonidis, Efstathios
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Abramsson-Zetterberg, Lilianne
    Törnqvist, Margareta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Internal dose of glycidol in children and estimation of associated cancer riskManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Children are more susceptible to exposures to harmful compounds compared to adults. Monitoring of the actual exposures in vivo is important to enable risk mitigation actions. The general population, including children, is exposed to the carcinogen glycidol through food. A possible exposure source to glycidol is food containing refined cooking oils where it is present as a process-induced contaminant in the form of fatty acid esters.

    In the present study internal (in vivo) doses of the genotoxic and carcinogenic compound glycidol have been determined in a cohort of 50 children and in a reference group of 12 adults (non-smokers and smokers). The lifetime in vivo doses of glycidol have been calculated from the levels of the hemoglobin (Hb) adduct N-(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)-valine in blood samples from the subjects, demonstrating about a 5-fold variation between the children (71–322 µMh). This variation is likely due to different dietary habits and/or different genotypes/phenotypes of the enzymes involved in the detoxification of glycidol. Data from the adults indicate that the non-smoking subjects are exposed to about the same level as the children, whereas the smoking subjects have about double levels, likely due to the presence of glycidol in tobacco smoke. The estimated exposure to glycidol in the children is higher than those estimated by European Food Safety Authority.

    The calculated relative cancer risk increment due to glycidol exposure demonstrated an unacceptable risk for all subjects. The excess lifetime risk based on the estimated lifetime in vivo doses of glycidol exceeded 1/1000, which should be compared to a generally applied acceptable lifetime risk level of 1/100 000. A small contribution to the internal dose of glycidol from other precursors to the measured Hb adduct, and corresponding contribution to estimated risks from intake of glycidol from food cannot though be excluded.

  • 22.
    Aasa, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Vryonidis, Efstathios
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Abramsson-Zetterberg, Lilianne
    Törnqvist, Margareta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Internal Doses of Glycidol in Children and Estimation of Associated Cancer Risk2019In: Toxics, E-ISSN 2305-6304, Vol. 7, no 1, article id 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The general population is exposed to the genotoxic carcinogen glycidol via food containing refined edible oils where glycidol is present in the form of fatty acid esters. In this study, internal (in vivo) doses of glycidol were determined in a cohort of 50 children and in a reference group of 12 adults (non-smokers and smokers). The lifetime in vivo doses and intakes of glycidol were calculated from the levels of the hemoglobin (Hb) adduct N-(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)valine in blood samples from the subjects, demonstrating a fivefold variation between the children. The estimated mean intake (1.4 mu g/kg/day) was about two times higher, compared to the estimated intake for children by the European Food Safety Authority. The data from adults indicate that the non-smoking and smoking subjects are exposed to about the same or higher levels compared to the children, respectively. The estimated lifetime cancer risk (200/10(5)) was calculated by a multiplicative risk model from the lifetime in vivo doses of glycidol in the children, and exceeds what is considered to be an acceptable cancer risk. The results emphasize the importance to further clarify exposure to glycidol and other possible precursors that could give a contribution to the observed adduct levels.

  • 23.
    Abada, Maria
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry.
    Spent Nuclear Fuel under Repository Conditions: Update and Expansion of Database and Development of Machine Learning Models2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is highly radioactive and therefore needs to be stored in deep geological repositories for thousands of years before it can be safely returned to nature. Due to the long storage times, performance assessments (PA) of the deep geological repositories are made. During PA dissolution experiments of SNF are made to evaluate the consequences of groundwater leaking into the fuel canister in case of barrier failure. These experiments are both expensive and time consuming, which is why computational models that can predict SNF dissolution behaviour are desirable. 

    This thesis focuses on gathering available experimental data of dissolution experiments to update and expand a database. Using the database, the dissolution behaviour of each radionuclide (RN) has been evaluated and compared to previous knowledge from existing literature. While it was difficult to be conclusive on the behaviour of elements where a limited amount of data was available, the dissolution behaviours found of different radionuclides in this thesis not only correspond to previous studies but also provide a tool to manage and compare SNF leaching data from different starting materials, irradiation history and leaching conditions. Moreover, the compilation of such a large amount of experimental data made it possible to understand where future experimental efforts should be focused, i.e. there is a lack of data during reducing conditions.

    In addition, machine learning models using Artificial Neural Network (ANN), Random Forest (RF) and XGBoost algorithms were developed and run using the database after which the performances were evaluated. The performances of each algorithm were compared to get an understanding of which model performed best, but also to understand whether these kinds of models are suitable tools for SNF dissolution behaviour predictions. The best performing model, with training and test R2 scores close to 1, was the XGBoost model. Although XGBoost, had a high performance, it was concluded that more experimental data is needed before machine learning models can be used in real situations.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 24.
    Abada, Maria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Fossum, Elin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Brandt, Louise
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Åkesson, Anton
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Property prediction of super-strong nanocellulose fibers2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The innovative technology behind production of strong biofilaments involves the process of spinning filaments from nanoparticles extracted from wood. These nanoparticles are called cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs). The spun filaments can have high mechanical properties, rivaling many other plant based materials, and could be an environmentally friendly replacement for many materials in the future such as fabrics and composites. Before mass production might be possible, the optimal dispersion properties must be determined for the intended use, with regard to concentration, method of oxidation (TEMPO-oxidation or carboxymethylation) and pretreatment through sonication and centrifugation.

    In this bachelor’s thesis attributes of spun filaments were investigated in order to find a correlation between mechanical properties and the effects of concentration, method of oxidation as well as sonication and centrifugation of the dispersions. The mechanical properties were also compared to the fibrils’ ability to entangle and align during flow-focusing. A variety of analytical methods: flow-stop, tensile testing, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) were implemented for the dispersions and filaments.

    The results from this study show that flow-stop analysis could be used to determine which CNF dispersions are spinnable and which are non-spinnable, along with which spinnable dispersion would yield the strongest filament. It was also concluded that crystallinity of fibrils affects the mechanical properties of filaments and that TCNFs are generally more crystalline than CMCs. Pretreatment through sonication and centrifugation seems to have a negative impact on spinnability and sonication in combination with low concentration seems to lead to non-spinnable conditions. On the other hand, sonicated dispersions seem to yield a greater number of samples without aggregates than non-sonicated ones. Aggregates, however, seem to only affect ultimate stress out of the measured mechanical properties. Furthermore, concentration and viscosity affect spinnability and CMC dispersions seem to yield thicker filaments than TCNF dispersions. However, due to lack of statistically validated data any definitive conclusions could not be drawn.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 25.
    Abal, Joao P. K.
    et al.
    Univ Fed Rio Grande do Sul, Inst Fis, BR-91501970 Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil..
    Dillenburg, Rodrigo F.
    Univ Fed Rio Grande do Sul, Inst Fis, BR-91501970 Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil..
    Köhler, Mateus H.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy. Univ Fed Santa Maria, Dept Fis, BR-97105900 Santa Maria, RS, Brazil.
    Barbosa, Marcia C.
    Univ Fed Rio Grande do Sul, Inst Fis, BR-91501970 Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil..
    Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Water Anchored in Multilayered Nanoporous MoS2 Membranes: Implications for Desalination2021In: ACS Applied Nano Materials, E-ISSN 2574-0970, Vol. 4, no 10, p. 10467-10476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the most promising applications in nano-science is the design of new materials to improve water permeability and selectivity of nanoporous membranes. Understanding the molecular architecture behind these fascinating structures and how it impacts the water flow is an intricate but a necessary task. We studied here the water flux through multi-layered nanoporous molybdenum disulfide (MLNMoS2) membranes with different nanopore sizes and lengths. Molecular dynamics simulations show that the permeability does not increase with the inverse of the membrane thickness, violating the classical hydrodynamic behavior. The data also reveal that water dynamics is slower than those observed in frictionless carbon nanotubes and multilayer graphene membranes, which we explain in terms of an anchor mechanism observed in between layers. We show that the membrane permeability is critically dependent on the nanopore architecture, bringing important insights into the manufacture of new desalination membranes.

  • 26.
    Abalos, M.
    et al.
    MTM Research Center, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Abad, E.
    Laboratory of Dioxins, Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, Environmental Chemistry Dept., IDÆA-CSIC, Barcelona, Spain.
    van Leeuwen, S. P. J.
    Institute for Environmental Studies (IVM), Vrije University, Amsterdam, Netherlands; RIKILT-Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Lindström, Gunilla
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Fiedler, Heidelore
    UNEP Chemicals, Châtelaine GE, Switzerland.
    de Boer, J.
    Institute for Environmental Studies (IVM), Vrije University, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    van Bavel, Bert
    Results for PCDD/PCDF and dl-PCBs in the first round of UNEPs biennial global interlaboratory assessment on persistent organic pollutants2013In: TrAC. Trends in analytical chemistry, ISSN 0165-9936, E-ISSN 1879-3142, Vol. 46, p. 98-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first worldwide interlaboratory assesment on persistent organic pollutants (POPs) under the Stockholm Convention was organized in the Asian/Pacific, Latin American and African regions during 2009-11.

    A relatively large number of laboratories reported data for the PCDDs/PCDFs and dioxin-like PCBs, especially in the Asian region. Within the Asian region, several participants used high-resolution GC/high-resolution MS systems optimized for dioxin analysis. The availibility of High-resolution mass spectrometer instrumentation is limited in the Latin America and African regions, although recently several new laboratories for dioxins have started in the Latin American region.

  • 27.
    Abb, Marcel J. S.
    et al.
    Institute of Physical Chemistry, Justus Liebig University, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 17, D-35392 Giessen, Germany; Institute of Physical Chemistry, Justus Liebig University, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 17, D-35392 Giessen, Germany.
    Weber, Tim
    Institute of Physical Chemistry, Justus Liebig University, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 17, D-35392 Giessen, Germany; Institute of Physical Chemistry, Justus Liebig University, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 17, D-35392 Giessen, Germany.
    Langsdorf, Daniel
    Institute of Physical Chemistry, Justus Liebig University, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 17, D-35392 Giessen, Germany; Institute of Physical Chemistry, Justus Liebig University, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 17, D-35392 Giessen, Germany.
    Koller, Volkmar
    Institute of Physical Chemistry, Justus Liebig University, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 17, D-35392 Giessen, Germany; Institute of Physical Chemistry, Justus Liebig University, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 17, D-35392 Giessen, Germany.
    Gericke, Sabrina M.
    Combustion Physics, Lund University, Box 118, S-22100 Lund, Sweden.
    Pfaff, Sebastian
    Combustion Physics, Lund University, Box 118, S-22100 Lund, Sweden.
    Busch, Michael
    Division Chemical Physics Department of Physics and Competence Centre for Catalysis, Chalmersplatsen 4, SE-41296 Göteborg, Sweden.
    Zetterberg, Johan
    Combustion Physics, Lund University, Box 118, S-22100 Lund, Sweden.
    Preobrajenski, Alexei
    MAX IV Laboratory, E120057, Fontongatan 2, 22484 Lund, Sweden.
    Grönbeck, Henrik
    Division Chemical Physics Department of Physics and Competence Centre for Catalysis, Chalmersplatsen 4, SE-41296 Göteborg, Sweden.
    Lundgren, Edvin
    Synchrotron Radiation Research, Lund University, Box 118, S-22100 Lund, Sweden.
    Over, Herbert
    Institute of Physical Chemistry, Justus Liebig University, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 17, D-35392 Giessen, Germany; Center for Materials Research, Justus Liebig University, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 16, D-35392 Giessen, Germany.
    Thermal Stability of Single-Crystalline IrO2(110) Layers: Spectroscopic and Adsorption Studies2020In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 124, no 28, p. 15324-15336Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Abbadessa, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Oinonen, Petri
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. Ecohelix AB, Teknikringen 38, SE-10044 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Characterization of Two Novel Bio-based Materials from Pulping Process Side Streams: Ecohelix and CleanFlow Black Lignin2018In: BioResources, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 7606-7627Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The characteristics of two novel types of technical lignin, namely Ecohelix (EH) and CleanFlow black lignin (CFBL), isolated from two different pulping process side streams, were analyzed. EH and CFBL were analyzed in terms of general composition, chemical functionalities, molar mass distribution, and thermal stability. For comparison, two relevant types of commercially available lignosulfonate and kraft lignin were used. The results showed that EH contains a large amount of sulfonated lignin, together with carbohydrates and ash. As such, it can be considered a lignin-carbohydrate hybrid molecule. CFBL was found to contain 91.5% Klason lignin and the lowest amount of carbohydrates (0.3%). EH showed the highest content of aliphatic OH groups (5.44 mmol/g) and CFBL a high content of phenols (4.73 mmol/g). EH had a molecular weight of 31.4 kDa and a sufficient thermal stability. CFBL had the lowest molecular weight (M-w = 2.0 kDa) and thermal stability of all kraft lignins analyzed in this study. These properties highlighted that EH is a suitable building block for material development and that CFBL is a promising material for the production of biofuel and biochemicals.

  • 29.
    Abbas, Alaa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC.
    Palladium-Catalysed Carbonylative Synthesis of Acylamidines2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 30.
    Abbas, Ghulam
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Johansson, Gustav
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Alay-e-Abbas, Syed Muhammad
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science. Computational Materials Modeling Laboratory, Department of Physics, Government College University, Faisalabad 38040, Pakistan.
    Shi, Yijun
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Machine Elements.
    Larsson, J. Andreas
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Material Science.
    Quasi Three-Dimensional Tetragonal SiC Polymorphs as Efficient Anodes for Sodium-Ion Batteries2023In: ACS Applied Energy Materials, E-ISSN 2574-0962, Vol. 6, no 17, p. 8976-8988Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present work, we investigate, for the first time, quasi 3D porous tetragonal silicon–carbon polymorphs t(SiC)12 and t(SiC)20 on the basis of first-principles density functional theory calculations. The structural design of these q3-t(SiC)12 and q3-t(SiC)20 polymorphs follows an intuitive rational approach based on armchair nanotubes of a tetragonal SiC monolayer where C–C and Si–Si bonds are arranged in a paired configuration for retaining a 1:1 ratio of the two elements. Our calculations uncover that q3-t(SiC)12 and q3-t(SiC)20 polymorphs are thermally, dynamically, and mechanically stable with this lattice framework. The results demonstrate that the smaller polymorph q3-t(SiC)12 shows a small band gap (∼0.59 eV), while the larger polymorph of q3-t(SiC)20 displays a Dirac nodal line semimetal. Moreover, the 1D channels are favorable for accommodating Na ions with excellent (>300 mAh g–1) reversible theoretical capacities. Thus confirming potential suitability of the two porous polymorphs with an appropriate average voltage and vanishingly small volume change (<6%) as anodes for Na-ion batteries.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 31.
    Abbas, S.
    et al.
    Quaid-i-Azam University, Pakistan.
    Imtiaz-ud-Din,
    Quaid-i-Azam University, Pakistan.
    Mehmood, M.
    Quaid-i-Azam University, Pakistan.
    Raheel, A.
    Quaid-i-Azam University, Pakistan.
    Ayub, Rabia
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Biorefinery and Energy.
    Zahid, M.
    Higher Education Department Govt. of the Punjab, Pakistan.
    Tahir, M. N.
    University of Sargodha, Pakistan.
    Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Bioactive Ferrocenyl Substituted Hydrazones2021In: Russian journal of coordination chemistry, ISSN 1070-3284, E-ISSN 1608-3318, Vol. 47, no 12, p. 891-902Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A series of ferrocenyl substituted hydrazones (I–VII) derived from ferrocene carboxaldehyde and substituted hydrazides have been prepared and characterized by FTIR, 1H NMR spectroscopy, and crystallographic studies. The single-crystal X-ray analysis for III·0.5H2O·0.5CH3CN (CIF file CCDC no. 1968937) further authenticates the structural motif of the synthesized compounds. The C(11) of ferrocene carboxaldehyde is linked with N(1) of the hydrazide moiety with a bond length of 1.283(5) Å, confirming the binding of the two structural units present in the final product. They were preliminarily screened for their antimicrobial activity and demonstrate good results. The free radical scavenging activity for the compounds (III, IV) has been found to be more than 90% when compared with the ascorbic acid. The total antioxidant capacity and total reducing power assays for VI show significant activity whereas the data for the other compounds are also encouraging. Quantum chemical calculations at the DFT level predict that compound II is the softest while VII is the hardest within the series, resultantly II can be used as a synthon for further chemical reactions.

  • 32. Abbas, Sk Jahir
    et al.
    Ramacharyulu, P. V. R. K.
    Lo, Hsin-Hsi
    Ali, Sk Imran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Ke, Shyue-Chu
    A catalytic approach to synthesis of PLP analogs and other environmental protocols in a single handed CaO/TiO2 green nanoparticle2017In: Applied Catalysis B: Environmental, ISSN 0926-3373, E-ISSN 1873-3883, Vol. 210, p. 276-289Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As our precursory stage we have focus straight forward on clean catalytic approach for the production of C3 substituted pyridoxal-5 '-phosphate analogues of vitamin B6, and other environmental protocols like photocatalytic activity, green fossil fuels and c-c coupling using efficient biocompatible eggshell related unrivalled materials which show versatility of the catalytic effect on different inorganic support. The eggshell immobilized nanoparticles have encouraging relevance in creation of new molecules and can advantageously be studied by various spectroscopic, thermal and elemental analyses like powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, UV-vis, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analysis. The elucidate nature of nanoparticles offer: more active site acts as lewis acid, vacancies on the catalyst surface and good to better yield of C3 substituted deoxy and 2-nor deoxy coenzyme pyridoxine (PN), coupling products propargylamines (PA), photo degrading enhancement of MB and nucleophilic substituted fatty acid (BD). This enzyme cofactor explore molecular synthons to synthetic equivalent: 3-deoxy and 2-nor-3-deoxy pyridoxal (PL), pyridoxal oxime (P0), pyridoxamine (PM) and mono phosphate derivative of 3-deoxyPM, 3-deoxyPL respectively and chemistry of selective oxidation and schiff base mechanism was studied and complemented through combined experimental and theoretical molecular orbital calculation consequently. The heterogeneous catalyst has strong selective ability towards selective reducing pyridine diester, bioactive intermediates substances and holds vast potential towards separation for the photogenerated electron-hole pairs and renewable, nontoxic, biodegradable green fossil fuels. The catalyst including environmental concern is reapplicable and strong impressive that can unfold the space of worthy metal component widely and facilitate the scope to take a vital role in different fileds like catalysis, biochemistry, nanoscience, energy and materials science.

  • 33.
    Abbasi, Alireza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical, Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Structural and Spectroscopic Studies of Solvated Metal Ions2005Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Crystallographic and spectroscopic studies have been performed of structures, coordination and chemical bonding for series of trivalent metal ions solvated by two oxygen-coordinating solvents, water and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The hydrated scandium(III) and lanthanoid(III) ions, La to Lu, are surrounded by tricapped trigonal prisms of aqua ligands in the isomorphous series of trifluoromethanesulfonates, [M(H2O)n](CF3SO3)3. For the smallest ions, M = Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, Sc, the hydration numbers decrease, n = 8.96(5), 8.8(1), 8.7(1), 8.5(1), 8.0(1), respectively, with decreasing size of the ion. The crystal structures at ambient temperature indicate randomly distributed vacancies of the capping oxygen atoms, and 2H solid-state NMR of the diamagnetic [M(H2O)n](CF3SO3)3, M = Sc, Lu, Y and La compounds revealed increasing mobility of the water ligands in the coordination sphere with increasing temperature, also for the fully nonahydrated LaIII and YIII ions. The stretching force constants of the Ln-O bonds, evaluated from vibrational spectroscopy, increased from 0.81 to 1.16 N cm-1 for the Ln-6O trigonal prism in a smooth correlation with the bond distances from La to Lu. For the capping Ln-3O bonds the increase from 0.49 to 0.65 N cm-1 reflects the increased ligand-ligand repulsion with decreasing ion size. This is also the reason for the water deficiency of the Er, Tm, Yb, Lu and Sc salts, and for [Sc(H2O)8.0](CF3SO3)3 the repulsion induced a phase transition at about 185 K that, by low temperature crystallography, was found to distort the coordination of water molecules toward a monocapped trigonal prism around the scandium(III) ion.

    All crystal structures of the octakis(dimethyl sulfoxide)lanthanoid(III) iodides comprise discrete [Ln(dmso)8]3+ complexes surrounded by iodide ions. The lanthanum(III) and praseodymium(III) compounds crystallize in the orthorhombic space group Pbca with more efficient packing than for the heavier and smaller ions in the lanthanoid series, which crystallize in the monoclinic space group P21/n. The group 13 metal ions, aluminium(III), gallium(III), indium(III), thallium(III), and also scandium(III) of group 3, form crystalline hexakis(dimethyl sulfoxide) solvates in the space group R 3, with octahedral MO6 coordination entities, which are increasingly compressed along one threefold axis for increasing ionic size. EXAFS measurements on the solvated ions display similar M-O bond distances in dimethyl sulfoxide solution as in the solid solvates. For all the solid dimethyl sulfoxide solvates the strength and nature of the metal-oxygen bond has been evaluated by normal coordinate analysis of vibrational spectra, and correlated with the S-O stretching vibrational mode.

    Distortions from regular octahedral six coordination are discussed for the hydrated isoelectronic soft mercury(II) and thallium(III) ions in the solid bisaquamercury(II) and trisaquatallium(III) trifluoromethanesulfonates, in terms of pseudo Jahn-Teller effects (PJTE). Mercury(II), generally more strongly influenced by PJTE distortions, displays a 2 + 4 Hg-O coordination forming chains that are held together in sheets by hydrogen bonds and in layers by van der Waals interactions, which explain the fragile structure of the crystals.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 34. Abbasi, Alireza
    et al.
    Damian Risberg, Emiliana
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical, Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Mink, Janos
    Persson, Ingmar
    Sandström, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Sidorov, Yurii V.
    Skripkin, Mikhail Yu.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Ullström, Ann-Sofi
    Crystallographic and Vibrational Spectroscopic Studies of Octakis(dimethyl sulfoxide)lanthanoid(III) Iodides2007In: Inorganic Chemistry, ISSN 0020-1669, E-ISSN 1520-510X, Vol. 46, no 19, p. 7731-7741Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The octakis(DMSO) (DMSO = dimethylsulfoxide) neodymium(III), samarium(III), gadolinium(III), dysprosium(III), erbium(III), and lutetium(III) iodides crystallize in the monoclinic space group P21/n (No. 14) with Z = 4, while the octakis(DMSO) iodides of the larger lanthanum(III), cerium(III), and praseodymium(III) ions crystallize in the orthorhombic space group Pbca (No. 61), Z = 8. In all [Ln(OS(Me2)8]I3 compounds the lanthanoid(III) ions coordinate eight DMSO oxygen atoms in a distorted square antiprism. Up to three of the DMSO ligands were found to be disordered and were described by two alternative configurations related by a twist around the metal−oxygen (Ln−O) bond. To resolve the atomic positions and achieve reliable Ln−O bond distances, complete semirigid DMSO molecules with restrained geometry and partial occupancy were refined for the alternative sites. This disorder model was also applied on previously collected data for the monoclinic octakis(DMSO)yttrium(III) iodide. At ambient temperature, the eight Ln−O bond distances are distributed over a range of about 0.1 Å. The average value increases from Ln−O 2.30, 2.34, 2.34, 2.36, 2.38, 2.40 to 2.43 Å (Ln = Lu, Er, Y, Dy, Gd, Sm, and Nd) for the monoclinic [Ln(OSMe2)8]I3 structures, and from 2.44, 2.47 to 2.49 Å (Ln = Pr, Ce, and La) for the orthorhombic structures, respectively. The average of the La−O and Nd−O bond distances remained unchanged at 100 K, 2.49 and 2.43 Å, respectively. Despite longer bond distances and larger Ln−O−S angles, the cell volumes are smaller for the orthorhombic structures (Ln = Pr, Ce, and La) than for the monoclinic structure with Ln = Nd, showing a more efficient packing arrangement. Raman and IR absorption spectra for the [Ln(OS(CH3)2)8]I3 (Ln = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Gd, Tb, Dy, Er, Lu, and Y) compounds, also deuterated for La and Y, have been recorded and analyzed by means of normal coordinate methods. The force constants for the Ln−O and S−O stretching modes in the complexes increase with decreasing Ln−O bond distance and show increasing polarization of the bonds for the smaller and heavier lanthanoid(III) ions.

  • 35. Abbasi, Alireza
    et al.
    Geranmayeh, Shokoofeh
    Skripkin, Mikhail Y.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Potassium ion-mediated non-covalent bonded coordination polymers2012In: Dalton Transactions, ISSN 1477-9226, E-ISSN 1477-9234, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 850-859Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Crystal structures and vibrational spectra of three related network-forming coordination complexes have been studied. Two novel thermodynamically stable pseudo-polymorphic solvated rhodium chloro compounds, [cis-RhCl4(DMSO-kappa S)(2)K](n), 1, and [cis-RhCl4(DMSO-kappa S)(2)K center dot 3H(2)O](n), 2, and one metastable compound [trans-RhCl4(DMSO-kappa S)(2)K center dot 0.25H(2)O](n), 3, crystallize at ambient temperature in the orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) for 1, and the monoclinic space groups P2(1)/n and P2(1)/c for 2 and 3, respectively. All three structures contain [RhCl4(DMSO-kappa S)(2)]-complexes in which the rhodium(III) ions bind to two dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) sulfur atoms and four chloride ions in distorted octahedral coordination geometries. The complexes are connected in networks via potassium ions interacting with the Cl- and the DMSO oxygen atoms. As the sum of Shannon ionic radii of K+ and Cl- exceeds the K-Cl distances in compounds under study, these compounds can be described as Rh-Cl-K coordination polymers with non-covalent bonding, which is not common in these systems, forming 1- and 2-D networks for 1/2 and 3, respectively. The 2-D network with nano-layered sheets for compound 3 was also confirmed by TEM images. Further evaluation of the bonding in the cis- and trans-[RhCl4(DMSO-kappa S)(2)](-) entities was obtained by recording Raman and FT-IR absorption spectra and assigning the vibrational frequencies with the support of force-field calculations. The force field study of complexes reveals the strong domination of trans-effect (DMSO-kappa S > Cl) over the effect of non-covalent bonding in coordination polymeric structures. The comparison of calculated RhCl, RhS and SO stretching force constants showed evidence of K+-ligand interactions whereas direct experimental evidences of K+-Cl- interaction were not obtained because of strong overlap of the corresponding spectral region with that where lattice modes and Rh-ligand bendings appear.

  • 36. Abbasi, Alireza
    et al.
    Skripkin, Mikhail Yu.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Torapava, Natallia
    Ambidentate coordination of dimethyl sulfoxide in rhodium(III) complexes2011In: Dalton Transactions, ISSN 1477-9226, E-ISSN 1477-9234, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 1111-1118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The two dimethyl sulfoxide solvated rhodium(III) compounds, [Rh(dmso-kappa O)(5)(dmso-kappa S)](CF(3)SO(3))(3) (1 & 1* at 298 K and 100 K, respectively) and [Rh(dmso-kappa O)(3)(dmso-kappa S)(2)Cl](CF(3)SO(3))(2) (2), crystallize with orthorhombic unit cells in the space group Pna2(1) (No. 33), Z = 4. In the [Rh(dmso)(6)](3+) complex with slightly distorted octahedral coordination geometry, the Rh-O bond distance is significantly longer with O trans to S, 2.143(6) angstrom (1) and 2.100(6) angstrom (1*), than the mean Rh-O bond distance with O trans to O, 2.019 angstrom (1) and 2.043 angstrom (1*). In the [RhCl(dmso)(5)](3+) complex, the mean Rh-O bond distance with O trans to S, 2.083 angstrom, is slightly longer than that for O trans to Cl, 2.067(4) angstrom, which is consistent with the trans influence DMSO-kappa S > Cl > DMSO-kappa O of the opposite ligands. Raman and IR absorption spectra were recorded and analyzed and a complete assignment of the vibrational bands was achieved with support by force field calculations. An increase in the Rh-O stretching vibrational frequency corresponded to a decreasing trans-influence from the opposite ligand. The Rh-O force constants obtained were correlated with the Rh-O bond lengths, also including previously obtained values for other M(dmso)(6)(3+) complexes with trivalent metal ions. An almost linear correlation was obtained for the MO stretching force constants vs. the reciprocal square of the MO bond lengths. The results show that the metal ion-oxygen bonding of dimethyl sulfoxide ligands is electrostatically dominated in those complexes and that the stretching force constants provide a useful measure of the relative trans-influence of the opposite ligands in hexa-coordinated Rh(III)-complexes.

  • 37.
    Abbasi Aval, Negar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. Isfahan Univ Technol, Dept Mat Engn, Biomat Res Grp, Esfahan 8475683777, Iran.;Isfahan Univ Med Sci, Sch Med, Dept Anat Sci, Esfahan, Iran..
    Emadi, Rahmatollah
    Isfahan Univ Technol, Dept Mat Engn, Biomat Res Grp, Esfahan 8475683777, Iran..
    Valiani, Ali
    Isfahan Univ Med Sci, Sch Med, Dept Anat Sci, Esfahan, Iran..
    Kharaziha, Mahshid
    Isfahan Univ Technol, Dept Mat Engn, Biomat Res Grp, Esfahan 8475683777, Iran..
    Finne Wistrand, Anna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    An aligned fibrous and thermosensitive hyaluronic acid-puramatrix interpenetrating polymer network hydrogel with mechanical properties adjusted for neural tissue2022In: Journal of Materials Science, ISSN 0022-2461, E-ISSN 1573-4803, Vol. 57, no 4, p. 2883-2896Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Central nervous system (CNS) injuries such as stroke or trauma can lead to long-lasting disability, and there is no currently accepted treatment to regenerate functional CNS tissue after injury. Hydrogels can mimic the neural extracellular matrix by providing a suitable 3D structure and mechanical properties and have shown great promise in CNS tissue regeneration. Here we present successful synthesis of a thermosensitive hyaluronic acid-RADA 16 (Puramatrix (TM)) peptide interpenetrating network (IPN) that can be applied in situ by injection. Thermosensitive hyaluronic acid (HA) was first synthesized by combining HA with poly(N-isopropylacrylamide). Then, the Puramatrix (TM) self-assembled peptide was combined with the thermosensitive HA to produce a series of injectable thermoresponsive IPNs. The HA-Puramatrix (TM) IPNs formed hydrogels successfully at physiological temperature. Characterization by SEM, rheological measurements, enzymatic degradation and swelling tests was performed to select the IPN optimized for neurologic use. SEM images of the optimized dry IPNs demonstrated an aligned porous structure, and the rheological measurements showed that the hydrogels were elastic, with an elastic modulus of approximately 500 Pa, similar to that of brain tissue. An evaluation of the cell-material interactions also showed that the IPN had biological characteristics required for tissue engineering, strongly suggesting that the IPN hydrogel possessed properties beneficial for regeneration of brain tissue.

  • 38.
    Abbasi, M.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Backstrom, J.
    Mid Sweden Univ, FSCN Mat Phys, Dept Nat Sci, SE-85170 Sundsvall, Sweden..
    Cornell, Ann M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Applied Electrochemistry.
    Fabrication of Spin-Coated Ti/TiHx/Ni-Sb-SnO2 Electrode: Stability and Electrocatalytic Activity2018In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, ISSN 0013-4651, E-ISSN 1945-7111, Vol. 165, no 9, p. H568-H574Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel three-layer anode having the composition Ti/TiHx/Ni-Sb-SnO2 (Ti/TiHx/NATO) was successfully prepared by a spin-coating and pyrolysis process aiming at a long service lifetime and good electrocatalytic properties for ozone formation. The TiHx as an interlayer was produced by electrochemical cathodic reduction of a coated layer of the TiOx on the titanium substrate. Spin coating and thermal decomposition were used to deposit the Sn-Sb-Ni precursor on the surface of the prepared Ti/TiHx electrode. Cyclic and linear scanning voltammetry, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to reveal the electrode performance and morphology. Results show that the onset potential for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) of Ti/TiHx /NATO is higher than for Ti/NATO. They also indicate that the service lifetime of the Ti/TiHx/NATO is twice as long as the Ti/NATO at a current density of 50 mA.cm(-2) at room temperature. Electrochemical ozone generation and degradation of the methylene blue were investigated to confirm selectivity and activity of the electrodes. After 5 min electrolysis, a current efficiency for ozone generation of 56% was obtained the electrode with TiHx while 38% was obtained on Ti/NATO under same conditions. The results also confirm that the Ti/TiH x /NATO has a higher kinetic rate constant and decolorization efficiency for removal of the methylene blue compare to the Ti/NATO. The rate constant for the pseudo-first ordered reaction of methylene blue degradation showed high values of 350 x 10(-3) min(-1) for Ti/NATO and 440 x 10(-3) min(-1) for Ti/TiHx/NATO. 

  • 39.
    Abbasi, M.
    et al.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Stockholm.
    Bäckström, Joakim
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Cornell, A.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Stockholm.
    Fabrication of Spin-Coated Ti/TiHx/Ni-Sb-SnO2 Electrode: Stability and Electrocatalytic Activity2018In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, ISSN 0013-4651, E-ISSN 1945-7111, Vol. 165, no 9, p. H568-H574Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel three-layer anode having the composition Ti/TiHx/Ni-Sb-SnO2 (Ti/TiHx/NATO) was successfully prepared by a spin-coating and pyrolysis process aiming at a long service lifetime and good electrocatalytic properties for ozone formation. The TiHx as an interlayer was produced by electrochemical cathodic reduction of a coated layer of the TiOx on the titanium substrate. Spin coating and thermal decomposition were used to deposit the Sn-Sb-Ni precursor on the surface of the prepared Ti/TiHx electrode. Cyclic and linear scanning voltammetry, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to reveal the electrode performance and morphology. Results show that the onset potential for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) of Ti/TiHx /NATO is higher than for Ti/NATO. They also indicate that the service lifetime of the Ti/TiHx/NATO is twice as long as the Ti/NATO at a current density of 50 mA.cm(-2) at room temperature. Electrochemical ozone generation and degradation of the methylene blue were investigated to confirm selectivity and activity of the electrodes. After 5 min electrolysis, a current efficiency for ozone generation of 56% was obtained the electrode with TiHx while 38% was obtained on Ti/NATO under same conditions. The results also confirm that the Ti/TiH x /NATO has a higher kinetic rate constant and decolorization efficiency for removal of the methylene blue compare to the Ti/NATO. The rate constant for the pseudo-first ordered reaction of methylene blue degradation showed high values of 350 x 10(-3) min(-1) for Ti/NATO and 440 x 10(-3) min(-1) for Ti/TiHx/NATO. 

  • 40.
    Abbasy, Leila
    et al.
    Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Mohammadzadeh, Arezoo
    Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Hasanzadeh, Mohammad
    Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Razmi, Nasrin
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics, Electronics and Mathematics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Development of a reliable bioanalytical method based on prostate specific antigen trapping on the cavity of molecular imprinted polymer towards sensing of PSA using binding affinity of PSA-MIP receptor: A novel biosensor2020In: Journal of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Analysis, ISSN 0731-7085, E-ISSN 1873-264X, Vol. 188, article id 113447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, electrically-conducting poly [Toluidine Blue (PTB)] was applied as artificial receptor. It was organized by molecular imprinting approaches and via electrochemical technique for the sensitive monitoring of prostate-specific antigen (PSA). The protein-imprinted PTB was electropolymerized in a pre-formed glutaraldehyde-cysteamine (GA-Cys A) matrix on the surface of gold electrode, which significantly boosted the stability against degradation of the Molecular Imprinted Polymer (MIP) on the surface of pre-modified gold electrode. Moreover, the MIP bio-receptor ability towards protein recognition was explored by some electrochemical techniques. The binding affinity of MIP system was considerably upper than that of non-imprinted polymer (NIP) system, indicating the success of the method in generating imprinted materials that was specifically use to PSA protein. The incubation of the MIP modified electrode in various concentration of PSA (from 1-60 μg/L) resulted in the increase of the Fe (CN)63-/4- redox peak current. The bio-device also showed linear response from 1-60 μg/L and LLOQ of 1 μg/L by using DPV technique, leading to PSA monitoring in clinical samples. The proposed MIP-based biosensor was satisfactorily applied to the determination of PSA in human plasma samples. Therefore, the developed bio-device provides a new approach for sensitive, simple, rapid, and cost-effective monitoring of 1 μg/L of PSA. Notably, this approach could appear as an appropriate candidate for point-of-care (POC) use in clinical and biomedical analyses.

  • 41.
    Abbaszad Rafi, Abdolrahim
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Ibrahem, Ismail
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Chemical Engineering.
    Cordova, Armando
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Copper nanoparticles on controlled pore glass (CPG) as highly efficient heterogeneous catalysts for “click reactions”2020In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 20547Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We herein report that supported copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) on commercially available controlled pore glass (CPG), which exhibit high mechanical, thermal and chemical stability as compared to other silica-based materials, serve as a useful heterogeneous catalyst system for 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions (“click” reactions) between terminal alkynes and organic azides under green chemistry conditions. The supported CuNPs-CPG catalyst exhibited a broad substrate scope and gave the corresponding triazole products in high yields. The CuNPs-CPG catalyst exhibit recyclability and could be reuced multiple times without contaminating the products with Cu. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 42. Abbrent, S
    et al.
    Plestil, J
    Hlavata, D
    Lindgren, Jan
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Structural Chemistry. strukturkemi.
    Tegenfeldt, Jörgen
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Materials Chemistry, Structural Chemistry. strukturkemi.
    Wendsjö, Å
    Crystallinity and morphology of PVdF-HFP based gel electrolytes.2001In: Polymer, Vol. 42, p. 1407-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Abbrent, Sabina
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry.
    Lithium ion interactions in polymer gel electrolytes: Effect on structure, dynamics and morphology2000Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Polymer electrolytes are an essential part of the modern all-solid lithium battery. Several properties, such as mechanical and thermal stability, good ionic conductivity and compatibility with other materials used in the battery are necessary for a successful material.

    This thesis is focused on the ionic interactions in two electrolyte systems, based on a cross-linked polyethylene oxide (nona(ethylene oxide)dimethacrylate) or a fluorinated copolymer (polyvinylidene fluoride-hexafluoropropylene). Changes of thermal properties and morphology of and coordination in the electrolyte on addition of a lithium salt (LiTFSI) and different types and concentrations of solvents are studied. These properties are shown to control the ionic conductivity of the resulting material, influencing the conductivity mechanism.

    The presumably inert polyvinylidene fluoride is shown to undergo large structural changes, where polar conformations of the polymer backbone appear on salt addition, inducing a different crystalline phase. The lithium cation in the polyethylene oxide based electrolyte can coordinate either to the polymer chain or to the solvent. In for example systems containing propylene carbonate, the lithium ion binds more strongly to the polymer than to the solvent. This is in contrast to the systems with dimethyl sulphoxide where the ion prefers the solvent. This variation in coordination also strongly affects the mobility of the cation, reflected both in diffusion constants and in conductivity data.

    A combination of techniques was necessary to use for a deeper understanding of these complex materials. Coordination has been studied by FTIR and high resolution NMR, dynamics by NMR diffusion measurements and impedance spectroscopy, and morphology by diffraction techniques and DSC.

  • 44. Abd El-Hakim, Abou El Fettouh Abd El Moneim
    et al.
    Haroun, Ahmed Abd Allah
    Rabie, Abdel Gawad Mohamed
    Ali, Gomaa Abdelgawad Mohammed
    Abdelrahim, Mohamed Yahia Marei
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Helwan University, Egypt.
    Improving the mechanical and thermal properties of chlorinated poly(vinyl chloride) by incorporating modified CaCO3 nanoparticles as a filler2019In: Turkish journal of chemistry, ISSN 1300-0527, E-ISSN 1303-6130, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 750-759Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chlorinated poly(vinyl chloride) (CPVC)/calcium carbonate nanocomposites were successfully prepared by the incorporation of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) nanoparticles into the CPVC matrix. The compatibility between the two phases was obtained by surface modification of the CaCO3 nanoparticles with stearic acid, leading to improved material performance. The effects of the addition of different amounts of CaCO3 nanoparticles to the CPVC on the thermal, mechanical, and morphological characteristics of the CPVC/CaCO3 nanocomposites were investigated. The thermal stability of the CPVC/CaCO3 nanocomposites was evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. In addition, the surface texture of the CPVC and the dispersion of the CaCO3 were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. Important enhancements in the thermal and mechanical properties of the modified CPVC/CaCO3 nanocomposites were obtained by incorporating different amounts (2.00%, 3.75%, and 5.75%) of surface-modified CaCO3 nanoparticles within the CPVC polymer matrix. The results reveal that 3.75% of CaCO3 was the optimum amount, where the CPVC/CaCO3 nanocomposite shows the highest impact strength, the highest tensile strength, the highest thermal stability, and the lowest elongation percentage. Replacement of the commercial impact modifier used in industry with the prepared surface-modified CaCO3 nanoparticles for the development of CPVC was successfully achieved.

  • 45. Abd El-Wahed, Aida A.
    et al.
    Farag, Mohamed A.
    Eraqi, Walaa A.
    Mersal, Gaber A. M.
    Zhao, Chao
    Khalifa, Shaden A. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    El-Seedi, Hesham R.
    Unravelling the beehive air volatiles profile as analysed via solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and chemometrics2021In: Journal of King Saud University – Science, ISSN 1018-3647, Vol. 33, no 5, article id 101449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Beehive air therapy is recognized as a potential remedy for treating asthma, bronchitis, lung fibrosis, and respiratory tract infections. Developed countries in which beehive air therapy is currently authorized include Germany, Hungary, Slovenia, and Austria. However, scientific proof of its efficacy is lacking which warrants further chemical and biological analyses as a proof of concept. In this study, beehive air volatile profile was determined for the first time along with its individual components (bees, venom, honey, and beeswax).

    Methods: Volatile compounds were collected from beehive air using solid phase micro-extraction (SPME) coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC–MS). Antimicrobial assay of the air released from 4 beehive products was further performed against Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, and multi drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) using the in vitro agar-well diffusion and microtiter plate assays.

    Results and conclusions: A total of 56 volatile compounds were identified from beehive air, venom, bee insect and wax air including 6 fatty acids, 6 alcohols, 10 aldehydes, 5 esters, 1 ether, 9 hydrocarbons, 1 phenol, 7 ketones, 1 nitrogenous compound and 10 terpenes. The most abundant constituents were short-chain fatty acids (26.32%) while the lowest were the nitrogenous compounds (0.82%). The principal component analysis (PCA) scores plot of the UPLC/MS dataset showed the similarity of the beehive air to the insect bee's aroma profile. With regards to antimicrobial assay, beehive air and venom exerted the strongest antimicrobial activity among the examined bee products against S. aureus, K. pneumoniae, A. baumannii, and MRSA in agar-well diffusion assay but failing to exert an effect using microtiter plate assay as in case of bee venom against the aforementioned bacteria.

  • 46.
    Abdala, Esraa
    et al.
    Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Khartoum, Khartoum, Sudan.
    Nur, Omer
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics, Electronics and Mathematics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mustafa, Mustafa A.
    Materials and Nanotechnology Research Centre, University of Khartoum, Khartoum, Sudan.
    Efficient Biodiesel Production from Algae Oil Using Ca-Doped ZnO Nanocatalyst2020In: Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, ISSN 0888-5885, E-ISSN 1520-5045, Vol. 59, no 43, p. 19235-19243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biodiesel is a sustainable alternative to petroleum diesel produced by transesterification of vegetable oils in the presence of a catalyst. The present study investigates heterogeneous transesterification of algal oil to biodiesel using novel calcium-doped zinc oxide nanocatalysts synthesized using a UV shaker. The developed catalyst was under different light sources, UV and non-UV; different calcium concentrations (0.01, 0.03, 0.05 M); and different calcination temperatures (600, 700, 800 degrees C). The catalyst has been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The effects of the different parameters used in catalyst preparation were studied for transesterification of algal oil. The catalyst of 0.05 M calcium loading and 700 degrees C calcination temperature synthesized in UV light is considered as the most suitable nanocatalyst, which achieved 99.18% yield of biodiesel. The catalyst was used three times effectively with 76% yield. The chemical properties of biodiesel have been investigated using gas chromatography (GC).

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 47. Abdala, Paula M
    et al.
    Safonova, Olga V
    Wiker, Geir
    van Beek, Wouter
    Emerich, Herman
    van Bokhoven, Jeroen A
    Sá, Jacinto
    Szlachetko, Jakub
    Nachtegaal, Maarten
    Scientific opportunities for heterogeneous catalysis research at the SuperXAS and SNBL beam lines.2012In: CHIMIA, ISSN 0009-4293, E-ISSN 2673-2424, Vol. 66, no 9, p. 699-705Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this short review, we describe the complementary experimental capabilities for catalysis research at two beam lines available to the Swiss community, SuperXAS at SLS (Swiss Light Source, Villigen) and SNBL (Swiss Norwegian Beam lines) at ESRF (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble). Over the years, these two facilities have been developed to provide powerful techniques for structural studies under in situ and operando conditions. These techniques, X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) in combination with Raman or infrared spectroscopy provide new avenues for structure-performance studies of catalysts. Several exemplary studies are used to demonstrate the capability of these facilities.

  • 48.
    Abdel Alim, Richard
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH).
    Formation of Soft Particles in Drop-in Fuels2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    As the mission to the decrease global warming and phase out highly pollutingenvironmental practices globally, regulations including Euro 6 and policies generated by theUnited Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) are pushing companiesto be more innovative when it comes to their energy sources. These regulations involve manyfactors related to the cleanliness of the fuel and produced emissions, for example, propertiesof the fuels such as sulfur content, ash content, water content, and resulting emission valuesof Carbon dioxide (CO2) and Nitrogen Oxides (NOx). Furthermore, Sweden has set achallenging target of a fossil-fuel-independent vehicle fleet by 2030 and no net greenhousegasemissions by 2050.One way to cut down on the polluting properties in the fuel, as well as weakening thedependence on fossil fuel based fuel includes utilizing higher blending ratios of biofuels in thetransport sector. This transition to biofuels comes with many challenges to the transportindustry due to higher concentrations of these new fuels leads to clogging of the filters in theengine, as well as, internal diesel injector deposits (IDIDs) that produce injector fouling. Thisclogging of the filters leads to lower performance by the engines which leads to higher repairtimes (uptime) and less time on the road to transport goods. The formation of these softparticles at the root of the clogging issue is a pivotal issue because the precise mechanismsbehind their formation are highly unknown. Scania, a leader in the Swedish automotiveindustry, is very interested in figuring out what mechanisms are the most influential in theformation of these particles in the engine. Understanding the key mechanisms would allowScania to make appropriate adjustments to the fuel or the engines to ensure more time onthe road and less maintenance.There are many conditions known to be possible causes of the formation of softparticles in engines such as water content, ash content, and temperature. After generatingsoft particles using a modified accelerated method, particles were analyzed using infraredtechnology (RTX-FTIR) and a Scanning Electric Microscope (SEM-EDX). Many differentexperiments were performed to be able to make a conclusion as to which mechanisms weremost influential including temperature, time, water, air, and oil. The combination of agingbiofuels (B100, B10, HVO) with metals, and water produced the largest amount of particlesfollowed by aging the biofuels with aged oil, metals, and water. Aging the fuels with aged oilincreased particles, meanwhile the addition of water prevented particle production possiblydue to additives. B100 produced the highest amount of particles when aged with Copper, B10with Brass, and HVO with Iron.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 49.
    Abd-El Azeem, Hoda H.
    et al.
    Menoufia Univ, Fac Sci, Dept Zool, Shibin Al Kawm 32512, Egypt..
    Osman, Gamalat Y.
    Menoufia Univ, Fac Sci, Dept Zool, Shibin Al Kawm 32512, Egypt..
    El-Seedi, Hesham
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Farmakognosi. Jiangsu Univ, Int Res Ctr Food Nutr & Safety, Zhenjiang 212013, Jiangsu, Peoples R China.;Jiangsu Univ, Jiangsu Educ Dept, Int Joint Res Lab Intelligent Agr & Agriprod Proc, Zhenjiang 212013, Jiangsu, Peoples R China.;Menoufia Univ, Fac Sci, Dept Chem, Shibin Al Kawm 32512, Egypt..
    Fallatah, Ahmed M.
    Taif Univ, Coll Sci, Dept Chem, POB 11099, Taif 21944, Saudi Arabia..
    Khalifa, Shaden A. M.
    Stockholm Univ, Wenner Gren Inst, Dept Mol Biosci, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gharib, Mohamed M.
    Menoufia Univ, Fac Sci, Dept Bot, Shibin Al Kawm 32512, Egypt..
    Antifungal Activity of Soft Tissue Extract from the Garden Snail Helix aspersa (Gastropoda, Mollusca)2022In: Molecules, ISSN 1431-5157, E-ISSN 1420-3049, Vol. 27, no 10, article id 3170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gastropods comprise approximately 80% of molluscans, of which land snails are used variably as food and traditional medicines due to their high protein content. Moreover, different components from land snails exhibit antimicrobial activities. In this study, we evaluated the antifungal activity of soft tissue extracts from Helix aspersa against Candida albicans, Aspergillus flavus, and Aspergillus brasiliensis by identifying extract components using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS). Two concentrations of three extracts (methanol, acetone, and acetic acid) showed antifungal activity. Both acetone (1 g/3 mL) and acetic acid extracts (1 g/mL) significantly inhibited C. albicans growth (p = 0.0001, 5.2 +/- 0.2 mm and p = 0.02, 69.7 +/- 0.6 mm, respectively). A. flavus and A. brasiliensis growth were inhibited by all extracts at 1 g/mL, while inhibition was observed for acetic acid extracts against A. brasiliensis (p = 0.02, 50.3 +/- 3.5 mm). The highest growth inhibition was observed for A. flavus using acetic acid and acetone extracts (inhibition zones = 38 +/- 1.7 mm and 3.1 +/- 0.7 mm, respectively). LC-MS-MS studies on methanol and acetone extracts identified 11-alpha-acetoxyprogesterone with a parent mass of 372.50800 m/z and 287.43500 m/z for luteolin. Methanol extracts contained hesperidin with a parent mass of 611.25400 m/z, whereas linoleic acid and genistein (parent mass = 280.4 and 271.48900 m/z, respectively) were the main metabolites.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 50.
    Abdel Aziz, Ilaria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Basque Country UPV EHU, Spain.
    Gladisch, Johannes
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Griggs, Sophie
    Univ Oxford, England.
    Moser, Maximilian
    Univ Oxford, England.
    Biesmans, Hanne
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Beloqui, Ana
    Univ Basque Country UPV EHU, Spain; Basque Fdn Sci, Spain.
    McCulloch, Iain
    Univ Oxford, England.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Stavrinidou, Eleni
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Drug delivery via a 3D electro-swellable conjugated polymer hydrogel2024In: Journal of materials chemistry. B, ISSN 2050-750X, E-ISSN 2050-7518Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spatiotemporal controlled drug delivery minimizes side-effects and enables therapies that require specific dosing patterns. Conjugated polymers (CP) can be used for electrically controlled drug delivery; however so far, most demonstrations were limited to molecules up to 500 Da. Larger molecules could be incorporated only during the CP polymerization and thus limited to a single delivery. This work harnesses the record volume changes of a glycolated polythiophene p(g3T2) for controlled drug delivery. p(g3T2) undergoes reversible volumetric changes of up to 300% during electrochemical doping, forming pores in the nm-size range, resulting in a conducting hydrogel. p(g3T2)-coated 3D carbon sponges enable controlled loading and release of molecules spanning molecular weights of 800-6000 Da, from simple dyes up to the hormone insulin. Molecules are loaded as a combination of electrostatic interactions with the charged polymer backbone and physical entrapment in the porous matrix. Smaller molecules leak out of the polymer while larger ones could not be loaded effectively. Finally, this work shows the temporally patterned release of molecules with molecular weight of 1300 Da and multiple reloading and release cycles without affecting the on/off ratio.

1234567 1 - 50 of 36103
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf