Digitala Vetenskapliga Arkivet

Change search
Refine search result
3456789 251 - 300 of 455
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 251.
    Lindbeck, Assar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Snower, Dennis
    Birkbeck College, University of London.
    Strikes, Lock-Outs and Fiscal Policy1985Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 252.
    Lindbeck, Assar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Snower, Dennis J.
    Birkbeck College, University of London.
    Centralized Bargaining, Multi-Tasking, and Work Incentives1996Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper examines the implications of an important aspect of the ongoing reorganization of work - the move from occupational specialization toward multi-tasking - for centralized wage bargaining. The analysis shows how, on account of this reorganization, centralized bargaining becomes increasingly inefficient and detrimental to firms' profit opportunities, since it prevents firms from offering their employees adequate incentives to perform the appropriate mix of tasks. The paper also shows how centralized bargaining inhibits firms from using eages to induce workers to learn how to use their experience from one set of tasks to enhance their performance at other tasks. In this way, the paper helps explain the increasing resistance to centralized bargaining in various advanced market economies.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 253.
    Lindbeck, Assar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Snower, Dennis J.
    Birkbeck College, University of London.
    Demand- and Supply-Side Policies and Unemployment: Policy Implications of the Insider-Outsider Approach1989Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 254.
    Lindbeck, Assar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Snower, Dennis J.
    Birkbeck College, London.
    Efficiency Wages versus Insiders and Outsiders1986Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 255.
    Lindbeck, Assar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Snower, Dennis J.
    Birkbeck College, University of London.
    Interactions between the Efficienct Wage and Insider-Outsider Theories1990Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 256.
    Lindbeck, Assar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Snower, Dennis J.
    Birkbeck College, University of London.
    Inter-Industry Wage Structure and the Power of Incumbent Workers1988Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 257.
    Lindbeck, Assar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Snower, Dennis J.
    Birkbeck College, University of London.
    Involuntary Employment as an Insider-Outsider Dilemma1984Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 258.
    Lindbeck, Assar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Snower, Dennis J.
    Birkbeck College, University of London.
    Long Term Unemployment and Macroeconomic Policy1987Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 259.
    Lindbeck, Assar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Snower, Dennis J.
    Birkbeck College, University of London.
    Macroeconomic Policy and Insider Power1989Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 260.
    Lindbeck, Assar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Snower, Dennis J.
    Birkbeck College, University of London.
    Patterns of Unemployment: An Insider-Outsider Analysis1992Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 261.
    Lindbeck, Assar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Snower, Dennis J.
    Birkbeck College, University of London.
    Price Inertia and Production Lags1991Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper shows how prolonged price inertia can arise in a macroeconomic system in which there are temporary price rigidities as well as production lags in the use of intermediate goods. In this context, changes in product demand - generated, say, by changes in the money supply - have long-lasting price and quantity effects. Specifically, a temporary demand shift generates "persistence" in price-quantity decision, in the sense that the price-quantity effects of this shift persist for long after the shift has dosappeared. A permanent demand shift generates "sluggishness" in price-quantity decisions, in the sense that the full price effects of the shift take a long time to appear and that meanwhile quantity effects are present.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 262.
    Lindbeck, Assar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Snower, Dennis J.
    Birkbeck College, University of London.
    Reorganization of Firms and Labor Market Inequality1996Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 263.
    Lindbeck, Assar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Snower, Dennis J.
    Department of Economics, Birkbeck College, University of London.
    Reorganization of Firms and Labor Market Inequality1996Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Much of the history of economic enterprise has involved reaping the benefits from specialization of labor by dividing increasingly fragemented tasks among different employees - as vividly described already by Adam Smith in his Wealth of Nations. This development was greatly facilitated through the rise of "Tayloristic organizations," where standardized inputs are processed to yield standardized outputs, and where different functional tasks (e.g. administration, production, marketing, design) are performed in different departments, coordinated through a hierarchy of managers. These organizations - common in both the manufacturing and service sectors - testified to the importance of specialization of work, in production as well as organization.   This pervasive organizational structure is now in retreat. Charlie Chaplin at the conveyor belt, in the movie Modern Times, is no longer the prototype worker. With hindsight, the wave of change began well over a decade ago; it has accelerated in recent years, and may be expected to gather even more pace over the next decade. The organization of many firms in both the manufacturing and service sectors is being progressively restructured. This process calls into question the need for extreme specialization by skill-specific occupation, creates demands for new combinations of skills, and thereby leads to new patterns of wage inequality.   The restructuring process is characterized by a number of complementary features. First, the organizational structure of firms is becoming flatter: the new structure is built around teams that report to the central management, with few if any intermediaries. Second, production processes are being transformed: the application of computer technology, flexible tools, and programmable, multi-task equipment reduces returns to scale and permits greater production flexibility. Third, the flow of information within firms has been revolutionized: the introduction of computerized data systems permits more individualilzed treatment of employess and customers, facilitates the decentralization of decision making, and enables employees to perform multiple tasks and exploit complementarities among them. Fourth, firms offer broader product lines in smaller quantities, responding more readily to customers' requirements: customer participation in product design is growing and there is greater emphasis on product quality and ancillary services. And fifth, the nature of work is changing: occupational boundaries are breaking down as workers engage in multi-tasking and work rotation. These various aspects distinguish the traditional, Tayloristic organizations from what we shall call "holistic" organizations.   Recent technological advances and improvements in physical and human capital have undoubtedly played a central role in driving the process whereby Tayloristic organizations restructure into holistic ones. The increasing use of computers to transmit information within firms and the rising versatility and programmability of equipment have increased the complementarities across tasks (e.g. production, marketing, customer service, product design) that a given employee can exploit. Furthermore, the growing amounts of all-round knowledge that has been disseminated through the education systems over the past few decades has made young people increasingly capable of performing multiple tasks. This accumulation of human capital has also changed people's preferences away from the monotonous, single-purpose Tayloristic jobs to the frequently more varied and stimulating holistic ones.   In what follows, we examine the consequences of these developments for the reorganization of work, the move towards multi-tasking and the consequent break-down of occupational barriers, the transformation of job opportunities, and the implications for inequality in the labor market.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 264.
    Lindbeck, Assar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Snower, Dennis J.
    Department of Economics, Birkbeck College, University of London.
    Restructuring Production and Work1995Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper analyzes the contemporary organizational restructuring of production and work and derives some salient implications for the labor market. The analysis focuses on the switch from occupational specialization at "Tayloristic" organizations to multi-tasking at "holistic" organizations. The restructuring process is shown to create demands for new combinations of skills and thereby "resegment" the labor market, raising the wages and job opportunities of some workers relative to others.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 265.
    Lindbeck, Assar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Snower, Dennis J.
    Birkbeck College, University of London.
    Segmented Labor Markets and Unemployment1990Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper suggests various alternatives to the Harris-Todaro theory in explaining unemployment in segmented labor markets. We focus on a labor market with a perfectly competitive secondary sector and an imperfectly competitive primary sector, the latter combining salient features of the efficiency wage, insider-outsider, and bargaining theories of employment and wage formation. Unemployment and labor market segmentation are explained with reference to heterogeneous preferences, productivities, and endowments amond workers. The responsiveness of unemployment to external shocks is shown to depend crucially on whether the above heterogeneities are exogenously given or whether they are endogenously generated through workers' employment histories.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 266.
    Lindbeck, Assar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Snower, Dennis J.
    Department of Economics, Birkbeck College, University of London.
    The Division of Labor within Firms1997Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper examines the determintants of the division of labor within firms. It provides an explanation of the pervasive change in work organization away from the traditional functional departments and towards multi-tasking and job rotation. Whereas the existing literature on the division of labor within firms emphasizes the returns from specialization and the need for coordination of the work of different workers, the persent analysis focuses on the returns from multi-tasking, which is shown to arise from informational and technological complementaries among tasks as well as from the exploitation of the versatility of human capital.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 267.
    Lindbeck, Assar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Snower, Dennis J.
    Birkbeck College, University of London.
    The Firm as a Pool of Factor Complementarities2003Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a new approach to the theory of the firm by identifying factor complementarities as central to the determination of the firm’s boundaries. The factor complementarities may take a variety of forms: technological and informational complementarities, as well as economies of scale and scope. We examine the tradeoff between the gains from these complementarities and transactions costs. In so doing, we must abandon the standard dichotomy between the determinants of plant size and firm size. The influence of factor complementarities on firm size is examined in partial and general equilibrium frameworks.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 268.
    Lindbeck, Assar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Snower, Dennis J.
    Birkbeck College, University of London.
    Transmission Mechanisms from the Product to the Labor Market1987Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 269.
    Lindbeck, Assar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Snower, Dennis J.
    Birkbeck College, London.
    Union Activity and Wage-Employment Movements1986Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper analyzes how the influence of labor unions over wage contracts may make the labor market less "resilient". Loss of resilience is depicted in two conceptually independent ways: (i) a tendency for changes in unemployment caused by exogenous labor demand shock to persist, (ii) a long-run tendency of such shocks to generate a bounded wage-unemployment ratchet. In this manner, the analysis may help explain why unemployment rates in Europe and the United States have had an upward trend over the past one and a half decades and why the expansion of employment has been much greater in the U.S. than in most European economies after the recent deep recessions.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 270.
    Lindbeck, Assar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Snower, Dennis J.
    Birkbeck College.
    Wage Setting, Unemployment, and Insider-Outsider Relations1985Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 271.
    Lindbeck, Assar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Weibull, Jörgen W.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Balanced-Budget Redistribution as Political Equilibrium1985Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper considers balanced-budget redistribution between socioeconomic groups of individuals as the outcome of electoral competition between two political parties. Equilibrium is unique in the present model, and a sufficient condition for existence is given, requiring that there be sufficient "stochastic heterogeneity" with respect to party preferences in the electorate. The validity of Hotelling's "principle of minimum differentiation", as well as of "Director's law", is examined under alternative hypotheses concerning administrative costs and voters' possibilities of "exit" adn "voice" in the election process. The policy strategy of expected-plurality maximization is contrasted with the strategy of maximizing the parobability of gaining a plurality. Incomes are fixed and known, so lump-sum taxation is feasible. However, constraints on tax/transfer differentitation between individuals are permitted in the analysis.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 272.
    Lindbeck, Assar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Weibull, Jörgen W.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Debt-Financed Transfers, Public Consumption and Public Investment in an Open Economy1985Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper compares the welfare implications for two consecutive generations of debt-financed public spending of three different types - tansfer payments, public consumption and public (infrastructure) investment. The analysis is performed by means of an overlapping generations model with the consumption of a publicly provided good in the utility function of the consumer and the stock of public productive capital in the private sector's production function. The standard overlapping generations model is extended also to include work in the second period of the individual's life and asset holdings in his/her preference function. It is shown how the utility effects on different generations depend not only on the type of spending but also on the implications of the spending for future tax (transfer) payments, as well as on the initial levels of public consumption and public capital.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 273.
    Lindbeck, Assar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Weibull, Jörgen W.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Intergenerational Aspects of Public Transfers, Borrowing and Debt1984Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper analyzes intergeneration distributional effects of taxes, transfer payments, public borrowing and debt. A two-period life-cucle model with overlapping generations is constructed. The model has two specific features: private wealth in both periods enter as arguments in the preference function, and the individuals (inelastically) supply labor in both periods. It turns out that some fiscal policy actions favor both of the currently lliving generations, possibly at the expense of future generations, while other actions generate conflicts between the currently living generations. The analysis also shows that it makes considerable difference whether the "burden" of public spending, debt and borrowing is defined in terms of wealth, consumption and utility. The different implications of foreign vs. domestic debt are examined.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 274.
    Lindbeck, Assar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Weibull, Jörgen W.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Political Equilibrium in Representative Democracy1989Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    It is shown in this paper that the Median Voter Theorem lacks robustness in the sense that if voters have (even the slightest) preferences for the competing candidates, beside preferences for their current policy proposals, then no policy in the neighbourhood of the median voter's preferred policy constitutes an equilibrium (in pure strategies). This suggests that this classical theorem does not apply to representative democracy. Indeed, if voters do have candidate preferences, and these are strong enough, the policy-motivated candidates will, in general, adopt differing policy positions in equilibrium, and, under certain qualifications, the equilibrium outcome will be (close ti) a particular utilitarian optimum. More specifically, in a discretized model the policy outcome will lie between the preferred policy of the most popular candidate and this utilitarian optimum.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 275.
    Lindbeck, Assar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Weibull, Jörgen W.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Strategic Interaction with Altruism: The Economics of Fait Accompli1987Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper analyzes the strategic and intertemporal insteraction between two well-informed economic agents, who have more or less "altruistic" preferences vis-à-vis each others. The agents may be two individuals, a social bureau and a client, or two units in an organization, etc. It is shown that the presence of altruism in such situations easily leads to socially inefficient outcomes, in which one economic agent "free-rides" on the other's altruism. In the paper, a formal definition of free-riding is suggested, and necessary and sufficient conditions are given for it to occur in subgame perfect equilibrium. We also discuss how such free-riding might be mitigated by social security systems.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 276.
    Lindbeck, Assar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Weibull, Jörgen W.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Welfare Effects of Alternative Forms of Public Spending1986Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper analyzes welfare effects, in a second-best world, of public spending of three different types: transfer payments, public consumption and public investment. It is shown how these effects depend not only on the type of spending but also on the initial level of spending, as well as on anticipated consequences for future taxes and transfer payments. The analysis is performed in an overlapping generations model with (i) individuals who in each period endogenously allocate their time between (taxed) market work and (tax free) home production, (ii) a publicly provided good ("public consumption") that enters as a secondfactor in home production, and (iii) productivity-enhancing public investment in the private (market) production sector. The consequences for the current account of the balance of payments of the different spending alternatives are also studied.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 277.
    Lindbeck, Assar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Wikström, Solveig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    ICT and Household-Firm Relations1999Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses how ICT and emerging electronic commerce in consumer products influence the relative efficiency in production of households and firms, resulting in changes in the division of tasks between these two types of agents. Increased information and competence of households, in combination with stiffer competition among firms, will also increase the power of households relative to firms, at least in a long-term perspective with free entry firms. Households will also get more powerful channels to influence firms directly, i.e., beside the indirect influence via market transactions. We point out that this will result in various counter-reactions by firms, including increased differentiation of products and prices. Finally, we briefly consider various limitations and obstacles to electronic commerce in a long-term perspective.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 278.
    Lindbeck, Assar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Wikström, Solveig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    The ICT Revolution in Consumer Product Markets1999Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    New information and communication technology (ICT) makes consumers better iformed about available products, prodct quality and prices, which mitigates problems of asymmetric information. The entry of firms is fascilitated, competition and economic efficiency is boosted and the market powers of households increased. Firms are likely to respond by increased product and price differentiation. There will also be considerable changes in the division of tasks between firms and households. But important obstacles to these developments are technological vulnerabillity, quality problems in the information on the Internet, cognitive limitatoins of individuals and weaknesses in the product delivery infrastructure in connection with Internet trade.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 279.
    Lindberg, Assar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Macroeconomic Theory and the Labor Market1991Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 280.
    Lindberg, Hans
    et al.
    Sveriges Riksbank.
    Svensson, Lars E.O.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Söderlind, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Devaluation Expectations: The Swedish Krona 1982-19911991Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Devaluation expectations for the Swedish krona are estimated for the period 1982-1991 with several methods. First the "simplest test" is applied under either only the minimal assumption of "no positive minimum profit" or the additional assumption of uncovered interest parity. Then a more precise method suggested by Bertola and Svensson is used, in which expected rates of depreciation within the exchange rate band, estimated in several ways, are subtracted from interest rate differentials. Finally, estimated devaluations expectations are to some extent explained by a few macrovariables and parliament elections.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 281.
    Lindberg, Hans
    et al.
    Sveriges Riksbank.
    Söderlind, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Target Zone Models and the Intervention Policy: The Swedish Case1991Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The intervention policy of the Swedish Central Bank is studied using daily data on all intervention instruments during the late 1980s. In sharp contrast to the first generation Krugman target zone models, it is found that the interventions occur all over the exchange rate band and almost every day. To capture this feature this paper uses a model with continuous interventions that increase in size when the exchange rate moves from some preferred level, implying that interventions not only takes place at the boundaries. This gives a strong mean reverting behaviour of the fundamental. In addition, time varying devaluation expectations are included in the model. The model is then estimated using the method of simulated moments. The results indicate that this model captures the characteristics of Swedish exchange rate data better than the Krugman model. The estimated degree of mean reversion is substantial.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 282.
    Lindberg, Hans
    et al.
    Sveriges Riksbank.
    Söderlind, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Testing the Basic Target Zone Model on Swedish Data1991Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish exchange rate band is studied using daily data in exchange rates and interest rate differentials for the 1980's. Applying a number of different statistical and econometrics techniques it is found that the first generation of target zone models cannot provide an adequate explanation of Swedish data. The main reasons are probably intra-marginal interventions by Sveriges Riksbank (The Swedish Central Bank) and time varying devaluation expectations.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 283.
    Marimon, Ramon
    et al.
    European University Institute.
    Zilibotti, Fabrizio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Unemployment vs. mismatch of talents: Reconsidering Unemployment Benefits1998Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We develop an equilibrium search-matching model with risk-neutral agents and two-sided ex-ante heterogeneity. Unemployment insurance has the standard effect of reducing employment, but also helps workers to get a suitable job. The predictions of our simple model are consistent with the contrasting performance of the labor market in Europe and US in terms of unemployment, productivity growth and wage inequality. To show this, we construct two fictitious economies a´with calibrated parameters which only differ by the degree of unemployment insurance and assume that they are hit by a common technological shock which enhances the importance of mismatch. This shock reduces the proportion of jobs which workers regards as acceptable in teh economy with unemployment insurance (Europe). As a result, unemployment doubles in this economy. In the laissez-faire economy (US), unemployment remains constant, but wage inequality increases more and productivity grows less due to larger mismatch. The model is used to address some political economy issues.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 284.
    Markowski, Aleksander
    et al.
    Central Bank of Sweden.
    Radetzki, Marian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    State Ownership and the Price Sensitivity of Supply: The Case of the Copper Mining Industry1986Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 285.
    Markusen, James R.
    et al.
    Department of Economics, University of Western Ontario.
    Svensson, Lars E.O.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Factor Endowments and Trade with Increasing Returns Versus Constant Returns to Scale1984Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A general equilibrium model of trade with increasing returns to scale is developed for the purpose of analyzing how the results of factor-proportions trade theory are affected by the existence of scale economies. Comparative statistics effects with scale economies are derived as explicit funstions of standard constant returns mappings such as the Rybczynski matrix. Issues addressed include (A) the direction of trade, (B) international factor-price differences, (C) factor mobility and the volume of trade, and (D) the welfare effects of endowment changes.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 286.
    Michaely, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Income Levels and the Structure of Trade1978Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 287.
    Michaely, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Trade Restriction and Welfare1972Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents within a uniform framework the basic propositions of trade policy and welfare. It discusses free trade and trade restriction in a Pareto-optimum situation as well as under distortions of some of the optimum conditions; and in a static position, with given data, as well as in the context of a changing economy. The propositions are derived consistently from the principle of revealed preference, thus freeing the analysis from the very light straight-jacket imposed on it by the more common use of community indifference curves.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 288.
    Myhrman, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    A Macroeconomic Model with Asset Equilibrium for an Open Economy1973Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 289.
    Myhrman, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Balance of Payments Adjustment and Portfolio Theory: A Survey1974Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper covers a broad field with many threads going far back in history. It is surprising how much understanding there was of the international payments system and its functions by authors such as Hume, Ricardo, Thornton and John Stuart Mill. It is even more amazing, though, how so many of these earlier insights could be forgotten for such a long time. It was not until what I have called the Mundell-Johnson epoch in the 1960s that an understanding of the internaional monetary system was once again reached. What remained to be done then and what is being done now is to build models that account for many assets in an increasingly, but perhaps not yet completely, integrated international credit and goods market. The important and difficult future task of designing short-run adjustment models is left to the next generation.

    My aim has been to follow the broad lines in the development up to the late 1960s and to report on the results shown by them. Following this there is a more detailed study of most of the contributions in recent years. In these later studies I have tried to give a glimpse of the typical features of the model construction and the main conclusions. It has been my ambition to simplify and to bring forth the important aspects of these models. For this reason I have written a special section to compare many of the models and to show their similarities and differences. It has not been possible to consider the problems of growth and devaluation and their effects on the balance of payments.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 290.
    Nandakumar, Parameswar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Government Policies in Mixed Open Economies1983Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 291.
    Nandakumar, Parameswar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Oil Price Increases and the Structure of Small Open Economies1984Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 292.
    Nandakumar, Parameswar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Supply Side Disturbances, International Competitiveness and Employment1984Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 293.
    Niepelt, Dirk
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Intra-Generational Conflict: The Role of Balanced Budget Rules2003Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A balanced budget requirement affects the intra-generational wealth distribution and reduces the socially preferred level of government spending. These effects can explain why some groups support balanced budget rules while other groups in the same generation oppose them. Simulations suggest that the intra-generational distributive conflicts surrounding balanced budget rules are prevalent. Survey data suggests that they are empirically relevant. Intra-generational conflict offers a coherent explanation for the observed partial support balanced budget rules

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 294.
    Niepelt, Dirk
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Social Security Reform: Economics and Politics2004Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 295.
    Niepelt, Dirk
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Tax Evasion Dynamics2003Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    I study the dynamic tax evasion program of a household with many sources of income. Contrary to the previous literature, I assume that the detection risk of tax evasion is uncorrelated across these sources. If detection triggers the repayment of currently and previously evaded taxes, the marginal cost of evasion increases over time and the optimal duration of evasion is positive but finite. With stochastic pre-tax income, the fraction of aggregate taxes evaded remains interior, even if detection triggers duration-independent penalties. The model helps to understand the recent European debate about the cross-border exchange of information about capital income as opposed to taxation at the source. It yields a transparent representation of the revenue and efficiency losses due to tax evasion and highlights various effects of tax policy on evasion.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 296.
    Niepelt, Dirk
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Tax Smoothing versus Tax Shifting2002Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Household-specific growth rates of the tax base imply that the timing of tax collections determines the distribution of tax burdens and wealth across households. Changes in financial policy do not only shift taxes across generations, but also within cohorts. Insitutional deficit constraints settle tax shifting conflicts in favor of individuals with high income growth. With distortionary taxes, policy makers trade off the wealth effects of financial policy and the efficiency cost of household-specific deadweight burdens. I apply the incidence analysis of financial policy to two examples: The financing of the German unifications, and the timing of tax collections over the U.S. business cycle.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 297.
    Niepelt, Dirk
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    The Fiscal Myth of the Price Level2002Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    I examine the "fiscal theory of the price level" according to which "non-Ricardian" policy and predetermined nominal government debt fiscally determine prices. I argue that the non-Ricardian policy assumption and, by implication, fiscal price level determination are inconsistent with a rational expectations equilibrium where all asset holdings reflect optimal household choices. In such a rational expectations equilibrium, policy must be Ricardian even if, in some states of nature, the government defaults or runs an exogenous real primary surplus sequence.

    I propose an alternative to the fiscal theory of the price level, based on nominal flows instead of nominal stocks. While this alternative framework establishes a consistent link between fiscal policy and the price level, it does not introduce inflationary fiscal effects beyond those suggested by Sargent and Wallace.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 298.
    Nordvall Lagerås, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics.
    Seim, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    How do Interactions Influence Formation of Social Networks?: A General Microfounded Explanation2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the strategic interaction effects that precede network formation. We find that for a general class of payoff functions which, among other things, feature strict supermodularity, the degree of a node is a sufficient statistic for the action it undertakes. Dynamically, we construct a general model where each period consists of two stages: first, a game on the given network is played and second, a link is either created or severed. It turns out that the payoff functions we consider give absolute convergence to the absorbing class of networks called nested split graphs. These networks do not only possess mathematically tractable characteristics, but we can also interpret real-world networks as perturbed nested split graphs. The general framework provided here can be applied to more or less complex models of network formation.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 299.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Import Determination: An Empirical Theory1971Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 300.
    Nyberg, Lars
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Viotti, Staffan
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Quasi-Dynamic and Dynamic Methods in an Economic Planning Problem1973Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
3456789 251 - 300 of 455
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf