Change search
Refine search result
1234567 1 - 50 of 19317
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Aafjes-van Doorn, Katie
    et al.
    Adelphi University, NY 21402 USA; University of Oxford, England.
    Lilliengren, Peter
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Cooper, Angela
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Macdonald, James
    Headington Psychotherapy, England.
    Falkenström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Patients Affective Processes Within Initial Experiential Dynamic Therapy Sessions2017In: Psychotherapy, ISSN 0033-3204, E-ISSN 1939-1536, Vol. 54, no 2, p. 175-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has indicated that patients in-session experience of previously avoided affects may be important for effective psychotherapy. The aim of this study was to investigate patients in-session levels of affect experiencing in relation to their corresponding levels of insight, motivation, and inhibitory affects in initial Experiential Dynamic Therapy (EDT) sessions. Four hundred sixty-six 10-min video segments from 31 initial sessions were rated using the Achievement of Therapeutic Objectives Scale. A series of multilevel growth models, controlling for between-therapist variability, were estimated to predict patients adaptive affect experiencing (Activating Affects) across session segments. In line with our expectations, higher within-person levels of Insight and Motivation related to higher levels of Activating Affects per segment. Contrary to expectations, however, lower levels of Inhibition were not associated with higher levels of Activating Affects. Further, using a time-lagged model, we did not find that the levels of Insight, Motivation, or Inhibition during one session segment predicted Activating Affects in the next, possibly indicating that 10-min segments may be suboptimal for testing temporal relationships in affective processes. Our results suggest that, to intensify patients immediate affect experiencing in initial EDT sessions, therapists should focus on increasing insight into defensive patterns and, in particular, motivation to give them up. Future research should examine the impact of specific inhibitory affects more closely, as well as between-therapist variability in patients in-session adaptive affect experiencing.

  • 2.
    Aagard Nielsen, Kurt
    et al.
    Roskilde Universitet, Denmark.
    Svensson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Sociology . Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Action Research and Interactive Research: Beyond pratice and theory2006Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3.
    Aagard Nielsen, Kurt
    et al.
    Roskilde Universitet.
    Svensson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Sociology. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life.
    How to Learn Action Research2006In: Action Research and Interactive Research: beyond practice and theory / [ed] Kurt Aagaard Nielsen and Lennart Svensson, Hamburg: Shaker Verlag , 2006, p. 389-398Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Aaltio, Iiris
    et al.
    School of Economics and Business University of Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Kyrö, PaulaHelsinki School of Economics, Finland.Sundin, ElisabethLinköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Women, Entrepreneurship and Social Capital: A Dialogue and Construction2008Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book explores social capital as the multiple relationships between gender, management and entrepreneurship. Human resources are the social capital of a firm and business life, based on trust as well as on expertise, values and cultural diversity. This calls for cross-cultural knowledge and an understanding of gender issues and individual differences in the social capital of the firm and society. The dialogue between women entrepreneurship and social capital theory and research has its special place among other women entrepreneurship books, the number of which has lately increased. It strengthens still in some respect the fragmented voice of women entrepreneurship research by providing a landscape of women entrepreneurs as creators of, and created by, social capital. It indicates how women entrepreneurs appear to have a special position in forming, developing and reorganizing the social capital in the business world. In its eleven chapters, twenty-six researchers representing a variety of disciplines from different parts of the world are presenting findings on diverse aspects of the dialogue between women entrepreneurship and social capital. As a consequence the central concepts, social capital, entrepreneurship and gender, are given a variety of meanings. Women entrepreneurs and business owners regardless of their cultural context, branch and education provide interesting ideas to the global debate on equality and social capital.

  • 5.
    Aarnio, Annika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kimber, Ellen
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Talent Management & Strategy: Identifying Patterns through a Multiple Case Study2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Exploring the Talent Management literature to understand the importance of Talent Management to strategy and the role the view on talent plays in consideration to Talent Management.

    Purpose

    The purpose of this thesis is to increase the empirical research on Talent Management to enable a creation of a conceptual framework.

    Methodology

    A multiple case study approach was taken, as 11 companies from diverse industries, sizes, backgrounds etc. was studied in order to gain a broader picture on the research topic. Furthermore, qualitative data collection method was used and main source of empirical data was interviews conducted with HR professionals of each case company.

    Findings

    The empirical findings indicated there to be a relationship between the strategy and the view on talent. There was further an indication that this relationship has an effect on the focus of the Talent Management activities. 

  • 6.
    Aarsand, P.A.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Frame switches and identity performances: Alternating between online and offline2008In: Text and Talk, ISSN 1860-7330, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 147-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study problematizes activity frames and participation frameworks (Goffman 1981), exploring how students deploy online (MSN Messenger) and offline activity frames in identity performances. One problem in analyzing participation frameworks and particularly notions of subordinate forms, like crossplay, byplay, and sideplay, is that these concepts require that the analyst can identify one dominant activity. This was not possible in the present data, which consist of video recordings of computer activities in a seventh-grade classroom. It is shown how MSN (online) identities were invoked in subsequent and intermittent face-to-face interaction, a dialogue that started on MSN would continue in face-to-face interaction, and vice versa. This means that frame switches constituted important features of the students' identity work. Similarly, the students employed nicknames or what are here called tags, that is, textual-visual displays of speaker identities, located in the boundary zone between online and offline activities. In the classroom interactions, there was thus not one dominant activity frame, but rather the activities involved borderwork, and more specifically frame switches and a strategic use of tags. © Walter de Gruyter 2008.

  • 7.
    Aarsand, Pål André
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Alternating between online and offline: tags and frame switches as interactional resources2007Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The present data are based on an ethnographic study of computer use in everyday interactions in a seventh grade class (of 13-14 year-olds). The data were analysed in terms of activity frames and participation frameworks (Goffman 1981), exploring how students deployed online and offline activity frames in their identity performance. It is shown how MSN (online) identities are invoked in subsequent and intermittent face-to-face interaction; a dialogue can start on MSN and continue in faceto-face interaction, and vice versa. This means that frame switches are important features of the students’ identity work. Similarly, the students employed nicknames or tags, that is, textual-visual displays of ‘speaker’ identities, located in the boundary zone between online and offline activities. In terms of participation frameworks, it is also documented ways in which students engaged in crossplay (Goffman 1981), where a ratified participant communicated with a non-ratified participant. Yet, one problem in analysing participation frameworks and particularly byplay and sideplay (Goffman 1981) is that these concepts require that the analyst can identify one dominant activity. This was not possible in the present data. Instead, the data are primarily analysed in terms of borderwork, that here entails frame switchings, crossplay and a strategic use of tags.

  • 8.
    Aarsand, Pål André
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Around the Screen: Computer activities in children’s everyday lives2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The present ethnography documents computer activities in everyday life. The data consist of video recordings, interviews and field notes, documenting (i) 16 students in a seventh grade class in a computer room and other school settings and (ii) 22 children, interacting with siblings, friends and parents in home settings. The thesis is inspired by discourse analytical as well as ethnographic approaches, including notions from Goffman (1974, 1981), e.g. those of activity frame and participation framework, which are applied and discussed.

    The thesis consists of four empirical studies. The first study focuses on students’ illegitimate use, from the school’s point of view, of online chatting in a classroom situation. It is shown that the distinction offline/online is not a static one, rather it is made relevant as part of switches between activity frames, indicating the problems of applying Goffman’s (1981) notions of sideplay, byplay and crossplay to analyses of interactions in which several activity frames are present, rather than one main activity. Moreover, it is shown that online identities, in terms of what is here called tags, that is, visual-textual nicknames, are related to offline phenomena, including local identities as well as contemporary aesthetics. The second study focuses on placement of game consoles as part of family life politics. It is shown that game consoles were mainly located in communal places in the homes. The distinction private/communal was also actualized in the participants’ negotiations about access to game consoles as well as negotiations about what to play, when, and for how long. It is shown that two strategies were used, inclusion and exclusion, for appropriating communal places for computer game activities. The third study focuses on a digital divide in terms of a generational divide with respect to ascribed computer competence, documenting how the children and adults positioned each other as people ‘in the know’ (the children) versus people in apprentice-like positions (the adults). It is shown that this generation gap was deployed as a resource in social interaction by both the children and the adults. The forth study focuses on gaming in family life, showing that gaming was recurrently marked by response cries (Goffman, 1981) and other forms of blurted talk. These forms of communication worked as parts of the architecture of intersubjectivity in gaming (cf. Heritage, 1984), indexing the distinction virtual/‘real’. It is shown how response cries, sound making, singing along and animated talk extended the virtual in that elements of the game became parts of the children’s social interaction around the screen, forming something of an action aesthetic, a type of performative action for securing and displaying joint involvement and collaboration. As a whole, the present studies show how the distinctions master/apprentice, public/private, virtual/real and subject/object are indexicalized and negotiated in computer activities.

  • 9.
    Aarsand, Pål André
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Computer- and Video games in Family Life: The digital divide as a resource in intergenerational interactions2007In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 235-256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this ethnographic study of family life, intergenerational video and computer game activities were videotaped and analysed. Both children and adults invoked the notion of a digital divide, i.e. a generation gap between those who master and do not master digital technology. It is argued that the digital divide was exploited by the children to control the game activities. Conversely, parents and grandparents positioned themselves as less knowledgeable, drawing on a displayed divide as a rhetorical resource for gaining access to playtime with the children. In these intergenerational encounters, the digital divide was thus an interactional resource rather than a problem.

  • 10.
    Aarsand, Pål André
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Aronsson, Karin
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Response cries and other gaming moves: Building intersubjectivity in gaming2009In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, Vol. 41, no 8, p. 1557-1575Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study focuses on the ways in which response cries (Goffman, 1981) are deployed as interactional resources in computer gaming in everyday life. It draws on a large-scale data set of video recordings of the everyday lives of middleclass families. The recordings of gaming between children and between children and parents show that response cries were not arbitrarily located within different phases of gaming (planning, gaming or commenting on gaming). Response cries were primarily used as interactional resources for securing and sustaining joint attention (cf. Goodwin, 1996) during the gaming as such, that is, during periods when the gaming activity was characterized by a relatively high tempo. In gaming between children, response cries co-occurred with their animations of game characters and with sound making, singing along, and code switching in ways that formed something of an action aesthetic, a type of aesthetic that was most clearly seen in gaming between game equals (here: between children). In contrast, response cries were rare during the planning phases and during phases in which the participants primarily engaged in setting up or adjusting the game.

  • 11.
    Abadir Guirgis, Georg
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Mindre energi och rätt tid: Utvärdering av utbildning och träning för lokförare i energieffektiv körning – en simulatorstudie2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    During the 80’s, the first train simulator was introduced in Swedish train driver education and is still the only full scale simulator being used to educate train drivers in Sweden. The reason for this seems to be a lack of educational and economic motives for an expanded usage of simulators within education and training. Energy savings within the railway domain, i.e. energy-efficient driving, is currently a topic for all train operators in Sweden. Some operators already educate their drivers in energy efficient driving and tests of energy efficiency in real traffic has shown a potential energy saving of 16 %, after drivers have completed a theoretical education in energy-efficient driving. Because there were some uncertainties in the data from the tests carried out in real traffic, where conditions and experimental procedures varied between the drivers and it also turned out that education and access to a support system while driving resulted in a small saving in energy (13 %) there was a need to examine the potential savings under controlled conditions. Therefore, a study was conducted using a train simulator. In the simulator, the researcher has full control over the data and conditions are the same for all drivers. The simulator used in the study was developed by VTI (Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute) and modeled after an X50 Regina. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the same theoretical education in energy-efficient driving, in combination with simulator training under ideal conditions, could contribute to the same, or better energy saving compared to the results of the tests from real traffic. Furthermore, the effect of feedback during training with regard to energy savings was also investigated. 24 train driver students were divided into three groups with 8 students in each. Two of these groups completed two sessions (reference and test session) with theoretical education and simulator training between the sessions. The last group (control group) completed two sessions (reference and test session) without education and training between the sessions. The two groups that were given theoretical education conducted their simulator training under two different conditions, where one group trained with feedback (energy consumption and rail gradient) and the other group trained without feedback. It turns out that a theoretical education in energy efficient driving, combined with 30 minutes of simulator training, resulted in a total saving of about 24 % energy for both groups. Also, considering that the control group improved their energy consumption by simply driving the simulator two times (8 % total energy saving), the energy saving was almost equal to the result of the tests in real traffic. Since the results were equal even though the conditions differed, there is reason to investigate how different driving conditions affect the outcome. There is also a need to better understand why education in combination with a support system resulted in a lower energy saving than for those who were only given education during the tests in real traffic, and also why feedback during training in the simulator did not give a detectable effect. Basically, there are many reasons to further investigate how to design simulator training and support systems for train drivers. In addition to the energy savings, the results showed that drivers improved their arrival times i.e. arrive more accurate in relation to the time table. The results suggest that there is great potential for train simulators in the Swedish train driver education, both for training and for evaluating the effects of the training.

  • 12.
    Abbass, Allan
    et al.
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Bernier, Denise
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Kisely, Steve
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Town, Joel
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Johansson, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Sustained reduction in health care costs after adjunctive treatment of graded intensive short-term dynamic psychotherapy in patients with psychotic disorders2015In: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 228, no 3, p. 538-543Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the changes in symptom severity and long-term health care cost after intensive short-term dynamic psychotherapy (ISTDP) individually tailored and administered to patients with psychotic disorders undergoing standard psychiatric care. Eleven therapists with different levels of expertise delivered an average of 13 one-hour sessions of graded ISTDP to 38 patients with psychotic disorders. Costs for health care services were compiled for a one-year period prior to the start of ISTDP (baseline) along with four one-year periods after termination. Two validated self-report scales, the Brief Symptom Inventory and the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems, were administered at intake and termination of ISTDP. Results revealed that health care cost reductions were significant for the one-year post-treatment period relative to baseline year, for both physician costs and hospital costs, and the reductions were sustained for the follow-up period of four post-treatment years. Furthermore, at treatment termination self-reported symptoms and interpersonal problems were significantly reduced. These preliminary findings suggest that this brief adjunctive psychotherapy may be beneficial and reduce costs in selected patients with psychotic disorders, and that gains are sustained in long-term follow-up. Future research directions are discussed. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 13.
    Abbass, Allan
    et al.
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Johansson, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rasic, Daniel
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Town, Joel M.
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Johansson, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Long-term healthcare cost reduction with Intensive Short-term Dynamic Psychotherapy in a tertiary psychiatric service2015In: Journal of Psychiatric Research, ISSN 0022-3956, E-ISSN 1879-1379, Vol. 64, p. 114-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate whether a mixed population of patients treated with Intensive Short-term Dynamic Psychotherapy (ISTDP) would exhibit reduced healthcare costs in long-term follow-up. Methods: A quasi-experimental design was employed in which data on pre- and post-treatment healthcare cost were compared for all ISTDP cases treated in a tertiary care service over a nine year period. Observed cost changes were compared with those of a control group of patients referred but never treated. Physician and hospital costs were compared to treatment cost estimates and normal population cost figures. Results: 1082 patients were included; 890 treated cases for a broad range of somatic and psychiatric disorders and 192 controls. The treatment averaged 7.3 sessions and measures of symptoms and interpersonal problems significantly improved. The average cost reduction per treated case was $12,628 over 3 follow-up years: this compared favorably with the estimated treatment cost of $708 per patient. Significant differences were seen between groups for follow-up hospital costs. Conclusions: ISTDP in this setting appears to facilitate reductions in healthcare costs, supporting the notion that brief dynamic psychotherapy provided in a tertiary setting can be beneficial to health care systems overall. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 14.
    Abdulla, Afrah
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Risenfors, Signild
    Högskolan Väst.
    Kursen samhällsorientering för nyanlända: mobilisering och integration för deltagare2013In: Gemenskaper: socialpedagogiska perspektiv / [ed] Lisbeth Eriksson, Gunilla Nilsson, Lars A. Svensson, Göteborg: Daidalos, 2013, p. 117-138Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Abongo, D. A.
    et al.
    University of Nairobi, Kenya.
    Wandiga, S. O.
    University of Nairobi, Kenya.
    Jumba, I. O.
    University of Nairobi, Kenya.
    Van den Brink, P. J.
    University of Wageningen and Research Centre, Netherlands.
    Naziriwo, B. B.
    Makerere University, Uganda.
    Madadi, V. O.
    University of Nairobi, Kenya.
    Wafula, G. A.
    University of Nairobi, Kenya.
    Nkedi-Kizza, P.
    University of Florida, FL USA.
    Kylin, Henrik
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. North West University, South Africa.
    Occurrence, abundance and distribution of benthic macroinvertebrates in the Nyando River catchment, Kenya2015In: African Journal of Aquatic Science, ISSN 1608-5914, E-ISSN 1727-9364, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 373-392Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A baseline study was conducted of the occurrence of macroinvertebrates at 26 sites in the Nyando River catchment in 2005-2006. A total of 13 orders and 16 families of Arthropoda, Mollusca, Platyhelminthes and Annelida were collected, with the order Ephemeroptera being most abundant in the up- and mid-stream reaches, followed by Hemiptera and Plecoptera respectively. The downstream sections of the river were dominated by Hirudinea and tubificids, as the water quality deteriorated mainly due to local land use, raw sewage effluent discharge and annual floods. Insects and annelids were the main invertebrates found and the extent of pollution increased from mid-section (Site 15) downwards as the river flowed into the Winam Gulf. Stringent management measures are required to safeguard the environment and ecosystems of Lake Victoria.

  • 16.
    Abong'o, Deborah
    et al.
    University of Nairobi, Kenya.
    Wandiga, Shem
    University of Nairobi, Kenya.
    Jumba, Isaac
    University of Nairobi, Kenya.
    Madadi, Vincent
    University of Nairobi, Kenya.
    Kylin, Henrik
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Impacts of pesticides on human health and environment in the River Nyando catchment, Kenya2014In: International Journal of Humanities, Arts, Medicine and Sciences, ISSN 2348-0521, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 1-14Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The population of the River Nyando catchment largely relies on rain fed agriculture for their subsistence.

    Important crops grown include cereals, cash crops fruits and vegetables. Farming is one of the contributors of pollution to Lake Victoria. Organophosphates and other banned organochlorine pesticides such as lindane, aldrin and dieldrin were used by farmers. The pesticides transport was by storm water run-off and air drift into the lake. Environmental risk assessment background information was collected through questionnaire and interviews of farmers to determine knowledge and safe use of pesticides. Fourteen pesticides were identified as commonly used of which four are toxic to bees and five to birds. The farmers identified declines in the number of pollinating insects, the disappearance of Red-billed Oxpecker (Buphagus erythrorthynchus) and wild bird’s fatalities. The general knowledge among farmers about chemicals risks, safety, and chronic illnesses was low. Activities that increases environmental awareness and safety of pesticides should be initiated by the agrochemical firms and government.

  • 17.
    Abong'o, Deborah
    et al.
    University of Nairobi, Kenya.
    Wandiga, Shem
    University of Nairobi. Kenya.
    Jumba, Isac
    University of Nairobi, Kenya.
    van den Brink, Paul
    Wageningen University, the Netherlands.
    Nazariwo, Betty
    Makerere University, Uganda.
    Madadi, Vincent
    University of Nairobi, Kenya.
    Wafula, Godfrey
    University of Nairobi, Kenya.
    Kylin, Henrik
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nkedi-Kizza, Peter
    University of Florida, USA.
    Organochlorine pesticide residue levels in soil from the Nyando River catchment, Kenya2015In: Africa Journal of Physical Sciences, ISSN 2313-3317, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 18-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Soil samples were collected from six locations representative of the Nyando River catchment area of the Lake Victoria over a period of two years. Sampling was done four times in the year in February, May, September and December 2005 and 2006 in farms where maize, tea, sugar cane, coffee, rice and vegetables have been grown over the years. This coincided with the effects of different seasons and farming activities on residue levels of the pesticides in use. The objective was to investigate levels and distribution of organochlorine pesticides that have either been banned or are restricted for use in Kenya. Organochlorine pesticides investigated were DDT, lindane, aldrin, dieldrin, heptachlor, endrin, endosulfan (both α- and β- isomers and endosulfan sulphate), the sum is called “total” or Σendosulfan and methoxychlor. Prior to the ban or restriction in use, these pesticides had found wide applications in public health for control of disease vectors and in agriculture for control of crop pests. The analysis revealed presence of all the targeted pesticides with the highest mean concentrations for methoxychlor 140 ± 1.5 μg/kg, Σendosulfan (30 ± 2.1 μg/kg), aldrin (18 ± 0.28 μg/kg), respectively. The results show the presence of these pesticides in soils in the basin and this could be impacting negatively on the ecosystem health of the area.

  • 18.
    Abrahamsson, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Larsson, Louise
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Media - makt att sätta företags agenda?: En kvantitativ studie om medias makt att påverka företags hållbarhetsredovisningar2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Lately, there has been a significant increase in sustainability related issues in media, while companies increasingly are reporting on sustainability. Media has a central role in today's society, and sustainability is emerging as one of the most contemporary issues in the business industry. Studies with a combination of media and sustainability are a fruitful field for future research.

    Purpose The aim of this study is to explain the relationship between medias sustainability exposure of companies and these companies' establishment and extent of a sustainability report.

    Method This quantitative study is pursued through a deductive approach in which the hypotheses are formulated with a background in existing theories. A cross-sectional design is used to measure the presence and the variation of a given phenomena at a certain time. Secondary data is used as the empirical basis. The study focuses on companies listed at Nasdaq Stockholm.

    Conclusion The results of this study indicate that medias' sustainability exposure of companies affects companies' establishment and extent of a sustainability report. Size, industry, profitability and number of subsidiaries are also significant factors. We have found that media is a primary factor in explaining why companies choose to report on sustainability issues. For every news story about a given company in a sustainability context – the likelihood of that company establishing a sustainability report is increased by 2,491. This study also proves that increased media exposure leads to a more extensive sustainability reporting.

  • 19.
    Abrahamsson, Kenneth
    et al.
    Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science, Luleå univeristet.
    Abrahamsson, LenaDepartment of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science, Luleå univeristet.Björkman, TorstenDepartment of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science, Luleå univeristet.Ellström, Per-ErikLinköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Work and Working Life. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.Johansson, JanDepartment of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Human Work Science, Luleå univeristet.
    Utbildning, kompetens och arbete2002Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med denna bok är att ge en översiktsbild av forskning om samspelet mellan utbildning, yrkesverksamhet och lärande. Avsikten är också att överbrygga klyftan mellan en i huvudsak utbildningsinriktad forskning och en forskning med tonvikt på lärande, utveckling och förändring. Fokus är kompetensförsörjningen till och inom arbetslivet. Uppmärksamhet ägnas även överutbildning och underlärande, dvs. den klassiska frågan om matchning mellan utbud och efterfrågan. Innehållet belyser även yrkesbegreppet och hur kvalifikationskraven ändras eller är stabila över tid i olika verksamheter samt villkoren för lärande på arbetsplatsen.

    Förutom en översikt av aktuell svensk forskning syftar boken till att skapa underlag för policyutveckling och konkreta insatser när det gäller villkoren för kompetensförsörjning och lärande i arbetslivet. Boken riktar sig till utbildningar i högskolan i allmänhet och lärarutbildningar i synnerhet med syfte att skapa ökad insikt om hur kunskap utvecklas och nyttiggörs i utbildning och arbetsliv. En annan målgrupp är politiker, utbildningsplanerare och företrädare för arbetsmarknadspolitik och arbetsmarknadens parter med intresse för hur utbildning, arbetsmarknad och välfärd utvecklas i Sverige.

  • 20.
    Abramsson, Marianne
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Äldre, infrastruktur och boende2017In: Vem är den äldre? - Äldrebilder i ett åldrande Sverige / [ed] Abramsson, Marianne; Hydén, Lars-Christer & Motel Klingebiel, Andreas, Stockholm: Nationell Kvalitetsplan för Äldreomsorgenionell Kvalitetsplan för Äldreomsorgen , 2017Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Abramsson, Marianne
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Changing residential mobility rates of older people in Sweden2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Abramsson, Marianne
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Housing Careers2012In: International Encyclopedia of Housing and Home / [ed] Susan J. Smith, Marja Elsinga, Lorna Fox O'Mahony, Ong Seow Eng, Susan Wachter, David Clapham, Oxford: Elsevier, 2012, p. 385-389Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Housing career is a frequently used term in housing research that describes the residential mobility of households often in relation to housing quality, size, tenure, and location. It can be defined as a series of dwellings occupied by a household during the course of life. Housing policies influence the choices and constraints of individuals acting on the housing market. They vary for different groups depending on factors such as experiences, education, or socioeconomic status. Resources, preferences, and possibilities are concepts used to describe households’ actions on the housing market.

  • 23.
    Abramsson, Marianne
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Society, Diversity, Identity .
    Housing Careers in a Changing Welfare State - A Swedish Cohort Study2008In: Housing, Theory and Society, ISSN 1403-6096, E-ISSN 1651-2278, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 231-253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study the housing careers of individuals are related to the development of the Swedish welfare state and its effects on the housing market.The aim of the study was to investigate if the value placed on housing standard, size, tenure and location has changed over time as the welfare state has developed. Twelve individuals in four cohorts born in 1925, 1942, 1955 and 1970 were interviewed. The most evident differences relate to the standard, size and the location of a dwelling. The older cohorts began their housing career in smaller housing with a standard that was the norm at that time. When the most basic housing needs were met, environmental and location aspects began to gain policy interest. These factors were taken into account by the younger cohorts as they entered the housing market, but also among the older as they had progressed through their housing career. A change in housing size as the household grows was not cohort-specific. Tenure was not cohort-specific, but was discussed in terms of freedom that differed between individuals rather than between cohorts.

  • 24.
    Abramsson, Marianne
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lifestyle motives as reasons for moving to senior housing2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to identify possible life style motives to why a group of older movers chose to move into senior housing. This was done using the results from an interview study with people moving into a senior housing facility. Interviews were conducted prior to and after the move.

  • 25.
    Abramsson, Marianne
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lifestyle Motives as Reasons for Moving to Senior Housing2014In: Nordic Seniors on the Move.: Mobility and Migration in Later Life. / [ed] Anne Leonora Blaakilde & Gabriella Nilsson, Lund: Lund Studies in Arts and Cultural Sciences , 2014, p. 51-74Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Abramsson, Marianne
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Mellanboendeformer för äldre: av intresse såväl för de äldre som för bostadsföretagen2009In: Åldrande, åldersordning, ålderism / [ed] Håkan Jönson, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press , 2009, 1, p. 138-156Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den här texten syftar till att diskutera det ökande intresset för äldres boendesituation utifrån kommunernas, bostadsföretagens samt de äldre individernas perspektiv. Detta görs genom att studera de förändringar som har ägt rum på bostadsmarknaden då nya former av boenden för äldre nu finns på marknaden. Dessa boenden riktar sig till aktiva äldre som närmar sig eller redan har uppnått pensionsåldern och som inte har hemmaboende barn. De förändringar som sker i den här fasen av livet kan antas påverka boendesituationen även om det är individer och hushåll som inte är beroende av insatser i form av vård och omsorg som endast kan lösas inom det särskilda boendet. Fokus här är på de förändringar som ägt rum på den ordinära bostadsmarknaden och inom bostadsföretagen men också på sociala frågor som kan ha med de äldres bostadssituation att göra.

    Studien utgår ifrån några forskningsfrågor kring tidpunkten för det ökade intresset för äldres boendesituation, de olika typer av boenden som diskuteras liksom de kvaliteter i boendet som poängteras i samband med marknadsföringen av seniorboenden.

    Texten är en sammanfattning dels av litteratur som berör äldre som aktörer på bostadsmarknaden, dels av möten med representanter för bostadsföretag och tjänstemän inom några olika kommuner kring de behov som finns och olika exempel på hur man försöker möta dessa behov. Ett antal studiebesök har också genomförts som visar på hur den här typen av boenden fungerar i praktiken och texten bygger också på preliminära resultat ifrån ett par pågående studier om äldres boendepreferenser i en medelstor svensk stad. Resultaten som presenteras är en sammanfattning av det som framkommit ur dessa olika källor.

    Det finns inga regler för vad som måste ingå för att ett boende ska räknas som en mellanboendeform, t.ex. seniorboende, även om en del riktlinjer och rekommendationer har presenterats (Wel Hops 2007). Oftast riktar sig boendet till individer som är 55 år eller äldre och som inte har några hemmavarande barn. Tillgängligheten är hög och det finns oftast gemensamhetsutrymmen och lokaler för hobbyverksamheter av olika slag. Mellanbo-endeformerna har en rad olika namn såsom seniorboende, plusboende, 55+, temaboende, boende för den tredje åldern, gemensamhetsboende etc. Här kommer termen seniorboende för enkelhetens skull att användas.

  • 27.
    Abramsson, Marianne
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Older people’s reasons to move or age in place – individual preferences or a housing market issue2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is generally known that older people move to a smaller extent than younger age groups. They are less prone to change housing when circumstances such as a change in household size or a change in income occur. Still some of them do move. Older people have different reasons for moving or ageing in place. In this study the aim was to dig deeper into the reasons for why older people act differently in the housing market to investigate whether their actions mainly depend on different individual preferences or issues related to the housing market or possibly other social or physical obstacles. In the study 80 older households aged 55 years or older were interviewed about their housing situation, their housing preferences and their knowledge about different types of housing offered in their local housing market. 55 of the interviewees lived in owner occupied single family housing or ordinary rental housing, 20 had recently moved to a rental senior housing complex and 5 had moved to a rental ‘sheltered’ housing complex. In addition the interviewees were selected from different geographical areas, a medium sized city, one small city, a small town and a countryside area. The results of the study showed that attachment to home and housing preferences were important for their respective actions. Their knowledge about the local housing market and the actual supply of housing suitable for older people influenced their decisions to move. Information about housing for older people such as advertisements and posters, as well as the building of new housing for this group made several of the interviewees decide to move. To some the lack of suitable or affordable housing was a reason to remain in current housing. Yet another group had not considered their housing situation at all and the question of moving or ageing in place was a non-issue.

  • 28.
    Abramsson, Marianne
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Plans and reasons for relocation among older people.2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Abramsson, Marianne
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Social relations within a senior housing complex –uniting or dividing?2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Abramsson, Marianne
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The housing situation as part of everyday life among older people2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Abramsson, Marianne
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The housing situation of older people – Issues of investigations2017In: Book of abstracts, 2017, p. 51-51Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The housing situation of older people has been on the Swedish political agenda for some time. An increasing ageing population implies a demand for housing in correspodence to their needs. Assisted living facilities decreased with 30 000 places between 2002 and 2016, as a result, the majority of older people age in a dwelling in the ordinary housing market. In 2008 and 2015 respectively two government investigations on older people’s housing were presented. The investigations focused on the need for housing to bridge the gap between ordinary housing and assisted living facilities and issues of affordability and social community but also the lack of accessible housing in particular geographic areas. This paper aims to investigate the origins of the two investigations and relate them to changes in the housing market affecting older people, arguing that the strong emphasis on ageing in place has shifted the responsibility of having a good place to live from general welfare to older individuals themselves.

  • 32.
    Abramsson, Marianne
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Vad kännetecknar de äldre under kommande årtionden? Äldre, generationsperspektiv och sociala nätverk2017In: Vem är den äldre? - Äldrebilder i ett åldrande Sverige / [ed] Abramsson, Marianne; Hydén, Lars-Christer & Motel Klingebiel, Andreas, Stockholm: Regeringskansliet Kommitteservice , 2017Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Abramsson, Marianne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Eva
    Changing locations – Central or peripheral moves of seniors’ residential mobility.2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing shares of elderly in European populations have initiated debates about where and how they will reside. Our main hypothesis is that when moving in this phase of life the most common move would be a move from a suburban location in owner occupation to a more centrally located apartment. This would be in line with the discussion that older people when they retire or the children have moved out want to take part in the culture of city living, such as concerts, theatres and museums in addition to enjoying a more convenient type of housing. This we argue, is the assumed residential pattern during the third age and a possible part of a mobility cycle as described by Rossi (1955). There are qualitative and survey studies pointing to such a residential mobility trend among seniors and increased mobility rates among young seniors have been shown statistically. However, quantitative tests showing a central or suburban destination and type of tenure chosen by the movers are still lacking. The aim of this study was to examine the local geographical mobility and tenure choice of older people. The analysis was made using a register database, Geoswede, comprising the total Swedish population. Moves of the cohorts born in the 1920s, 1930s and the 1940s were followed between 2001 and 2006. Using five distances to the municipal’s population core we concluded that a centralized mobility pattern could be observed among elderly movers in Sweden. The two older cohorts made such moves whereas the majority of the young cohort moved to more peripheral destinations. Also, movers from owner occupation in the cohort born in the 1940s to a larger extent move within owner occupation and make short distance moves. This is further analysed through the use of three case municipalities. Increased knowledge about the mobility rates and residential patterns of the studied cohorts, that constitute two out of nine million people in Sweden, will have an impact on planning issues.

  • 34.
    Abramsson, Marianne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Eva
    Dept of Human Geography, Stockholm University, Stockholm.
    Changing Preferences with Ageing – Housing Choices and Housing Plans of Older People2016In: Housing, Theory and Society, ISSN 1403-6096, E-ISSN 1651-2278, Vol. 2016, no 33, p. 217-241, article id 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Planning for the housing situation of an ageing population is one of the challenges of many countries. To increase our understanding of the needs of the ageing population, a nationwide survey stratified on age and municipality type was conducted. Research questions referred to the current housing situation and plans. The aim was to investigate how preferences, location, and/or the type of housing preferred changes with age and if they are housing market dependent. Results of 10-year cohorts show that the most marked change is between the cohort 75–84 years old and the oldest cohort 85+. There is a gradual change over time of moves from large to small housing, from owner-occupation to rented housing. Respondents in the major cities and in the rural or tourism-dependent municipalities are less inclined to move compared to those from other types of municipalities. The study predicts a shortage of rented apartments.

  • 35.
    Abramsson, Marianne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Eva
    Housing choices and housing plans of older people2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Planning for the housing situation of an ageing population is one of the challenges of many countries today. In Sweden housing provision is mainly a matter at the municipal level and although the municipalities do not provide housing themselves, they can facilitate for the actors to realise their housing plans and influence the situation in the housing market. In or-der to do this successfully, knowledge about the housing preferences of the different actors is crucial. Most people today remain in ordinary housing all through life. In Sweden only 5 per cent of the population aged 65 and above move to assisted living. This results in greater de-mands on the housing that is available in the ordinary housing market and on the municipali-ties in ascertaining that suitable housing is being provided. In order to increase our under-tanding of the needs and wants of the ageing population, a survey was conducted in 2013 in which the respondents answered questions about their current housing situation and their housing plans for the future. The research questions raised regarded the choice of housing location in relation to the respondents’ current housing, similarly the choice of tenure and housing size and if there are differences in the choices made depending of the age of the indi-vidual and in the type of municipality in which they live. The survey was sent out nation-wide, to 4000 people aged 55 years and older resulting in a response rate at 60,7 per cent (2400 individual), the oldest respondent being 103 years old.

    In this study the housing plans as regard location and housing type were in focus. The aim was to distinguish if there is a time in life when the locations and/or the type of housing the respondents would prefer changes, a tipping point. Preliminary results of 10 year cohorts show that the most frequent the movers are those aged 55-65 and 85 and older, the former mainly moving within the same tenure whereas the latter are more likely to change tenure, into rental housing which is more often located in central areas in the municipality.

  • 36.
    Abramsson, Marianne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Eva
    Housing choices and housing plans of older people – in search of a tipping point.2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Planning for the housing situation of an ageing population is one of the challenges of many countries today. In Sweden housing provision is mainly a matter at the municipal level where the municipalities take on the responsibility for facilitating for the different actors to realise their housing plans and for influencing the situation in the housing market. In order to do this successfully, knowledge about the housing preferences of the different actors is crucial. Most people today remain in ordinary housing all through life. In Sweden only 5 per cent of the population aged 65 and above move to assisted living. This results in greater demands on the housing that is available in the ordinary housing market and on the municipalities in ascertaining that suitable housing is being provided. In order to increase our understanding of the needs and wants of the ageing population, a survey named SHIELD, Survey of Housing Intentions among the ELDerly, was conducted in 2013 in which the respondents answered questions about their current housing situation and their housing plans for the future. The research questions raised regarded the choice of tenure and housing size and were stratified on age and municipality type to certify analyses of these variables. The SHIELD-survey was sent out nation-wide, to 4000 people aged 55 years and older resulting in a response rate at 60,7 per cent (2400 individual). In this study the housing preferences as regard housing, housing location and housing type were in focus in relation to age. The aim was to distinguish if there is a time in life when the preferences, locations and/or the type of housing the respondents would prefer changes, a tipping point. Preliminary results of 10 year cohorts show that the most marked change in preferences and behaviour is between the cohort 75-84 years old and the oldest cohort 85+ but it is also evident from the study that there is a gradual change over time, such as moves from large to small housing, from owner occupation to rental housing that begin already between the first two cohorts, 55–64 and 65–74 years old. The survey shows that in general respondents in the major cities and in the rural or tourism-dependent municipalities are less inclined to move compared to respondents from other types of municipalities.