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  • Andersson, Sandra
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Sundberg, Mårten
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC.
    Pristovsek, Nusa
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Ibrahim, Ahmed
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Biotechnol, Div Prote & Nanotechnol, Sci Life Lab, S-17121 Solna, Sweden.;Natl Res Ctr, Div Pharmaceut Ind, Dokki 12622, Egypt..
    Jonsson, Philip
    Univ Houston, Dept Biol & Biochem, Houston, TX 77204 USA.;Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, Human Oncol & Pathogenesis Program, New York, NY 10065 USA..
    Katona, Borbala
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Clausson, Carl-Magnus
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Zieba, Agata
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Ramström, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC.
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Williams, Cecilia
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Biotechnol, Div Prote & Nanotechnol, Sci Life Lab, S-17121 Solna, Sweden.;Univ Houston, Dept Biol & Biochem, Houston, TX 77204 USA.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, S-14183 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Asplund, Anna
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Insufficient antibody validation challenges oestrogen receptor beta research2017In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 8, 15840Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The discovery of oestrogen receptor beta (ER beta/ESR2) was a landmark discovery. Its reported expression and homology with breast cancer pharmacological target ER alpha (ESR1) raised hopes for improved endocrine therapies. After 20 years of intense research, this has not materialized. We here perform a rigorous validation of 13 anti-ER beta antibodies, using well-characterized controls and a panel of validation methods. We conclude that only one antibody, the rarely used monoclonal PPZ0506, specifically targets ER beta in immunohistochemistry. Applying this antibody for protein expression profiling in 44 normal and 21 malignant human tissues, we detect ER beta protein in testis, ovary, lymphoid cells, granulosa cell tumours, and a subset of malignant melanoma and thyroid cancers. We do not find evidence of expression in normal or cancerous human breast. This expression pattern aligns well with RNA-seq data, but contradicts a multitude of studies. Our study highlights how inadequately validated antibodies can lead an exciting field astray.

  • Nolte, Ilja M.
    et al.
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Epidemiol, POB 30001, NL-9700 RB Groningen, Netherlands..
    Munoz, M. Loretto
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Epidemiol, POB 30001, NL-9700 RB Groningen, Netherlands..
    Tragante, Vinicius
    Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Div Heart & Lungs, Dept Cardiol, Heidelberglaan 100, NL-3584 CX Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Amare, Azmeraw T.
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Epidemiol, POB 30001, NL-9700 RB Groningen, Netherlands.;Univ Adelaide, Sch Med, Dept Epidemiol, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia.;Bahir Dar Univ, Coll Med & Hlth Sci, Bahir Dar 6000, Ethiopia..
    Jansen, Rick
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, EMGO Inst Hlth & Care Res & Neurosci, Dept Psychiat,GGZ inGeest, Campus Amsterdam, NL-1081 BT Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Vaez, Ahmad
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Epidemiol, POB 30001, NL-9700 RB Groningen, Netherlands.;Isfahan Univ Med Sci, Sch Med, Esfahan 8174673461, Iran..
    von der Heyde, Benedikt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Avery, Christy L.
    Univ N Carolina, Gillings Sch Global Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA..
    Bis, Joshua C.
    Univ Washington, Dept Med, Cardiovasc Hlth Res Unit, Seattle, WA 98104 USA..
    Dierckx, Bram
    Dept Child & Adolescent Psychiat, Dept Child & Adolescent Psychiat Psychol, POB 2060, NL-3000 CB Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC, Generat Study Grp R, POB 2060, NL-3000 CB0 Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    van Dongen, Jenny
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Dept Biol Psychol Behav & Movement Sci, NL-1081 BT Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Gogarten, Stephanie M.
    Univ Washington, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Goyette, Philippe
    Montreal Heart Inst, Montreal, PQ H1T IC8, Canada..
    Hernesniemi, Jussi
    Fimlab Labs, Dept Clin Chem, Tampere 33520, Finland.;Univ Tampere, Dept Clin Chem, Sch Med, Tampere 33014, Finland.;Tampere Univ Hosp, Heart Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Tampere 33521, Finland..
    Huikari, Ville
    Univ Oulu, Ctr Life Course Hlth Res, Oulu 90014, Finland..
    Hwang, Shih-Jen
    Framingham Heart Dis Epidemiol Study, Framingham, MA 01702 USA.;NHLBI, Populat Sci Branch, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Jaju, Deepali
    Sultan Qaboos Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Physiol, Muscat 123, Oman..
    Kerr, Kathleen F.
    Univ Washington, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Kluttig, Alexander
    Martin Luther Univ Halle Wittenberg, Inst Med Epidemiol Biostat & Informat, D-06097 Halle, Germany..
    Krijthe, Bouwe P.
    Erasmus MC, Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Dept Epidemiol, POB 2060, NL-3000 CB Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Kumar, Jitender
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    van der Laan, Sander W.
    Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Dept Heart & Lung, Lab Expt Cardiol, Heidelberglaan 100, NL-3584 CX Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Lyytikainen, Leo-Pekka
    Fimlab Labs, Dept Clin Chem, Tampere 33520, Finland.;Univ Tampere, Dept Clin Chem, Sch Med, Tampere 33014, Finland..
    Maihofer, Adam X.
    Univ Calif San Diego, Dept Psychiat, San Diego, CA 92093 USA.;VA San Diego Healthcare Syst, Ctr Stress & Mental Hlth CESAMH, San Diego, CA 92161 USA..
    Minassian, Arpi
    Univ Calif San Diego, Dept Psychiat, San Diego, CA 92093 USA.;VA San Diego Healthcare Syst, Ctr Stress & Mental Hlth CESAMH, San Diego, CA 92161 USA..
    van der Most, Peter J.
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Epidemiol, POB 30001, NL-9700 RB Groningen, Netherlands..
    Mueller-Nurasyid, Martina
    Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Inst Genet Epidemiol, D-85764 Neuherberg, Germany.;Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Dept Med, Univ Hosp Munich, D-80539 Munich, Germany.;Munich Heart Alliance, DZHK German Ctr Cardiovasc Res, Partner Site, D-80336 Munich, Germany..
    Nivard, Michel
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Dept Biol Psychol Behav & Movement Sci, NL-1081 BT Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, EMGO Inst Hlth & Care Res, NL-1081 HV Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, NL-1081 HV Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Salvi, Erika
    Univ Milan, Dept Hlth Sci, I-20122 Milan, Italy..
    Stewart, James D.
    Univ N Carolina, Gillings Sch Global Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA.;Univ N Carolina, Carolina Populat Ctr, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA..
    Thayer, Julian F.
    Ohio State Univ, Dept Psychol, 1835 Neil Ave, Columbus, OH 43210 USA..
    Verweij, Niek
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Cardiol, POB 30001, NL-9700 RB Groningen, Netherlands..
    Wong, Andrew
    UCL, MRC Unit Lifelong Hlth & Ageing, 33 Bedford Pl, London WC1B 5JU, England..
    Zabaneh, Delilah
    Kings Coll London, Inst Psychiat Psychol & Neurosci, De Crespigny Pk, London SE5 8AF, England.;UCL, Genet Inst, London WC1E 6BT, England..
    Zafarmand, Mohammad H.
    Univ Amsterdam, Acad Med Ctr, Dept Publ Hlth, NL-1105 AZ Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Univ Amsterdam, Acad Med Ctr, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, NL-1105 AZ Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Abdellaoui, Abdel
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Dept Biol Psychol Behav & Movement Sci, NL-1081 BT Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, EMGO Inst Hlth & Care Res, NL-1081 HV Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, NL-1081 HV Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Albarwani, Sulayma
    Sultan Qaboos Univ, Coll Med & Hlth Sci, Dept Physiol, Muscat Al Khoudh 123, Oman..
    Albert, Christine
    Harvard Med Sch, Brigham & Womens Hosp, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Alonso, Alvaro
    Emory Univ, Rollins Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Atlanta, GA 30322 USA..
    Ashar, Foram
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, McKusick Nathans Inst Genet Med, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA..
    Auvinen, Juha
    Univ Oulu, Ctr Life Course Hlth Res, Oulu 90014, Finland.;Oulu Univ Hosp, Unit Primary Hlth Care, Oulu 90220, Finland..
    Axelsson, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine.
    Baker, Dewleen G.
    Univ Calif San Diego, Dept Psychiat, San Diego, CA 92093 USA.;VA San Diego Healthcare Syst, Ctr Stress & Mental Hlth CESAMH, San Diego, CA 92161 USA..
    de Bakker, Paul I. W.
    Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Dept Genet, Ctr Mol Med, NL-3584 CX Utrecht, Netherlands.;Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Julius Ctr Hlth Sci & Primary Care, Dept Epidemiol, NL-3584 CX Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Barcella, Matteo
    Univ Milan, Dept Hlth Sci, I-20122 Milan, Italy..
    Bayoumi, Riad
    Mohammed Bin Rashid Univ, Coll Med, Dubai Healthcare City, POB 505055, Dubai, U Arab Emirates..
    Bieringa, Rob J.
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Epidemiol, POB 30001, NL-9700 RB Groningen, Netherlands..
    Boomsma, Dorret
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Dept Biol Psychol Behav & Movement Sci, NL-1081 BT Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, EMGO Inst Hlth & Care Res, NL-1081 HV Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, NL-1081 HV Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Boucher, Gabrielle
    Montreal Heart Inst, Montreal, PQ H1T IC8, Canada..
    Britton, Annie R.
    UCL, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, London WC1E 6BT, England..
    Christophersen, Ingrid E.
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Cardiovasc Res Ctr, Boston, MA 02114 USA.;Broad Inst Harvard, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA 02114 USA.;MIT, Cambridge, MA 02114 USA.;Baerum Hosp, Vestre Viken Hosp Trust, Dept Med Res, N-1346 Rud, Norway..
    Dietrich, Andrea
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Child & Adolescent Psychiat, POB 30001, NL-9700 RB Groningen, Netherlands..
    Ehret, George B.
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, McKusick Nathans Inst Genet Med, Ctr Complex Dis Genom, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA.;Geneva Univ Hosp, Dept Specialties Internal Med, Cardiol, CH-1211 Geneva, Switzerland..
    Ellinor, Patrick T.
    Broad Inst Harvard, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA 02114 USA.;MIT, Cambridge, MA 02114 USA.;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Cardiac Arrhythmia Serv, Boston, MA 02114 USA.;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Cardiovasc Res Ctr, Boston, MA 02114 USA..
    Eskola, Markku
    Tampere Univ Hosp, Heart Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Tampere 33521, Finland.;Univ Tampere, Sch Med, Dept Cardiol, Tampere 33014, Finland..
    Felix, Janine F.
    Erasmus MC, Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Dept Epidemiol, POB 2060, NL-3000 CB Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Floras, John S.
    Univ Toronto, Univ Hlth Network, Toronto, ON, Canada.;Univ Toronto, Mt Sinai Hosp, Div Cardiol, Dept Med, Toronto, ON, Canada.;Univ Hlth Network, Toronto Gen Res Inst, Toronto, ON M5G 2C4, Canada..
    Franco, Oscar H.
    Erasmus MC, Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Dept Epidemiol, POB 2060, NL-3000 CB Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Friberg, Peter
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Univ Hosp, Inst Med, Dept Mol & Clin Med, SE-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Gademan, Maaike G. J.
    Univ Amsterdam, Acad Med Ctr, Dept Publ Hlth, NL-1105 AZ Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Geyer, Mark A.
    Univ Calif San Diego, Dept Psychiat, San Diego, CA 92093 USA..
    Giedraitis, Vilmantas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Hartman, Catharina A.
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Interdisciplinary Ctr Psychopathol & Emot Regulat, Dept Psychiat, POB 30001, NL-9700 RB Groningen, Netherlands..
    Hemerich, Daiane
    Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Div Heart & Lungs, Dept Cardiol, Heidelberglaan 100, NL-3584 CX Utrecht, Netherlands.;Minist Educ Brazil, CAPES Fdn, BR-70040020 Brasilia, DF, Brazil..
    Hofman, Albert
    Erasmus MC, Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Dept Epidemiol, POB 2060, NL-3000 CB Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Hottenga, Jouke-Jan
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Dept Biol Psychol Behav & Movement Sci, NL-1081 BT Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, EMGO Inst Hlth & Care Res, NL-1081 HV Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, NL-1081 HV Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Huikuri, Heikki
    Oulu Univ Hosp, Med Res Ctr, Res Unit Internal Med, Oulu 90220, Finland.;Univ Oulu, SF-90220 Oulu, Finland..
    Hutri-Kahonen, Nina
    Tampere Univ Hosp, Dept Pediat, Tampere 33521, Finland.;Univ Tampere, Sch Med, Dept Pediat, Tampere 33014, Finland..
    Jouven, Xavier
    Paris Descartes Univ, INSERM, U970, F-75006 Paris, France..
    Junttila, Juhani
    Oulu Univ Hosp, Med Res Ctr, Res Unit Internal Med, Oulu 90220, Finland.;Univ Oulu, SF-90220 Oulu, Finland..
    Juonala, Markus
    Univ Turku, Dept Med, Turku 20520, Finland.;Turku Univ Hosp, Div Med, Turku 20521, Finland..
    Kiviniemi, Antti M.
    Oulu Univ Hosp, Med Res Ctr, Res Unit Internal Med, Oulu 90220, Finland.;Univ Oulu, SF-90220 Oulu, Finland..
    Kors, Jan A.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Med Informat, NL-3015 CE Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Kumari, Meena
    UCL, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, London WC1E 6BT, England.;Essex Univ, ISER, Colchester CO4 3SQ, Essex, England..
    Kuznetsova, Tatiana
    Univ Leuven, KU Leuven Dept Cardiovasc Sci, Studies Coordinating Ctr, Res Unit Hypertens & Cardiovasc Epidemiol, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Laurie, Cathy C.
    Univ Washington, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Lefrandt, Joop D.
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Internal Med, Div Vasc Med, POB 30001, NL-9700 RB Groningen, Netherlands..
    Li, Yong
    Univ Freiburg, Fac Med, Med Center, Div Genet Epidemiol,Inst Med Biometry & Stat, D-79110 Freiburg, Germany..
    Li, Yun
    Univ N Carolina, Dept Genet, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA.;Univ N Carolina, Dept Biostat, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA.;Univ N Carolina, Dept Comp Sci, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA..
    Liao, Duanping
    Penn State Univ, Coll Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Div Epidemiol, Hershey, PA 17033 USA..
    Limacher, Marian C.
    Univ Florida, Coll Med, Div Cardiovasc Med, Gainesville, FL 32611 USA..
    Lin, Henry J.
    Harbor UCLA Med Ctr, Dept Pediat, Los Angeles Biomed Res Inst Harbor, Inst Translat Genom & Populat Sci, Torrance, CA 90502 USA.;Harbor UCLA Med Ctr, Dept Pediat, Div Med Genet, Torrance, CA 90502 USA..
    Lindgren, Cecilia M.
    Univ Oxford, Big Data Inst, Li Ka Shing Ctr Hlth Informat & Discovery, Oxford OX3 7BN, England.;Univ Oxford, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford OX3 7BN, England..
    Lubitz, Steven A.
    Broad Inst Harvard, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA 02114 USA.;MIT, Cambridge, MA 02114 USA.;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Cardiac Arrhythmia Serv, Boston, MA 02114 USA.;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Cardiovasc Res Ctr, Boston, MA 02114 USA..
    Mahajan, Anubha
    Univ Oxford, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford OX3 7BN, England..
    McKnight, Barbara
    Univ Washington, Dept Med, Cardiovasc Hlth Res Unit, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.;Univ Washington, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Publ Hlth Sci Div, Seattle, WA 98109 USA..
    zu Schwabedissen, Henriette Meyer
    Univ Basel, Dept Pharmaceut Sci, Biopharm, CH-4056 Basel, Switzerland..
    Milaneschi, Yuri
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, EMGO Inst Hlth & Care Res & Neurosci, Dept Psychiat,GGZ inGeest, Campus Amsterdam, NL-1081 BT Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Mononen, Nina
    Fimlab Labs, Dept Clin Chem, Tampere 33520, Finland.;Univ Tampere, Dept Clin Chem, Sch Med, Tampere 33014, Finland..
    Morris, Andrew P.
    Univ Oxford, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford OX3 7BN, England.;Univ Liverpool, Dept Biostat, Liverpool L69 3GL, Merseyside, England..
    Nalls, Mike A.
    NIA, Lab Neurogenet, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Navis, Gerjan
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Internal Med, Div Nephrol, POB 30001, NL-9700 RB Groningen, Netherlands..
    Neijts, Melanie
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Dept Biol Psychol Behav & Movement Sci, NL-1081 BT Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, EMGO Inst Hlth & Care Res, NL-1081 HV Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, NL-1081 HV Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Nikus, Kjell
    Tampere Univ Hosp, Heart Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Tampere 33521, Finland.;Univ Tampere, Sch Med, Dept Cardiol, Tampere 33014, Finland..
    North, Kari E.
    Univ N Carolina, Gillings Sch Global Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA.;Univ N Carolina, Carolina Ctr Genome Sci, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA..
    O'Connor, Daniel T.
    Univ Calif San Diego, Dept Med, San Diego, CA 92093 USA..
    Ormel, Johan
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Interdisciplinary Ctr Psychopathol & Emot Regulat, Dept Psychiat, POB 30001, NL-9700 RB Groningen, Netherlands..
    Perz, Siegfried
    Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Inst Epidemiol 2, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, D-85764 Neuherberg, Germany..
    Peters, Annette
    Munich Heart Alliance, DZHK German Ctr Cardiovasc Res, Partner Site, D-80336 Munich, Germany.;Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Inst Epidemiol 2, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, D-85764 Neuherberg, Germany.;German Ctr Diabet Res, D-85764 Neuherberg, Germany..
    Psaty, Bruce M.
    Univ Washington, Dept Med, Cardiovasc Hlth Res Unit, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.;Univ Washington, Dept Epidemiol & Hlth Serv, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Grp Hlth Cooperat Puget Sound, Grp Hlth Res Inst, Seattle, WA 98101 USA..
    Raitakari, Olli T.
    Turku Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Physiol & Nucl Med, Turku 20521, Finland.;Univ Turku, Res Ctr Appl & Prevent Cardiovasc Med, Turku 20520, Finland..
    Risbrough, Victoria B.
    Univ Calif San Diego, Dept Psychiat, San Diego, CA 92093 USA.;VA San Diego Healthcare Syst, Ctr Stress & Mental Hlth CESAMH, San Diego, CA 92161 USA..
    Sinner, Moritz F.
    Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Dept Med, Univ Hosp Munich, D-80539 Munich, Germany.;Munich Heart Alliance, DZHK German Ctr Cardiovasc Res, Partner Site, D-80336 Munich, Germany..
    Siscovick, David
    New York Acad Med, New York, NY 10029 USA..
    Smit, Johannes H.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, EMGO Inst Hlth & Care Res & Neurosci, Dept Psychiat,GGZ inGeest, Campus Amsterdam, NL-1081 BT Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Smith, Nicholas L.
    Grp Hlth Cooperat Puget Sound, Grp Hlth Res Inst, Seattle, WA 98101 USA.;Univ Washington, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Vet Affairs Off Res & Dev, Seattle Epidemiol Res & Informat Ctr, Seattle, WA 98108 USA..
    Soliman, Elsayed Z.
    Wake Forest Sch Med, Div Publ Hlth Sci, Epidemiol Cardiol Res Ctr EPICARE, Winston Salem, NC 27157 USA..
    Sotoodehnia, Nona
    Univ Washington, Dept Med & Epidemiol, Div Cardiol, Cardiovasc Hlth Res Unit, Seattle, WA 98101 USA..
    Staessen, Jan A.
    Univ Leuven, KU Leuven Dept Cardiovasc Sci, Studies Coordinating Ctr, Res Unit Hypertens & Cardiovasc Epidemiol, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Stein, Phyllis K.
    Washington Univ, Heart Rate Variabil Lab, Sch Med, St Louis, MO 63108 USA..
    Stilp, Adrienne M.
    Univ Washington, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Stolarz-Skrzypek, Katarzyna
    Jagiellonian Univ, Med Coll, Dept Cardiol Intervent Electrocardi & Hypertens 1, PL-31008 Krakow, Poland..
    Strauch, Konstantin
    Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Inst Genet Epidemiol, D-85764 Neuherberg, Germany.;Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Chair Genet Epidemiol, Inst Med Informat Biometry & Epidemiol, D-81377 Munich, Germany..
    Sundstrom, Johan
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Sci Cardiovasc Epidemiol, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Swenne, Cees A.
    Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Cardiol, NL-2300 RC Leiden, Netherlands..
    Syvänen, Ann-Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine.
    Tardif, Jean-Claude
    Montreal Heart Inst, Montreal, PQ H1T IC8, Canada.;Univ Montreal, Montreal, PQ H3T IJ4, Canada..
    Taylor, Kent D.
    Harbor UCLA Med Ctr, Los Angeles Biomed Res Inst, Dept Pediat & Med, Inst Translat Genom & Populat Sci, Torrance, CA 90509 USA..
    Teumer, Alexander
    Univ Med Greifswald, Inst Community Med, D-17475 Greifswald, Germany..
    Thornton, Timothy A.
    Univ Washington, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Tinker, Lesley E.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Publ Hlth Sci Div, Seattle, WA 98109 USA..
    Uitterlinden, Andre G.
    Erasmus MC, Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Dept Epidemiol, POB 2060, NL-3000 CB Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Internal Med, NL-3015 CE Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Netherlands Consortium Hlth Aging, Netherlands Genom Initiat, NL-2300 RC Leiden, Netherlands..
    van Setten, Jessica
    Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Div Heart & Lungs, Dept Cardiol, Heidelberglaan 100, NL-3584 CX Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Voss, Andreas
    IGHT Jena Ernst Abbe Hsch, Inst Innovat Hlth Technol, D-07745 Jena, Germany..
    Waldenberger, Melanie
    Dept Child & Adolescent Psychiat, Dept Child & Adolescent Psychiat Psychol, POB 2060, NL-3000 CB Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Inst Epidemiol 2, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, D-85764 Neuherberg, Germany.;Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Res Unit Mol Epidemiol, D-85764 Neuherberg, Germany..
    Wilhelmsen, Kirk C.
    Univ N Carolina, Dept Genet & Neurol, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA.;Renaissance Comp Inst, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA..
    Willemsen, Gonneke
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Dept Biol Psychol Behav & Movement Sci, NL-1081 BT Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, EMGO Inst Hlth & Care Res, NL-1081 HV Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, NL-1081 HV Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Wong, Quenna
    Univ Washington, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Zhang, Zhu-Ming
    Wake Forest Sch Med, Div Publ Hlth Sci, Epidemiol Cardiol Res Ctr EPICARE, Winston Salem, NC 27157 USA.;Wake Forest Sch Med, Div Publ Hlth Sci, Dept Epidemiol & Prevent, Winston Salem, NC 27157 USA..
    Zonderman, Alan B.
    NIA, Lab Epidemiol & Populat Sci, NIH, Baltimore, MD 21224 USA..
    Cusi, Daniele
    Italian Natl Res Council, CNR, Inst Biomed Technol, I-20090 Milan, Italy.;KOS Genet SRL, I-20091 Milan, Italy..
    Evans, Michele K.
    NIA, Lab Epidemiol & Populat Sci, NIH, Baltimore, MD 21224 USA..
    Greiser, Halina K.
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Canc Epidemiol, D-69210 Heidelberg, Germany..
    van der Harst, Pim
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Cardiol, POB 30001, NL-9700 RB Groningen, Netherlands..
    Hassan, Mohammad
    Sultan Qaboos Univ, Coll Med & Hlth Sci, Dept Physiol, Muscat Al Khoudh 123, Oman..
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Stanford Univ, Sch Med, Div Cardiovasc Med, Dept Med, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta
    Univ Oulu, Ctr Life Course Hlth Res, Oulu 90014, Finland.;Oulu Univ Hosp, Unit Primary Hlth Care, Oulu 90220, Finland.;Imperial Coll London, Fac Med, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, St Marys Campus, London, England.;Univ Oulu, Bioctr Oulu, Oulu 90014, Finland..
    Kaab, Stefan
    Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Dept Med, Univ Hosp Munich, D-80539 Munich, Germany.;Munich Heart Alliance, DZHK German Ctr Cardiovasc Res, Partner Site, D-80336 Munich, Germany..
    Kahonen, Mika
    Tampere Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Physiol, Tampere 33521, Finland.;Univ Tampere, Sch Med, Dept Clin Physiol, Tampere 33014, Finland..
    Kivimaki, Mika
    UCL, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, London WC1E 6BT, England..
    Kooperberg, Charles
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Publ Hlth Sci Div, Seattle, WA 98109 USA..
    Kuh, Diana
    UCL, MRC Unit Lifelong Hlth & Ageing, 33 Bedford Pl, London WC1B 5JU, England..
    Lehtimaki, Terho
    Fimlab Labs, Dept Clin Chem, Tampere 33520, Finland.;Univ Tampere, Dept Clin Chem, Sch Med, Tampere 33014, Finland..
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Sci Cardiovasc Epidemiol, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Nievergelt, Caroline M.
    Univ Calif San Diego, Dept Psychiat, San Diego, CA 92093 USA.;VA San Diego Healthcare Syst, Ctr Stress & Mental Hlth CESAMH, San Diego, CA 92161 USA..
    O'Donnell, Chris J.
    Framingham Heart Dis Epidemiol Study, Framingham, MA 01702 USA.;NHLBI, Populat Sci Branch, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.;Boston Vet Adm Healthcare Boston, Cardiol Sect, Boston, MD 02132 USA..
    Oldehinkel, Albertine J.
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Interdisciplinary Ctr Psychopathol & Emot Regulat, Dept Psychiat, POB 30001, NL-9700 RB Groningen, Netherlands..
    Penninx, Brenda
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, EMGO Inst Hlth & Care Res & Neurosci, Dept Psychiat,GGZ inGeest, Campus Amsterdam, NL-1081 BT Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Reiner, Alexander P.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Publ Hlth Sci Div, Seattle, WA 98109 USA.;Univ Washington, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Riese, Harriette
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Interdisciplinary Ctr Psychopathol & Emot Regulat, Dept Psychiat, POB 30001, NL-9700 RB Groningen, Netherlands..
    van Roon, Arie M.
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Internal Med, Div Vasc Med, POB 30001, NL-9700 RB Groningen, Netherlands..
    Rioux, John D.
    Montreal Heart Inst, Montreal, PQ H1T IC8, Canada.;Univ Montreal, Montreal, PQ H3T IJ4, Canada..
    Rotter, Jerome I.
    Harbor UCLA Med Ctr, Los Angeles Biomed Res Inst, Dept Pediat & Med, Inst Translat Genom & Populat Sci, Torrance, CA 90509 USA..
    Sofer, Tamar
    Univ Washington, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Stricker, Bruno H.
    Erasmus MC, Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Dept Epidemiol, POB 2060, NL-3000 CB Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Inspectorate Hlth Care, NL-2511 VX The Hague, Netherlands..
    Tiemeier, Henning
    Dept Child & Adolescent Psychiat, Dept Child & Adolescent Psychiat Psychol, POB 2060, NL-3000 CB Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC, Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Dept Epidemiol, POB 2060, NL-3000 CB Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Vrijkotte, Tanja G. M.
    Univ Amsterdam, Acad Med Ctr, Dept Publ Hlth, NL-1105 AZ Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Asselbergs, Folkert W.
    Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Div Heart & Lungs, Dept Cardiol, Heidelberglaan 100, NL-3584 CX Utrecht, Netherlands.;UCL, Inst Cardiovasc Sci, 222 Euston Rd, London NW1 2DA, England.;ICIN Netherlands Heart Inst, Durrer Ctr Cardiogenet Res, NL-3501 DG Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Brundel, Bianca J. J. M.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Inst Cardiovasc Res, Dept Physiol, Med Ctr, De Boelelaan 1118, NL-1081 HV Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Heckbert, Susan R.
    Univ Washington, Dept Med, Cardiovasc Hlth Res Unit, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.;Univ Washington, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Whitsel, Eric A.
    Univ N Carolina, Gillings Sch Global Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA.;Univ N Carolina, Dept Med, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA..
    den Hoed, Marcel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Snieder, Harold
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Epidemiol, POB 30001, NL-9700 RB Groningen, Netherlands..
    de Geus, Eco J. C.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Dept Biol Psychol Behav & Movement Sci, NL-1081 BT Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, EMGO Inst Hlth & Care Res, NL-1081 HV Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, NL-1081 HV Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Genetic loci associated with heart rate variability and their effects on cardiac disease risk2017In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 8, 15805Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reduced cardiac vagal control reflected in low heart rate variability (HRV) is associated with greater risks for cardiac morbidity and mortality. In two-stage meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies for three HRV traits in up to 53,174 individuals of European ancestry, we detect 17 genome-wide significant SNPs in eight loci. HRV SNPs tag non-synonymous SNPs (in NDUFA11 and KIAA1755), expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) (influencing GNG11, RGS6 and NEO1), or are located in genes preferentially expressed in the sinoatrial node (GNG11, RGS6 and HCN4). Genetic risk scores account for 0.9 to 2.6% of the HRV variance. Significant genetic correlation is found for HRV with heart rate (-0.74 < r(g) < -0.55) and blood pressure (-0.35 < r(g) < -0.20). These findings provide clinically relevant biological insight into heritable variation in vagal heart rhythm regulation, with a key role for genetic variants (GNG11, RGS6) that influence G-protein heterotrimer action in GIRK-channel induced pacemaker membrane hyperpolarization.

  • Pathak, Ashish
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). Ruxmaniben Deepchand Gardi Med Coll, Dept Paediat, Ujjain, Madhya Pradesh, India.; Karolinska Inst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Global Hlth Hlth Syst & Policy, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Mahadik, Kalpana
    Ruxmaniben Deepchand Gardi Med Coll, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Ujjain, Madhya Pradesh, India..
    Swami, Manmat B.
    Ruxmaniben Deepchand Gardi Med Coll, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Ujjain, Madhya Pradesh, India..
    Roy, Pulak K.
    Ruxmaniben Deepchand Gardi Med Coll, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Ujjain, Madhya Pradesh, India..
    Sharma, Megha
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Global Hlth Hlth Syst & Policy, Stockholm, Sweden.;Ruxmaniben Deepchand Gardi Med Coll, Dept Pharmacol, Ujjain, Madhya Pradesh, India..
    Mahadik, Vijay K.
    Ruxmaniben Deepchand Gardi Med Coll, Ujjain, Madhya Pradesh, India..
    Lundborg, Cecilia Stalsby
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Global Hlth Hlth Syst & Policy, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Incidence and risk factors for surgical site infections in obstetric and gynecological surgeries from a teaching hospital in rural India2017In: Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control, ISSN 2047-2994, E-ISSN 2047-2994, Vol. 6, 66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Surgical site infections (SSI) are one of the most common healthcare associated infections in the low-middle income countries. Data on incidence and risk factors for SSI following surgeries in general and Obstetric and Gynecological surgeries in particular are scare. This study set out to identify risk factors for SSI in patients undergoing Obstetric and Gynecological surgeries in an Indian rural hospital.

    Methods: Patients who underwent a surgical procedure between September 2010 to February 2013 in the 60-bedded ward of Obstetric and Gynecology department were included. Surveillance for SSI was based on the Centre for Disease Control (CDC) definition and methodology. Incidence and risk factors for SSI, including those for specific procedure, were calculated from data collected on daily ward rounds.

    Results: A total of 1173 patients underwent a surgical procedure during the study period. The incidence of SSI in the cohort was 7.84% (95% CI 6.30-9.38). Majority of SSI were superficial. Obstetric surgeries had a lower SSI incidence compared to gynecological surgeries (1.2% versus 10.3% respectively). The risk factors for SSI identified in the multivariate logistic regression model were age (OR 1.03), vaginal examination (OR 1.31); presence of vaginal discharge (OR 4.04); medical disease (OR 5.76); American Society of Anesthesia score greater than 3 (OR 12.8); concurrent surgical procedure (OR 3.26); each increase in hour of surgery, after the first hour, doubled the risk of SSI; inappropriate antibiotic prophylaxis increased the risk of SSI by nearly 5 times. Each day increase in stay in the hospital after the surgery increased the risk of contacting an SSI by 5%.

    Conclusions: Incidence and risk factors from prospective SSI surveillance can be reported simultaneously for the Obstetric and Gynecological surgeries and can be part of routine practice in resource-constrained settings. The incidence of SSI was lower for Obstetric surgeries compared to Gynecological surgeries. Multiple risk factors identified in the present study can be helpful for SSI risk stratification in low-middle income countries.

  • TekniskUnd informerar 2015:62015Other (Other academic)
  • TekniskUnd informerar 2015:52015Other (Other academic)
  • TekniskUnd informerar 2015:42015Other (Other academic)
  • TekniskUnd informerar 2015:32015Other (Other academic)
  • TekniskUnd informerar 2015:22015Other (Other academic)
  • TekniskUnd informerar 2015:12015Other (Other academic)
  • Cato, Karin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Sylvén, Sara M
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Lindbäck, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Skalkidou, Alkistis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Rubertsson, Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Risk factors for exclusive breastfeeding lasting less than two months-Identifying women in need of targeted breastfeeding support2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 6, e0179402Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Breastfeeding rates in Sweden are declining, and it is important to identify women at risk for early cessation of exclusive breastfeeding.

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate factors associated with exclusive breastfeeding lasting less than two months postpartum.

    Methods: A population-based longitudinal study was conducted at Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden. Six hundred and seventy-nine women were included in this sub-study. Questionnaires were sent at five days, six weeks and six months postpartum, including questions on breastfeeding initiation and duration as well as several other background variables. The main outcome measure was exclusive breastfeeding lasting less than two months postpartum. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used in order to calculate adjusted Odds Ratios (AOR) and 95% Confidence Intervals (95% CI).

    Results: Seventy-seven percent of the women reported exclusive breastfeeding at two months postpartum. The following variables in the multivariate regression analysis were independently associated with exclusive breastfeeding lasting less than two months postpartum: being a first time mother (AOR 2.15, 95% CI 1.32 +/- 3.49), reporting emotional distress during pregnancy (AOR 2.21, 95% CI 1.35 +/- 3.62) and giving birth by cesarean section (AOR 2.63, 95% CI 1.34 +/- 5.17).

    Conclusions: Factors associated with shorter exclusive breastfeeding duration were determined. Identification of women experiencing emotional distress during pregnancy, as well as scrutiny of caregiving routines on cesarean section need to be addressed, in order to give individual targeted breastfeeding support and promote longer breastfeeding duration.

  • Yang, Xiao
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Theory. Yanshan Univ, Coll Civil Engn & Mech, Qin Huangdao 066004, Hebei, Peoples R China..
    Li, Huijian
    Yanshan Univ, Coll Civil Engn & Mech, Qin Huangdao 066004, Hebei, Peoples R China..
    Ahuja, Rajeev
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Theory. Royal Inst Technol KTH, Dept Mat & Engn, S-10044 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kang, Taewon
    Dongguk Univ, Nano Informat Technol Acad, Seoul 100715, South Korea..
    Luo, Wei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Theory. Dongguk Univ, Nano Informat Technol Acad, Seoul 100715, South Korea..
    Formation and electronic properties of palladium hydrides and palladium-rhodium dihydride alloys under pressure2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, 3520Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present the formation possibility for Pd-hydrides and Pd-Rh hydrides system by density functional theory (DFT) in high pressure upto 50 GPa. Calculation confirmed that PdH2 in face-centered cubic (fcc) structure is not stable under compression that will decomposition to fcc-PdH and H-2. But it can be formed under high pressure while the palladium is involved in the reaction. We also indicate a probably reason why PdH2 can not be synthesised in experiment due to PdH is most favourite to be formed in Pd and H-2 environment from ambient to higher pressure. With Rh doped, the Pd-Rh dihydrides are stabilized in fcc structure for 25% and 75% doping and in tetragonal structure for 50% doping, and can be formed from Pd, Rh and H-2 at high pressure. The electronic structural study on fcc type PdxRh1-xH2 indicates the electronic and structural transition from metallic to semi-metallic as Pd increased from x = 0 to 1.

  • Eivindson, Espen
    et al.
    Oslo and Akershus University College, Norway.
    Innvær, Berner E.
    Oslo and Akershus University College, Norway.
    Kolberg, Elisabeth
    Oslo and Akershus University College, Norway.
    Merschbrock, Christoph
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Civil Engineeering and Lighting Science. Oslo and Akershus University College, Norway.
    Rolfsen, Christian Nordahl
    Oslo and Akershus University College, Norway.
    Inefficiencies in Norwegian small-scale construction, or the problem of too long trucks?2017In: Procedia Engineering, Elsevier, 2017, Vol. 196, 543-549 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    “When the truck arrived at the construction site it could not unload the material because it [the truck] was too long, we had to send it away […], this happens all the time in Oslo where we have to build on very small plots.” (Carpenter, Oslo). As the quote illustrates, inefficiencies and resulting low productivity remain a challenge for today’s small construction businesses. While the reasons for inefficiencies are not completely understood, various techniques for project planning and control have proven their practical value in mitigating them. Lean construction has been articulated as one of the concepts that can solve inefficiency problems. The national initiative “Lean construction Norway” initiated by government, academia, and industry, seeks to diffuse lean production principles in the construction industry. However, small to medium sized contractors remain largely excluded from the innovative practices. This article sets out to study what a small Norwegian contractor enforcing lean concepts in addressing construction inefficienciesmay gain. Ingrained in the concept of muda we exemplify waste related to waiting, overproduction, defects, inventory, motion, over processing, and transporting. We ran a case study in a small industry standard type of residential project executed by a small contractor. Data were collected based on a series of qualitative interviews conducted with the on-site personnel. The findings illustrate a variety of inefficiencies resulting in low productivity. We expect that management inspired by lean principles in conjunction with modern planning methods such as building information modelling may improve project delivery in Norwegian small-scale construction.

  • Bojner Horwitz, Eva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine. Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Ctr Social Sustainabil, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Grape Viding, Christina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Rydwik, Elisabeth
    Karolinska Inst, Div Physiotherapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Solna, Sweden.;Stockholm Cty Council, Acad Primary Care Ctr, CEFAM, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Huss, Ephrat
    Ben Gurion Univ Negev, Charlotte B & Jack J Spitzer Dept Social Work, Beer Sheva, Israel..
    Arts as an ecological method to enhance quality of work experience of healthcare staff: a phenomenological-hermeneutic study2017In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 12, no 1, 1333898Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the impact of self-chosen arts-based recreational activities, as opposed to the traditional arts therapy activities, on the well-being of healthcare providers. Three qualitative case studies of programs in which arts-based activities were used to work with healthcare providers, lasting for 10 weeks each, are phenomenological-hermeneutically evaluated using interviews and focus groups. The findings show what we refer to as an "ecological" ripple of effects: (1) the arts-based activities helped to reduce individual stress and to enhance mood over time, (2) the activities helped to transform workplace relationships within wards, and (3) the arts humanized the overall work climate in the healthcare setting. These effects go beyond those of using the art production as a strategy for stress reduction and imply potential for a more encompassing role for the arts within healthcare.

  • Public defence: 2017-09-29 13:00 Hall C, Kista
    Ivanov, Ruslan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Optics and Photonics, OFO.
    Impact of carrier localization on recombination in InGaN quantum wells with nonbasal crystallographic orientations2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The modern InGaN technology demonstrates high efficiencies only in the blue spectral region and low current operation modes. The growth of InGaN quantum wells (QWs) on nonbasal crystallographic planes (NBP) has potential to deliver high-power blue and green light emitting diodes and lasers. The emission properties of these QWs are largely determined by the localization of carriers in the minima of spatially inhomogeneous band potential, which affects the recombination dynamics, spectral characteristics of the emission, its optical polarization and carrier transport. Understanding it is crucial for increasing the efficiency of NBP structures to their theoretical limit.

    In this thesis, the influence of carrier localization on the critical aspects of light emission has been investigated in semipolar  and nonpolar  InGaN QWs. For this purpose, novel multimode scanning near-field optical microscopy configurations have been developed, allowing mapping of the spectrally-, time-, and polarization-resolved emission.

    In the nonpolar QW structures the sub-micrometer band gap fluctuations could be assigned to the selective incorporation of indium on different slopes of the undulations, while in the smoother semipolar QWs – to the nonuniformity of QW growth. The nanoscale band potential fluctuations and the carrier localization were found to increase with increasing indium percentage in the InGaN alloy. In spite to the large depth of the potential minima, the localized valence band states were found to retain properties of the corresponding bands. The reduced carrier transfer between localization sites has been suggested as a reason for the long recombination times in the green-emitting semipolar QWs. Sharp increase of the radiative lifetimes has been assigned to the effect of nanoscale electric fields resulting from nonplanar QW interfaces. Lastly, the ambipolar carrier diffusion has been measured, revealing ~100 nm diffusion length and high anisotropy.

  • Public defence: 2017-10-23 10:00 F3, Stockholm
    Walbrühl, Martin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    ICME guided development of cemented carbides with alternative binder systems2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of alternative binder systems for tungsten carbide (WC) based cemented carbides has again become of relevance due to possible changes in EU regulations regarding the use of Cobalt (Co). A framework for the ICME (Integrated Computational Materials Engineering) based Materials Design is presented to accelerate the development of alternative binder systems.           Part one of this work deals with the design of the cemented carbide composite hardness. It has been shown that the intrinsic binder hardness is comparable to a bulk metal alloy and that based on the binder solubilities a solid solution strengthening model developed in this work can be employed. Using a method presented in this work the non-equilibrium, frozen-in binder solubilities can be obtained. Both the design of the binder phase and composite hardness is presented based on a general Materials Design approach.        Part two deals with a multiscale approach to model the surface gradient formation. The experimentally missing data on liquid binder diffusion has been calculated using AIMD (Ab initio Molecular Dynamics). The diffusion through the liquid cemented carbide binder has to be reduced to an effective diffusion value due to the solid carbides acting as obstacles that increase the diffusion path. The geometrical reduction of the diffusion has been investigated experimentally using the SIMS (secondary ion mass spectroscopy) technique in WC-Nickel-58Nickel diffusion couples. The geometrical contribution of the so-called labyrinth factor has been proven by the combination of the experiments and in conjunction with DICTRA simulations using the precise liquid AIMD diffusivities. Unfortunately, despite the improved kinetic database and the geometrical diffusion reduction, the surface gradient formation cannot be explained satisfactory in complex cemented carbide grades. Additional, but so far unidentified, contributions have to be considered to predict the surface gradient thickness.

  • Public defence: 2017-10-19 13:15 L111, Sundsvall
    Klareld, Ann-Sofie
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Systems and Technology.
    Closer Together or Further Apart?: Public administration and archives in the digital age2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The research presented in this thesis is about recordkeeping in the public sector, focusing especially on the relationship between the public administration and its archives, and selected aspects affecting the way this relationship is developing in the digital era. Two research questions are addressed: RQ1: What are ‘archives’ and ‘recordkeeping’ in the digital context and the developing e-government? RQ2: What are the indications of current and future challenges regarding the cooperation between public administration and archives? Six studies resulting in six papers form the basis of the thesis. Each study explores a unique aspect of how current developments, discussions, and decisions affect contemporary understanding and practices regarding archives and recordkeeping. Public records are authoritative information resources, crucial in the everyday lives of citizens. Public recordkeeping develops continuously alongside administrative practices, technological achievements, and political goals. Examples include the development of shared services within the public sector and the involvement of the private sector in public infrastructure projects through outsourcing. These processes are currently affected both by digital technologies, which offer new possibilities to create, use, and preserve records, and by e-government, characterized by the combination of information and communication technologies with organizational change to improve public services and democratic participation. In these processes, existing practices are reviewed and revised, and the concepts of ‘archives’ and ‘recordkeeping’ redefined. The research was pursued using an interpretive approach. The research methods used were concept analysis; discourse analysis; literary warrant analysis; phenomenography; critical theory; and the records continuum model as a theoretical structure. The results shows that common usage of the terms ‘archive’ and ‘recordkeeping’ is fluid and changing, which can make decision-making challenging and affect the relationship between archives and administration. Efforts to develop recordkeeping strategies may be hampered by factors related to the different ways in which the nature and role of archives and recordkeeping are perceived, including differing understandings of related concepts; varying discourses on what an archive (or e-archive) is or should be, and different ways of interpreting legal frameworks and their significance.

  • Wallert, John
    et al.
    Tomasoni, Mattia
    Madison, Guy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Held, Claes
    Predicting two-year survival versus non-survival after first myocardial infarction using machine learning and Swedish national register data2017In: BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making, ISSN 1472-6947, E-ISSN 1472-6947, Vol. 17, 99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Machine learning algorithms hold potential for improved prediction of all-cause mortality in cardiovascular patients, yet have not previously been developed with high-quality population data. This study compared four popular machine learning algorithms trained on unselected, nation-wide population data from Sweden to solve the binary classification problem of predicting survival versus non-survival 2 years after first myocardial infarction (MI). Methods: This prospective national registry study for prognostic accuracy validation of predictive models used data from 51,943 complete first MI cases as registered during 6 years (2006-2011) in the national quality register SWEDEHEART/RIKS-HIA (90% coverage of all MIs in Sweden) with follow-up in the Cause of Death register (> 99% coverage). Primary outcome was AUROC (C-statistic) performance of each model on the untouched test set (40% of cases) after model development on the training set (60% of cases) with the full (39) predictor set. Model AUROCs were bootstrapped and compared, correcting the P-values for multiple comparisons with the Bonferroni method. Secondary outcomes were derived when varying sample size (1-100% of total) and predictor sets (39, 10, and 5) for each model. Analyses were repeated on 79,869 completed cases after multivariable imputation of predictors. Results: A Support Vector Machine with a radial basis kernel developed on 39 predictors had the highest complete cases performance on the test set (AUROC = 0.845, PPV = 0.280, NPV = 0.966) outperforming Boosted C5.0 (0.845 vs. 0. 841, P = 0.028) but not significantly higher than Logistic Regression or Random Forest. Models converged to the point of algorithm indifference with increased sample size and predictors. Using the top five predictors also produced good classifiers. Imputed analyses had slightly higher performance. Conclusions: Improved mortality prediction at hospital discharge after first MI is important for identifying high-risk individuals eligible for intensified treatment and care. All models performed accurately and similarly and because of the superior national coverage, the best model can potentially be used to better differentiate new patients, allowing for improved targeting of limited resources. Future research should focus on further model development and investigate possibilities for implementation.

  • Karlsson, Viktor
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Building Technology.
    Wärnelöv, Morgan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Building Technology.
    Dorn, Michael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Building Technology.
    Östman, Birgit
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Building Technology.
    Brandpåverkan på lastbärande trä-glasväggar2017In: Bygg & teknik, ISSN 0281-658X, Vol. 109, no 6, 44-47 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Glas har flera av de egenskaper som eftersöks hos ett bärande material: hög styvhet, hög hållfasthet - och är dessutom transparant! Tillsammans med rätt lim och en träram bildas väggar som klarar stora laster. Linnéuniversitetet i Växjö har forskat inom detta ämne och gjort många tester på glasväggar. Resultaten visar att en bärande glasvägg kan ha lastkapacitet för att klara en bostadslast för 3-4 våningar. Nu har möjligheterna att även klara brandkraven undersökts i ett examensarbete.

  • Norin, Lars
    et al.
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    Devasthale, Abhay
    SMHI, Research Department, Atmospheric remote sensing.
    L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.
    The sensitivity of snowfall to weather states over Sweden2017In: Atmospheric Measurement Techniques, ISSN 1867-1381, E-ISSN 1867-8548, Vol. 10, no 9, 3249-3263 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • Colette, Augustin
    et al.
    Andersson, Camilla
    SMHI, Research Department, Air quality.
    Manders, Astrid
    Mar, Kathleen
    Mircea, Mihaela
    Pay, Maria-Teresa
    Raffort, Valentin
    Tsyro, Svetlana
    Cuvelier, Cornelius
    Adani, Mario
    Bessagnet, Bertrand
    Bergström, Robert
    SMHI, Research Department, Air quality.
    Briganti, Gino
    Butler, Tim
    Cappelletti, Andrea
    Couvidat, Florian
    D'Isidoro, Massimo
    Doumbia, Thierno
    Fagerli, Hilde
    Granier, Claire
    Heyes, Chris
    Klimont, Zig
    Ojha, Narendra
    Otero, Noelia
    Schaap, Martijn
    Sindelarova, Katarina
    Stegehuis, Annemiek I.
    Roustan, Yelva
    Vautard, Robert
    van Meijgaard, Erik
    Vivanco, Marta Garcia
    Wind, Peter
    EURODELTA-Trends, a multi-model experiment of air quality hindcast in Europe over 1990-20102017In: Geoscientific Model Development, ISSN 1991-959X, E-ISSN 1991-9603, Vol. 10, no 9, 3255-3276 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • Tärnlund, Sten-Åke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    P is not equal to NP2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    SAT  is not in  P  is proved, in a first-order theory, with a new single finite axiom of Turing's theory of computing. So, P  is not equal to NP.

  • Public defence: 2017-10-10 10:00 Hörsal G, Humanisthuset, Umeå
    Fowler, Philip
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Methods for improving covariate balance in observational studies2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis contributes to the field of causal inference, where the main interest is to estimate the effect of a treatment on some outcome. At its core, causal inference is an exercise in controlling for imbalance (differences) in covariate distributions between the treated and the controls, as such imbalances otherwise can bias estimates of causal effects. Imbalance on observed covariates can be handled through matching, where treated and controls with similar covariate distributions are extracted from a data set and then used to estimate the effect of a treatment.

    The first paper of this thesis describes and investigates a matching design, where a data-driven algorithm is used to discretise a covariate before matching. The paper also gives sufficient conditions for if, and how, a covariate can be discretised without introducing bias.

    Balance is needed for unobserved covariates too, but is more difficult to achieve and verify. Unobserved covariates are sometimes replaced with correlated counterparts, usually referred to as proxy variables. However, just replacing an unobserved covariate with a correlated one does not guarantee an elimination of, or even reduction of, bias. In the second paper we formalise proxy variables in a causal inference framework and give sufficient conditions for when they lead to nonparametric identification of causal effects.

    The third and fourth papers both concern estimating the effect an enhanced cooperation between the Swedish Social Insurance Agency and the Public Employment Service has on reducing sick leave. The third paper is a study protocol, where the matching design used to estimate this effect is described. The matching was then also carried out in the study protocol, before the outcome for the treated was available, ensuring that the matching design was not influenced by any estimated causal effects. The third paper also presents a potential proxy variable for unobserved covariates, that is used as part of the matching. The fourth paper then carries out the analysis described in the third paper, and uses an instrumental variable approach to test for unobserved confounding not captured by the supposed proxy variable.

  • Iddris, Faisal
    Halmstad University, School of Business, Engineering and Science, Centre for Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Learning Research (CIEL).
    Examining the Research output of Lecturers in Selected Public Universities in Ghana2017In: 1st International Conference on Competency-Based Training and Research / [ed] Reynolds Okai, 2017, 208-215 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study has been to examine the research output of lecturers in public universities in Ghana. A systematic literature review (SLR) was thus conducted to examine (a) productive researchers (b) subject area that attracts more research and (c) the type of research outlets for the teaching staff.  Scopus electronic database was searched using the keywords; “University of Education winneba”, “Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology”, “University of Cape Coast” and “University of Ghana, Legon”. Peer-reviewed articles written in English language were considered for the study. The analysis revealed that medicine, agricultural, biological sciences and environmental science contributed to 49% out of 27 subject areas analysed. The conclusion is that researchers in other fields of study need to increase their research output. In addition, As expected the analysis revealed that article constituted the largest type of publication (6477 papers, 85%)  and conference paper constitutes the fourth largest publication (243 papers, 3 %). The conclusion is that there is need for more conference paper presentation. Attending conference enables networking, collaborative research, and access to new knowledge, research topics and trends in a particular field of study. The general trend in number of publications indicates that publications from the four universities have been on the increase since 2003.

  • Gustavsson, Karin
    Expeditioner i det förflutna: etnologiska fältarbeten och försvinnande allmogekultur under 1900-talets början2014Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • Lange, Ulrich
    Ladugården: om lantbrukets bebyggelse och arkitektur 1600-20002011Book (Other academic)
  • Bett, Bernard
    et al.
    Int Livestock Res Inst, Nairobi, Kenya..
    Said, Mohammed Y.
    Int Livestock Res Inst, Nairobi, Kenya..
    Sang, Rosemary
    Kenya Govt Med Res Ctr, Nairobi, Kenya..
    Bukachi, Salome
    Univ Nairobi, Inst Anthropol Gender & African Studies, Nairobi, Kenya..
    Wanyoike, Salome
    Minist Agr, Dept Vet Serv, Nairobi, Kenya..
    Kifugo, Shem C.
    Int Livestock Res Inst, Nairobi, Kenya..
    Otieno, Fredrick
    Int Livestock Res Inst, Nairobi, Kenya..
    Ontiri, Enoch
    Int Livestock Res Inst, Nairobi, Kenya..
    Njeru, Ian
    Kenyatta Natl Hosp, Minist Publ Hlth & Sanitat, Div Dis Surveillance & Response, Nairobi, Kenya..
    Lindahl, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Int Livestock Res Inst, Nairobi, Kenya.;Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Clin Sci, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Grace, Delia
    Int Livestock Res Inst, Nairobi, Kenya..
    Effects of flood irrigation on the risk of selected zoonotic pathogens in an arid and semi-arid area in the eastern Kenya2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 5, e0172626Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To investigate the effects of irrigation on land cover changes and the risk of selected zoonotic pathogens, we carried out a study in irrigated, pastoral and riverine areas in the eastern Kenya. Activities implemented included secondary data analyses to determine land use and land cover (LULC) changes as well as human, livestock and wildlife population trends; entomological surveys to characterize mosquitoes population densities and species distribution by habitat and season; and serological surveys in people to determine the risk of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), West Nile fever virus (WNV), dengue fever virus (DFV), Leptospira spp. and Brucella spp. Results demonstrate a drastic decline in vegetation cover over R approximate to 25 years particularly in the irrigated areas where cropland increased by about 1,400% and non-farm land (under closed trees, open to closed herbaceous vegetation, bushlands and open trees) reduced by 30-100%. The irrigated areas had high densities of Aedes mcintoshi, Culexspp. and Mansonia spp. (important vectors for multiple arboviruses) during the wet and dry season while pastoral areas had high densities of Ae. tricholabis specifically in the wet season. The seroprevalences of RVFV, WNV and DFV were higher in the irrigated compared to the pastoral areas while those for Leptospira spp and Brucella spp. were higher in the pastoral compared to the irrigated areas. It is likely that people in the pastoral areas get exposed to Leptospira spp by using water fetched from reservoirs that are shared with livestock and wildlife, and to Brucella spp. by consuming raw or partially cooked animal source foods such as milk and meat. This study suggests that irrigation increases the risk of mosquito-borne infections while at the same time providing a protective effect against zoonotic pathogens that thrive in areas with high livestock population densities.

  • De Widt, Dennis
    University of Exeter.
    DUTCH HORIZONTAL MONITORING: The Handicap of a Head Start2017Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This report outlines the Dutch model of Horizontal Monitoring (HM), which is widely regarded as one of the first examples of a cooperative compliance program. It describes how, since 2005, the Netherlands Tax and Customs Administration (NTCA) developed a monitoring regime that has significantly altered the relationship between the Dutch tax authority and corporate taxpayers. The report demonstrates that under HM the attitude of both corporates and tax administrators has shifted from an adversarial ‘them and us’ relationship, to one stronger characterised by cooperation. Despite the widely identified benefits of HM, including increased ability of corporates to acquire fiscal certainty, the monitoring regime faces major challenges. It has proven particularly difficult to quantify the model’s impact on revenue collection and the tax authority’s administrative resources. The report concludes that if HM is to subsist, it is vital to increase formalisation and transparency of the risk monitoring techniques as applied by the tax authority, and develop more advanced metrics than have been available hitherto.

  • Public defence: 2017-09-29 13:00 Belladonna, ing 76/78, Linköping
    Wennerholm, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Risks for cardiovascular disease in middle-aged women in different social environments2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The importance of the social environment and human life conditions for public health was early recognized in community medicine. Despite major reductions in recent decades, cardiovascular diseases (CVD) is one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity for both genders in all European countries. 

    Aim: The overall aim of this thesis was to increase our knowledge of factors in the social environment and of individual psychosocial factors that could explain why some women in working ages are affected by cardiovascular diseases.

    Methods: The Swedish sample comes from the urban population in two major cities in a region in the south-east of Sweden, the Twin cities. According to their social history they could be labelled a “blue-collar” and a “white-collar” city. Cardiovascular morbidity data in all papers for the Twin cities was derived from a computerized population-based administrative Health Care Register (HCR). In Paper IV, we made a comparative study between Sweden and Scotland, the Scottish data comes from the Scottish Health Survey.

    Results: In Paper I, the cumulative incidence of different cardiovascular diagnoses for younger and also elderly men and women were significantly higher in the population of the blue collar city in all ages and for both sexes. The qualitative interviews of women after an MI, in Paper II, the findings revealed a broad picture of social factors, life circumstances, personalities and, not least, psychosocial factors that are important to middle-aged women who have suffered an MI. Paper III demonstrated that women with a high level of the personality trait “being a Good Girl” reported significantly more psychosocial risk factors for CVD and more commonly report chest pain without seeking medical care, no increased incidence for various CVD-diagnoses were found. The comparative study (Paper IV) clearly showed that Scottish middle-aged women are – relative to Swedish women - particularly affected by a worse profile of CVD risks, even after adjustment for education.  

    Conclusions: The social environment is of importance for cardiovascular risks and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This has been shown in Swedish Twin cities context and also in comparative studies between Swedish and Scottish women. The thesis gives strong implications for an upstream public health approach initiating long-term community intervention program in the blue collar city and among Scottish middle-aged women.

  • Wennerholm, Carina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bromley, Catherine
    Public Health Observatory Division, NHS Health Scotland, Edinburgh, UK..
    Johansson, AnnaKarin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Frank, John
    Scottish Collaboration of Public Health Research & Policy (SCPHRP); Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences and Informatics, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.
    Faresjö, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Two tales of cardiovascular risks-middle-aged women living in Sweden and Scotland: a cross-sectional comparative study.2017In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 7, no 8, e016527Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To compare cardiovascular risk factors as well as rates of cardiovascular diseases in middle-aged women from urban areas in Scotland and Sweden.

    DESIGN: Comparative cross-sectional study.

    SETTING: Data from the general population in urban areas of Scotland and the general population in two major Swedish cities in southeast Sweden, south of Stockholm.

    PARTICIPANTS: Comparable data of middle-aged women (40-65 years) from the Scottish Health Survey (n=6250) and the Swedish QWIN study (n=741) were merged together into a new dataset (n=6991 participants).

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: We compared middle-aged women in urban areas in Sweden and Scotland regarding risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD), CVD diagnosis, anthropometrics, psychological distress and lifestyle.

    RESULTS: In almost all measurements, there were significant differences between the countries, favouring the Swedish women. Scottish women demonstrated a higher frequency of alcohol consumption, smoking, obesity, low vegetable consumption, a sedentary lifestyle and also more psychological distress. For doctor-diagnosed coronary heart disease, there were also significant differences, with a higher prevalence among the Scottish women.

    CONCLUSIONS: This is one of the first studies that clearly shows that Scottish middle-aged women are particularly affected by a worse profile of CVD risks. The profound differences in CVD risk and outcome frequency in the two populations are likely to have arisen from differences in the two groups of women's social, cultural, political and economic environments.

  • Bergh, Daniel
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Centre for Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Health. Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies.
    School Pressure, Family Relationships and psycho-somatic health complaints: are the associations similar for boys and girls?2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In adolescence, the experiences of psychosomatic health complaints emerge among some students. During later parts of adolescence (14-16 years old), differences between girls and boys have been observed. Adolescents spend a considerable amount of their time in school, but still the family is very influential. In order to improve adolescent psychosomatic health, it is important to rule out how different factors influence health for different groups of adolescents.To analyze the associations between school pressure, family relationships and psychosomatic health complaints among Swedish adolescents. A specific objective is to rule out whether the associations are similar for boys and girls i.e. to investigate potential statistical interaction effects by sex.This study is based on HBSC data collected in 2013/14 among Swedish adolescents. Statistical analysis was conducted using linear regression analysis (OLS) and multinomial logistic regression.Tentative results indicate that there are strong connections between students’ experiences of school pressure (risk factor), as well as family relationships (protective factor), and psychosomatic complaints (psychological, somatic and psychosomatic). However, it is important to recognize that the associations may work differently for girls and boys.In order to be able to improve the health of adolescents, it may be necessary to rule out the influence of different factors on psychosomatic health, and if this influence is similar for different groups of adolescents.

  • van Vliet, Philine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, FREIA. University of Amsterdam.
    Simulations of the Electron Current Spectrometer Setup in Geant4: Exploring the Physics Limitations of Compact High Gradient Accelerating Structures2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The high field gradient of 100 MV/m that will be applied to the accelerator cavities of the CompactLinear Collider (CLIC), gives rise to the problem of RF breakdowns. The eld collapses and a plasmaof electrons and ions is being formed in the cavity, preventing the RF field from penetrating the cavity. Electrons in the plasma are being accelerated and ejected out, resulting in a breakdown current up to a few Amperes, measured outside the cavities. These breakdowns lead to luminosity loss, so reducing their amount is of great importance. For this, a better understanding of the physics behind RF breakdowns is needed. To study these breakdowns, the XBox 2 test facility has a spectrometer setup installed after the RF cavity that is being conditioned. For this report, a simulation of this spectrometer setup has been made using Geant4. Once a detailed simulation of the RF eld and cavity has been made, it canbe connected to this simulation of the spectrometer setup and used to recreate the data that has been collected at XBox 2, before and after a breakdown has occured. In this way, we hope to be able to look further into the RF breakdowns occuring in high field gradient accelerator structures.

  • Olusoga, Peter
    et al.
    Sheffield Hallam University.
    Kenttä, Göran
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Desperate to Quit: A Narrative Analysis of Burnout and Recovery in High-Performance Sports Coaching.2017In: The Sport psychologist, ISSN 0888-4781, E-ISSN 1543-2793, Vol. 31, no 3, 237-248 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated how the experiences of two elite coaches contributed to and shaped their stories of burnout and withdrawal from high performance coaching. The coaches whose narratives we explore were both middle-aged head coaches, one in a major team sport at the highest club level, and one in an individual Olympic sport at international level. Through a thematic narrative analysis, based on in-depth interviews, the stories of the two coaches are presented in four distinct sections: antecedents, experiences of coaching with burnout symptoms, withdrawal from sport, and the process of recovery and personal growth. These narratives have implications for high performance coaching, such as the importance of role clarity, work-home interference, counseling, mentoring, and social support as means to facilitate recovery, and the need for additional research with coaches who have left sport, to gain a more comprehensive understanding of the complete burnout-recovery process.

  • Kivimäki, Mika
    et al.
    Nyberg, Solja T.
    Batty, G. David
    Kawachi, Ichiro
    Jokela, Markus
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Bjorner, Jakob B
    Borritz, Marianne
    Burr, Hermann
    Dragano, Nico
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ, Dep. of Natural Science and Biomedicine. Jönköping University, School of Health and Welfare, HHJ. ADULT.
    Heikkilä, Katriina
    Knutsson, Anders
    Koskenvuo, Markku
    Kumari, Meena
    Madsen, Ida E H
    Nielsen, Martin L.
    Nordin, Maria
    Oksanen, Tuula
    Pejtersen, Jan H
    Pentti, Jaana
    Rugulies, Reiner
    Salo, Paula
    Shipley, Martin J
    Suominen, Sakari
    Theorell, Töres
    Vahtera, Jussi
    Westerholm, Peter
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Steptoe, Andrew
    Singh-Manoux, Archana
    Hamer, Mark
    Ferrie, Jane E
    Virtanen, Marianna
    Tabak, Adam G
    Long working hours as a risk factor for atrial fibrillation: a multi-cohort study2017In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 38, no 34, 2621-2628 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Studies suggest that people who work long hours are at increased risk of stroke, but the association of long working hours with atrial fibrillation, the most common cardiac arrhythmia and a risk factor for stroke, is unknown. We examined the risk of atrial fibrillation in individuals working long hours (≥55 per week) and those working standard 35-40 h/week.

    Methods and results: In this prospective multi-cohort study from the Individual-Participant-Data Meta-analysis in Working Populations (IPD-Work) Consortium, the study population was 85 494 working men and women (mean age 43.4 years) with no recorded atrial fibrillation. Working hours were assessed at study baseline (1991-2004). Mean follow-up for incident atrial fibrillation was 10 years and cases were defined using data on electrocardiograms, hospital records, drug reimbursement registers, and death certificates. We identified 1061 new cases of atrial fibrillation (10-year cumulative incidence 12.4 per 1000). After adjustment for age, sex and socioeconomic status, individuals working long hours had a 1.4-fold increased risk of atrial fibrillation compared with those working standard hours (hazard ratio = 1.42, 95% CI = 1.13-1.80, P = 0.003). There was no significant heterogeneity between the cohort-specific effect estimates (I2 = 0%, P = 0.66) and the finding remained after excluding participants with coronary heart disease or stroke at baseline or during the follow-up (N = 2006, hazard ratio = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.05-1.76, P = 0.0180). Adjustment for potential confounding factors, such as obesity, risky alcohol use and high blood pressure, had little impact on this association.

    Conclusion: Individuals who worked long hours were more likely to develop atrial fibrillation than those working standard hours.

  • Hartig, Olaf
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Foundations of RDF* and SPARQL*: (An Alternative Approach to Statement-Level Metadata in RDF)2017In: Proceedings of the 11th Alberto Mendelzon International Workshop on Foundations of Data Management and the Web 2017 / [ed] Juan Reutter, Divesh Srivastava, Juan Reutter, Divesh Srivastava , 2017, Vol. 1912, 12Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The standard approach to annotate statements in RDF with metadatahas a number of shortcomings including data size blow-up and unnecessarilycomplicated queries. We propose an alternative approach that is based on nestingof RDF triples and of query patterns. The approach allows for a more compactrepresentation of data and queries, and it is backwards compatible with the standard.In this paper we present the formal foundations of our proposal and ofdifferent approaches to implement it. More specifically, we formally capture thenecessary extensions of the RDF data model and its query language SPARQL,and we define mappings based on which our extended notions can be convertedback to ordinary RDF and SPARQL. Additionally, for such type of mappings wedefine two desirable properties, information preservation and query result equivalence,and we show that the introduced mappings possess these properties.

  • Public defence: 2017-10-09 10:00 Sal F3, Stockholm
    Poppi, Stefano
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Solar heat pump systems for heating applications: Analysis of system performance and possible solutions for improving system performance2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Solar heat pump systems (SHPs) are systems that combine solar energy and heat pumps. SHPs have been investigated for several decades and have been proven to increase the share of renewable energy and reduce electric energy demand in residential heating applications. Many solar thermal heat pump systems have become market-available in recent years; however these systems are still not widely employed in the residential sector. This is due mainly to the high initial costs (investment and installation costs) of solar thermal heat pump systems, which limits their cost-effectiveness. Enhancing cost-effectiveness of solar thermal heat pump systems is necessary for a more effective and broader market penetration.

    In this thesis, solar thermal and photovoltaic systems combined with heat pumps for heating applications are treated. The overall aims of the thesis are to: 1) investigate techno-economics of SHPs and 2) investigate possible solutions for improving system performance of a reference solar thermal and heat pump system for residential heating applications.

    In the first part of the thesis, the influence of climatic boundary conditions on economic performance of SHPs has been investigated by means of: a) an economic comparison of SHPs found in the relevant literature and b) system simulations of the reference solar thermal heat pump system.

    In the second part of the thesis, potential solutions for improving system performance of the reference solar thermal heat pump system with limited change in system’ costs are investigated. A systematic approach was used for investigating cost-effectiveness of the system improvements in the reference system.

    Based on results of the cost-effectiveness analysis, some of the investigated system improvements were chosen for being included in the design of a novel solar thermal and air source heat pump system concept. The novel system was designed for a house standard with relatively high operating temperatures (55°C/45°C) in the space heating distribution system and for high space heating demand (123 kWh/m2·year). Finally, the thesis ends with a cost-effectiveness analysis of the novel system.

  • Public defence: 2017-10-13 10:00 Kollegiesalen, Stockholm
    Bastian, Anne
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science.
    Explaining Trends in Car Use2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Many western countries have seen a plateau and subsequent decline in car travel during the early 21st century. What has generated particular interest and debate is the claim that the development cannot only be explained by changes in traditional explanatory factors such as GDP, fuel prices and land-use. Instead, it has been argued, the observed trends are indications of substantial changes in lifestyles, preferences and attitudes to car travel and thus, not just a temporary plateau but a true peak in car use.

    This thesis is a compilation of five papers, studying the issue on a national, international, regional and city scale through quantitative analysis of aggregate administrative data and individual travel survey data. It concludes that the aggregate development of car travel per capita can be explained fairly well with the traditional model variables GDP and fuel price. Furthermore, this thesis shows that spatial context and policy become increasingly important in car use trends: car use diverges over time between city, suburban and rural residents of Sweden and other European countries, while gender and to some extent income become less differentiating for car use.

  • Public defence: 2017-10-12 13:00 Magnélisalen, Kemiska övningslaboratoriet, Stockholm
    Abdelhamid, Hani Nasser
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Lanthanide Metal-Organic Frameworks and Hierarchical Porous Zeolitic Imidazolate Frameworks: Synthesis, Properties, and Applications2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis presents the synthesis, properties, and applications of two important classes of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs); lanthanide MOFs and hierarchical porous zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs). The materials have been characterized using a wide range of techniques including diffraction, imaging, various spectroscopic techniques, gas sorption, dynamical light scattering (DLS) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA).

    In Chapter 1, the unique features of MOFs and ZIFs as well as their potential applications are summarized. In Chapter 2, different characterization techniques are presented.

    Chapter 3 describes a family of new isoreticular lanthanide MOFs synthesized using tri-topic linkers of different sizes, H3L1-H3L4, denoted SUMOF-7I-IV (Ln) (SU; Stockholm University, Ln = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu and Gd, Paper I). The SUMOF-7I-III (Ln) contain permanent pores and exhibit exceptionally high thermal and chemical stability. The luminescence properties of SUMOF-7IIs are reported (Paper II). The influences of Ln ions and the tri-topic linkers as well as solvent molecules on the luminescence properties are investigated. Furthermore, the potential of SUMOF-7II (La) for selective sensing of Fe (III) ions and the amino acid tryptophan is demonstrated (Paper III). 

    Chapter 4 presents a simple, fast and scalable approach for the synthesis of hierarchical porous zeolitic imidazolate framework ZIF-8 and ZIF-67 using triethylamine (TEA)-assisted approach (Paper IV). Organic dye molecules and proteins are encapsulated directly into the ZIFs using the one-pot method. The photophysical properties of the dyes are improved through the encapsulation into ZIF-8 nanoparticles (Paper IV). The porosity and surface area of the ZIF materials can be tuned using the different amounts of dye or TEA. To further simplify the synthesis of hierarchical porous ZIF-8, a template-free approach is presented using sodium hydroxide, which at low concentrations induces the formation of zinc hydroxide nitrate nanosheets that serve as in situ sacrificial templates (Chapter 5, Paper V). A 2D leaf-like ZIF (ZIF-L) is also obtained using the method. The hierarchical porous ZIF-8 and ZIF-L show good performance for CO2 sorption.

  • Public defence: 2017-10-13 10:00 Magnélisalen, Kemiska övningslaboratoriet, Stockholm
    Ojwang, Dickson Odhiambo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Prussian blue analogue copper hexacyanoferrate: Synthesis, structure characterization and its applications as battery electrode and CO2 adsorbent2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Prussian blue (PB) and Prussian blue analogues (PBAs) are compounds with potential applications in a large variety of fields such as gas storage, poison antidotes, electrochromism, electrochemistry and molecular magnets. The compounds are easy to synthesize, cheap, environmentally friendly and have been pursued for both fundamental research and industrial purposes. Despite the multifunctionality of PB and PBAs, they have complicated compositions, which are largely dependent on the synthesis methods and storage conditions. Thus, performing investigations on such compounds with defined composition, stoichiometry and crystal structure is essential.

    This thesis has focused on synthesis and detailed structure characterization of copper hexacyanoferrate (CuHCF) via X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), neutron powder diffraction (NPD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), Mössbauer spectroscopy, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), infrared (IR) and Raman techniques. In addition, kinetics of thermal dehydration process, CO2 adsorption and CO2 adsorption kinetics were investigated. Moreover, in operando synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments were performed to gain insight into the structure-electrochemistry relationships in an aqueous CuHCF/Zn battery during operation.

  • Public defence: 2017-10-11 13:00 Magnélisalen, Kemiska övningslaboratoriet, Stockholm
    Peng, Fei
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Structure determination of beam sensitive crystals by rotation electron diffraction: the impact of sample cooling2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Electron crystallography is complementary to X-ray crystallography. Single crystal X-ray diffraction requires the size of a crystal to be larger than about 5 × 5 × 5 μm3 while a TEM allows a million times smaller crystals being studied. This advantage of electron crystallography has been used to solve new structures of small crystals. One method which has been used to collect electron diffraction data is rotation electron diffraction (RED) developed at Stockholm University. The RED method combines the goniometer tilt and beam tilt in a TEM to achieve 3D electron diffraction data. Using a high angle tilt sample holder, RED data can be collected to cover a tilt range of up to 140o

    Here the crystal structures of several different compounds have been determined using RED. The structure of needle-like crystals on the surface of NiMH particles was solved as La(OH)2. A structure model of metal-organic layers has been built based on RED data. A 3D MOF structure was solved from RED data. Two halide perovskite structures and two newly synthesized aluminophosphate structures were solved. For those beam sensitive crystals characterized here, sample cooling down to -170oC was used to reduce the beam damage. The low temperature not only reduces electron beam damage, but also keeps the structure more stable in the high vacuum in a TEM and improves the quality of the diffraction data. It is shown that cooling can improve the resolution of diffraction data for MOFs and zeolites, for samples undergoing phase changes at low temperature, the data quality could be worse by cooling. In summary, cooling can improve the ED data quality as long as the low temperature does not trigger structural changes. 

  • Public defence: 2017-10-11 13:00 Stora hörsalen, Naturhistoriska riksmuseet, Stockholm
    Odhammar, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Möten i psykodynamisk barnpsykoterapi: Förväntningar, samspel och förändring2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis aims to increase the knowledge of courses and processes of change prior to and during psychodynamic child psychotherapy with parallel parent contact. The dissertation examines parents’ and psychotherapists’ stated goals and expectations prior to the child’s psychotherapy, processes of change focusing on the psychotherapeutic encounter between child and psychotherapist, and outcome gauged by standardized measures compared to experienced change regarding the child’s problems. This dissertation also wants to examine different instruments for describing the psychotherapeutic process. Data was collected from systematic case studies, at different times during the course of psychotherapy, with material from different sources, such as child psychiatric assessment before and after conducted psychotherapy, questionnaires, and video taping of therapy sessions. By examining the therapeutic encounter from the perspectives of child, parent and psychotherapist, an image of psychotherapy, which illustrates the complexity of the psychotherapeutic process, was created. The thesis is based on three articles: Study I examines parents’ and psychotherapists’ goals and expectations prior to psychotherapy. Study II is a close study of a video-taped individual therapy, in which the interaction between child and therapist is examined with the rating instrument Child Psychotherapy Q-set (CPQ), the psychotherapist’s description of the psychotherapy’s process, and the self-rating instrument Feeling Word Checklist (FWC-24). Study III examines change in global functioning ability after child psychotherapy. By examining several psychotherapies in order to construct qualitative understanding of low and high change, respectively, in rated global functioning, limitations in the rating instrument Children’s Global Assessment Scale (CGAS) are analyzed. The results point to: 1. The need for a culture of cooperation between family and the one conducting the treatment, where goals are formulated together and in accordance with the family’s frame of reference and life experiences, which can increase the possibility of creating positive expectations, and of adapting treatment to the family in question. 2. Different methods of examining psychotherapy reflect and complete the image of the psychotherapy process. 3. The psychotherapy process’s complexity and the difficulty in describing the effect of therapy with simple measurements or remaining psychiatric symptoms. Positive change in several areas, such as the child experiencing increased independence, gets access to more positive affections, has improved self-esteem and a more optimistic idea of the future, could be described as psychological phenomena and can be difficult to encompass with narrow psychiatric terminology. 4. The intersubjectivity between child and psychotherapist appears essential. The therapist’s attitude and interventions are characterized by creating a steady therapeutic framework for exploring the child’s problems. 5.  The importance of the therapist’s meta-competence, i.e., overarching competencies that psychotherapists need to use to guide any intervention, what interventions to use, and when they are suitable. 

  • Mårtensson, Lasse
    Uppsala universitet, Institutionen för nordiska språk.
    Översikten över Háttatal i DG 11 4to: dess funktion och ursprungManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • Mårtensson, Lasse
    Uppsala universitet, Institutionen för nordiska språk.
    Uttal, skriftnorm och förlaga: Att identifiera genomslag från förlagan i medeltida västnordiska handskrifterManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • Svensson, Eva
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences.
    Amundsen, Hilde
    Norwegian Institute for Cultural Heritage Research (NIKU), Oslo, Norway.
    Holm, Ingunn
    Directorate for Cultural Heritage, Oslo, Norway.
    Hulling, Hans
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Political, Historical, Religious and Cultural Studies.
    Johansson, Annie
    County Council, Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Löfgren, Jan
    Värmlandsarkiv, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Pia
    National Historical Museums, Linköping, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Stefan
    Geographica Antiqua, Storfors, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Susanne
    Norwegian Maritime Museum, Oslo, Norway.
    Stensby, Vigdis
    Regional State Archives of Hamar, Hamar, Norway.
    Empowering marginal lifescapes: The heritage of crofters inbetween the past and the present2017In: International Journal of Heritage Studies (IJHS), ISSN 1352-7258, E-ISSN 1470-3610Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a rich, but unacknowledged, heritage of rural subalterns, crofters, in Scandinavia. A Swedish-Norwegian interdisciplinary research-network investigated the most prominent category – the remains of crofts. Due to industrialisation, urbanisation and the modern welfare state, the institution of crofting was abolished, and many crofters left for opportunities elsewhere. The welfare state transformed a landscape of living and working people into a one filled with relicts mostly from the nineteenth century. Although numerous and important to local citizens, these sites fall outside the authorised heritage discourse (AHD) in terms of both research and heritage management. This paper takes an environmental justice perspective to challenge the AHD. Three themes are in focus: (1) bringing out the history of a subaltern and marginalised group of people; (2) promoting crofts as heritage of importance to local citizens and demanding complex management due to the various historical narratives and risks; (3) considering the crofting landscapes in relation to the (economisation) framing of heritage in development processes, especially in relation to fair development in present rural communities.

  • Galli, Raoul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Symboliskt kapital2017In: Nyckelbegrepp i socialantropologin, 42-44 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I Bourdieus konstruktion av begreppet symboliskt kapital ingår ett centralt element som synliggör att det slags fenomen som symboliskt kapital söker ringa in – att någon specifik tillgång eller egenskap igenkänns som värdefull och tillerkänns värde – också väsentligen misskänns (eng. misrecognition) av den aktuella gruppen, som ett av dem själva konstruerat värde. Istället uppfattas den maktform som det uppskattade och värderade ger upphov till, snarare som en fullt legitim-, d.v.s. naturlig, form av kraft, styrka, utstrålning och överordning. Det gör att denna typ av social makt utövas under andra premisser än exempelvis ekonomiskt/materiell makt, eftersom det eventuella egenintresset och strategiska kalkylerandet för att ackumulera symboliskt kapital som maktresurs, blir mer osynligt genom just sin uppfattade ”naturlighet”. Häri ligger ett slags förnekelse och kollektivt självbedrägeri som kan vara närmast avgörande för gruppens hierarkiska stabilitet och sociala ordning.

  • Galli, Raoul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Habitus2017In: Nyckelbegrepp i socialantropologin, 17-18 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    HABITUS (latin, ”vana” och ”utseende”; etymologiskt härlett från habere: att ha, hålla, äga). Begreppet habitus tillämpas inom flera vetenskapliga discipliner (botanik, medicin, zoologi) och definieras som samhällsveten-skapligt begrepp kort som: system av varaktiga och överförbara dispositioner att varsebli, värdera och handla. Genom att betona praktisk kunskap –praktik – i form av invanda och förkroppsligade handlingsmönster, utgör habitusbegreppet ett alternativ till handlingsteorier grundade på människors (i huvudsak) medvetna, intentionella och målrationella handlande (se →agens; →aktör; →interaktion).

  • Galli, Raoul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Förord 20172017In: Nyckelbegrepp i socialantropologin, 3-4 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    En grundtanke bakom föreliggande uppdatering av ”Nyckelbegrepp” är att fortsättnings-vis se det som ett dokument under kontinuerlig utveckling. Ytterligare uppdaterade utgåvor kommer att publiceras i anslutning till nya läsår och terminer vid Stockholms universitet. De sjutton nya och reviderade nyckelbegrepp som publiceras i och med denna, 2017 års upplaga, smyger sig in bland den majoritet begrepp som finns kvar i texten från 1983. Vissa begrepps-artiklar författade i 1980-talets början är omisskännligt daterade. Mycket har hänt sedan dess inom antropologin, samhällsvetenskapen och inte minst den omgivande värld som vi har i upp-gift att söka förstå och förklara. En del av dessa begreppsartiklar kommer att ersättas av uppdaterade texter. Andra kommer att stå kvar enligt principen att hellre än att gallras ut finnas tillgängliga i studentpedagogiskt syfte eftersom de har ett uppenbart begrepps- och ämneshistoriskt värde.

  • Galli, Raoul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Björklund, Ulf (Creator)
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Nyckelbegrepp i socialantropologin: Ulf Björklund, Ulf Hannerz & Socialantropologiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet 2017/19832017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • Rakus-Andersson, Elisabeth
    Blekinge Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mathematics and Natural Sciences.
    The new approach to the construction of parametric membership functions for fuzzy sets with unequal supports2017In: Knowledge-Based and Intelligent Information & Engineering Systems: Proceedings of the 21st International Conference, KES-20176-8 September 2017, Marseille, France / [ed] Cecilia Zanni-Merk, Claudia Frydman, Carlos Toro, Yulia Hicks, Robert J. Howlett, Lakhmi C. Jain, Elsevier, 2017, Vol. 112, 2057-2065 p., kes17-155Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current research is devoted to developing methods of a novel mathematical interpretation of term-sets of linguistic variables. To the term-sets of the linguistic variables fuzzy sets are assigned. We intend to adopt the π-functions and the π-functions to derive formulas of membership functions of these sets. The fuzzy sets are divided in three families in the case of an odd number of the term-sets. To each family, we assign only one parametric formula, which depends on two parameters: the width of a non-fuzzy set, which contains all supports of the fuzzy sets being representatives of the term-sets, and a number of the term-sets. Provided that the supports of fuzzy sets will be unequal, the membership function of the set, belonging to one of the families, is computed by means of a functional modifier, inserted in the common equation typical of this family. Medical examples explain how to use cumulated membership functions practically. The procedure can be easily computerized.

  • Schötz, Susanne
    et al.
    Lund University.
    van de Weijer, Joost
    Lund University.
    Eklund, Robert
    Phonetic Characteristics of Domestic Cat Vocalisations2017In: Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Vocal Interactivity in-and-between Humans, Animals and Robots, VIHAR 2017 / [ed] Angela Dassow, Ricard Marxer & Roger K. Moore, 2017, 5-6 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cat (Felis catus, Linneaus 1758) has lived around or with humans for at least 10,000 years, and is now one of the most popular pets of the world with more than 600 millionindividuals. Domestic cats have developed a more extensive, variable and complex vocal repertoire than most other members of the Carnivora, which may be explained by their social organisation, their nocturnal activity and the long period of association between mother and young. Still, we know surprisingly little about the phonetic characteristics of these sounds, and about the interaction between cats and humans.

    Members of the research project Melody in human–cat communication (Meowsic) investigate the prosodic characteristics of cat vocalisations as well as the communication between human and cat. The first step includes a categorisation of cat vocalisations. In the next step it will be investigated how humans perceive the vocal signals of domestic cats. This paper presents an outline of the project which has only recently started.

  • Amundin, Mats
    et al.
    Kolmården Wildlife Park.
    Hållsten, Henrik
    Eklund, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture.
    Karlgren, Jussi
    Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan.
    Molinder, Lars
    Carnegie Investment Bank, Swedden.
    A proposal to use distributional models to analyse dolphin vocalisation2017In: Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Vocal Interactivity in-and-between Humans, Animals and Robots, VIHAR 2017 / [ed] Angela Dassow, Ricard Marxer & Roger K. Moore, 2017, 31-32 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper gives a brief introduction to the starting points of an experimental project to study dolphin communicative behaviour using distributional semantics, with methods implemented for the large scale study of human language.