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  • Ren, Weicheng
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Biochem & Biophys, Div Immunol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wan, Hui
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Biochem & Biophys, Div Immunol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Abd Own, Sulaf
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Div Clin Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Div Pathol, SE-14186 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Berglund, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer Immunotherapy. Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Biochem & Biophys, Div Immunol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wang, Xianhuo
    Tianjin Med Univ Canc Inst & Hosp, Natl Clin Res Ctr Canc, Key Lab Canc Prevent & Therapy, Tianjins Clin Res Ctr Canc,Dept Lymphoma, Tianjin, Peoples R China..
    Yang, Mingyu
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Biochem & Biophys, Div Immunol, Stockholm, Sweden.;BGI Res, Shenzhen, Peoples R China.;BGI Res, Guangdong Prov Key Lab Human Dis Genom, Shenzhen Key Lab Genom, Shenzhen, Peoples R China..
    Li, Xiaobo
    BGI Res, Shenzhen, Peoples R China.;BGI Res, Guangdong Prov Key Lab Human Dis Genom, Shenzhen Key Lab Genom, Shenzhen, Peoples R China..
    Liu, Dongbing
    BGI Res, Shenzhen, Peoples R China.;BGI Res, Guangdong Prov Key Lab Human Dis Genom, Shenzhen Key Lab Genom, Shenzhen, Peoples R China..
    Ye, Xiaofei
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Biochem & Biophys, Div Immunol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Kindstar Global Precis Med Inst, Wuhan, Peoples R China..
    Sonnevi, Kristina
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Hematol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer Immunotherapy.
    Amini, Rose-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer Immunotherapy.
    Sander, Birgitta
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Hematol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wu, Kui
    BGI Res, Shenzhen, Peoples R China.;BGI Res, Guangdong Prov Key Lab Human Dis Genom, Shenzhen Key Lab Genom, Shenzhen, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, Huilai
    Tianjin Med Univ Canc Inst & Hosp, Natl Clin Res Ctr Canc, Key Lab Canc Prevent & Therapy, Tianjins Clin Res Ctr Canc,Dept Lymphoma, Tianjin, Peoples R China..
    Wahlin, Bjoern Engelbrekt
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Hematol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Smedby, Karin E.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Div Clin Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Hematol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Pan-Hammarstrom, Qiang
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Biochem & Biophys, Div Immunol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Genetic and transcriptomic analyses of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients with poor outcomes within two years of diagnosis2024In: Leukemia, ISSN 0887-6924, E-ISSN 1476-5551, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 438-441Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the improvements in clinical outcomes for DLBCL, a significant proportion of patients still face challenges with refractory/relapsed (R/R) disease after receiving first-line R-CHOP treatment. To further elucidate the underlying mechanism of R/R disease and to develop methods for identifying patients at risk of early disease progression, we integrated clinical, genetic and transcriptomic data derived from 2805 R-CHOP-treated patients from seven independent cohorts. Among these, 887 patients exhibited R/R disease within two years (poor outcome), and 1918 patients remained in remission at two years (good outcome). Our analysis identified four preferentially mutated genes (TP53, MYD88, SPEN, MYC) in the untreated (diagnostic) tumor samples from patients with poor outcomes. Furthermore, transcriptomic analysis revealed a distinct gene expression pattern linked to poor outcomes, affecting pathways involved in cell adhesion/migration, T-cell activation/regulation, PI3K, and NF-kappa B signaling. Moreover, we developed and validated a 24-gene expression score as an independent prognostic predictor for treatment outcomes. This score also demonstrated efficacy in further stratifying high-risk patients when integrated with existing genetic or cell-of-origin subtypes, including the unclassified cases in these models. Finally, based on these findings, we developed an online analysis tool (https://lymphprog.serve.scilifelab.se/app/lymphprog) that can be used for prognostic prediction for DLBCL patients.

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  • Tranaeus, Ulrika
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Physiology, Nutrition and Biomechanics. Stockholm Sports Trauma Research Centre, FIFA Medical Centre of Excellence; Unit of Intervention and Implementation for Worker Health, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gledhill, Adam
    Carnegie School of Sport, Leeds Beckett University, Leeds, UK.
    Johnson, Urban
    School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Podlog, Leslie
    School of Kinesiology and Physical Activity Sciences, Faculté de Médecine, Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada. ; Centre de Recherche, CHU-Saint Justine, Montreal, QC, Canada..
    Wadey, Ross
    St Mary's University, Twickenham, London, UK..
    Wiese Bjornstal, Diane
    School of Kinesiology, University of Minnesota Twin Cities, Minneapolis, USA..
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden ; Department of Sport Science and Physical Education, University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway..
    50 Years of Research on the Psychology of Sport Injury: A Consensus Statement.2024In: Sports Medicine, ISSN 0112-1642, E-ISSN 1179-2035Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Factors influencing sport injury risk, rehabilitation outcomes, and return to sport processes have been the focus in various research disciplines (sports medicine, psychology and sociology). One discipline, with over 50 years of scholarship, is the psychology of sport injury. Despite the research in this field, there is no evidence-based consensus to inform professional practice. The aim of this original and timely consensus statement is to summarise psychological sport injury research and provide consensus recommendations for sport practitioners seeking to implement psychological principles into clinical practice. A total of seven experts with extensive experience outlined the consensus objectives and identified three psychology of sport injury sub-domains: risk, rehabilitation and return to sport. The researchers, grouped in pairs, prepared initial drafts of assigned sub-domains. The group met in Stockholm, and the three texts were merged into a draft and revised in an iterative process. Stress responses are the strongest psychological risk factor for acute injuries. Intra- and interpersonal factors, as well as sociocultural factors, are demonstrated psychosocial risk factors for overuse injuries. Stress management and mindfulness interventions to prevent injuries have been successfully implemented. The rehabilitation process may influence athlete's cognitive, emotional, and behavioural responses. Social support, mindfulness, acceptance-based practices, and cognitive-behavioural based intervention programs reduce negative reactions. Return to sport includes various stages and different trajectories. Returning athletes typically experience concerns regarding competence, autonomy, and relatedness. It is recommended that athletes focus on the physical, technical, and psychological demands of their sport as they progress to increasingly intense activities. Interdisciplinary collaboration (e.g., sports medicine and psychology) would be beneficial in enhancing clinical practice and improving athlete outcomes.

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  • Haavisto, Anu
    et al.
    Univ Helsinki, Dept Psychol & Logoped, Helsinki, Finland.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden.;Abo Akad Univ, Fac Educ & Welf Studies, Turku, Finland.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Visionsgatan 4, S-17164 Solna, Sweden..
    Lampic, Claudia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden.;Umeå Univ, Dept Psychol, Umeå, Sweden. Turku Univ Hosp, Dept Pediat & Adolescent Med, Turku, Finland. Univ Turku, FICANWEST, Turku, Finland..
    Wettergren, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Laehteenmaeki, Paeivi M.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Jahnukainen, Kirsi
    Univ Helsinki, Helsinki Univ Hosp, Helsinki, Finland.;Helsinki Univ Hosp, Helsinki, Finland.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, NORDFERTIL Res Lab Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Reproductive late effects and testosterone replacement therapy in male childhood cancer survivors: A population-based study (the Fex-Can study)2024In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 154, no 12, p. 2121-2131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Childhood cancer survivors are at risk of various endocrine late effects affecting their quality of life. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and predictors of endocrine and reproductive outcomes in young adult survivors. A secondary aim was to assess possible associations between testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) and other endocrine, cardiovascular and psychosocial late effects. This nationwide study comprised 1212 male childhood cancer survivors aged 19-40 years, identified through the National Quality Registry for Childhood Cancer in Sweden. Median age at diagnosis during 1981-2017 was 7 (range 0-17) and at study 29 (19-40) years. The study combined self-report survey data with cancer treatment data from the national registry. Hormone-induced puberty was self-reported by 3.8% of the survivors and ongoing TRT by 6.0%. In separate logistic regression analyses, these treatments were associated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and cranial radiotherapy. Hormone-induced puberty was additionally associated with younger age at diagnosis. Men with TRT had a higher prevalence of other endocrine deficiencies, cholesterol medication, depressive symptoms and fatigue as well as a lower probability of living with a partner, having a biological child or current occupation. In the total male cohort, 28.2% reported having a biological child. Reassuring reproductive outcomes after less intensive therapies and low frequency of TRT were observed in young adult male childhood cancer survivors treated in the most recent treatment era. However, men with TRT suffered from several other endocrine, cardiovascular and psychosocial late effects, indicating a need for long-term monitoring of this high-risk group. Childhood cancer survivors are at risk of various endocrine late effects affecting their quality of life. This population-based study in a recent cohort of childhood cancer survivors assessed prevalence rates of testosterone replacement therapy and fertility outcomes, providing valuable information for current patients. Among young adult men with a history of childhood cancer, 6% reported ongoing testosterone replacement therapy. Testosterone replacement was associated with self-reported treatment with other hormones and cardiovascular medication as well as psychological and sociodemographic factors. The findings indicate a need for long-term follow-up in male childhood cancer survivors with testosterone substitution. image

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  • Badjana, Heou Maleki
    et al.
    Univ Reading, Dept Geog & Environm Sci, Reading, England.;Univ Lome, Fac Sci, Lab Bot & Plant Ecol, Lome, Togo.;Univ Reading, Dept Geog & Environm Sci, Reading RG6 6DW, England..
    Cloke, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. Univ Reading, Dept Geog & Environm Sci, Reading, England.;Univ Reading, Dept Meteorol, Reading, England.;CNDS, Ctr Nat Hazards & Disaster Sci, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Verhoef, Anne
    Univ Reading, Dept Geog & Environm Sci, Reading, England..
    Julich, Stefan
    Tech Univ Dresden, Inst Soil Sci & Site Ecol, Tharandt, Germany..
    Camargos, Carla
    Justus Liebig Univ Giessen, Inst Landscape Ecol & Resources Management ILR, Res Ctr Biosyst Land Use & Nutr iFZ, Giessen, Germany..
    Collins, Sarah
    British Geol Survey, Lyell Ctr, Edinburgh, Scotland..
    Macdonald, David M. J.
    British Geol Survey, Wallingford, Oxon, England..
    McGuire, Patrick C.
    Univ Reading, Dept Meteorol, Reading, England.;Univ Reading, Natl Ctr Atmospher Sci NCAS, Reading, England..
    Clark, Joanna
    Univ Reading, Dept Geog & Environm Sci, Reading, England..
    Can hydrological models assess the impact of natural flood management in groundwater-dominated catchments?2023In: Journal of Flood Risk Management, E-ISSN 1753-318X, Vol. 16, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Natural flood management (NFM) is widely promoted for managing flood risks but the effectiveness of different types of NFM schemes at medium (100-1000 km(2)) and large scales (>1000 km(2)) remains widely unknown. This study demonstrates the importance of fully understanding the impact of model structure, calibration and uncertainty techniques on the results before the NFM assessment is undertaken. Land-based NFM assessment is undertaken in two medium-scale lowland catchments within the Thames River basin (UK) with a modelling approach that uses the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model within an uncertainty framework. The model performed poorly in groundwater-dominated areas (P-factor 0.6). The model performed better in areas dominated by surface and interflow processes (P-factor >0.5 and R-factor <0.6) and here hypothetical experiments converting land to broadleaf woodland and cropland showed that the model offers good potential for the assessment of NFM effectiveness. However, the reduction of large flood flows greater than 4% in medium-sized catchments would require afforestation of more than 75% of the area. Whilst hydrological models, and specifically SWAT, can be useful tools in assessing the effectiveness of NFM, these results demonstrate that they cannot be applied in all settings.

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  • Græsholt-Knudsen, Troels
    et al.
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Publ Hlth, Res Unit Mental Publ Hlth, Bartholins Alle 2, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark.;Aarhus Univ, Dept Forens Med, Palle Juul Jensens Blvd 99, DK-8200 Aarhus N, Denmark..
    Rask, Charlotte Ulrikka
    Aarhus Univ Hosp Psychiat, Dept Child & Adolescent Psychiat, Palle Juul Jensens Blvd 175, DK-8200 Aarhus N, Denmark.;Aarhus Univ, Dept Clin Med, Olof Palmes 43, DK-8200 Aarhus N, Denmark..
    Lucas, Steven
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Paediatric Inflammation, Metabolism and Child Health Research. Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Obel, Carsten
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Publ Hlth, Res Unit Mental Publ Hlth, Bartholins Alle 2, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark..
    Hammer Bech, Bodil
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Publ Hlth, Res Unit Epidemiol, Bartholins Alle 2, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark..
    Parental physical disease severity and severe documented physical child abuse: a prospective cohort study2024In: European Journal of Pediatrics, ISSN 0340-6199, E-ISSN 1432-1076, Vol. 183, no 1, p. 357-369Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Successful prevention of physical child abuse is dependent on improvements in risk assessment. The risk of abuse is assumed to increase when family stressors overcome resources. Severe physical disease can increase stress, and parental physical disease has been studied as a risk factor for physical child abuse, but with heterogeneous definitions. This study evaluated the relation between parental physical disease severity and severe documented physical child abuse. Models were based on data on children aged 0–17 years in Denmark between 1997 and 2018, and their parents. Severe documented physical child abuse was modeled as violence against a child registered by either health authorities in treatment or mortality registries, or police authorities in cases confirmed by the courts. Parental physical disease severity was modeled as the sum of Charlson Comorbidity Index scores for the child’s parents. The causal connection was examined in two model types: a survival model comparing exposed with non-exposed children, adjusted for covariates at baseline, and a G-model, taking time-varying covariates, including income and parental psychiatric disease into account. Neither model showed an association between parental physical disease severity and severe documented physical child abuse, with RR 0.99 and 95% CI (0.93–1.05) for the survival model and RR 1.08 for the G-model (CI not calculated).

    Conclusion: In the model studied, parental physical disease severity was not a risk factor for severe documented physical child abuse. Individual categories of physical disease remain to be examined.

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  • Corona González, Belkis
    et al.
    Centro Nacional de Sanidad Agropecuaria, Mayabeque, Cuba.
    Díaz Sánchez, Adrian Alberto
    Centro Nacional de Sanidad Agropecuaria, Mayabeque, Cuba; Departamento de Biología, Universidad de Saskatchewan., SK, Canada.
    Roblejo Arias, Lisset
    Centro Nacional de Sanidad Agropecuaria, Mayabeque, Cuba.
    Lobo Rivero, Evelyn
    Centro Nacional de Sanidad Agropecuaria, Mayabeque, Cuba.
    Hofmann Lehmann, Regina
    Laboratorio Clínico, Departamento de Diagnóstico Clínico y Servicios, Centro para estudios Clínicos, Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad de Zurich., Zurich, Switzerland.
    Luisa Meli, Marina
    Laboratorio Clínico, Departamento de Diagnóstico Clínico y Servicios, Centro para estudios Clínicos, Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad de Zurich., Zurich, Switzerland.
    Fonseca Rodriguez, Osvaldo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Vega Cañizares, Ernesto
    Centro Nacional de Sanidad Agropecuaria, Mayabeque, Cuba.
    Obregón Álvarez, Dasiel
    Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Agraria de la Habana, Mayabeque, Cuba.
    Marrero Perera, Roxana
    Centro Nacional de Sanidad Agropecuaria, Mayabeque, Cuba.
    Rodríguez Mirabal, Elianys
    Centro Nacional de Sanidad Agropecuaria, Mayabeque, Cuba.
    Primera evidencia molecular de especies de micoplasmas hemotrópicos (Mycoplasma spp.) en animales de importancia económica y social en Cuba: [First molecular evidence of hemotropic mycoplasma species (Mycoplasma spp.) in animals of economic and social importance in Cuba]2023In: Anales de la Academia de Ciencias de Cuba, E-ISSN 2304-0106, Vol. 13, no 4, article id e1459Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Hemotropic mycoplasmas are widely distributed in several regions of the world. The aim of the present work was to determine the presence of hemotropic mycoplasma species in cattle, buffaloes, dogs and ticks in Cuba.

    Methods: They were analyzed thirty-nine buffalo and 41 cattle blood samples to investigate the presence of Mycoplasma wenyonii and ‘Candidatus Mycoplasma haemobos’. They were analyzed and 391 dog blood samples and 247 tick pools to detect the presence of Mycoplasma haemocanis and ‘Candidatus Mycoplasma haematoparvum’. In all cases it was used the species-specific TaqMan® real-time PCR assay.

    Results: For M. wenyonii 53 animals were positive and 33 for ‘Ca. Mycoplasma haemobos’; in coinfection with M. wenyonii, with similar prevalence in cattle and buffalo. 17.9% of dog samples were positive for at least one hemoplasma species, with 15.1% positive for M. haemocanis, 4.4% for ‘Ca. Mycoplasma haematoparvum’, and 1.5% co-infected. The ticks were identified as Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato; none of the pools were positive for the canine mycoplasma species under study. It was demonstrated he presence of five different haplotypes for M. haemocanis and four haplotypes for ‘Ca. M. haematoparvum’; one of these haplotypes showed 100 % identity with one isolated from Grenada, which was associated with cases of zoonotic exposure.

    Conclusions. These results constitute the first molecular evidence of infection by hemoplasma species in cattle and buffaloes in Cuba and the Caribbean and the first molecular report of the occurrence of single infections and co-infections caused by M. haemocanis and ‘Ca. M. haematoparvum’ in dogs in Cuba. For the first time is evident the circulation of a genotype of ‘Ca. M. haematoparvum’ with zoonotic potential, common between the Greater and Lesser Antilles of the Caribbean.

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  • Gottvall, Maria
    et al.
    Swedish Red Cross University, Department of Health Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Isaac, Rummage
    Swedish Red Cross University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Ainembabazi, Ronah
    Swedish Red Cross University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Yasin, Sumera
    Swedish Red Cross University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Eldebo, Anna
    Swedish Red Cross University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Carlsson, Tommy
    Swedish Red Cross University, Department of Health Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    ‘Your heart is resting and pumping at the same time’: ental health impact of seeking asylum among sexual minority men2024In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To explore the experiences of seeking asylum and its impact on mental health among sexual minority forced migrant cisgender men living in Sweden.

    Methods: Exploratory qualitative study based on individual semi-structured interviews with 15 adult gay and bisexual cisgender men recruited via a combination of purposeful, convenience and snowball sampling. Data were analysed with systematic text condensation through a collaborative approach with three migrants with lived experience.

    Results: Seeking asylum had been an emotionally challenging journey for the participants in this study, involving several procedures that negatively impacted mental health. Being expected to disclose intimate information during asylum interviews had been a significant challenge, alongside needing to wait through long periods in uncertainty with little information about the progress of their asylum case. The behaviours and attitudes of professionals involved in the legal procedures had been a central aspect, as participants encountered interpreters and caseworkers who acted disrespectful and homophobic during asylum interviews. Participants mentioned that the behaviours of interpreters and the accuracy of the interpretation could influence the outcome of asylum claims and how comfortable they felt in sharing information. Thus, participants emphasized the importance of adequate and accurate interpreter services.

    Conclusions: Sexual minority men are faced with an unfamiliar and emotionally challenging position when seeking asylum and undergoing asylum interviews. The findings highlight the importance of adequate competence among professionals involved in asylum interviews, including interpreter utilization. Research is needed to determine effective methods to support these men throughout their asylum process.

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  • Portinson Hylander, Jens
    et al.
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Society, environment and transport, Mobility, actors and planning processes. The Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute (VTI), Linköping, Sweden; K2 – Sweden’s National Center for Research and Education on Public Transport, Lund, Sweden.
    Thoresson, Karin
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Society, environment and transport, Mobility, actors and planning processes. The Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute (VTI), Linköping, Sweden; K2 – Sweden’s National Center for Research and Education on Public Transport, Lund, Sweden.
    Hedegaard Sørensen, Claus
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Society, environment and transport, Mobility, actors and planning processes. The Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute (VTI), Linköping, Sweden; K2 – Sweden’s National Center for Research and Education on Public Transport, Lund, Sweden.
    Alm, Jens
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Society, environment and transport, Mobility, actors and planning processes. The Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute (VTI), Linköping, Sweden; K2 – Sweden’s National Center for Research and Education on Public Transport, Lund, Sweden.
    (Im)mobilising citizens: Governing individual transport under COVID-19 and climate change in Sweden2024In: Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment, ISSN 1361-9209, E-ISSN 1879-2340, article id 104262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One striking effect from policy responses by governments to address the COVID-19 pandemic was the repression of mobility, resulting in altered volumes and patterns of passenger transport on a global scale. Building on governance and governmentality theories we provide a comparative analysis of the management of COVID-19 and climate change by the Swedish state in relation to individual mobility and transport. We find that the governance approach in the two cases differ significantly, with a unified state response to COVID-19 being based on a perception of acute crisis combined with solidarity appeals to citizens. In contrast, climate change is marked by a distributed network governance, a conceptualisation of future crisis, and individuals being invoked primarily as economic agents. We discuss whether a stronger leadership by the state combined with appeals to civic solidarity may open new policy avenues for sustainable mobility. 

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  • Blohm, My
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Center for Clinical Research Dalarna. Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol, Stockholm, Sweden; Mora Hosp, Dept Surg, Mora, Sweden.
    Sandblom, Gabriel
    Karolinska Inst, South Gen Hosp, Dept Clin Sci & Educ, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Enochsson, Lars
    Umeå Univ, Dept Surg & Perioperat Sci, Surg, Umeå, Sweden.;Sunderby Hosp, Dept Surg, Luleå, Sweden..
    Österberg, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Center for Clinical Research Dalarna. Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol, Stockholm, Sweden; Mora Hosp, Dept Surg, Mora, Sweden.
    Differences in Cholecystectomy Outcomes and Operating Time Between Male and Female Surgeons in Sweden2023In: JAMA Surgery, ISSN 2168-6254, E-ISSN 2168-6262, Vol. 158, no 11, p. 1168-1175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Importance  Female surgeons are still in the minority worldwide, and highlighting gender differences in surgery is important in understanding and reducing inequities within the surgical specialty. Studies on different surgical procedures indicate equal results, or safer outcomes, for female surgeons, but it is still unclear whether surgical outcomes of gallstone surgery differ between female and male surgeons.

    Objective  To examine the association of the surgeon’s gender with surgical outcomes and operating time in elective and acute care cholecystectomies.

    Design, Setting, and Participants  A population-based cohort study based on data from the Swedish Registry of Gallstone Surgery was performed from January 1, 2006, to December 31, 2019. The sample included all registered patients undergoing cholecystectomy in Sweden during the study period. The follow-up time was 30 days. Data analysis was performed from September 1 to September 7, 2022, and updated March 24, 2023.

    Exposure  The surgeon’s gender.

    Main Outcome(s) and Measure(s)  The association between the surgeon’s gender and surgical outcomes for elective and acute care cholecystectomies was calculated with generalized estimating equations. Differences in operating time were calculated with mixed linear model analysis.

    Results  A total of 150 509 patients, with 97 755 (64.9%) undergoing elective cholecystectomies and 52 754 (35.1%) undergoing acute care cholecystectomies, were operated on by 2553 surgeons, including 849 (33.3%) female surgeons and 1704 (67.7%) male surgeons. Female surgeons performed fewer cholecystectomies per year and were somewhat better represented at universities and private clinics. Patients operated on by male surgeons had more surgical complications (odds ratio [OR], 1.29; 95% CI, 1.19-1.40) and total complications (OR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.06-1.19). Male surgeons had more bile duct injuries in elective surgery (OR, 1.69; 95% CI, 1.22-2.34), but no significant difference was apparent in acute care operations. Female surgeons had significantly longer operation times. Male surgeons converted to open surgery more often than female surgeons in acute care surgery (OR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.04-1.43), and their patients had longer hospital stays (OR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.11-1.31). No significant difference in 30-day mortality could be demonstrated.

    Conclusions and Relevance  The results of this cohort study indicate that female surgeons have more favorable outcomes and operate more slowly than male surgeons in elective and acute care cholecystectomies. These findings may contribute to an increased understanding of gender differences within this surgical specialty.

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  • Abdelrahman, Kholoud N.
    et al.
    Faculty of Development and Technology, Zagazig University, Zagazig, Egypt.
    Abdel Ghany, Abdel Ghany A.
    Faculty of Development and Technology, Zagazig University, Zagazig, Egypt.
    Saber, Refaat A.
    Faculty of Development and Technology, Zagazig University, Zagazig, Egypt.
    Osman, Ali
    Biochemistry Department, Faculty of Agriculture, Zagazig University, Zagazig, Egypt.
    Sitohy, Basel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Sitohy, Mahmoud
    Biochemistry Department, Faculty of Agriculture, Zagazig University, Zagazig, Egypt.
    Anthocyanins from pomegranate peel (Punica granatum), chili pepper fruit (Capsicum annuum), and bougainvillea flowers (Bougainvillea spectabilis) with multiple biofunctions: antibacterial, antioxidant, and anticancer2024In: Heliyon, E-ISSN 2405-8440, Vol. 10, no 11, article id e32222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Natural colorants, including natural pigments, e.g., anthocyanins, carotenoids, and chlorophylls, in novel and attractive food matrixes have become a popular trend. They impart favorite colors to food products and provide significant therapeutic effects. This study is aimed at extracting and identifying some natural pigments from different plant sources and evaluating their ability as antibacterial, antioxidant, and anticancer activities.

    Methods: The anthocyanin-rich extract (ARE) is derived from three natural plant sources: pomegranate peel (Punica granatum), chili pepper fruit (Capsicum annuum), and Bougainvillea flowers. Bougainvillea spectabilis are analyzed for biochemical composition, as well as antioxidant, antibacterial, and anticancer activity, HPLC, DPPH, FRAP, disc diffusion assay, MIC, MTT, VEGFR‐2, and caspase-9 assays.

    Results: All three extracts had varying total phenolic contents, ranging from 14 to 466 mg GAE/g extract, where Punica granatum was the highest (466 mg GAE/g extract), followed by Bougainvillea spectabilis (180 mg GAE/g extract), and then Capsicum annuum (14 mg GAE/g extract). The antioxidant activity rose steadily with raising concentration. The ARE of pomegranate peels recorded highest value, followed by Bougainvillea flowers and chili pepper fruit. The MTT assay revealed an inhibitory action of the tested extracts on the proliferation of HCT-116, MCF-7, and HepG2 in a concentration-based manner. Gene expression of caspase-9 transcripts was considerably multiplied by the application of ARE of pomegranate peels. All the tested extracts inhibited VEGFR-2, and the inhibition (%) expanded gradually with increasing concentrations, achieving the highest value (80 %) at 10 μg/mL. The ARE of pomegranate peels scored highest antibacterial activity, followed by ARE of chili pepper fruit and Bougainvillea flowers. The inhibition zone diameter escalated gradually with rising concentrations of the tested samples.

    Conclusion: The AREs of the three studied plant sources can be used as multifunctional products with antioxidant, anticancer, and antibacterial activities that are natural, safe, and cheap.

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  • Sandahl, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Teaching and Learning.
    Att summera och diskutera andras forskning. Litteraturstudien som genre och tidigare forskning i uppsatsskrivande.2021Other (Other academic)
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  • Canocchi, G.
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, AlbaNova Univ Ctr, Dept Astron, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lind, K.
    Stockholm Univ, AlbaNova Univ Ctr, Dept Astron, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lagae, C.
    Stockholm Univ, AlbaNova Univ Ctr, Dept Astron, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Pietrow, A. G. M.
    Leibniz Inst Astrophys Potsdam AIP, Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam, Germany..
    Amarsi, Anish M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Theoretical Astrophysics.
    Kiselman, D.
    Stockholm Univ, Albanova Univ Ctr, Inst Solar Phys, Dept Astron, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Andriienko, O.
    Stockholm Univ, Albanova Univ Ctr, Inst Solar Phys, Dept Astron, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hoeijmakers, H. J.
    Lund Univ, Dept Astron & Theoret Phys, Lund Observ, Box 43, S-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    3D non-LTE modeling of the stellar center-to-limb variation for transmission spectroscopy studies2024In: Astronomy and Astrophysics, ISSN 0004-6361, E-ISSN 1432-0746, Vol. 683, article id A242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context. Transmission spectroscopy is one of the most powerful techniques used to characterize transiting exoplanets, since it allows for the abundance of the atomic and molecular species in the planetary atmosphere to be measured. However, stellar lines may bias the determination of such abundances if their center-to-limb variations (CLVs) are not properly accounted for.

    Aims. This paper aims to show that three-dimensional (3D) radiation hydrodynamic models and the assumption of non-local ther-modynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) line formation are required for an accurate modeling of the stellar CLV of the Na I D1 and K I resonance lines on transmission spectra.

    Methods. We modeled the CLV of the Na I D1 and K I resonance lines in the Sun with 3D non-LTE radiative transfer. The synthetic spectra were compared to solar observations with high spatial and spectral resolution, including new data collected with the CRISP instrument at the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope between µ = 0.1 and µ = 1.0.

    Results. Our 3D non-LTE modeling of the Na I D1 resonance line at 5896 Å and the K I 7699 Å resonance line in the Sun is in good agreement with the observed CLV in the solar spectrum. Moreover, the simulated CLV curve for a Jupiter-Sun system inferred with a 3D non-LTE analysis shows significant differences from the one obtained from a 1D atmosphere. The latter does indeed tend to overestimate the amplitude of the transmission curve by a factor that is on the same order of magnitude as a planetary absorption depth (i.e., up to 0.2%).

    Conclusions. This work highlights the fact that to correctly characterize exoplanetary atmospheres, 3D non-LTE synthetic spectra ought to be used to estimate the stellar CLV effect in transmission spectra of solar-like planet hosts. Moreover, since different spectral lines show different CLV curves for the same geometry of the planet-star system, it is fundamental to model the CLV individually for each line of interest. The work will be extended to other lines and FGK-type stars, allowing for synthetic high-resolution spectra to mitigate the stellar contamination of low-resolution planetary spectra, for example, those drawn from JWST.

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  • Schiele, Carina
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-11418 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Di, Andi
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-11418 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hadi, Seyed Ehsan
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-11418 Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Wallenberg Wood Sci Ctr, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Rangaiah, Pramod K. B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Electrical Engineering, Solid-State Electronics.
    Augustine, Robin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Electrical Engineering, Solid-State Electronics.
    Bergström, Lennart
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-11418 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hybrid Foams based on Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Cellulose Nanocrystals for Anisotropic Electromagnetic Shielding and Heat Transport2024In: Advanced Materials Interfaces, ISSN 2196-7350, Vol. 11, no 12, article id 2300996Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lightweight and mechanically robust hybrid foams based on cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) with an anisotropic structure are prepared by directional ice-templating. The anisotropic hybrid CNC-MWCNT foams displayed a combination of highly anisotropic thermal conductivity and an orientation-dependent electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding with a maximum EMI shielding efficiency (EMI-SE) of 41–48 dB between 8 and 12 GHz for the hybrid foam with 22 wt% MWCNT. The EMI-SE is dominated by absorption (SEA) which is important for microwave absorber applications. Modelling of the low radial thermal conductivity highlighted the importance of phonon scattering at the heterogeneous CNC-MWCNT interfaces while the axial thermal conductivity is dominated by the solid conduction along the aligned rod-like particles. The lightweight CNC-MWCNT foams combination of an anisotropic thermal conductivity and EMI shielding efficiency is unusual and can be useful for directional heat transport and EMI shielding.

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  • De Carli, Alice
    et al.
    Univ St Andrews, Sch Math & Stat, St Andrews, Scotland..
    Kapelyukh, Yury
    Univ Dundee, Ninewells Hosp, Jacqui Wood Canc Ctr, Sch Med, Dundee, Scotland.;Univ Dundee, Med Sch, Dundee, Scotland..
    Kursawe, Jochen
    Univ St Andrews, Sch Math & Stat, St Andrews, Scotland..
    Chaplain, Mark A. J.
    Univ St Andrews, Sch Math & Stat, St Andrews, Scotland..
    Wolf, C. Roland
    Univ Dundee, Ninewells Hosp, Jacqui Wood Canc Ctr, Sch Med, Dundee, Scotland.;Univ Dundee, Med Sch, Dundee, Scotland..
    Hamis, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Systems and Control. Univ St Andrews, Sch Math & Stat, St Andrews, Scotland.;Tampere Univ, Fac Med & Hlth Technol, Tampere Inst Adv Study, Tampere, Finland..
    Simulating BRAFV600E-MEK-ERK signalling dynamics in response to vertical inhibition treatment strategies2024In: npj systems biology and applications., E-ISSN 2056-7189, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In vertical inhibition treatment strategies, multiple components of an intracellular pathway are simultaneously inhibited. Vertical inhibition of the BRAFV600E-MEK-ERK signalling pathway is a standard of care for treating BRAFV600E-mutated melanoma where two targeted cancer drugs, a BRAFV600E-inhibitor, and a MEK inhibitor, are administered in combination. Targeted therapies have been linked to early onsets of drug resistance, and thus treatment strategies of higher complexities and lower doses have been proposed as alternatives to current clinical strategies. However, finding optimal complex, low-dose treatment strategies is a challenge, as it is possible to design more treatment strategies than are feasibly testable in experimental settings. To quantitatively address this challenge, we develop a mathematical model of BRAFV600E-MEK-ERK signalling dynamics in response to combinations of the BRAFV600E-inhibitor dabrafenib (DBF), the MEK inhibitor trametinib (TMT), and the ERK-inhibitor SCH772984 (SCH). From a model of the BRAFV600E-MEK-ERK pathway, and a set of molecular-level drug-protein interactions, we extract a system of chemical reactions that is parameterised by in vitro data and converted to a system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) using the law of mass action. The ODEs are solved numerically to produce simulations of how pathway-component concentrations change over time in response to different treatment strategies, i.e., inhibitor combinations and doses. The model can thus be used to limit the search space for effective treatment strategies that target the BRAFV600E-MEK-ERK pathway and warrant further experimental investigation. The results demonstrate that DBF and DBF-TMT-SCH therapies show marked sensitivity to BRAFV600E concentrations in silico, whilst TMT and SCH monotherapies do not.

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  • Knihs de Camargo, Carolina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Psychiatry. Inst Environm Med, Karolinska Inst, Unit Occupat Med, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Falkstedt, Daniel
    Inst Environm Med, Karolinska Inst, Unit Occupat Med, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Pan, Kuan-Yu
    Inst Environm Med, Karolinska Inst, Unit Occupat Med, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Almroth, Melody
    Inst Environm Med, Karolinska Inst, Unit Occupat Med, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nevriana, Alicia
    Inst Environm Med, Karolinska Inst, Unit Occupat Med, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.;C6 Inst Miljomed, C6 Arbetsmed Falkstedt, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Diagnoses of common mental disorders among social workers in Sweden: A register-based cohort study2024In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 355, p. 415-421Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Little is known about common mental disorders (CMD) diagnoses among social workers, i.e., depression, anxiety, or stress-related disorders. This study aims to examine the risk of CMD among social workers in comparison to other workers and to further investigate differences between men and women and specific occupational titles.

    Methods:

    This register-based cohort study consists of 3,034,304 persons, of which 26,610 were social workers (0.9 % of all workers), aged 30 -64 years, living in Sweden in 2015. The risk of diagnosed CMDs was followed up until 2020. Cox regression models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI), adjusting for sex, birth country, education, and birth year.

    Results:

    The participants were followed up by a total of 16,833,742.9 person-years, with an average follow-up of 5.5 years. Social workers, compared to other workers, were at a higher risk of CMD (HR 1.3, 95 % CI 1.2 -1.4) after adjustment. The HR was equal, 1.3, for depression (95 % CI 1.2 -1.5) and anxiety or stress-related disorder (95 % CI 1.2 -1.4). The association between social work and CMD was stronger among men (HR 1.7, 95 % CI 1.6 -1.9) compared to women (HR 1.2, 95 % CI 1.1 -1.3). Further, men working as assistance analysts had the highest risk among the occupational categories (HR 2.2, 95 % CI 1.2 -3.9).

    Limitations:

    CMD diagnoses only included cases treated in secondary care.

    Conclusions:

    Social workers, especially male social workers, had a higher risk of CMD. This deserves attention for future research and interventions aimed at improving the mental health of social workers.

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  • Rubak, Adam
    et al.
    Karlstad University.
    Taheri, Javid
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Mathematics and Computer Science (from 2013). Queen's University Belfast, United Kingdom.
    Machine Learning for Predictive Resource Scaling of Microservices on Kubernetes Platforms2023In: Proceedings of the IEEE/ACM 16th International Conference on Utility and Cloud Computing, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2023, p. 1-8Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resource scaling is the process of adjusting the amount of resources allocated to a system or a service according to the changing demand. For microservices, resource scaling can be done at different levels, such as the container, the pod, or the cluster. However, the current approaches for resource scaling are not good enough because they rely on reactive or rule-based methods that do not account for the dynamic and complex nature of microservices. These methods often lead to over-provisioning or under-provisioning of resources, both affecting the quality of service and the cost efficiency. To address these issues, this work focuses on testing multiple machine learning approaches to optimize the pod dimensioning problem for Kubernetes platforms through predicting resource requirements for an upscaled number of users. The proposed approach aims to address the limitations of the standard Horizontal Pod Autoscaler (HPA), which often results in resource wastage or suboptimal performance. The results were promising and demonstrated high precision and performance of multiple ML models to accurately forecast future resource needs. 

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  • Thomsen, Frederik F.
    et al.
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Herlev & Gentofte Hosp, Dept Urol, Herlev, Denmark..
    Garmo, Hans
    Uppsala Univ Hosp, Dept Surg Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.;Kings Coll London, Sch Med, Div Canc Studies, Canc Epidemiol Grp, London, England..
    Egevad, Lars
    Karolinska Univ Hosp Solna, Karolinska Inst, Dept Oncol Pathol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Stattin, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Brasso, Klaus
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Rigshosp, Copenhagen Prostate Canc Ctr, Dept Urol, Copenhagen, Denmark.;Univ Copenhagen, Dept Clin Med, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Temporal trend in risk of prostate cancer death in men with favourable-risk prostate cancer2024In: Scandinavian journal of urology, ISSN 2168-1805, E-ISSN 2168-1813, Vol. 59, p. 76-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and objectives: Changes in work-up and histopathological assessment have caused stage and grade migration in men with prostate cancer (PCa). The aim of this study was to assess temporal trends in risk of PCa death for men with favourable-risk PCa managed with primary radical prostatectomy or observation.

    Methods and material: Men aged 75 or younger with Charlson Comorbidity index 0–1 diagnosed with favourable-risk PCa (T1–T2, prostate specific antigen [PSA] <20 ng/mL and Gleason score 6 or 7[3+4]) in the period 2000–2016 who were treated with primary radical prostatectomy or managed with observation in PCBaSe 4.0. Treatment groups were compared following propensity score matching, and risk of PCa death was estimated by use of Cox regression analyses.

    Results: A total of 9,666 men were selected for each treatment strategy. The 7-year cumulative incidence of PCa death decreased in all risk and treatment groups. For example, the incidence in men diagnosed with low-risk PCa and managed with observation was 1.2% in 2000–2005, which decreased to 0.4% in 2011–2016. Corresponding incidences for men with intermediate-risk PCa managed with observation were 2.0% and 0.7%. The relative risk of PCa death was lower in men with low-risk PCa managed with radical prostatectomy compared to observation: in 2000–2005 hazard ratio (HR) 0.20 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.10–0.38) and in 2011–2016 HR 0.35 (95% CI 0.05–2.26). Corresponding risks for men with intermediate-risk PCa were HR 0.28 (95% CI 0.16–0.47) and HR 0.21 (95% CI 0.04–1.18). The absolute risk reduction of radical prostatectomy compared to observation for men with low-risk PCa was 1% in 2000–2005 and 0.4% in 2011–2016, and for men with intermediate-risk PCa 1.1% in 2000–2005 and 0.7% in 2011–2016.

    Conclusion: Men diagnosed in 2011–2016 with low-risk and favourable intermediate-risk PCa have a similar relative benefit but smaller absolute benefit of curative treatment compared to men diagnosed in 2000–2005.

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  • Taheri, Javid
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Mathematics and Computer Science (from 2013). Queen’s University Belfast, UK.
    Gördén, Arvid
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Mathematics and Computer Science (from 2013).
    Al-Dulaimy, Auday
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Using Machine Learning to Predict the Exact Resource Usage of Microservice Chains2023In: Proceedings of the IEEE/ACM 16th International Conference on Utility and Cloud Computing, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2023, p. 1-9Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cloud computing offers a wide range of services, but it comes with some challenges. One of these challenges is to predict the resource utilization of the nodes that run applications and services. This is especially relevant for container-based platforms such as Kubernetes. Predicting the resource utilization of a Kubernetes cluster can help optimize the performance, reliability, and cost-effectiveness of the platform. This paper focuses on how well different resources in a cluster can be predicted using machine learning techniques. The approach consists of three main steps: data collection and extraction, data pre-processing and analysis, and resource prediction. The data collection step involves stressing the system with a load-generator (called Locust) and collecting data from Locust and Kubernetes with the use of Prometheus. The data pre-processing and extraction step involves extracting relevant data and transforming it into a suitable format for the machine learning models. The final step involves applying different machine learning models to the data and evaluating their accuracy. The results illustrate that different machine learning techniques can predict resources accurately. 

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  • Stigevall, Caroline
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Inst Clin Sci, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Orthoped, Gothenburg Mölndal, Sweden..
    Möller, Michael
    Univ Gothenburg, Inst Clin Sci, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Orthoped, Gothenburg Mölndal, Sweden..
    Wennergren, David
    Univ Gothenburg, Inst Clin Sci, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Orthoped, Gothenburg Mölndal, Sweden..
    Wolf, Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics and Handsurgery.
    Ekelund, Jan
    Ctr Registers Vastra Gotaland, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Bergdahl, Carl
    Univ Gothenburg, Inst Clin Sci, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Orthoped, Gothenburg Mölndal, Sweden..
    Patients with more complex ankle fractures are associated with poorer patient-reported outcome: an observational study of 11,733 patients from the Swedish Fracture Register2024In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 95, p. 212-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose: Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) following ankle fractures, including all fracture types, have not been reported. It is therefore unclear whether fracture morphology correlates with outcome. We aimed to analyze PROMs in patients with an ankle fracture in relation to the Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen/Orthopaedic Trauma Association (AO/OTA) fracture classification using population-based register data from the Swedish Fracture Register (SFR).

    Methods: All patients aged ≥ 18 years with an ankle fracture (AO/OTA 44A1–C3) registered in the SFR between 2012 and 2019 were retrieved from the register. Patients with completed PROM questionnaires (Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment and EuroQol-Visual Analogue Scale) on both day 0 (pre-trauma) and 1-year post-trauma were included. The difference in PROMs between day 0 and 1 year was calculated for each patient (delta value) and mean delta values were calculated at group level, based on the AO/OTA fracture classification.

    Results: 11,733 patients with 11,751 fractures with complete PROMs were included. According to the AO/OTA classification, 21% were A fractures, 67% were B fractures and 12% were C fractures. All groups of patients, regardless of fracture class (A1–C3), displayed an impairment in PROMs after 1 year compared with day 0. Type C fractures displayed a larger impairment in PROMs at group level than type B, which in turn had a greater impairment than type A. The same pattern was seen in groups 3, 2, and 1 for A and B fractures.

    Conclusion: We found that the AO/OTA classification is prognostic, where more complex fractures were associated with poorer PROMs.

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  • Riaz, Muhammad
    et al.
    Univ Sains Malaysia, Sch Pharmaceut Sci, Discipline Clin Pharm, Palau Penang, Malaysia.;Govt Coll Univ Faisalabad, Fac Pharmaceut Sci, Faisalabad, Pakistan..
    Harun, Sabriah Noor Binti
    Univ Sains Malaysia, Sch Pharmaceut Sci, Discipline Clin Pharm, Palau Penang, Malaysia..
    Mallhi, Tauqeer Hussain
    Jouf Univ, Coll Pharm, Dept Clin Pharm, Sakakah, Al Jouf, Saudi Arabia..
    Khan, Yusra Habib
    Jouf Univ, Coll Pharm, Dept Clin Pharm, Sakakah, Al Jouf, Saudi Arabia..
    Butt, Muhammad Hammad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Husain, Aamir
    Faisalabad Med Univ, Dept Med, Faisalabad, Pakistan..
    Khan, Muhammad Mujeeb
    Rawalpindi Med Univ, Dept Infect Dis, Rawalpindi, Pakistan..
    Khan, Amer Hayat
    Univ Sains Malaysia, Sch Pharmaceut Sci, Discipline Clin Pharm, Palau Penang, Malaysia..
    Evaluation of clinical and laboratory characteristics of dengue viral infection and risk factors of dengue hemorrhagic fever: a multi-center retrospective analysis2024In: BMC Infectious Diseases, E-ISSN 1471-2334, Vol. 24, no 1, article id 500Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Dengue Viral Infection (DVI) has become endemic in Pakistan since the first major outbreak in Karachi in 1996. Despite aggressive measures taken by relevant authorities, Pakistan has been dealing with a worsening dengue crisis for the past two decades. DHF is severe form of dengue infection which is linked with significant morbidity and mortality. Early identification of severe dengue infections can reduce the morbidity and mortality. In this context we planned current study in which we find out the different factors related with DHF as well as clinical laboratory features of DHF and compare them to DF so that patients can be best evaluated for DHF and managed accordingly at admission.

    Methods

    Retrospective study conducted over a period of 6 years (2013-2018) in two tertiary care hospitals in Pakistan. Data were collected by using a pre-structured data collection form. Data were statistically analyzed to determine the clinical and laboratory characteristics of DVI and risk factors of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF).

    Results

    A total 512 dengue cases (34.05 +/- 15.08 years; Male 69.53%) were reviewed. Most common clinical manifestations of DVI were fever (99.60%), headache (89.1%), chills (86.5%), rigors (86.5%), myalgia (72.3%). Less common clinical manifestations were vomiting (52.5%), arthralgia (50.2%) and skin rashes (47.5%). Furthermore, nasal bleeding (44.1%), gum bleeding (32.6%), pleural effusion (13.9%) and hematuria (13.1%) were more profound clinical presentations among DHF patients. Mortality rate was 1.5% in this study. Logistic regression analysis indicated that delayed hospitalization (OR: 2.30) and diabetes mellitus (OR:2.71), shortness of breath (OR:2.21), association with risk groups i.e., living near stagnant water, travelling to endemic areas, living in endemic regions (OR:1.95), and presence of warning signs (OR:2.18) were identified as risk factors of DHF. Statistically we found that there is strong association of diabetes mellitus (DM) with DHF while the patient suffering from DM individually had higher odds (2.71) of developing DHF than patients without disease.

    Conclusions

    The current study demonstrated that the clinical and laboratory profiles of DF and DHF are significantly distinct. Significant predictors of DHF were advanced age, diabetes mellitus, ascites, pleural effusion, thick gallbladder and delayed hospitalization. The identification of these factors at early stage provides opportunities for the clinicians to identify high risk patients and to reduce dengue-related morbidity and mortality.

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  • Walan, Susanne
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Environmental and Life Sciences (from 2013).
    Primary school students’ perceptions of artificial intelligence – for good or bad2024In: International journal of technology and design education, ISSN 0957-7572, E-ISSN 1573-1804Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the end of 2022, global discussions on Artificial Intelligence (AI) have surged, influencing diverse societal groups, such as teachers, students and policymakers. This case study focuses on Swedish primary school students aged 11–12. The aim is to examine their cognitive and affective perceptions of AI and their current usage. Data, comprising a pre-test, focus group interviews, and post-lesson evaluation reports, were analysed using a fusion of Mitcham’s philosophical framework of technology with a behavioural component, and the four basic pillars of AI literacy. Results revealed students’ cognitive perceptions encompassing AI as both a machine and a concept with or without human attributes. Affective perceptions were mixed, with students expressing positive views on AI’s support in studies and practical tasks, alongside concerns about rapid development, job loss, privacy invasion, and potential harm. Regarding AI usage, students initially explored various AI tools, emphasising the need for regulations to slow down and contemplate consequences. This study provides insights into primary school students perceptions and use of AI, serving as a foundation for further exploration of AI literacy in education contexts and considerations for policy makers to take into account, listening to children’s voices. 

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  • Knöchel, Jane
    et al.
    AstraZeneca, Clin Pharmacol & Quantitat Pharmacol, Clin Pharmacol & Safety Sci, R&D, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Bergenholm, Linnéa
    AstraZeneca, BioPharmaceut R&D, DMPK, Res & Early Dev,Cardiovasc Renal & Metab CVRM, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Ibrahim, Eman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping Univ, Dept Hlth Med & Caring Sci, Linköping, Sweden..
    Hansson, Sara
    AstraZeneca, BioPharmaceut R&D, Translat Sci & Expt Med, Res & Early Dev,Cardiovasc Renal & Metab CVRM, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Liljeblad, Mathias
    AstraZeneca, BioPharmaceut R&D, Translat Sci & Expt Med, Res & Early Dev,Cardiovasc Renal & Metab CVRM, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Nasr, Patrik
    Linköping Univ, Dept Hlth Med & Caring Sci, Linköping, Sweden..
    Carlsson, Björn
    AstraZeneca, BioPharmaceut R&D, Translat Sci & Expt Med, Res & Early Dev,Cardiovasc Renal & Metab CVRM, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping Univ, Dept Hlth Med & Caring Sci, Linköping, Sweden..
    Ueckert, Sebastian
    AstraZeneca, Clin Pharmacol & Quantitat Pharmacol, Clin Pharmacol & Safety Sci, R&D, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    A Markov model of fibrosis development in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease predicts fibrosis progression in clinical cohorts2023In: CPT: Pharmacometrics and Systems Pharmacology (PSP), E-ISSN 2163-8306, Vol. 12, no 12, p. 2038-2049Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Disease progression in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is highly heterogenous and remains poorly understood. Fibrosis stage is currently the best predictor for development of end-stage liver disease and mortality. Better understanding and quantifying the impact of factors affecting NASH and fibrosis is essential to inform a clinical study design. We developed a population Markov model to describe the transition probability between fibrosis stages and mortality using a unique clinical nonalcoholic fatty liver disease cohort with serial biopsies over 3 decades. We evaluated covariate effects on all model parameters and performed clinical trial simulations to predict the fibrosis progression rate for external clinical cohorts. All parameters were estimated with good precision. Age and diagnosis of type 2 diabetes (T2D) were found to be significant predictors in the model. Increase in hepatic steatosis between visits was the most important predictor for progression of fibrosis. Fibrosis progression rate (FPR) was twofold higher for fibrosis stages 0 and 1 (F0-1) compared to fibrosis stage 2 and 3 (F2-3). A twofold increase in FPR was observed for T2D. A two-point steatosis worsening increased the FPR 11-fold. Predicted fibrosis progression was in good agreement with data from external clinical cohorts. Our fibrosis progression model shows that patient selection, particularly initial fibrosis stage distribution, can significantly impact fibrosis progression and as such the window for assessing drug efficacy in clinical trials. Our work highlights the increase in hepatic steatosis as the most important factor in increasing FPR, emphasizing the importance of well-defined lifestyle advise for reducing variability in NASH progression during clinical trials.

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  • Johansson, Nils
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Engångs kan vara mer än en gång2024In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, no 4/5, p. 60-63Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • Annelin, Alice
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Svanström, Tobias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Audit team diversity, work quality and affective state outcomes2024In: International Journal of Auditing, ISSN 1090-6738, E-ISSN 1099-1123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the audit team outcomes of team diversity. Diversity theory suggests that diversity can benefit a team's work quality if the variety of team characteristics improves decision-making and performance. However, team diversity can have harmful affective outcomes if team members separate into different categories, and thus they feel stressed, intend to leave the profession or experience conflict between team members. We investigated this paradox in team diversity in an audit context at a Big 4 audit firm in Sweden, which provided proprietary team data. In addition, 335 individuals from 185 different audit teams responded to a questionnaire. Each participant responded to a survey about their experience with one specific engagement. Results indicated that team diversity benefits the audit team's affective outcomes of role stress, satisfaction and turnover intentions. However, diverse teams also reduce some audit teams' work quality outcomes, such as dysfunctional behaviour, performance, effort and perceptions of audit quality.

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  • Berenguer, Paloma
    et al.
    Univ Acad Humanismo Cristiano, Escuela Antropol Geog & Hist, Fac Ciencias Sociales, Santiago, Chile..
    Clavero, Claudia
    Univ Metropolitana Ciencias Educ, Fac Ciencias Bas, Nunoa, Chile..
    Saldarriaga-Córdoba, Mónica
    Univ Bernardo OHiggins, Ctr Invest Recursos Nat & Sustentabil CYRENIS, Santiago, Chile..
    Rivera-Hutinel, Antonio
    Univ Metropolitana Ciencias Educ, Fac Ciencias Bas, Nunoa, Chile..
    Seelenfreund, Daniela
    Univ Chile, Fac Ciencias Quim & Farmaceut, Santiago, Chile..
    Martinsson-Wallin, Helene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Castañeda, Patricia
    Univ Metropolitana Ciencias Educ, Fac Ciencias Bas, Nunoa, Chile..
    Seelenfreund, Andrea
    Univ Acad Humanismo Cristiano, Escuela Antropol Geog & Hist, Fac Ciencias Sociales, Santiago, Chile..
    Identification of breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis) and South American crops introduced during early settlement of Rapa Nui (Easter Island), as revealed through starch analysis2024In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 19, no 3, article id e0298896Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Starch residue analysis was carried out on stone tools recovered from the bottom layer of the Anakena site on Rapa Nui (Easter Island). These deposits have been dated to AD 1000–1300 AD and so far, represent the earliest evidence of human settlement on this island. Twenty obsidian tools were analyzed. Analysis of 46 starch grains recovered from 20 obsidian tools from the earliest dated level of the Anakena site on Rapa Nui provides direct evidence for translocation of traditional crop plants at initial stages of the colonization of this island. The analysis of starch grains was based mainly on statistical methods for species identification but was complemented by visual inspection in some cases. Our results identify taxons previously unknown to have been cultivated on the island, such as breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis), Zingiber officinale (ginger), and starch grains of the Spondias dulcis and Inocarpus fagifer tropical trees. Additionally, starch grains of Colocasia esculenta (taro) and Dioscorea sp. (yam), both common species in Pacific agriculture, were identified. Furthermore, the presence of four American taxa Ipomoea batatas (sweet potato), Canna sp. (achira), Manihot esculenta (manioc), and Xanthosoma sp., was detected. The occurrence of Canna sp., M. esculenta, and Xanthosoma sp. starch grains suggests the translocation of previously not described South American cultivars into the Pacific. The detection of I. batatas from this site in Rapa Nui constitutes the earliest record of this cultigen in the Pacific. Our study provides direct evidence for translocation of a set of traditional Polynesian and South American crop plants at the initial stages of colonization in Rapa Nui.

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  • Zwackman, Sammy
    et al.
    Linköping Univ, Dept Hlth Med & Caring Sci, Div Diagnost & Specialist Med, Unit Cardiovasc Sci, Linköping, Sweden..
    Leosdottir, Margret
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Malmö, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Fac Med, Dept Clin Sci, Malmö, Sweden..
    Hagström, Emil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Uppsala Clinical Research Center (UCR).
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Karolinska Inst, Danderyd Hosp, Dept Clin Sci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Karlsson, Jan-Erik
    Linköping Univ, Dept Hlth Med & Caring Sci, Div Diagnost & Specialist Med, Unit Cardiovasc Sci, Linköping, Sweden.;Cty Hosp Ryhov, Dept Internal Med, Jönköping, Sweden..
    Lawesson, Sofia Sederholm
    Linköping Univ, Dept Hlth Med & Caring Sci, Div Diagnost & Specialist Med, Unit Cardiovasc Sci, Linköping, Sweden..
    Michelsen, Halldora Ögmundsdottir
    Ravn-Fischer, Annica
    Gothenburg Univ, Sahlgrenska Univ Hosp, Inst Med, Sahlgrenska Acad,Dept Mol & Clin Med,Dept Cardiol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Wallert, John
    Karolinska Inst, Ctr Psychiat Res, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm HealthCare Serv, Huddinge, Region Stockhol, Sweden..
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping Univ, Dept Hlth Med & Caring Sci, Div Diagnost & Specialist Med, Unit Cardiovasc Sci, Linköping, Sweden..
    Provision of professional interpreters and Heart School attendance for foreign-born compared with native-born myocardial infarction patients in Sweden2024In: IJC Heart & Vasculature, E-ISSN 2352-9067, Vol. 51, article id 101392Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective:

    Interactive patient education, referred to as Heart School (HS), is an important part of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) after myocardial infarction (MI), which has been associated with improved outcomes. Little is known about HS attendance among foreign-born patients. The aims were to assess; 1) HS attendance in foreign-born versus native-born patients, 2) the association between the provision of professional interpreters and HS attendance, and 3) secondary prevention goal attainment after MI based on HS attendance.

    Methods:

    The provision of professional interpreters during post-MI follow-up was assessed by a questionnaire sent to all 78 Swedish CR sites. Patient-specific data was retrieved from the SWEDEHEART registry. The association between the provision of professional interpreters and HS attendance was estimated with logistic regression models. HS attendance and attainment of secondary prevention goals by country of birth were investigated.

    Results:

    In total, 8377 patients < 75 years (78 % male) were included. Foreign-born (19.8 %) had a higher prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and were less likely to attend HS (33.7 vs 51.3 %, p < 0.001), adjusted odds ratio (OR) 0.59 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.52-0.68), compared with native-born patients. CR centers providing professional interpreters had higher HS attendance among foreign-born (adjusted OR 1.55, 95 % CI 1.20-2.01) but not among native-born patients. Attending HS was similarly associated with improved secondary prevention goal attainment in both groups.

    Conclusions:

    Despite similar positive association between HS attendance and attainment of secondary prevention goals, foreign-born patients attended HS less often. With the provision of professional interpreters, HS attendance increased in foreign-born patients.

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  • Lahtinen, Atte K.
    et al.
    Applied Tumor Genomics Research Program, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Medical and Clinical Genetics/Medicum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Funke, Miriam
    Centre of Reproductive Medicine and Andrology, Institute of Reproductive and Regenerative Biology, University Münster, Munster, Germany.
    Krallmann, Claudia
    Department of Clinical and Surgical Andrology, Centre of Reproductive Medicine and Andrology, University Hospital Münster, Munster, Germany.
    Wyrwoll, Margot J.
    Department of Clinical and Surgical Andrology, Centre of Reproductive Medicine and Andrology, University Hospital Münster, Munster, Germany.
    Jarisch, Andrea
    Division of Stem Cell Transplantation and Immunology, Department of Children and Adolescent Medicine, University Hospital Frankfurt, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.
    Yang, Yifan
    NORDFERTIL Research Lab Stockholm, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bjarnason, Ragnar
    Children's Medical Center, Landspítali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland; Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Romerius, Patrik
    Department of Paediatric Oncology and Haematology, Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Barn-Och Ungdomssjukhuset Lund, Skånes Universitetssjukhus, Lund, Sweden.
    Sundin, Mikael
    Division of Paediatrics, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Section of Paediatric Haematology, Immunology and HCT, Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Norén-Nyström, Ulrika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Langenskiöld, Cecilia
    Department of Paediatric Oncology, The Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Cremers, Jann-Frederik
    Department of Clinical and Surgical Andrology, Centre of Reproductive Medicine and Andrology, University Hospital Münster, Munster, Germany.
    Kliesch, Sabine
    Department of Clinical and Surgical Andrology, Centre of Reproductive Medicine and Andrology, University Hospital Münster, Munster, Germany.
    Stukenborg, Jan-Bernd
    NORDFERTIL Research Lab Stockholm, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Neuhaus, Nina
    Centre of Reproductive Medicine and Andrology, Institute of Reproductive and Regenerative Biology, University Münster, Munster, Germany.
    Jahnukainen, Kirsi
    NORDFERTIL Research Lab Stockholm, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; New Children's Hospital, Pediatric Research Center, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
    Decreased spermatogonial numbers in boys with severe haematological diseases2024In: British Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0007-1048, E-ISSN 1365-2141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines spermatogonial numbers in testicular samples from 43 prepubertal patients undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). High-dose chemotherapy and/or radiation during HSCT can impact spermatogenesis requiring fertility preservation. Results show that 49% of patients have decreased and 19% severely depleted spermatogonial pool prior to HSCT. Patients with Fanconi anaemia exhibit significantly reduced spermatogonial numbers. Patients with immunodeficiency or aplastic anaemia generally present within the normal range, while results in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome or myeloproliferative neoplasm vary. The study emphasizes the importance of assessing spermatogonial numbers in patients with severe haematological diseases for informed fertility preservation decisions.

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  • Tkachuk, Anton
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013).
    Tkachuk, M. M.
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Engineering and Physics (from 2013).
    Design of truss structures with multiple eigenfrequency constraints via rank minimization2024In: Computers & structures, ISSN 0045-7949, E-ISSN 1879-2243, Vol. 299, article id 107392Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rank deficiency of the dynamic stiffness matrix is an indicator for resonance of a structure at a given frequency. This indicator can be exploited as a heuristic optimization objective to achieve resonance at several frequencies. Log-det heuristic provides a tractable surrogate function for matrix rank in the case of affine dependency of stiffness and mass matrices on design parameters, which applies to truss structures. Reducing the rank of the dynamic stiffness matrix for higher frequencies implies that the matrix is not semi-positive definite. For this case, the log-det heuristic is valid with a combination of interior-point methods and Fazel’s semi-definite embedding via linear matrix inequalities. Further constraints on the fundamental frequency and compliance can be easily added within the framework as linear matrix inequalities. Several successful numerical examples illustrate the performance of the approach. 

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  • Fagerkvist, Kristina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Centre for Clinical Research Sörmland. Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Tomtebodavagen 18A, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Jahnukainen, Kirsi
    Univ Helsinki, Helsinki Univ Cent Hosp, Childrens Hosp, Div Haematol Oncol & Stem Cell Transplantat, Helsinki, Finland.;Karolinska Inst, Nordfertil Res Lab Stockholm, Childhood Canc Res Unit, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ljungman, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Reproductive Health.
    Lampic, Claudia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Tomtebodavagen 18A, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.;Umeå Univ, Dept Psychol, SE-90187 Umeå, Sweden..
    Wettergren, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Tomtebodavagen 18A, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Efficacy of a web-based psychoeducational intervention, Fex-can sex, for young adult childhood cancer survivors with sexual dysfunction: A randomized controlled trial2024In: Internet Interventions, ISSN 2214-7829, Vol. 36, article id 100739Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    No web-based interventions addressing sexual problems are available for young adult survivors of childhood cancer.

    Aim:

    This study aimed to test the efficacy of a web-based psychoeducational intervention, Fex-Can Sex, to alleviate sexual problems in young adults treated for cancer during childhood.

    Method:

    This randomized controlled trial tested the effects of a 12-week, self-help, web-based intervention. Young adults (aged 19-40) reporting sexual dysfunction were drawn from a population-based national cohort of childhood cancer survivors and randomized to either an intervention group (IG, n = 142) or a wait-list control group (CG, n = 136). The primary outcome was 'Satisfaction with sex life' assessed by the PROMIS (R) SexFS v 2.0. Secondary outcomes included other SexFS domains, body image (BIS), emotional distress (HADS), health-related quality of life (EORTC QLQ-C30), and sex-related self-efficacy. Surveys were completed at baseline (T0), directly after the intervention (T1), and three months later (T2). The effects of the intervention were tested using t-test and linear mixed models, including intention-to-treat (ITT) and subgroups analysis. Adherence was based on log data extracted from the website system. The intervention included an open-ended question about perceived sexual problems.

    Results:

    No effect of the intervention was found in the primary outcome. Regarding secondary outcomes, the IG reported less vaginal dryness (Lubrication subscale) than the CG at T1 (p = 0.048) and T2 (p = 0.023). Furthermore, at T1, the IG reported less emotional distress than the CG (p = 0.047). Subgroup analyses showed that those with greater sexual problems at T0 improved over time (T1 and T2), regardless of group allocation. Overall, adherence to the intervention was low and participants' activity levels did not change the results. Additionally, some members of the IG reported increased understanding and acceptance of their sexual problems.

    Conclusion:

    The Fex-Can Sex intervention shows potential to improve sexual function, especially among those with greater dysfunction. To increase adherence and effect, we recommend the intervention to be further developed including more tailored content.

    Clinical trial registration: ISRCTN Registry, trial number: 33081791 (registered on November 27, 2019).

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  • Elekes, Zoltán
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Regional Science (CERUM). ANETI Lab, HUN-REN Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Budapest, Hungary.
    Tóth, Gergő
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Regional Science (CERUM). ANETI Lab, HUN-REN Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Budapest, Hungary.
    Eriksson, Rikard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Regional Science (CERUM).
    Regional resilience and the network structure of inter-industry labour flows2024In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores how the network structure of local inter-industry labour flows relates to regional economic resilience across 72 local labour markets in Sweden. Drawing on recent advancements in network science, we stress test these networks against the sequential elimination of their nodes, finding substantial heterogeneity in network robustness across regions. Regression analysis with least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) in the context of the 2008 financial crisis indicates that labour flow network robustness is a prominent structural predictor of employment change during crisis. These findings elaborate on how variation in the self-organisation of regional economies as complex systems makes for more or less resilient regions.

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  • Boussard, Annika
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Zool, Svante Arrhenius Vag 18B, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ahlkvist, Mikaela
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Zool, Svante Arrhenius Vag 18B, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Corral-López, Alberto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Fong, Stephanie
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Zool, Svante Arrhenius Vag 18B, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Fitzpatrick, John
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Zool, Svante Arrhenius Vag 18B, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kolm, Niclas
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Zool, Svante Arrhenius Vag 18B, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Relative telencephalon size does not affect collective motion in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata)2024In: Behavioral Ecology, ISSN 1045-2249, E-ISSN 1465-7279, Vol. 35, no 4, article id arae033Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collective motion is common across all animal taxa, from swarming insects to schools of fish. The collective motion requires intricate behavioral integration among individuals, yet little is known about how evolutionary changes in brain morphology influence the ability for individuals to coordinate behavior in groups. In this study, we utilized guppies that were selectively bred for relative telencephalon size, an aspect of brain morphology that is normally associated with advanced cognitive functions, to examine its role in collective motion using an open-field assay. We analyzed high-resolution tracking data of same-sex shoals consisting of 8 individuals to assess different aspects of collective motion, such as alignment, attraction to nearby shoal members, and swimming speed. Our findings indicate that variation in collective motion in guppy shoals might not be strongly affected by variation in relative telencephalon size. Our study suggests that group dynamics in collectively moving animals are likely not driven by advanced cognitive functions but rather by fundamental cognitive processes stemming from relatively simple rules among neighboring individuals. Collective motion occurs when animals coordinate their movement in schools, flocks, or herds. Using an experimental approach, we show that the size of the cognitive center in the vertebrate brain, the telencephalon, does not influence the ability to coordinate movement in single-sex guppy shoals artificially selected to have large or small telencephalon size. Advanced cognitive functions are likely not used during coordination of movements in guppy shoals.

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  • Snellman, Marie-Louise
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Svenlin, Anu-Riina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. University of Jyväskylä.
    Burén, Linda
    Umeå kommun, Umeå, Sverige.
    Jägerving Isaksson, Camilla
    Umeå kommun, Umeå, Sverige.
    Bergmark, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Blom, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Snellman, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Tillsammans för ett bättre liv – livet ut: forskningsöversikt om äldres självständighet och aktiva deltagande i samhällslivet samt hur kommuner kan förbättra sin samhällsplanering2024Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Rapporten är ett resultat av ett samverkansprojekt mellan Umeå kommun och Umeå Universitet. Syftet är att ta reda på vilka förhållanden som kan främja äldre invånares möjligheter att bo kvar hemma i eget boende och samtidigt möjliggöra förutsättningar till ett aktivt deltagande i samhällslivet, ökad självständighet och ett förlängt steg till vård- och omsorg.

     Rapporten innehåller en narrativ litteraturöversikt, där målsättningen är att sammanfatta och diskutera empiriska och teoretiska studier på ett område där det saknas en etablerad översikt och kunskapsläget är oklart. Översikten genomfördes i fyra faser: 1) Inledande litteratursökning, 2) Fokuserad litteratursökning, 3) Översiktlig analys av identifierade publikationer, samt 4) Kompletterande sökning och slutlig analys. För att identifiera relevanta publikationer gjordes datorbaserade sökningar i vetenskapliga databaser och etablerade sökmotorer. Det empiriska materialet består av 99 publikationer som slutligen valdes ut och analyserades systematiskt i fem steg.

    Resultaten presenteras i fem kapitel: 1) Förhållanden relaterade till den egna personen, 2) Social delaktighet, sociala relationer och nätverk, 3) Boende och bostaden, 4) Digital teknik, 5) Fysisk omgivning. Resultaten visar att för att äldre ska kunna bo kvar hemma krävs ett holistiskt perspektiv som inkluderar både bostaden och den sociala och fysiska miljön utanför. Viktiga faktorer inkluderar självständighet, trygghet och säkerhet inom hemmet, samt att ta hänsyn till äldres egna uppfattningar om stöd och service. Det finns begränsat med forskning med fokus på att främja äldres boende i eget hem, och i rapporten betonas att det är en komplex fråga som kräver insatser från olika discipliner och sektorer. Att se de äldre som individer med varierande behov, och att använda ett personcentrerat förhållningssätt är centralt, trots att många insatser ofta utformas utifrån en homogen bild av äldre.

    Baserat på resultaten diskuteras i det sista kapitlet tre huvudteman: Proaktiv bostads- och samhällsplanering, Social delaktighet och tredje rum, samt Digital teknik i den äldres vardag. Där belyses även bristen på studier som tar ett helhetsgrepp kring främjande av äldres vardag och självständighet i olika livssituationer.

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  • Abdel-Hafiez, Mahmoud
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Condensed Matter Physics of Energy Materials. Univ Sharjah, Res Inst Sci & Engn, Ctr Adv Mat Res, Sharjah, U Arab Emirates.;Univ Sharjah, Dept Appl Phys & Astron, Sharjah, U Arab Emirates..
    Shi, Li Fen
    Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing Natl Lab Condensed Matter Phys, Beijing 100190, Peoples R China.;Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Phys, Beijing 100190, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Sch Phys Sci, Beijing 100190, Peoples R China..
    Cheng, Jinguang
    Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing Natl Lab Condensed Matter Phys, Beijing 100190, Peoples R China.;Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Phys, Beijing 100190, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Sch Phys Sci, Beijing 100190, Peoples R China..
    Gorlova, Irina G.
    RAS, Kotelnikov Inst Radioengn & Elect, Moscow 125009, Russia..
    Zybtsev, Sergey G.
    RAS, Kotelnikov Inst Radioengn & Elect, Moscow 125009, Russia..
    Pokrovskii, Vadim Ya.
    RAS, Kotelnikov Inst Radioengn & Elect, Moscow 125009, Russia..
    Ao, Lingyi
    Nanjing Univ, Coll Engn & Appl Sci, Natl Lab Solid State Microstruct, Nanjing 210000, Peoples R China.;Nanjing Univ, Jiangsu Key Lab Artificial Funct Mat, Nanjing 210000, Peoples R China..
    Huang, Junwei
    Nanjing Univ, Coll Engn & Appl Sci, Natl Lab Solid State Microstruct, Nanjing 210000, Peoples R China.;Nanjing Univ, Jiangsu Key Lab Artificial Funct Mat, Nanjing 210000, Peoples R China..
    Yuan, Hongtao
    Nanjing Univ, Coll Engn & Appl Sci, Natl Lab Solid State Microstruct, Nanjing 210000, Peoples R China.;Nanjing Univ, Jiangsu Key Lab Artificial Funct Mat, Nanjing 210000, Peoples R China..
    Titov, Alexsandr N.
    Russian Acad Sci, MN Miheev Inst Met Phys, Ural Branch, Ekaterinburg 620990, Russia..
    Eriksson, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Theory. Uppsala Univ, WISE Wallenberg Initiat Mat Sci, SE-75120 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Ong, Chin Shen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Theory.
    From Insulator to Superconductor: A Series of Pressure-Driven Transitions in Quasi-One-Dimensional TiS3 Nanoribbons2024In: Nano Letters, ISSN 1530-6984, E-ISSN 1530-6992, Vol. 24, no 18, p. 5562-5569Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transition metal trichalcogenides (TMTCs) offer remarkable opportunities for tuning electronic states through modifications in chemical composition, temperature, and pressure. Despite considerable interest in TMTCs, there remain significant knowledge gaps concerning the evolution of their electronic properties under compression. In this study, we employ experimental and theoretical approaches to comprehensively explore the high-pressure behavior of the electronic properties of TiS3, a quasi-one-dimensional (Q1D) semiconductor, across various temperature ranges. Through high-pressure electrical resistance and magnetic measurements at elevated pressures, we uncover a distinctive sequence of phase transitions within TiS3, encompassing a transformation from an insulating state at ambient pressure to the emergence of an incipient superconducting state above 70 GPa. Our findings provide compelling evidence that superconductivity at low temperatures of ∼2.9 K is a fundamental characteristic of TiS3, shedding new light on the intriguing high-pressure electronic properties of TiS3 and underscoring the broader implications of our discoveries for TMTCs in general.

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  • Longinetti, Elisa
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Clin Epidemiol Div, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Englund, Simon
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Burman, Joachim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Fink, Katharina
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Fogdell-Hahn, Anna
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gunnarsson, Martin
    Örebro Univ, Dept Neurol, Örebro, Sweden..
    Hillert, Jan
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Langer-Gould, Annette Magdalene
    Kaiser Permanente Southern Calif, Clin & Translat Neurosci, Pasadena, CA USA..
    Lycke, Jan
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Clin Neurosci, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Nilsson, Petra
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Div Neurol, Lund, Sweden..
    Salzer, Jonatan
    Umeå Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Neurosci, Umeå, Sweden..
    Svenningsson, Anders
    Karolinska Inst, Danderyd Hosp, Dept Clin Sci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Mellergård, Johan
    Linköping Univ, Dept Neurol, Linköping, Ostergotland, Sweden. Linköping Univ, Dept Biomed & Clin Sci, Linköping, Sweden..
    Olsson, Tomas
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Piehl, Fredrik
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Frisell, Thomas
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Clin Epidemiol Div, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Trajectories of cognitive processing speed and physical disability over 11 years following initiation of a first multiple sclerosis disease-modulating therapy2024In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, ISSN 0022-3050, E-ISSN 1468-330X, Vol. 95, no 2, p. 134-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background We analysed the COMparison Between All immunoTherapies for Multiple Sclerosis (NCT03193866), a Swedish nationwide observational study in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), to identify trajectories of processing speed and physical disability after disease-modulating therapy (DMT) start.

    Methods Using a group-modelling approach, we assessed trajectories of processing speed with oral Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT) and physical disability with Expanded Disability Status Scale, from first DMT start among 1645 patients with RRMS followed during 2011–2022. We investigated predictors of trajectories using group membership as a multinomial outcome and calculated conditional probabilities linking membership across the trajectories.

    Results We identified 5 stable trajectories of processing speed: low SDMT scores (mean starting values=29.9; 5.4% of population), low/medium (44.3; 25.3%), medium (52.6; 37.9%), medium/high (63.1; 25.8%) and high (72.4; 5.6%). We identified 3 physical disability trajectories: no disability/stable (0.8; 26.8%), minimal disability/stable (1.6; 58.1%) and moderate disability (3.2; 15.1%), which increased to severe disability. Older patients starting interferons were more likely than younger patients starting rituximab to be on low processing speed trajectories. Older patients starting teriflunomide, with more than one comorbidity, and a history of pain treatment were more likely to belong to the moderate/severe physical disability trajectory, relative to the no disability one. There was a strong association between processing speed and physical disability trajectories.

    Conclusions In this cohort of actively treated RRMS, patients’ processing speed remained stable over the years following DMT start, whereas patients with moderate physical disability deteriorated in physical function. Nevertheless, there was a strong link between processing speed and disability after DMT start.

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  • Sokolov, Aleksandr V.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Functional Pharmacology and Neuroscience.
    Lafta, Muataz
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Functional Pharmacology and Neuroscience.
    Nordberg, Didi
    Jonsson, Jörgen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Functional Pharmacology and Neuroscience.
    Schiöth, Helgi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Functional Pharmacology and Neuroscience.
    Depression proteomic profiling in adolescents with transcriptome analyses in independent cohorts2024In: Frontiers in Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1664-0640, Vol. 15, article id 1372106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Depression is a major global burden with unclear pathophysiology and poor treatment outcomes. Diagnosis of depression continues to rely primarily on behavioral rather than biological methods. Investigating tools that might aid in diagnosing and treating early-onset depression is essential for improving the prognosis of the disease course. While there is increasing evidence of possible biomarkers in adult depression, studies investigating this subject in adolescents are lacking.Methods In the current study, we analyzed protein levels in 461 adolescents assessed for depression using the Development and Well-Being Assessment (DAWBA) questionnaire as part of the domestic Psychiatric Health in Adolescent Study conducted in Uppsala, Sweden. We used the Proseek Multiplex Neuro Exploratory panel with Proximity Extension Assay technology provided by Olink Bioscience, followed by transcriptome analyses for the genes corresponding to the significant proteins, using four publicly available cohorts.Results We identified a total of seven proteins showing different levels between DAWBA risk groups at nominal significance, including RBKS, CRADD, ASGR1, HMOX2, PPP3R1, CD63, and PMVK. Transcriptomic analyses for these genes showed nominally significant replication of PPP3R1 in two of four cohorts including whole blood and prefrontal cortex, while ASGR1 and CD63 were replicated in only one cohort.Discussion Our study on adolescent depression revealed protein-level and transcriptomic differences, particularly in PPP3R1, pointing to the involvement of the calcineurin pathway in depression. Our findings regarding PPP3R1 also support the role of the prefrontal cortex in depression and reinforce the significance of investigating prefrontal cortex-related mechanisms in depression.

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  • Hesammokri, Parnian
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Mechanics.
    Isaksson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Mechanics.
    Numerical analyses of brittle crack growth experiments in compression using a modified phase-field theory2024In: International Journal of Solids and Structures, ISSN 0020-7683, E-ISSN 1879-2146, Vol. 296, article id 112815Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been a huge interest in recent years in using phase -field theories for numerical analyses of fracture phenomena. However, in phase -field fracture theories, a critical aspect often involves a decomposition of the strain energy density to select physically trustworthy crack paths and to prevent interpenetration of crack surfaces. This aspect becomes even more critical in the case of mixed -mode loading under compression. To overcome these challenges, a hydrostatic-spectral-deviatoric decomposition, enhanced by separate critical energy release rates for different fracture modes, is employed in this study. In order to evaluate the enhanced decomposition strategy, a set of biaxially loaded crack experiments in global compression is designed. Samples of different geometries contain multiple flaws and holes. The experiments are numerically simulated using a unified set of material parameters and three different strain energy decomposition methods (i.e., hydrostaticspectral-deviatoric, spectral and hydrostatic-deviatoric). Simulations using the hydrostatic-spectral-deviatoric decomposition scheme capture both intricate crack paths and critical loads in the experiments. The enhanced decomposition strategy seems capable of simulating the experiments with reasonable precision, in sharp contrast to the two commonly used decomposition strategies (spectral and hydrostatic-deviatoric).

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  • Deforges, Camille
    et al.
    Univ Lausanne, Inst Higher Educ & Res Healthcare, Lausanne, Vaud, Switzerland..
    Sandoz, Vania
    Univ Lausanne, Inst Higher Educ & Res Healthcare, Lausanne, Vaud, Switzerland.;Lausanne Univ Hosp, Dept Woman Mother Child, Lausanne, Vaud, Switzerland..
    Noël, Yvonnick
    Rennes 2 Univ, Dept Psychol, Rennes, France..
    Avignon, Valérie
    Univ Lausanne, Inst Higher Educ & Res Healthcare, Lausanne, Vaud, Switzerland.;Lausanne Univ Hosp, Dept Woman Mother Child, Lausanne, Vaud, Switzerland..
    Desseauve, David
    Lausanne Univ Hosp, Dept Woman Mother Child, Lausanne, Vaud, Switzerland..
    Bourdin, Julie
    Lausanne Univ Hosp, Dept Woman Mother Child, Lausanne, Vaud, Switzerland..
    Vial, Yvan
    Lausanne Univ Hosp, Dept Woman Mother Child, Lausanne, Vaud, Switzerland..
    Ayers, Susan
    City Univ London, Ctr Maternal & Child Hlth Res, London, England..
    Holmes, Emily A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Epiney, Manuella
    Geneva Univ Hosp, Dept Woman Child & Teenager, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Horsch, Antje
    Univ Lausanne, Inst Higher Educ & Res Healthcare, Lausanne, Vaud, Switzerland.;Lausanne Univ Hosp, Dept Woman Mother Child, Lausanne, Vaud, Switzerland..
    Single-session visuospatial task procedure to prevent childbirth-related posttraumatic stress disorder: a multicentre double-blind randomised controlled trial2023In: Molecular Psychiatry, ISSN 1359-4184, E-ISSN 1476-5578, Vol. 28, no 9, p. 3842-3850Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Preventive evidence-based interventions for childbirth-related posttraumatic stress disorder (CB-PTSD) are lacking. Yet, 18.5% of women develop CB-PTSD symptoms following an unplanned caesarean section (UCS). This two-arm, multicentre, double-blind superiority trial tested the efficacy of an early single-session intervention including a visuospatial task on the prevention of maternal CB-PTSD symptoms. The intervention was delivered by trained maternity clinicians. Shortly after UCS, women were included if they gave birth to a live baby, provided consent, and perceived their childbirth as traumatic. Participants were randomly assigned to the intervention or attention-placebo group (allocation ratio 1:1). Assessments were done at birth, six weeks, and six months postpartum. Group differences in maternal CB-PTSD symptoms at six weeks (primary outcomes) and six months postpartum (secondary outcomes) were assessed with the self-report PTSD Checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5) and by blinded research assessors with the Clinician-administered PTSD scale for DSM-5 (CAPS-5). Analysis was by intention-to-treat. The trial was prospectively registered (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT03576586). Of the 2068 women assessed for eligibility, 166 were eligible and 146 were randomly assigned to the intervention (n = 74) or attention-placebo control group (n = 72). For the PCL-5, at six weeks, a marginally significant intervention effect was found on the total PCL-5 PTSD symptom count (β = −0.43, S.E. = 0.23, z = −1.88, p < 0.06), and on the intrusions (β = −0.73, S.E. = 0.38, z = −1.94, p < 0.0525) and arousal (β = −0.55, S.E. = 0.29, z = −1.92, p < 0.0552) clusters. At six months, a significant intervention effect on the total PCL-5 PTSD symptom count (β = −0.65, S.E. = 0.32, z = −2.04, p = 0.041, 95%CI[−1.27, −0.03]), on alterations in cognition and mood (β = −0.85, S.E. = 0.27, z = −3.15, p = 0.0016) and arousal (β = −0.56, S.E. = 0.26, z = −2.19, p < 0.0289, 95%CI[−1.07, −0.06]) clusters appeared. No group differences on the CAPS-5 emerged. Results provide evidence that this brief, single-session intervention carried out by trained clinicians can prevent the development of CB-PTSD symptoms up to six months postpartum.

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  • Mages, Tobias
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computer Architecture and Computer Communication.
    Anastasiadi, Elli
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology.
    Rohner, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology.
    Non-Negative Decomposition of Multivariate Information: From Minimum to Blackwell-Specific Information2024In: Entropy, E-ISSN 1099-4300, Vol. 26, no 5, article id 424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Partial information decompositions (PIDs) aim to categorize how a set of source variables provides information about a target variable redundantly, uniquely, or synergetically. The original proposal for such an analysis used a lattice-based approach and gained significant attention. However, finding a suitable underlying decomposition measure is still an open research question at an arbitrary number of discrete random variables. This work proposes a solution with a non-negative PID that satisfies an inclusion-exclusion relation for any f-information measure. The decomposition is constructed from a pointwise perspective of the target variable to take advantage of the equivalence between the Blackwell and zonogon order in this setting. Zonogons are the Neyman-Pearson region for an indicator variable of each target state, and f-information is the expected value of quantifying its boundary. We prove that the proposed decomposition satisfies the desired axioms and guarantees non-negative partial information results. Moreover, we demonstrate how the obtained decomposition can be transformed between different decomposition lattices and that it directly provides a non-negative decomposition of R & eacute;nyi-information at a transformed inclusion-exclusion relation. Finally, we highlight that the decomposition behaves differently depending on the information measure used and how it can be used for tracing partial information flows through Markov chains.

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  • Preinbergs, Julia K.
    et al.
    Linköping Univ, Div Clin Chem & Pharmacol, Dept Biomed & Clin Sci, Fac Med & Hlth Sci, Linköping, Sweden..
    Sundström-Poromaa, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Reproductive Health.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping Univ, Div Clin Chem & Pharmacol, Dept Biomed & Clin Sci, Fac Med & Hlth Sci, Linköping, Sweden..
    Ström, Jakob O.
    Linköping Univ, Div Clin Chem & Pharmacol, Dept Biomed & Clin Sci, Fac Med & Hlth Sci, Linköping, Sweden.;Örebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Dept Neurol, Örebro, Sweden..
    Ingberg, Edvin
    Örebro Univ, Dept Infect Dis, Fac Med & Hlth, Örebro, Sweden..
    Effect of cosmetic hair treatment and natural hair colour on hair testosterone concentrations2023In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 18, no 10, article id e0291812Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Testosterone analysis in hair allows for retrospective evaluation of endogenous testosterone concentrations, but studies devoted to investigating confounders in hair testosterone analysis have hitherto been scarce. The current study examined the stability of testosterone concentrations between two hair samples collected three months apart and investigated two potential confounding factors: natural hair colour and cosmetic hair treatments.

    Methods

    Testosterone was analysed with an in-house radioimmunoassay with a limit of detection adequate for the purpose.

    Results

    The testosterone concentrations from the two samplings, at baseline and three months later, had an intra-individual correlation of moderate strength (rho = 0.378, p<0.001, n = 146). Hair treatment, such as colouring or bleaching, seemed to increase testosterone concentrations (p = 0.051, n = 191, and in a paired analysis in a subset of the cohort p = 0.005, n = 24), while no effect of natural colour in untreated hair (p = 0.133) could be detected.

    Conclusion

    The current results suggest that cosmetic hair treatments need to be considered in hair testosterone analyses and demonstrate the utility of a radioimmunoassay to reliably measure testosterone concentrations in small hair samples in women.

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  • Saatoglu, Dilan
    et al.
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Ctr Biodivers Dynam, Dept Biol, Trondheim, Norway..
    Lundregan, Sarah L.
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Ctr Biodivers Dynam, Dept Biol, Trondheim, Norway..
    Fetterplace, Evelyn
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Ctr Biodivers Dynam, Dept Biol, Trondheim, Norway..
    Goedert, Debora
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Ctr Biodivers Dynam, Dept Biol, Trondheim, Norway..
    Husby, Arild
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology. Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Ctr Biodivers Dynam, Dept Biol, Trondheim, Norway.
    Niskanen, Alina K.
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Ctr Biodivers Dynam, Dept Biol, Trondheim, Norway.;Univ Oulu, Ecol & Genet Res Unit, Oulu, Finland..
    Muff, Stefanie
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Ctr Biodivers Dynam, Dept Math Sci, Trondheim, Norway..
    Jensen, Henrik
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Ctr Biodivers Dynam, Dept Biol, Trondheim, Norway.;Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Ctr Biodivers Dynam, Dept Biol, NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway..
    The genetic basis of dispersal in a vertebrate metapopulation2024In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 33, no 6, article id e17295Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dispersal affects evolutionary processes by changing population size and genetic composition, influencing the viability and persistence of populations. Investigating which mechanisms underlie variation in dispersal phenotypes and whether populations harbour adaptive potential for dispersal is crucial to understanding the eco-evolutionary dynamics of this important trait. Here, we investigate the genetic architecture of dispersal among successfully recruited individuals in an insular metapopulation of house sparrows. We use an extensive long-term individual-based ecological data set and high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotypes for over 2500 individuals. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS), and found a relationship between dispersal probability and a SNP located near genes known to regulate circadian rhythm, glycogenesis and exercise performance, among other functions. However, this SNP only explained 3.8% of variance, suggesting that dispersal is a polygenic trait. We then used an animal model to estimate heritable genetic variation (σA2), which composes 10% of the total variation in dispersal probability. Finally, we investigated differences in σA2 across populations occupying ecologically relevant habitat types (farm vs. non-farm) using a genetic groups animal model. We found different adaptive potentials across habitats, with higher mean breeding value, σA2, and heritability for the habitat presenting lower dispersal rates, suggesting also different roles of environmental variation. Our results suggest a complex genetic architecture of dispersal and demonstrate that adaptive potential may be environment dependent in key eco-evolutionary traits. The eco-evolutionary implications of such environment dependence and consequent spatial variation are likely to become ever more important with the increased fragmentation and loss of suitable habitats for many natural populations.

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  • Najafi, Leyla
    et al.
    BeDimensional SpA, Via Lungotorrente secca 30R, I-16163 Genoa, Italy..
    Bellani, Sebastiano
    BeDimensional SpA, Via Lungotorrente secca 30R, I-16163 Genoa, Italy..
    Zappia, Marilena I.
    BeDimensional SpA, Via Lungotorrente secca 30R, I-16163 Genoa, Italy..
    Serri, Michele
    Ist Italiano Tecnol, Graphene Labs, Genoa, Italy..
    Oropesa-Nuñez, Reinier
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Solid State Physics.
    Bagheri, Ahmad
    Ist Italiano Tecnol, Graphene Labs, Genoa, Italy..
    Beydaghi, Hossein
    BeDimensional SpA, Via Lungotorrente secca 30R, I-16163 Genoa, Italy..
    Brescia, Rosaria
    Ist Italiano Tecnol, Electron Microscopy Facil, Genoa, Italy..
    Pasquale, Lea
    Ist Italiano Tecnol, Mat Characterizat Facil, Genoa, Italy..
    Shinde, Dipak V.
    Ist Italiano Tecnol, NanoChem, Genoa, Italy..
    Zuo, Yong
    Ist Italiano Tecnol, NanoChem, Genoa, Italy..
    Drago, Filippo
    Ist Italiano Tecnol, NanoChem, Genoa, Italy..
    Mosina, Kseniia
    Univ Chem & Technol Prague, Dept Inorgan Chem, Prague 6, Czech Republic..
    Sofer, Zdeněk
    Univ Chem & Technol Prague, Dept Inorgan Chem, Prague 6, Czech Republic..
    Manna, Liberato
    Ist Italiano Tecnol, NanoChem, Genoa, Italy..
    Bonaccorso, Francesco
    BeDimensional SpA, Via Lungotorrente secca 30R, I-16163 Genoa, Italy..
    Transition metal dichalcogenides as catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction: The emblematic case of "inert" ZrSe2 as catalyst for electrolyzers2022In: Nano Select, E-ISSN 2688-4011, Vol. 3, no 6, p. 1069-1081Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of earth-abundant electrocatalysts (ECs) operating at high current densities in water splitting electrolyzers is pivotal for the widespread use of the current green hydrogen production plants. Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have emerged as promising alternatives to the most efficient noble metal ECs, leading to a wealth of research. Some strategies based on material nanostructuring and hybridization, introduction of defects and chemical/physical modifications appeared as universal approaches to provide catalytic properties to TMDs, regardless of the specific material. In this work, we show that even a theoretically poorly catalytic (and poorly studied) TMD, namely zirconium diselenide (ZrSe2), can act as an efficient EC for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) when exfoliated in the form of two-dimensional (2D) few-layer flakes. We critically show the difficulties of explaining the catalytic mechanisms of the resulting ECs in the presence of complex structural and chemical modifications, which are nevertheless evaluated extensively. By doing so, we also highlight the easiness of transforming 2D TMDs into effective HER-ECs. To strengthen our message in practical environments, we report ZrSe2-based acidic (proton exchange membrane [PEM]) and alkaline water electrolyzers operating at 400 mA cm–2 at a voltage of 1.88 and 1.92 V, respectively, thus competing with commercial technologies.

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  • Larsson, Linda
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol CLINTEC, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Immunol & Transfus Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ohlsson, Sara
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Immunol & Transfus Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Andersson, Theresa Neimert
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol CLINTEC, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Immunol & Transfus Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Watz, Emma
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol CLINTEC, Stockholm, Sweden.;Uppsala Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Immunol & Transfus Med, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Larsson, Stella
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Immunol & Transfus Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sandgren, Per
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol CLINTEC, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Immunol & Transfus Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Uhlin, Michael
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol CLINTEC, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Immunol & Transfus Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Pathogen reduced red blood cells as an alternative to irradiated and washed components with potential for up to 42 days storage2024In: Blood Transfusion, ISSN 1723-2007, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 130-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background - The urgency of maintaining a safe and adequate blood supply is increasing. One approach to ensure a sufficient supply is to limit the outdating frequency of blood components. Pathogen inactivation technology was developed primarily to increase safety by preventing transmission of infectious diseases. The Intercept Blood System for pathogen reduction of red blood cells (RBC) has additional benefits such as inactivation of leucocytes and removal of plasma and storage debris through centrifugation. Irradiation and automated washing are detrimental to the RBC membrane and often implicate shortened shelf-life. We aimed to assess whether pathogen inactivation can replace RBC irradiation and washing to avoid shelf-life reduction. Materials and methods - RBC concentrates (No.=48) were pooled-and-split into four study arms, which underwent pathogen inactivation treatment, irradiation, automated washing or no treatment (reference). RBC quality was evaluated during 42 days by assessment of storage lesion. Washing efficacy was defined by IgA and albumin reduction. Results - Pathogen reduced RBCs had similar membrane preservation to reference RBCs (hemolysis, microvesicles and extracellular potassium ions), whereas the RBCs were negatively impacted by irradiation or automated washing. ATP increased substantially post-pathogen inactivation, while 2,3-DPG decreased. Pathogen inactivation considerably reduced albumin and IgA, though slightly less efficiently than automated washing. Discussion - RBCs exhibit superior membrane preservation after pathogen inactivation treatment, compared to both irradiation and automated washing. This suggests that replacement is possible, even though the plasma reduction protocol could be further optimised. Replacement of irradiated and washed RBC concentrates with pathogen reduced RBC concentrates storable up to 42 days would be advantageous for both the blood supply and patient safety.

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  • Huvila, Isto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Regimes of participation: theorising participatory archives from the outset of archivists' views on archival institutions and user participation in Scandinavia2024In: Information research, E-ISSN 1368-1613, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 121-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. In spite of the prominence of the notion of participatory archives, there is no consensus of what participation entails in archival contexts and a lack of theory to explain the mechanisms underpinning the diversity of views. Method. Norwegian and Swedish archivists were surveyed as a part of the international ALMPUB research project for their views on user participation and how these views relate to their understanding of the role and the raison d'& ecirc;tre of archives and archival institutions. The survey findings were used as a basis for theory development. Analysis. The data were analysed using exploratory factor analysis and descriptive statistics. The results of the factor analysis theorised as subject positions relating to views pertaining to archival participation and the societal role of archival institutions. Results. The analysis shows that the professionals' perceptions of the rationale and impact of participation and the societal role of archives and archival institutions forms clusters were interpreted as relating to regimes of participation. Conclusion. Drawing on the theorising of Boltanski and Th & eacute;venot, the alignments of the perceptions to archives' raisons d'& ecirc;tre and archival participation are explained in terms of four regimes of participation: 1) participation as an intrinsically valuable activity; 2) participation as a complement to professional work in the records continuum; 3) professional work as an auxiliary activity to participation of experts; and 4) participation as a means of producing additional value for archival institutions, i.e., arrangements of framing the justification and value of participation in, with and for archival institutions. It is, however, possible to imagine additional regimes that correspond with the social worlds of Boltanski and Th & eacute;venot not represented by them, including the inspired (participation as a source of inspiration) and domestic worlds (domiciliary participation), and the world by project (participatory project). The study suggests that inquiring into the justifications and regimes of worth attached to participation helps to refute simplistic assumptions of what participation entails and recognise the variety of participatory engagements and their diverging implications for different types of archival institutions and their diverse stakeholders.

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  • Claësson Kaarsgaard, Simon
    et al.
    Bauer, Bjørn
    Rosado, Leonardo
    Kassi, Tuuli
    Ekblad, Maria
    Skattenborg, Regina
    Nordic Network for Circular Construction: WP 3 - Metrics for circularity2024Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This report constitutes the final delivery of Work Package 3 in the Nordic Network for Circular Construction (NNCC) programme. The programme's goal is to accelerate the implementation of circular economy practices in the Nordic construction sector. WP 3 aims to develop a joint Nordic monitoring model for circular construction. The present report summarises findings and conclusions from a two-year effort identifying and analysing indicators for circular construction. Stakeholders from the Nordic countries have been involved in discussing the feasibility and relevance of several hundred indicators. 11 indicators have been thoroughly analysed. A strategy for implementation of the new monitoring framework for circular construction is proposed.

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  • Heyman, Sofia
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Inst Clin Sci, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Oncol, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Reg Vastra Gotaland, Dept Oncol, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, Bla Straket 2, SE-40583 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Perman, Mats
    Univ Gothenburg, Inst Clin Sci, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Oncol, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Reg Vastra Gotaland, Dept Oncol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Radu, Calin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer precision medicine.
    Reduction of elective lymph node volume in radiotherapy of early anal squamous cell cancer: a comparative study between two Swedish university hospitals2024In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 63, no 1, p. 118-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Anal squamous cell cancer (ASCC) in early stages (T1–2N0M0) is treated with chemoradiotherapy with a 3-year overall survival (OS) exceeding 90%. In Swedish guidelines, it has been optional to include the external iliac and presacral lymph node (LN) stations in radiotherapy (RT) treatment fields in early ASCC. Two Swedish hospitals treating ASCC (SU: Sahlgrenska University Hospital; UU: Uppsala University Hospital) have chosen different approaches since 2010.

    Material and methods: This study included consecutive patients with early ASCC (T1–2N0M0) treated between 2010 and 2017 at both sites (SU n = 70; UU n = 46). Data were retrieved from medical records and RT charts.

    Results: At SU, the external iliac and presacral LN stations were included in elective LN irradiation in 96.8% (n = 60) and 95.2% (n = 59) patients compared to 2.4% (n = 1) and 29.3% (n = 12) at UU. The mean elective LN volume was 2,313 cc (interquartile range [IQR] 1,951–2,627) in the SU cohort compared to 1,317 cc (IQR 1,192–1,528) in the UU cohort, p < 0.0001. No case of regional LN recurrence was seen in either cohort. Disease specific survival (DSS) at 5 years was 95.7% (confidence interval [CI] 90.1–100.0) in the SU cohort and 97.8% (CI 93.2–100.0) in the UU cohort (p 0.55). OS at 5 years was 84.5% (CI 76.1–93.0) in the SU cohort and 82.6% (CI 69.6–89.1) in the UU cohort (p 0.8).

    Interpretation: We found no differences in regional recurrence, DSS or OS between the cohorts treated with different elective LN volumes. In this population-based study, reduction of RT volume in early ASCC did not lead to inferior outcome.

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  • Simonsson, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Bramer, Tobias
    AstraZeneca Gothenburg, Inhalat Prod Dev, Pharmaceut Technol & Dev, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Wimbush, Alex
    AstraZeneca Gothenburg, Inhalat Prod Dev, Pharmaceut Technol & Dev, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Alderborn, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Effect of drug load on the aerosolisation propensity of binary adhesive mixtures for inhalation2024In: International Journal of Pharmaceutics, ISSN 0378-5173, E-ISSN 1873-3476, Vol. 657, article id 124122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate how the propensity for aerosolisation in binary adhesive mixtures was affected by the drug load, and to determine whether these findings could be linked to different blend states. Binary blends of two different lactose carriers, each with varying size and morphology, were prepared together with budesonide. In vitro aerosolisation studies were conducted at four different pressure drops, ranging from 0.5 to 4 kPa, utilising a Next Generation Impactor. Several dispersion parameters were derived from the relationship between the quantity of dispersed API and the pressure drop. The evolution of the parameters with drug load was complex, especially at low drug loads. While similar responses were observed for both carriers, the range of drug load that could be used varied significantly. The choice of carrier not only influenced the capacity for drug loading but also affected the spatial distribution of the API within the mixture, which, in turn, affected its aerosolisation propensity. Thus, the drug dispersion process could be linked to different configurations of the lactose carrier and budesonide in the blends, i.e. blend states. In conclusion, the study suggests that the concept of blend states can provide an explanation for the complex dispersion process observed in adhesive blends.

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  • Karalė, Kristina
    et al.
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Chemical Process and Pharmaceutical Development. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Bollmark, Martin
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Chemical Process and Pharmaceutical Development.
    Karalius, Antanas
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Chemical Process and Pharmaceutical Development.
    Lopes, Mónica
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Chemical Process and Pharmaceutical Development. University of Southampton, UK.
    Perez, Oswaldo
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Chemical Process and Pharmaceutical Development. University of Iceland, Iceland.
    Strömberg, Roger
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Tedebark, Ulf
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioeconomy and Health, Chemical Process and Pharmaceutical Development.
    Synthesis and stability studies of bicyclo[6.1.0]nonyne scaffolds for automated solid-phase oligonucleotide synthesis2024In: RSC Advances, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 14, no 25, p. 17406-17412Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two novel bicyclo[6.1.0]nonyne (BCN) linker derivatives, which can be directly incorporated into oligonucleotide sequences during standard automated solid-phase synthesis, are reported. Stabilities of BCN-carbinol and two BCN-oligonucleotides are evaluated under acidic conditions. In addition, derivatized BCN linkers (non-acidic and acid treated) are evaluated for strain-promoted alkyne-azide cycloaddition (SPAAC). 

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  • Santesson, Ia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Centre for Clinical Research Sörmland. Dept Patient Safety, S-63188 Eskilstuna, Region Sormland, Sweden..
    Schell, Carl Otto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Centre for Clinical Research Sörmland. Karolinska Inst, Dept Global Publ Hlth, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.;Nyköping Hosp, Dept Med, S-61188 Nyköping, Sweden..
    Bjurling-Sjöberg, Petronella
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, research centers etc., Centre for Clinical Research Sörmland. Dept Patient Safety, S-63188 Eskilstuna, Region Sormland, Sweden.;Uppsala Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci, S-75237 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Capability to identify and manage critical conditions: effects of an interprofessional training intervention2024In: BMC Medical Education, E-ISSN 1472-6920, Vol. 24, no 1, article id 584Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The burden of critical illness is a global issue. Healthcare systems often fail to provide essential emergency and critical care for deteriorating patients, and the optimal strategy for ensuring safe care is not fully known. This study aimed to explore the capability to identify and manage critical conditions and to evaluate how an interprofessional training intervention that included theory as well as high-fidelity simulation (proACT) in the short and long term affected the capability.

    Methods: A questionnaire study was performed. A cross-sectional survey of all in-hospital nurses and physicians in a Swedish region (n538) and a longitudinal cohort of participants entering the proACT course during a six-month period (n99) were included. Descriptive and comparative statistics were generated. Additionally, qualitative content analysis was performed for free text answers.

    Results: The findings demonstrated that the intervention improved the individual healthcare professionals' competence with a sustained effect over time. The coverage of proACT trained staff increased from 13.2% to 26.5%, but no correlation was observed with workplace conditions that support safe care. Collaboration and workplace climate were perceived to be mainly positive, but for safer care, an overall need for improved competence and staffing was emphasized.

    Conclusions: The present study confirms previously identified issues and the need for improvements in the care of critically ill patients in general hospital wards. It supports the notion that a training intervention, such as proACT, can increase the capability to identify and manage patients with critical conditions. All healthcare professions increased the competence. Hence, more effort is needed to enable staff of all professions to participate in such training. Studies of interventions cover higher number of trained staff in the setting are warranted to clarify whether the training can also improve workplace conditions that support safe care of deteriorating and critically ill patients.

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  • Pineda, Sebastian
    et al.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Anim Biosci, Uppsala, Sweden.;Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Anim Biosci, Pharmacol & Toxicol Unit, POB 7043, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Lignell, Sanna
    Swedish Food Agcy, Dept Risk & Benefit Assessment, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Gyllenhammar, Irina
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Anim Biosci, Uppsala, Sweden.;Swedish Food Agcy, Dept Risk & Benefit Assessment, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Lampa, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Epidemiology.
    Benskin, Jonathan P.
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Environm Sci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lundh, Thomas
    Lund Univ, Dept Lab Med, Div Occupat & Environm Med, Lund, Sweden..
    Lindh, Christian
    Lund Univ, Dept Lab Med, Div Occupat & Environm Med, Lund, Sweden..
    Kiviranta, Hannu
    Finnish Inst Hlth & Welf, Environm Hlth Unit, Kuopio, Finland..
    Glynn, Anders
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Anim Biosci, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Socio-demographic inequalities influence differences in the chemical exposome among Swedish adolescents2024In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, Vol. 186, article id 108618Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Relatively little is known about the relationship between socio-demographic factors and the chemical exposome in adolescent populations. This knowledge gap hampers global efforts to meet certain UN sustainability goals. The present work addresses this problem in Swedish adolescents by discerning patterns within the chemical exposome and identify demographic groups susceptible to heightened exposures. Enlisting the Riksmaten Adolescents 2016 -17 (RMA) study population (N = 1082) in human-biomonitoring, and using proportional odds ordinal logistic regression models, we examined the associations between concentrations of a diverse array of substances (N = 63) with the determinants: gender, age, participant/maternal birth country income per capita level, parental education levels, and geographic place of living (longitude/ latitude). Participant/maternal birth country exhibited a significant association with the concentrations of 46 substances, followed by gender (N = 41), and longitude (N = 37). Notably, individuals born in high -income countries by high -income country mothers demonstrated substantially higher estimated adjusted means (EAM) concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) compared to those born in low-income countries by low-income country mothers. A reverse trend was observed for cobalt (Co), cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), aluminium (Al), chlorinated pesticides, and phthalate metabolites. Males exhibited higher EAM concentrations of chromium (Cr), mercury (Hg), Pb, PCBs, chlorinated pesticides, BFRs and PFASs than females. In contrast, females displayed higher EAM concentrations of Mn, Co, Cd and metabolites of phthalates and phosphorous flame retardants, and phenolic substances. Geographical disparities, indicative of north -to -south or west -to -east substance concentrations gradients, were identified in Sweden. Only a limited number of lifestyle, physiological and dietary factors were identified as possible drivers of demographic inequalities for specific substances. This research underscores birth country, gender, and geographical disparities as contributors to exposure differences among Swedish adolescents. Identifying underlying drivers is crucial to addressing societal inequalities associated with chemical exposure and aligning with UN sustainability goals.

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  • Cedervall, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Inorganic Chemistry.
    Shtender, Vitalii
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Inorganic Chemistry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Material Science.
    Manuel, Pascal
    Rutherford Appleton Lab, ISIS Pulsed Neutron & Muon Facil, Harwell Campus, Didcot OX11 0QX, England..
    Pomjakushin, Vladimir
    Paul Scherrer Inst, Lab Neutron Scattering & Imaging, CH-5232 Villigen, Switzerland..
    Mathieu, Roland
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Solid State Physics.
    Haeussermann, Ulrich
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Andersson, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Inorganic Chemistry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Magnetic property changes of NdGa upon hydrogen absorption2024In: Physical Review B, ISSN 2469-9950, E-ISSN 2469-9969, Vol. 109, no 13, article id 134434Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rare earth monogallide (REGa) Zintl phases are attractive for their properties in hydrogen storage and magnetic cooling. However, the magnetic effects upon hydrogen additions in REGa are not well understood. This study aims to explore the magnetic effects in REGaHx using SQUID magnetometry and neutron powder diffraction. To avoid challenges due to absorption and high incoherent scattering in the neutron diffraction experiments, the compound NdGaDx (x = 0, 0.9, or 1.6) was chosen for examination. It was found that NdGa exhibits two ferromagnetic structures below the Curie temperature of 42 K. Just below 42 K the magnetic moments are oriented along the crystallographic c axis, and at 20 K a spin reorientation occurs where the moments turn similar to 30 degrees toward the a axis. Upon partial deuteration (x = 0.9), the magnetization decreases and two magnetic phases are observed, one intermediate incommensurate phase, and one canted ferromagnetic phase with the net magnetization aligning along the b axis. For the full deuteride (x = 1.6) only one incommensurate magnetic phase is observed at low temperatures. Magnetometry also reveals that there are no isotope effects when absorbing H or D. The absorption of H or D changes the Nd-Nd distances as well as the electronic structure, which results in a drastic change in the magnetic properties as compared to NdGa.

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